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Montrose Voice, No. 163, December 9, 1983
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Montrose Voice, No. 163, December 9, 1983 - File 001. 1983-12-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2407/show/2382.

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(1983-12-09). Montrose Voice, No. 163, December 9, 1983 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2407/show/2382

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 163, December 9, 1983 - File 001, 1983-12-09, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2407/show/2382.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 163, December 9, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Hyde, Robert
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date December 9, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Hall's Proposal Sent to City Legal Dept. for Study By Hollis Hood Houston City Council heard two proposals Wednesday, Dec. 7, regarding protection of civil rights. One would establish a com· mission to investigate human rights viola­tions. The other was introduced by City Councilman Anthony Hall and would change the city's non-police and fire civil service laws and affirmative action poli­cies so that gay people would have protec­tion from employment discrimination. Rep. Ron Wilson (D) introduced the proposal to establish a local human rights commission patterned after the state level entity. He stated this would help guard worker discrimination in private compan­ies, unions and government. The mayor voiced her approval and sup­port for the proposal. The changes Hall proposed, referred to the city's legal department, would offer protection to workers not in the police and fire departments. These changes protect­ing discrimination in hiring and promo­tion were instituted in the police and fire department& when a 1982 Dallas federal court ruling declared the state law making homosexual activity a crime unconstitu- Hall acted, said several community tional. leaders, in response to a request made by them and some campaign supporters last week in a meeting in a private home. Hall had indicated that it was a matter he would follow up in a meeting with GPC officials last August at the screenin2. Hall, who scored second only to Grea­nias on the GPC questionaire yet failed to receive the GPC endorsement, stated that at an appropriate time, "the beet time," he would ~sponsor or introduce the addi­tional wording, a representative of the liai­son group said. "They (GPC) have referred to this as fulfilling the promise Hall made to the caucus three months ago, and we just can't let that go by," he said. "Our group, which is not organized-yet-asked him to do it, and he did." The proposal is modeled aft.er the pro­posed ordinance draft brought out publi­cally by Gregg Russell months ago. "That one was deemed unconstitu­tional, but with a few changes," the repre­sentative said, "it was usable." RU88ell began a push for the ordinance in July which reportedly resulted in a meeting between four of the councilper­sons and GPC reps. Council was told there was a problem, that the ordinance was not a priority on the gay agenda, and that Russell did not repreaent the GPC. "So it just isn't fair for GPC to take all the credit, when really they haven't done anything. Bagneris didn't even know that marital status had been taken out of the ordinance, and how could he? He wasn't there when the arrangements and request were made." Bagneris said he bad contacted Hall briefly et a social gathering since the elec­tion, and told him to "remember what you promised." Hall repeatedly stated, according to the representative, that he would support gay rights as a minority, so it comes as no surprize that he would begin accomplish­ing that, he said. ''The bloc vote was very splintered where Hall was concerned, and he had a very large gay following," the representa­tive said. MONTROSE Whatever Happened to the Boys V 0 I C E from 'Bent' Billie Duncan, p .17 The Newspaper of Montrose Dec. 9. 1983 Issue .... 163 Published Every Fnaay Mayor, Much of Council, Turn out for Shiflett Tribute By Hollis Hood Mayor Kathy Whitmire, city council members, business and civic leaders plus hundreds of friends roasted, toasted and wished Steve Shiflett, president of Citi­zens for Human Equality and community activist, farewell at a reception, fun­draiser Sunday, Dec. 4, in the 60th floor Texas Commerce Bank skylobby. Following welcoming comments to the wine and cheese event by Joe Thornton, the presentation took the form of a "roast" by master of ceremonies Mike Lonergan. Shiflett, according to Lonergan, was "born in a leather cabin," and went on from there to become a leader in Houston's gay political scene, and according to the roast in world affairs. "In' 195.5, Japan entered the United Nations w1th GPC and Steve. In 1980, the hostages were taken in Iran, and Steve had nothing to do with it. In 1983, Kathy Whitmire was the first mayor to visit Mary's, and Stevewaen'tthe:e .. .. In.1984, Steve waa seen in San Francisco trying to unionize the Sisters of Perpetual Indul· gence" (referring to his pending move to thC:~~~l~~~·an Eleanor Tinsley told Shiflett that " it's okay for you to leave; we've got everything taken care of," with a laugh. And Councilman Jim Greenwood eaid he didn't know ifShiflett's influence had anything to do with hie election, ~ut he had Jost before and won after meeting Steve. Councilman George Greanias said that Houston would certainly miss Shi­flett. Mayor Whitmire noted that "if someone had told me two yeara ago that when Steve Shinett aaid goodbye he would have on hand the mayor of Houston and half the Mayor Whitmire proclaims Dec. 4 "Steve Shiflett Day" in Houston. ing Shiflett'& civic accomplishments and leadership and pronouncing Dec. 4 Steve Shiflett Day in Houston. Shiflett addressed the crowd, reminisc­ing about incidents the gay community had survived and how the community had blossomed and proved itaelf. "Leadera reflect the kind of people they represent," he said, "and I'm proud to represent you. [ do thank you, and I'm going to misa ya'll." Shiflett told the crowd about the prof es· sional opportunity that was available in San Francisco, which is taking him away from Houston. "One person said 'don't forget us' .how could I?" he queried, fight­ing tears. "I hope I will be remembered well." Politics is a proct>88 by which people 1 help people. he said, so he will probably become involved m San Francisoo, but only after a respite for personal time. He voiced the need for continued sup­port for the Shanti Project, CHE and the Committee for Public Health Awareness. Shiflett presented the a Texas Freedom Award to Robert Schwab. It was accepted by a fellow attorney. Schwab was unable to attend because of a declining AIDS con­dition. "Robert, we love you," said Shiflett, not­ing Schwab's many accomplishments in the area of human rights in Texas. 