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Houston Voice, No. 1182, June 20, 2003
File 008
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Houston Voice, No. 1182, June 20, 2003 - File 008. 2003-06-20. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 6, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2445/show/2415.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2003-06-20). Houston Voice, No. 1182, June 20, 2003 - File 008. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2445/show/2415

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1182, June 20, 2003 - File 008, 2003-06-20, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 6, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2445/show/2415.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1182, June 20, 2003
Contributor
  • Weaver, Penny
  • Crain, Chris
Publisher Window Media
Date June 20, 2003
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 008
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com JUNE 20, 2003 national news Gay marriage in U.S. still an uncertainty MARRIAGE, continued from Page 1 European countries, which have a residency requirement before gay couples can be wed. Ontario has no such restriction. Gay marriage activists on both sides of the border are celebrating the court's decision. Many American advocates of marriage equality are hopeful that the Canadian prime minister's public avowal of their cause may mean a sea change in attitudes in the United States. "What this presents for American couples is an opportunity to easily enter into a legal marriage and come back to the United States with a powerful tool to break down the remaining discrimination here," Lavi Soloway. founder of the New York-based Lesbian & Gay Immigration Rights Task Force, told the Times. Advocates like Soloway also hope that couples returning from Canada will challenge states' refusal to recognize the legality of their relationships. U.S. couples face uncertainties Already, there appears to be a smattering of U.S. gay couples going to Toronto, Windsor. Ottawa, Stratford and other Ontario cities to marry. The number may be higher after provincial officials process fhe qualifying documents from interested couples, but "currently there are 10 same-sex marriage registrants," said Gerald Crowell, a spokesperson with the Ministry of Consumer & Business Services in Ontario. American couples wedded in Ontario may still face "uncertainties and discrimination," upon their return to the United States, according to a joint advisory issued by New York-based Freedom to Marry and other pro-gay marriage organizations. "People in Seattle cannot go to Vancouver." said Evan Wolfson. executive director of Freedom to Marry. "As of today, only in Ontario may they marry." A spokesperson at the Office of the Registrar General for the province of Ontario said a few couples registered to get married on the day of the decision. "It's tapered off a little since then." Registering is a two-step process, Crowell said. First, applicants must go to city hall to fill out a series of forms. Those papers are then filed with the provincial government at the Registrar General. Crowell speculates that there may be 20 or more couples who have already registered in Toronto. Crowell was unsure of the percentage of American applicants. "We don't capture that residency data," he said. The majority of gay marriages in Ontario are taking place in Toronto and Ottawa, the Canadian capital, he added. HH • ^^■pljj^H Hr r( W - Am ' ■ x-H s mw - Michael Ustiner (left) and Michael Stalk celebrated their marriage with a bottle of champagne. They were the first gay couple legally married in Canada. (Photo by Michael Stupyark/Toronto Star) Toronto City Counselor Kyle Rae said four American couples have wed there so far. "We have people from Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Florida and Washington," said Rae, a gay member of the City Council. "Since June 10, there have been a total of 131 same-sex marriages" in the province. Rae himself plans to join their ranks June 20 by marrying his partner of nine years, Mark Reid, at a ceremony in an art gallery within the downtown ward that Rae represents. Religious allowances In a bow to organized religion, Chretien announced that his proposed bill would allow religious institutions to refuse to marry gay couples. But in Canada as elsewhere, couples can be wed in civil ceremonies as well as religious ceremonies where a member of fhe clergy is licensed by the government to perform marriage ceremonies. In most towns throughout Ontario, a marriage license can be obtained from the clerk at the Marriage License Issuers, the Canadian equivalent of a marriage bureau. The license is valid anywhere in Ontario for three months. To obtain a license, only one of fhe parties must be physically present. Necessary documents are identification, such as a birth certificate, current passport and photo identification for both individuals. The fee varies slightly from city to city. Mass. case pending In the United States, the issue of gay marriage is about to become more heated. At present, Massachusetts presents the most likely prospect for approximating Ontario's decision and even moving beyond neighboring Vermont's civil unions, according to Mary Bonauto, an attorney at Boston-based Gay & Lesbian Advocates and Defenders. Bonauto argued a case in front of the Massachusetts State Supreme Judicial Court on March 4, in which she represented seven same-sex couples seeking the right to marry under the state Constitution. By law, a decision must be made 130 days after the argument, so Bonauto expects a ruling soon. "We could win it, or also lose it, or end up in a Vermont-type decision in which the court says you're entitled to the protections of marriage." she said. "Our case argues that [current interpretation of the law-] is excluding same-sex couples from what is already in the Constitution," she said. If fhe court agrees with her plaintiffs, then the state legislature doesn't have to take up any amendment to current law, Bonauto said. The premise of the right for gay couples to marry is based on "equality, liberty and privacy," she said. Many states have passed so-called "defense of marriage acts," which limit marriage to a man and a woman. In 1996, President Bill Clinton signed the national Defense of Marriage Act into law-. N.J. case heads to court New Jersey is providing another judicial battleground for the fight to marry. The State Supreme Court agreed to hear oral arguments in the case of seven same-sex couples. "Canada this week has shown us what's possible in New Jersey." said David Buckel, an attorney at Lambda Legal Defense & Education Fund, which is arguing the case. The state's attorney general tried to quash the suit by arguing that gay people can indeed marry — just not each other. Lambda Legal successfully fended off that challenge. Gov. Jim McGreevey said he cannot comment on court cases, but shortly after the case was filed, the Democrat said he objects to any effort by a court to reverse state law as it applies to marriage. But a multi-pronged approach will impel legislation and public sentiment to include gay couples, Bonauto said. If the Massachusetts decision is favorable to gays, it will be a national boon for gay marriage, she said. "We all know gay families live in every county," she said. "The families are there as a part of the community. They need the same protection afforded to other families. We're in a civil rights movement here." ft MORE INFO Canadian government www.cbs.govon.ca Freedom to Marry www.freedomtomarry.com Lambda Legal Defense 4 Education Fund www.lambdalegal.org Gay & Lesbian Advocates and Defenders wwwalad.org
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