Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Voice, No. 1182, June 20, 2003
File 011
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Voice, No. 1182, June 20, 2003 - File 011. 2003-06-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 6, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2445/show/2418.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2003-06-20). Houston Voice, No. 1182, June 20, 2003 - File 011. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2445/show/2418

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1182, June 20, 2003 - File 011, 2003-06-20, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 6, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2445/show/2418.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, No. 1182, June 20, 2003
Contributor
  • Weaver, Penny
  • Crain, Chris
Publisher Window Media
Date June 20, 2003
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 011
Transcript STAFF EDITORIAL & PRODUCTION Executive Editor CHRIS CRAIN Editor PENNY WEAVER editora'houstonvoice-com Production BONNIE NAUGLE. JOEY CAROLINO Correspritradents: LOU CHIBBARO JR., JOE CREA, UURA DOUGLAS-BROWN. MIKE FLEMING, MATTHEW HENNIE. BRIAN MOYIAN, KEVIN NAFF. JENNIFER SMITH, RHONDA SMITH, STEVE WEINSTEIN Coaltrifxiton J.A. CHAPMAN. JOHNNY HOOKS, TINA KING r-tK-tographers DALTON DEHART, KIMBERLY THOMPSON Webmaster ARAMVARTIAN SALES & ADMINISTRATION General Manager DANIEL EMERICH demenctiinlioustonvoice.com Account Executives BRETT CULLUM - bcullumidttoustonvoicejom BRIAN MARTIN - timartiniflhoustonvoice.com Administrative Assistant USA GALLARDO - lgallardr>a houstonvoice.com National Advertising Repr**sentative Rivendell Marketing Company, Inc. 212-242-0863 A Win PuWisher-WINDOW MEDIA LLC Presidait- WILLIAM WAYBOURN Editorial Director- CHRIS CRAIN Corporate Controller- BARNETTE HOLSTON Art Director-ROB BOEGER General Manager- MICHAEL KITCHENS Marketing Manager- DAN GARRIOTT I mZ CraaaW thediamber %)w_ymwmrtwaMMM^bttimrrbm-<3i CHARTER MEMBER Established 1974 as the Montrose Star 500 Lovett Blvd. Suite 200 Houston, Texas 77006 (713) 529-8490 Fax:(713)529-9531 wwwJKMJstonvoice.com Contents copyright 2003 Office hours: 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. weekdays To submit a letter letters should be fewer than 400 words. We reserve the right to edrt for content and length. We will withhold names upon request but you must include your name and phone number for verification. Please send mail to Houston voice. 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200, Houston, Texas 77006; fax (713) 529-9531 or e-mail to editor ohoustonvoicecom. Opinions expressed therein do not reflect those of the Houston Voice. All material in Houston Voice is protected by federal .:ooynqht law and riw* not be reproduced without the written consent of Houston Voice. The seiual orientation of advertisers, pftotographers. writers and cartoonists puWshed herein is neither irrferred or implied. The appearand or names or pictorial representation does not mcessarily indicate the seiual orientation of that person or persons Houston Voice accepts iinsoJicited editorial material but cannot take responsibility for its return The eottor reserves the tight to accept, reject or «Jit any submission AH rights revert to authors upon putal-calrori. C-uideSries for freelance contributors are available upon request. Folium HOUSTON VOICE JUNE 20, 2003 PAGE 10 guest editorial First they came for the Muslims Why should gays fret over the fate of pious Muslims who overstayed their visas and are about as likely as Jerry Falwell to embrace our cause? We could be the next scapegoats. By ADELE M.STAN idfl5fl|jBlication K Jl Issue 1182 OR ATTORNEY GENERAL John Ashcroft, it's been a busy couple of weeks. First, there was the matter of defending his Department of Justice after his own inspector general released a report taking the agency to task for its roundup and long detention of Muslim immigrants, charged with no crimes, in the wake of 9/11. Then there was his impassioned plea before the House Judiciary Committee on June 5 for expansion of the USA Patriot Act, the legislation hurriedly passed into law during the panic that followed the attacks on the Pentagon and the World Trade Center. Finally there was the mess with DOJ Pride, a gay employee group, in which Ashcroft presided over the department's apparent refusal to allow the Justice Department's gay employee organization to hold its annual pride event at DOJ headquarters. That initial decision was followed by a partial reversal of that stance but a continued refusal to sponsor and underwrite the security costs of holding the event at the headquarters. DOJ Pride organizers ultimately decided to move the program to Capitol Hill, where N.J. Sen. Frank Lautenberg (D) invited them as guests of the Senate. While the last of these controversies has, understandably garnered the most attention within the queer community, the DOJ Pride flap is a mere indicator of why we need to turn our collective gaze to the first two. Correction In the June 13 issue of the Voice, a news story on the Canadian