'The irony is that he embodies the entire movement's goals and philosophy, but he won't be with us much longer," he said. city council, I'm not sure I would have the audience "but here we are." She pro­taken them seriously," to laughter from ceeded to re~d a proclamation commend- He challenged attendees to rise above personalities and addre.ss issues of impor­tance to the gay community. "I see you as friends. I hope we keep in touch." 2 MONTROSE VOICE/ DEC. 9, 1983 1022 V\lesthelmer-528-8851-New DJ wayne Barton, Hot! Hot! Hot! Westheimer Picketers Urge 'Living Love' Gays Expected to be Active and Visible in Primaries By Hollis Hood "Pornography Must Go" read the sign held by a member of the Unification Church, 945 Harvard, at the corner ofTaft and Westheimer Wednesday evening, and church members stayed on Westheimer all night to encourage passersby to try "liv· ing love" and not the "dying love" found in sexually oriented businesses on the strip. Small groups of vocal members carry­ing signs spent the night at various loca­tions in the first 10 blocks of Westheimer because "people need to know there is a higher quality of love than what's being offered here." The groups concentrated in front of nude dancing studios for a 24-hour period and said they may come back on a wee. kend night. Various personnel of the establish­ments vocalized opposition to the groups "camping" on their doorsteps, but aside from one place turning on its sprinklers while they picketed, members said they had no problems 0They have said nasty things, but they are not aggressive," she said. ThP effort was located in Montrose becau•e the group evaluated it as the high­est concentration of sexually oriented businesses in the city-the modeling stu­dios in the first 10 blocks of Westheimer. "We want people who go in there to know they are settling for something far below what they can expect from love and life," the church representative said. "We want people to become inspired. We are fighting for a new moral and spiritual regf'neration o.nd, hopefully, mora lity. This is a part of th at," she said. Gaye on the strip "seem to want to jus­tify what they are doing," she said. "But we believe that God didn't create men and women to have homosexual relation­ships." The members taught, sang and prayed through Thursday noon and then dis­banded. By Larry Bueh Democratic presidential hopefuls con­tinue a hectic schedule, and straw polls in both Iowa and Florida drew candidates and gay activists. In Iowa, 1980 Democratic National Con­vention delegate Harold Wells helped launch a statewide effort to bring gays in for the Jefferson-Jackson Day dinner early in the month. showing that gays will be active and visible in the first primary. About 350 attended the Democratic Party fundraiser, and presidential hopeful Alan Cranston joined the gay group earlier in the day to talk over his candidacy. In Florida, a smaller but equally vocal group of gay Democratic Party activists also put in a day's work at the state's con­vention; most were divided half-and-half between Cranston a nd Mondale, with a smattering favoring former Florida gover­nor Rueben Askew. Of particular note at the convention was the human rights statement, which did not echo national Democratic Party standards and instead left out support for c:ivil rights for gays. Fred Butler, a past Key West Business Guild president and treasurer of the Mon­roe County Democratic Committee, rose to a point of order on the issue, but was ruled out of orde-r. When the proposal pasEied , a vocal outpouring of "nays" were heard, according to Dade County Demoraticcom· mittee member Jack Campbell, a leading gay businessman Meanwhile, South Carolina senator Ernest Hollings has added hie name to the Jist of cosponsors of the federal gay civil righte bill. The step, which was unex­pected on ly bt>cause Hollings had earlier indicated his support of the measure but not a willingness to cosponsor, came after Hollings told the National Organization for Women convention meeting in Washington , D.C. tha t he was a cospon sor. NOW les bian rights project director Chris Riddiough and Gay Rights National Lobby field associates director Tanyan Corman talked to Hollings after­wards, toJd him he was not a cosponsor, and got him to move. Black civil rights leader Jesse Jackson, declaring for the presidency on Nov. 3, was the only Democratic hopeful to date to specifically mention gays among his coa· lition and support for civil rights that Wfil, ~ITl5, I GI.{$ 1\\ESE wms HOO: IN 1ll' ~ t-\IN\.500 roN'T MINl>?fl~lffTIN~ Of 1W tm:t··· include gay people among his objectives. Among those invited to attend Jackson's announ~ment in Washington, D.C. was National Coalition of Black Gays director Gil Gerald and National Gay Task Force Washington representative Jeff Levi. It was Levi, by the way, and not Gerald, who was invited to the podium; Levi suggested afterwards it might have been because he is also Jewish, and a Jewish Defense League protest was set to take place at the event. Quack Cures for AIDS Range from Dead Cats to Hypnotism Unethical vendors are hopping on the AIDS bandwagon trying to make a for­tune off of the desperate seeking a cure for the deadly syndrome, reports the Dallas Times Herald. A doctor in the Bahamas is offering a treatment for $18,000, and a less expen­sive serum injection in Mexico is going for $1900. Other tnatments for the syndrome include vitamins, herbs, massage. hypnot­ism and "keeping a dead cat in the freezer," reports Rick Grossman of Hous­ton's Gay Switchboard "When you hav"e an incurable disease, there are people who will take advantage of it." he said . Dr. Peter Droutman of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control's AIDS task force said, "AlDS isn't any different from other aerious illnesses that don 't have a quick and reliable cure. Arthritis. Cancer. Herpes. These are all