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Montrose Voice, No. 317, November 11, 1986
File 003
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Montrose Voice, No. 317, November 11, 1986 - File 003. 1986-11-11. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 12, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2459/show/2448.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-11-11). Montrose Voice, No. 317, November 11, 1986 - File 003. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2459/show/2448

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 317, November 11, 1986 - File 003, 1986-11-11, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 12, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2459/show/2448.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 317, November 11, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date November 11, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 003
Transcript 2 HOUSTON DAILY VOICE/ NOVEMBER 11,1986 Communities, Not Politicans, Must Take Lead in AIDS Education Commentary by Neil Schram Pacific News Service Special to the Houston Daily Voice The massive AIDS education campaign now urged by top science leaders cannot wait for government to take the lead. The initiative has to come from communities themselves or it will never get off the ground. In June the Public Health Service (PHS) warned that 270,000 Americans will have developed the deadly disease by the end of 1991. The PHS also estimated that between one and 1.5 million Americans are already infected by the AIDS virus. What makes the latter figure so ominous is that each of those persons is believed to be infected for life and also able to spread the virus sexually or by blood transfer. Dr. Myron Essex of the Harvard School of Public Health estimates that an additional 1.5 to 4 million Americans will be infected within the next five years. Most of these infections could be prevented if we had an effective education and prevention program in place now. On Oct. 22, Surgeon General C. Everett Koop advocated sex education in schools beginning in early grades. Seven days later the National Academy of Sciences also urged massive education programs. Yet there is no evidence that these programs are likely to occur soon. The major obstacle is that virtually everyone who is in a position to implement such a program is politically unable or unwilling to do so. On the federal level such a program would almost certainly need the loud support of President Reagan. But as yet there is no evidence he is heeding the call ofthe National Academy of Sciences that he publicly urge major federal funding for the program. In fact, his two prior statements on AIDS did little to help the problem. When asked if a child with AIDS should be allowed to attend school Reagan ignored the recommendations of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control that most children could safely do so. Instead he said he could understand the fear of parents. Asked about AIDS by the Los Angeles Times this year, Reagan advised people to donate their own In 1986 we have the way to prevent virtually any new spread of the AIDS virus. Who now in each community is going to provide us with the will? blood in case they needed it later. He said nothing about the need for education. On the state and local levels most politicians are afraid to spend money on education about AIDS prevention for fear of appearing to condone homosexuality, IV drug use or premarital sex. Political leaders seem unable to lead in this matter. School boards with rare but important exceptions are afraid of offending parents and politicians by talking about "safe sex" and "safe" drug use. Remarkably, even health maintenance organizations (HMOs)—aware of the rising medical costs they will incur from treating AIDS patients—are afraid to be too outspoken about AIDS education for fear of attracting even greater numbers of clients in high risk categories. So how can we overcome the paralysis? We must recognize that in virtually every state, city and county no governor or mayor appears willing to take the lead by advocating large sums for education. They seem to be waiting for political pressure to make it acceptable. And that political pressure actually exists. Parents don't want their children infected. Insurance ocmpanies don't want to pay off large numbers of insurance policies on young people. HMOs don't want to pay large medical costs for AIDS patients. Many people in our society are afraid. They want correct information including how to protect themselves and their loved ones. Put since no one is willing to take the lea/d, a way must be established in each community for everyone to take the lead—parent groups, school boards, public health officials, physicians' groups, HMOs, etc. Through lobbying and high profile public statements, this kind of coalition can create the political pressure to allow the funding of education programs. It will, of course, require each com munity to put together its own colaition. That can be done behind the scenes so no one publicly is taking the lead. Surely in each community there is someone with knowledge and credibility who can try to do this. The results would be unbelievably rewarding. In 1986 we have the way to prevent virtually any new spread of the AIDS virus. Who now in each community is going to provide us with the will? PNS commentator Neil Schram. a physician, is chair of the Los Angeles City/County AIDS Task Force. BIZARRO the neighborhood By DAN PIRARO CALDWELL Phyllis pushes a familiar button on Allen's psychic control panel JNUSUAL CONTENT VflMNERS: (f^JJA-HLE'V FISHER, OF MSEM. IDAHO EMTERED ~^h 'NAKt 1W- BREAKFAST-TREAT CONTE-T III 197V AUD HoH HIS WEIGHT IH PiANos
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