marriage ruling ("Ontario court OKs gay marriage"), a direct quotation is attributed to activist Evan Wolfson on the issue of "comity," or the acceptance of Canadian marriages in the U.S. In fact, that language paraphrased Wolfson's actual statement on the topic. In addition, the article failed to identify Rex Wockner as the freelance journalist who obtained that interview. The Voice regrets the errors. IN THE DAYS THAT FOLLOWED THE Sept. 11 attacks, more than 750 Muslim immigrants were rounded up — many on pure hearsay — and held in a federal detention center without being charged, their families lied to about their whereabouts, and their access to lawyers denied or obstructed. A number of the detainees, according to the inspector general, were subjected to verbal and physical abuse, including the use such of torture techniques as keeping them shackled in solitary confinement under bright lights some 23 hours a day. Why, you may ask, should queer people fret over the fate of pious Muslims who overstayed their visas? After all, you might reason, they're about as likely as Jerry Falwell to embrace our cause. True enough, perhaps. Nonetheless, what's right is right, and these people were done wrong. More than that, the United States Constitution was done wrong, trampled on with impunity by the FBI. And that bodes not well, my friends, for both the nation as a whole and for us as a community. History has shown, time and time again, that when the powers-that-be go looking for scapegoats, we usually make it onto the short list. Even when the initial targets are ethnic, religious or ideological groups, the sights ultimately find us in range, as well. During his recent visit to Capitol Hill, Ashcroft was hardly contrite about the inspector general's findings. "We make no apologies," he said, for holding prisoners until it was determined that they had no connection to terrorism. In other words, guilty until proven innocent. In the 2001 Patriot Act, Ashcroft won the right to amass, through secret warrants, information on the library habits of U.S. citizens and residents, their retail purchases, credit records, general health and mental health charts, student records and the like. Likewise, the government's wiretapping powers were expanded, with e-mail and Internet traffic designated fair game for secret government surveillance. The definition of terrorism was broadened in such a way that domestic political advocacy groups that engage in civil disobedience could be monitored and infiltrated by law enforcement authorities with little judicial oversight. Had this bill been law during the 1980s and '90s, Queer Nation would have been a prime target for the terrorist label (especially after that Communion stunt at New York's St. Patrick's Cathedral). Most frighteningly, the Patriot Act allows the FBI to "investigate American citizens for criminal matters without probable cause of a crime," according to the American Civil Liberties Union, so long as the agents claim the investigation is "for intelligence purposes." If you missed your chance to kiss the Fourth Amendment (protection against unreasonable searches and seizures) goodbye while she was being rushed out the door, you may wish to send her a note. IF YOU THOUGHT ASHRCROFT'S BLOOD- lust would have been satisfied with the red meat of one hunk of the Bill of Rights, think again. He's back, and he's asking for more. Imagine the consequences for political activists and just regular queer folk if Justice's proposed Domestic Security Enhancement Act passed into law in the form it took when some saint at the department leaked it. earlier this year, to the Center for Public Integrity. As reported by ABC News, the draft calls for granting the Justice Department the power "to wiretap a person for 15 days without a warrant, [and would permit] federal agents to secretly arrest people and provide no information to their family, the media or their attorney until charges are brought, no matter how long that took." But the bill's coup de grace is its provision allowing "the government to strip Americans of their citizenship for even unknowingly helping a group that is connected to an organization deemed to be terrorist." Note the phrase "deemed to be terrorist." You may want to think twice before joining the gay contingent at the next anti- globalization march. And remember those Muslim detainees, and how we didn't feel that outraged about what happened to them, since they weren't U.S. citizens? According to this draft of what has come to be known as "Patriot II," the government could deem you and me non-citizens for an act of civil disobedience. One of Ashcroft's first acts upon assuming office was to drape the classical nude sculptures that grace the headquarters' lobby in sheets, so as to cover their privates. An act of civil disobedience I'd love to see: Let's have a party in the lobby and yank those sheets. We can use, as the new fig leaves, copies of the BUI of Rights, a document soon to be rendered unenforceable. Adele M.Stan a Washington writer and can be reached through this publication
File Name uhlib_31485329_n1182_010.jpg