troubling to the peo­ple who have them. "Some people are willing to try any­thing that will hold out any hope, regard­less of whether these things work. People who are willing to take advantage of that will continue to set up shop and go into business." DEC. 9, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Montrose Mouth By Jeff Bray It's the Season 'Tis the season to light up that tree and get out all that tacky Chnstmas stuff and make Montrose look like the last stop from the North Pole. The world"s tackiest bsr,Mary"s, is a major focal point, naturally On Sun .. Oec.11, Mary's will be lighting the famous Montrose Community Christmas Tree, sponsored by our friends at Liberty Bank, Montrose Symphonic Band, Neartown Associ­ation and the Westhe1mer Colony Art Assoc1a­lion, to name a few The event will feature church choirs from the community and the Montrose Symphonic Band and volunteers in a combined Hallelu1ah Chorus with some 3000 carolers in a march down Westheimer. It starts at 5:30pm and is free (now how are they going to charge us for standmg on Westheimer when there are ~ pie who actually charge others while standing on Westheimer?) -o- Don't forget that on Sat. , Dec. 17, the Montrose Symphonic Band's annual Christmas concert will be held at Cullen Auditorium on the main campus of the University of Houston. Tickets are $5. The program begins at 8pm For info call 527-9454 -o- The Exile last Sunday held the1r 1963 Miss Exile Contest to a packed house. The hot Diana Wright won the coveted award. with the ever­delectable Tracey as runner-up. Our own lova­ble Mark Drago {Voice) was on the panel of judges. along with Lulu Simpson (Hole). Miss Alabama (The Outlaws) and Michael Bour­land Be sure and get all greased up for the truly arousing Mr Exile Contest coming soon. Read this paper for the deta11s -o- Get out them crawflsh prongs, Hon, 'cause Silly Sally's in Alexandra. Louisiana, is plan­ning a New Year's Spectacular. Call and ask for Ernie to get your reservations accepted early. For Holiday travelers. •·th is will bea great treat in Good ol' Cenla"(??) -o- GMAC, co-owners of the Rubber Band Car and the Jew Canoe. wish to thank the owners of Ruby and Anita Roadheaven for their refer­rals -o- Stop steahng those ash trays from the bars and hotels. They don't mean anything when com­pared to owning your very own Montrose Texas ashtrays made 1n Mexico and available at the Neartown Garage. Your$1 donation will go to KS/AIDS of Houston. Start your collec­tion now -o- Oh my God. Isn't it bad enough that we had to watch Tora Tora Tora oncealreadyth1sweek? Al's celebrated Pearl Harbor Day last Wednes­day with full air raid decor, including sand bags, bunks, camouflage and muscular men to serve as cannon fodder. Get this All month long, Al's will be conducting maneuvers with Drink Specials and also v1deogame and pool specials As an example. next week. Tuesday will be Boots. Fatigue & Cap Night. Wednesday will be Servicemen's Club Night. Thursday will be Winter Maneuvers/Un1form/Leather. etc. etc Are we really that hepped up over war? Could such an event e'o'er have happened only 10 years ago? Oh well. have fun playing. boys Houston (and Texas m general} is becommg quite the film mecca these days Get out those big sun glasses and wear those sequins because you n8\ler know where and when you'll be on camera Right now. filming is underway for The Willowdale Handcar. one of the 18 tales by macabre cartoonist Edward Gorey that make up Gorey Stories. an off-the­wall musical treat being presented at Main Street Theater, 2540 Times Blvd., this holiday season. Gorey Stories will play at MST from Dec. 16-Jan 21 (1984. can you believe?). D That 1ncred1bly English-looking little church on Alabama and Woodhead. St. Stephen"s Episcopal, ts planning a busy hohday month Drop on m, since you·re in the neighborhood c-cmtmu.f'd Pa.RE' 4 4 MONTROSE VOICE I DEC. 9, 1983 Montrose Mouth Here's More from page 3 Sun .• Oec.11. at 9·1Sam and 11:30am, the Rev Helen M Havens {Rector) and her husband will present a Christmas Triptych narrative of the Christmas story_ On Dec. 12, 8pm, there will be a recital of Baroque to contemporary music with flute and harp by Bernard Phillips and Laura Whitt (two very talented musicians,/ know). Donations requested for the organ fund. On Fri., Dec. 16. 8pm, the annual Christ­mas Concert will be held, featurmg works from Handel to Rutter. The exciting program will feature Houston's only inner-city male chorus Amahl and the Night Visitors is slated for a fully staged performance on Sun .. Dec. 8, 4pm The cast will include Lowell McKelvey in the title role and members of the Houston Grand Opera For information. call Craig Gallagher, 528- 6665 -a- Stages. one of the truly gifted dramatic organi­zations located here in Houston, 1s looking for cast members to audition for some upcoming events If you have talent (and we know you do). call 225-6260 tor the Dec 10 & 11 audi­tions at 709 Franklin, downtown. The plays and actors needed are as follows· Mass Appeal: Needs 2 males, one 20-30 years old; the other 45-50 years old Come Back to the 5 & Dime Jimmy Dean, Jimmy Dean: Needs 8 women, 18-55 years old The Taming of the Shrew· (We know you're out there. Honey.) Needs 10-12 men and 5-7 women Please bring prepared material: one 2- minute classic for Shakepeare. and one con­temporary piece for other shows This may be your big chance to get involved on stage and work with real professionals in an important creative organization -a- The C1t1zens for Human Equality {CHE) will meet next Tues. Dec. 13. at Watson de Naby Gallery. 1106 Berthea Guest speaker, Efraim Garcia, director of city planning for Houston Cocktails. 7;30pm: meeting. Bpm -a- HELP PAY FOR THE MONTROSE COMMUN­ITY CHRISTMAS TREE. Donations are being accepted to pay for the 20-foot tree atop Mary's Lounge. Give your money to Cassan­dra. Mary's Oh-So-Special general manager. -a-we ·re all going to go nuts. but it's already time to think about New Years. kids Rascals is feat­uring the ever-popular Samantha Samuels for a one· night stand on the 31st. and Baja's is presenting local songstress Luisa Amaral­Sm1th for their special Dinner & Champagne Spectacular Better get those reservations in early1 Some local gossip to pass on. y'all. Mary's ever-popular daytime bartender, Red, has become the bar's new night manager. Ron will be taking over Red's daytime shift. Jeff Dunn (seated) of Private Selections prepares to be taped by HBO Not only has Jeff Dunn (that hunky number) been wowmg Houston with his looks and his booming Private Selection dating service; now he is a video star Jeff is president of Houston's first gay video dating service. He was among a number of Houstonians interviewed recently for a Home Box Office Special documentary (also shot 1n San Antonio) about contempor­ary gay lifestyles as a positive force in today's American society. The special will be aired in July on the HBO network. We'll all be watch­ing Ms Marilyn Roark was In town from Dallas last weekend, after giving us a whirlwind tour of that city and treating us to a marvelous recital at SMU. She then came to Houston and gave us more of her incredible charm and talent as a harpsichordist for the Houston Chamber Sin­gers' Christmas program at First Presbyterian. Ms Roark will be back on Dec. 16 as a guest of Marshall Maxwell. She loves us gay men and we love her. Wallace Whitman got the break of a lifetime after working with Houston Grand Opera He will now be working with the New York City Opera Company under th• direction of Bev­erly Sills. The best of luck to you, Wallace. We'll miss seeing you at Texas Art Supply, and remember, if you get confused in New York, just ask Miss Beverly-she will at least be able to show you how to call for a-TAXI. -a­PAATY ALERTS Friday, Dec. 9, is Louie Crew's 47th birthday He's the founder of the gay Episcopalian group Integrity Saturday, Dec. 10: The 1,000,000th Ford was bwlt today in 1915. A "Model T," of course Sunday. Dec. 11 Today is Quentin Crisp's 75th birthday-proof that ltfe begins at 70 -a- Well, enough gossip for now, gang. Good luck with your Christmas shopping {now that rent is out of the way for another month .. ) and stay away from those blue-light pantie specials at the Galleria. SO tar this year, five people have been trampled to death out there near that tricky stairway in front of Gumps ITALIAN BEEF HOUSE • Italian Beef Sausage (with green peppers) • Italian Sausage Sandwich (with green peppers and grilled onions) •Italian Meatball Sandwich • Polish Sausage (grilled onions, mustard and relish) •HotDogs (Chicago style) 2703 Montrose at Westheimer ORDERS TOGO 526-8709 •···· "THE: ULTIMATE: BAKE:DPQTATO"" SPUDS AREA GIRESBEST FRIEND! 416 Westlwimer Houllton, TX 77006 520-0554 DEC. 9, 1983 /MONTROSE VOICE 5 Melton, Hightower Address Caucus National Gay Leaders Meet with New CDC Director By Hollis Hood Herbert Mell<>n, Gay Political Caucus endorsed candidate in the recent school board election, told that organization's members that he sanctions them "because you are part of the human spirit-as good ae any and better than some" during its final Dec. 7 meeting before the holidays in the Holiday Inn on Main Street. useveral weeks ago I appealed to you for help and assistance," he continued, "and I think you spoke loudly and magnificently. I say the same thing then that! say now- 1 am a humanist." Melton characterized himself as a "night fighter. Since I'm black and I'm always cast in the shadows, no one knows I'm there until it.a over." He promised the GPC that he would be dealing with issues and insist that the human spirit be brought into focus within the school system. "I'm going to work to the inside of this maze," he said, referring to the bureau­cratic system within the school board. "I speak and reed five different languages, so I believe I can understand that buJl­shit." He noted that the solid vote in Montrose was attributable I<> the GPC, and prom· ised that he would "forever fight for the underdog." GPC President Larry Bagneris said he anticipates an increase in GPC member­ship when closeted teachers realize they can have input to the school board without fear. Bagnerio told the organization ofGPC's political accomplishments, including "taking on the blur of ignorance, Frank Mann" and replacing him with Eleanor Tinsley, supporting single member dis­tricts "so we could have an accountable Montrose Voice The Newspaper of Montrose Published every Friday 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 M;::-~~:Jr~::_IV 01~11Gl)'Newt.fl.OOOCOl)lel ......... ly Au1111V61nAntono0S11r.4000oopo•blwe81y tC111ITu•11•.ll_OOOcoplel~ly1vg Contentscopyrlght•1983 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Hen~~~;:urg Robert Hyde m1n1g111ged1t0f Hn~~:~~ Ch1':,!'1:;;~1th Biiiie Duncan Peter Derksen Jon Cheetwood Joel Watts tnllrflllf'H'J'lefl/Wrlllfl ~~~~~~ Jeff Bray fll~IU Sonny Davis .ccoun11ng LytH1rn1 ldv1Tl<$1fJgd•t1Ct<N Ma1kDr1go .aver11t111g ~°:.:"~':!'.:::' Gr .. t1r Montrou But•nest Guild_ G1y News S1rv1c11 lntern1hon1I G1y Newt Agency. Pec1hc NewS $efv1c1.l1rry8u1h(Wuhmgton,OC) ~~'!~~:~.:~:::.·u~~;~!1~"~;~~.,~~~:11;:;:;::~ R1ndy Allred. S1onew1t1 FHtur" Svnd1c1t•. Brl1n McN1ught.JoeBlker POSTMASTER Sendlddr ... conect1on1103317 MonlroM 11J08.HoU1ton.TX77008 Sutucript1011r•teinUS1t11ffi.d1nvelof:» S.9peryur(52 lstue1).S20per111rnonth1(2e1Uun).orSl25per....-(1t111 1h1n2e»suffl 8.ckonuee$200uch N•llOnl/M/Vf/ftlllflQr•ptHMltllN• Jo.01S.b110. Rivendell Marketing &66 IS!h Avenue New YoB 10011. 1212) 242·6863 ::;:::::a cJead/fne Tuetdl)I. 5 30pm ICM" IUue rel6Qed fo No11ce1oa<1ver1r .. u Local•.,.,.f1•aing111esc~ui.s,-·A ..,.uellect•'t9Juty1.1983 ifMlJqrlsJlμ/lly Mont~Vo1C•doetnota1umer11pOnst­bi1tt) l'IOffdvt1rh1lngct.irM RIMtdftBlhOUldll«t M<mt(l)M Voce'IOlr"f~'••~ city councilperson," and support of a mayor that has tried I<> bring about liber· alizing changes in gay treatment. GPC·supported Nikki Van Highl<>wer oaid gays' employment rights needed I<> be protected by an ordinance, and she U>ld the group that the issues are far from dead. u1 stand before you still a vision. I wanted I<> be a reality .... " she said and thanked the caucus' members for their support of her campaign. "Thank you for the incredible effort and commitment. I'm awfuUy sorry we didn't win, but it was forces beyond our control. We have a lot of work I<> do. There's lots that's going I<> be done, and I hope to be working with you. Sorry it won't be in City Hall, but it will be there," she concluded. Bagneris announced that Anthony Hall, that day, had introduced the addi­tion of the words "sexual orientation" into policies regarding employment discrimi· nation. Hall instructed the Legal Depart· ment to research the wording, which is the first step in its inclusion. "HaB has submitted sexual orientation and marital statue to the city," said Bag­neris, who was immediately corrected by Jerry Mayes who so.id marital status had been deleted. Loneliness More Lethal Than Smoking We used U>hearofpeopledyingofa broken heart only in song, reports Pacific News Service. But a new study confirms that loneliness is in fact a greater cause of death than 1;moking, drinking or eating the wrong foods. Researchers at the University of Cali­fornia at Berkeley say lonely people are particularly susceptible I<> cardio·vascular diseaAe, the nation's number one killer. A related study at Johns Hopkins Univer­sity found that many people who deve­loped cancer were also victims of loneliness. Says one doctor, "Loneliness is finally co.ning out of the closet." Shrinks Say Savers Mindless People are just as interested in saving a penny as in saving a dollar, says Psychol­ogy Today. That's what a New York tire company found out when it made an error on its monthly coupon mailing. Instead of a buck diocount, the coupon offered only a cent. The same number of new customers still came in. Psychologists have a name for the behavior: "mindlessness." What is needed, said Bagneris, is docu· mentation to show the need for the ordi­nance regarding employment and discrimination abuses. "Our job now is to document this with valid needs for reforms," he said. Ray Hill said that a tabloid is being drafted to ascertain "who we are and what our real and preceived concerns are," for use in the documentation process. Mayes stated that the model for what Hall is introducing was Gregg Russell's proposed ordinance draft begun several months ago and at that time rejected by the caucus as not a priority on the gay agenda. "Let's be a little more honest," said Neil Isbin to Bagneris, regarding the evalua­tion of the inclusion of the wording. '"This was a race between two good candidates, and it was good for gays because whoever won, we would have an influence on." Bagneris took exception to !shin's state­ment: "I beg you, if you really believe what you are saying, place your name in nomi­nation for one of the many board vacan­cies that will be available in the new year and take on son\e of the responsibility for running this organization." Bagneris then announced the commun· ity Christmas tree lighting at Mary's on Sunday, Dec. IO. !twill bethefifthyearfor the event. The Montrose Symphonic Band will provide music for caroling following the lighting. Members of the community were also encouraged to bring food and U>ys for the Toys for Tots campaign. A representative of the band U>ld members about the Christmas concert scheduled for Dec. 17 at Cullen Audito­rium at 8 p.m. Tickets are $5 and available from band members, Mary's, Kindred Spirits and Wilde 'n' Stein. The band will also have a reverse raffle "every person is a winner" on Dec. 20, the representative said, to raise money for the band's trip I<> Los Angeles in 1984. Tickets are $100. Sue Lovell reported from the KS.AIDS group that a national conference is being planned in June in Housl<>n by the federal government health officials in conjunc­tion with M.D. Anderson Hospital. ''This is the first time anything like this has hap­pened," she said. GPC will hold a fundraioer on Dec. 15 at Kindred Spirits. It will be a Casino Night, which has been successfu) in the past. GPC will sponsor a night at the theater Jan. 'l:7 for the Alley's presentation of Cloud Nine. Tickets are $12.50 each and include the cast party afterwards. "I know we are not always in agreement in some areas," said Bagneris, "but I have a lot of respect for you people and for all our disagreements-this is where the power lies, here and beyond. I wish you much happineao in 1984." With that, the year's activity at GPC found adjournment. Leaders of the National Gay Task Force met on Nov. 29 with the new director of the Centers for Disease Control, Dr. James 0. Mason, reports the NGTF newsletter. NGTF Executive Director Virginia M. Apuzzo described the session as ''a very good get·acquainted meeting that offered us an opportunity to introduce the gay community to Dr. Mason and to raise our interests and concerns about the work of CDC." Apuzzo stressed how important the work of the CDC is I<> the gay community, particularly during the AIDS crisis. "We want I<> see good epidemiology and surveillance,'' Apuzzo said. "This can be achieved within the context of protection of confidentiality and sensitivity to the status of gays and lesbians in American society.'' NGHEF Seeks Ideas for Gay Health Conference The National Gay Health Education Foundation is currentJy planning the first Southeastern Lesbian 1 Gay Health Con· ference I<> be held in Atlanta on Apr. 21 and is asking the gay community for prop­osals for workshops and presentations. Previous national conferences have been presented in major metropolitan areas for the past six years and have brought U>gether gay health care provid­ers to share information and ideas, to coor­dinate networking and caucusing within their respective professions) organiza~ tions, and to provide a forum for profes­sional support and development. For additional information or to submit a proposal, contact Caitlin Ryan, 550 Cresthill Ave., Atlanta, GA 30306; (404) 892-2459. The deadline for submission is Feb. 10. In-House Spy Business Booming The happiest worker in a recovering econ­omy may be the company spy, reports the Phil<Uklphia Inquirer. More and more firms are hiring private detectives who pose as employees I<> find out who's smoking joints at lunchtime, and who's stealing merchandise from the stockroom. One detective says, "It's the best year we've ever had." But they face new legal restrictions, too. Because of laws limiting information­gathering on prospective employees, sometimes companies just trade thieves. 6 MONTROSE VOICE / DEC. 9, 1983 Air Force's Gay .----C------ 1 --------------.. ProbeDeemed oming uesday, Dec. 20 Outrage WASHINGTON, D.C. - Gay Rights ~:!r~as~;~=~!tf::~~~i~ ~~e Montl'OJe ~o,·ce men in the Washington, D.C. area. At least 45 men who work at the Pentagon, Andrews AFB, Bolling AFB and other bases were questioned about homosexual- 3 d A I ity in early November, GRNL said. The Lobby has received reports that /'I nn "' some of the men have been encouraged to identify gay men and women in the Air Force in order to receive better treatment, , theysaid c~ . GRNML reported that one man said t ,,. that Air Force agents entered and ~'' me1 a l'tlj searched his room without a search war-rant and confiscated many personal items. "Thi.a investigation and tbe apparent D ~i~~;:rI~~E~\~£~~~= and ru 6l ie Spectacle on archaic stereotypes of gay and lesbian Americans-stereotypes which ignore FREE BEER BUST those women and men who are gay and who have served and are serving in the 'W~s~0~c: ;~~rd~s~r:i:;;.members for the Readers of the Montrose ~oice are in contact with some of the airmen being investigated and with senators and repreeentatives who are members of the Armed Service Committees. The Lobby is encouraging Members of Congress to question Air Force officials about the nature of the investigation and to deter­mine whether the rights of the enlisted men have been violated.. "Again we see a clear demonstrated need for Congress to remove the regula­tion that homosexuality is incompatible with military service. GRNL staff memben and our Field Associates must continue our efforts with the Amred Servi­ces Committees and other Members of Congress," stated Jerry Weller, GRNL Deputy Director. MCC Founder Encouraged by Church Council Dialogue Rev Troy Perry. founder of the Univer88l Fellowship of Metropolitan Community Churches. was reported by tbe Chicago Tribune as being pleased with tbe recent vote by the National Council of Churches to postpone indefinitely the membership application of the MCC. "I consider that vote to be a miracle," Perry said. "Wehaven'tcomeoutofthis as victims or losers. The dialogue will con­tinue." Perry, who started the MCC 15 years ago, stated: "The rest of Christianity has been terrified of sexuality . . .. we have to remember that the (Council) is not the enemy. They have struggled and sweated blood over ua. If we applied to join the Moral Majority, we'd get an answer in less than five minute.. "We have made an impact on the(Coun· cil). We don't want to destroy tbem. We jwrt want the fellowship of otber Chri• ti.ans. We need it,. becauae sometimes it'• harder to come out 8.1!1 a Christian in the gay community than to come out as a gay or lesbian in the straight world." Americans Prefer Health to Wealth Pacific New• Service Money can't buy happiness. That's the consensus of Americans in a national sur­vey by Bruskin Associates. Americana were asked what would make them happiest: money, health or accompliahments. Nearly half said per­sonal achievement. Almoot as many said good health, but 1ust 5 percent said great wealth. A Benelif lol' the Media Fund lo,. Human Riaht1 (We 'II be alkinf lo/' a 12 Donation at the Dool') Dancing with DJ Ram Rocha Plu1: Nou1ton P/'emie/'e Video Showing ol " fJa!J. P/'611 A11ociation Rim #low the Stnifbt Media Tl'611t1 the flag Communitg" The Upper Deck at the Officer's Club 2100 Albanv Your lnritation The Monttote Voice cotdiallg_ inritei gou to out 3td Annual C/,,i1tma1 Pattg and Public Spectacle Tueidag, Decembet 20, 1983 8:00 p.m.-1:00 a.m. "The Uppet Deel<" 2100 Albang IZ 11 161 ''''For 161 #1'11 Fun' For Hu•1n RJ1611 FHI DrtF#, C.16 ,,, DEC. 9, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 Shiflett Dissects Houston Gay Politics, States His Solutions By Robert Hyde (Thie is the second of a two-part story baaed on a recent interview. Part one appeared last week.) "It is apparent to me that the divisiveness and hard feelings generated by continued political opposition within the GPC and manipulative forces from without prohibit me from concentrating upon the issues and primary goals critical to the establish­ment of gay rights .... "Therefore, in the best interests of the entire Houston gay community, and as a necessary first step towards re­establishing GPC unity and solidarity, I resign the presidency of GPC effective immediately." Thus on April 9, 1980, Steven H. Shiflett submitted his letter of resignation to Houston's Gay Political Caucus and stepped down from the organization he had helped nuture from the 1975 fraternity of timid idealists to a powerful caucus too influential to be bypassed by those whose sought public office. And this was after being elected to hie third term as GPC'e president. What happened? Perhaps Shiflett had become the victim of his own creation, for had the caucus remained the email brotherhood that met in barrooms when he helped found it in 1975, it is unlikely that a bid for the presid­ency would interest the community as much as it did, or that state representative candidates would desire the caucus' endor· eement so much that they would try to coerce the nod fromtheGPCatthecaucue' expense. When current GPC President Larry Bagnerie challenged Shiflett for the head of the caucus in 1980, for the first time in its history, the question of who would be at the helm of the organization was extremely important. Up to then, Shiflett was their Roosevelt, metaphorically lead· ing the young and inexperienced group out of political ignorance into the political mainstream. "Larry and I weren't getting along," Shiflett said of 1979 prior to the '80 GPC presidential campaign. "We started dis· trusting each other for whatever reason. I'm sure they're a lot of them. I couldn't go into it now, even if I wanted to. "But I had told him that I wasn't going to run for president for a third term," Shi· flett said. Shi.flett's statement to Bagneris undoubtedly lighted political fires that would not tum to smoke when later in the year Shiflett changed hie mind and found himself in a bitter campaign. "In fact, I had chosen to (run for presi· dent) late in 1979-likeDecember," he con· tinued. ''And the next year was the famous cam· paign where Larry and I ran against each other," Shiflett said. "And that was pretty traumatic for the entire community, I think, because it polarized us, and it sure lowered the level of energy in working together that we had had before." lit~~i:J:!tc:~~e~~:illi'i;~;;,t:.\'~~~dl'vfd"!j the caucus to where it could be manipu· lated by outside forces. In that political year, one of those forces was Debra Danburg, running for the Dis· trict 79 race as state representative, and ahe wanted badly the caucus' endorse­menl fl;t~ ~:fd~i:' f~c~ h~~ ~~~:~!~: ~~:: gation to its members-not to endorse any political candidates prior to a GPC screen· ing and recommendation by the board, and then only after a vote of approval for endorsement by the GPC as a whole. In the spring of 1980, this policy was bypaBBed, and Debra Danbur!f was endorsed by the caucus-pnor to screening-without caucus approval. Something was amiss. "The state representative Distr!ct 79 race ia bu tone example of how the pnmary goal of gay righta in Housti;>~ ~am!' aecondary to self.interest poht1cs. Shi-· "We're suffering from some type of political myopia." flett's resignation read. "This was manif· ested through manipulation of our board·established screening process. I submit that this process must operate with integrity and act impartially to make can· didate recommendations which fully represent and reflect GPC's entire consti· tuency. I cannot endorse or support the self-defeating, steam·roller tactics of a dis· ruptively vocal, minority coalition whose more immediate goals and priorities I do not share" (Shiflett'• emphasis). Shiflett had been playing by the rules and had thought that all candidates would be properly screened and chosen before a public endorsement would be made. And there had been other candi· dates besides Debra Danburg. 0 1 saw a gay candidate, Don McCrory, and a pro-gay candidate, Peter Armato­who has an extensive background in help. ing gay rights-and a pro-gay person, Richard Petronella. And I thought, 'Why alienate our constituency?' "I was not against Debra Dan burg until Debra personally pissed me off," Shiflett said. "I got tired of her trying to harangue me into an endorsement of her. I resented trying to be pushed into a position." But due to the Bagneris/ Shiflett cam­paign, Danburg oaw that she could push elsewhere, and she was right. Shiflett then wondered what he was doing at the Jlelm of an organization he did not truly repres· ent. "I resigned the GPC because I did not have the support of the board of directors," Shiflett said angrily, " and they deliber­ately made a decision contrary to an agreement I was asked to make with them regarding the endorsement of candidates in the name of the caucus. "And that was all created out of a power play going on in the District 79 race where the D.emocratic Party was manipulating the different factions within the caucus and taking advantage of a split" Shiflett said. "And that was the straw that broke the camel'• back. . "I think the J?hilosophy over resigning is much more important than just that event," he continued. "We now had Demo­cratic Party forcee wanting that bloc vote in their camp._And this is the first example that I can thmk of where outside forces were making a de~ibe~ate attempt to co-op that support-which 10 what politics is all about-gaining support. ''But the way it w!ls go.ne about through the District 79 race mfunated me, because if our community is going to support some­body or some political force, I think it should be with our full knowledge. We should be consulted. We should make that decision consciously after a consensus of opinion is reached. • "What wli.8 happening is that we had "(The GPC) might be a dinosaur by February. " Democratic Party candidates trying to gamer that support without asking for our input and assuming that it was there. "And when I chose to stand up to these people (Danburg endorsers) and say, 'I don't think that's right,' I had been made wrong," Shiflett continued, "because Larry and I weren't getting along, and the caucus was somewhat factionalized. It was easy for this force to manipulate the disenfranchised people within the caucus away from me and create the split, because we were in a vulnerable Position. "We were weak," Shiflett said sadly. "We were fighting among ourselves. It was a textbook case of how power is trans· ferred. You find an Achilles' heel and you go in for all you can get." So Shiflett resigned. Hie vice president Lee Harrington took over the reins and served out Shiflett'• term until Harrington had a term of hie own. Then Bagnerie finally won hie bid for the GPC presidency in 1982. uwe're not going at each other at all ," Shiflett said of hie relationship with Bag­neris today. 0 We just don't talk to each other very much. We don't see each other. We don't have much in common. I've helped him out everytime he's called. I've never said 'no' to him." But the campaign with Bagneris, the Danburg incident and his subsequent resignation from the GPC continue to haunt Shiflett, as if a mistake was made somewhere back there that has sent the caucus and the community on a palitical spiral downwards. Today, the GPC'e political clout could be questioned when the next election comes around, Shiflett feels. He also thinks that today the GPC is weak in representing the community. ''The perception I have from the people in the community about the GPC is that if you disagree with them, you're wrong," Shiflett said, "instead of being different, with your ideas being included as possible general ideas that could be thought about and included later. And that is essentially the beginning of a propaganda machine for ideas to be e:ccluMd. ''They now interpret a difference of opin· ion as a division of opinion," he continued. "Just because you disagree doesn't mean that you're any less credible or less worthy in your point of view." Shiflett brought hie idea into sharper focus by concentrating on the recent Council·at·Large race wherein the victor, Anthony Hall, challenged the GPC­endorsed candidate, Nikki Van Hight­ower. Shiflett feels that both candidates could have served the community admira· bly and thatitwasamietakeon the part of the caucu IQ fevor on• and disoount the other. "W~ haue a political organization that is deferred UJ out of laziness ... " What do you do? "You take a Jot of people into the Gay Political Caucus and you ask them, 'Why are you saying this, when you know it's not true.' ''There's no way they aoJd this com.mun· ity by the evidence of(Hall'e election) that gay unity was what we sacrificed because of a vote for Anthony Hall. when the facts stood for gay rights," Shiflett added. "It is that simple. The gay community is not dumb. ''The gay community leaders need to make the community at large understand that we are, in fact, bloc voting, even if we do differ on one or two races. And we are not sacrificing the bloc vote if we choose to differ. We've already proven our bloc vote." What concerns Shiflett is the perception future candidates may have of the GPC'e political pursuasiveness. "You only receive credibility in a politi· cal arena by promising to deliver som~ thing. And when you define that something, you'd better deliver it. If you say you're going to deliver lOOpercentand you only deliver 90, next time around they question you. And that's the problem that has happened with this election. "And next time, it's going to be one of our own people running against somebody for City Council and then what are we going to do when that incumbent is a good person?" Shiflett asked. "Or we have three of our best friends running against each other for mayor. What are we going to do? "We'd better start learning from our experience," Shiflett advised. "It's okay to recommend one or more candidates when they support our community." The division the HallJ Hightower race caused within the community is indicative of a burned out bridge between the GPC and the people it represents, Shiflett feels. Part of this Jack of communication could have occured when the feminists within the GPC chose to push Nikki Van Hight· ower into the GPC endorsement, despite the recommendation from the screening committee that the caucus endorse Anthony Hall, a direction that led away from the basic gay rights issue and right into the feminist camp Shiflett feels might hamper the caucus as a whole. "The gay rights agenda was beginning to lose its foothold aa the number one priority because of the incre8.8ing influ· ence of feminist issues/' he said. "And that's not to say that a gay rights organi. zation should not be ooncerned with femi· nist issues, it just means that a gay rights erganization like the GPC should focus on those purpose statements that were in the bylaws and in the articles of incorporation and should aee•rt them The gay rights continued page 8 8 MONTROSE VOICE I DEC. 9, 1983 Former GPC Pres. Cites 1980 as His Year of Disillusionment from page 7 agenda should be our first priority. ''When that starts to go down to second notch, third notch and fourth notch," he reasoned, "people start questioning who's in control and what are they up to. And that has continued to happen. "We had an errosion of gay rights as our first priority," he said. "There are plenty of women's organizations that we can par· ticipate in that were meant to help the feminist cauRe. We can coalesce with those organizations and get something in return. And I haven't seen that happen," he added Shiflett feels that the GPC (ailed to rec­OJ; rnize Hall ' ~ popularity within the com· munity. and their endorsement of Hightower backfired. "One of the problems we have in the community at large is that we don't have a mechanism to gain a consensus of opin­ion. We have a political organization that is deferred to by the constituents out of laziness, out of want and out of trust from previous record. But I think that recently more constituents are asking 'why' to the GPC about some of their decisions and actions, and they're not getting satisfac­tory answers "There's not a willingness to communi­cate," he continued. "There's a tendency to continue on a separate agenda and call that unity. There'aadifferenceinaunified uoice with several people participating and one person speaking and calling it unity "Right now," he added, "we're suffering from some type of political myopia." But this Rhort-sightedness will not deter the office seekers from obtaining what they want from the community, Shiflett feels, with or without the GPC, as evi· denced by Hall's victory. "Those politicians downtown have con­stituent support that they have developed on their own," he said. "They can find out what the gay community needs and wants and how to get it done the quickest and the easiest way and without going through our political organization." So where does the GPC stand today? What is its future? Shiflett thinks it could be on its way to a calvary of its own making-void of people to folJow in Bagneris' stepe when he steps down early next year-void of monetary support that sees it sinking in a sea of red ink-void of community support when the community wants to be heard. Even with the political aspirations of longtime GPC activist Ray Hill, a man ~:t'n;ea~ d'~cs~~~::,,"~ -:0h): next step, the caucus may be on its way ou.~i think Ray Hill could win the presid· ency very easily, because he's very popu­lar among the attending mem'bt:rs," Shiflett oaid. "My concern about that ts he is not considered popular among the majority o( the gay community and-God love him-he deserves a lot of credit. But there's a right place and a right time for everybody, and I don't think the presid­ency would be the best place for him. I don't know that he'll really make the run. "But if Ray Hill i.o elected president o( the GPC, it will-in reality-release anyb­ody who is desirous of working within the gay political oystem from any loyalty to the caucus" he continued. "It will give them permfsaion to go orga~e their ow~ organization. becau~e Ray 18 not consi­dered enough estabhshment-oriented. Shiflett paused for a moment, then added, ''That must hurt Ray to hear that, as much as he's given to the commumty. But Ray needs to realize his own limits· tions and put himself where he's best used-in an activist role. "We need the GPC, and if Ray's the only one who'• going to be holding it together, then oo be it " Shiflett oaid. "But the input ]"m getting from the community at large is not good about Ray being president." But regardleaa of who is elected, the next pI'l!aident will have to help recoup the "We'ue played the game of pclitics with "We need to trust each other more." mirrors . ., financial losses from the preceding angry with one another because we administrations. differ," he added. "That's what's so wond- "There'a going to be a change ofleader· erful about the group-its open· ship in February, but there's not that mindedness-its maturity." He smiled. many people running to take over an "Maturity is what it is." organization that io in debt that much. th!'~n~~;r 1t:i~Ut~::: ::::,i,,,~~~Y~ ~1Z! "It could," Shiflett said, "of its own and-jumping back to his political accord, go away. It might be a dinosaur by interest-fondly recalls his early days February." with the GPC when he and Ray Hill Then sympathetically he added, "We instrumented a town meeting wherein all cannot let that image and that clout and members of the community gathered to that reputation go down the tubes. We form some semblance of unity-a dream have a responsibility to step in.And that's for Houston he's leaving behind when he not to say create a rival group. heada for San Francisco next month. "If we have leadership, we will go on. "We brought in acoalition ofpeoplewho There's no reason to create a new GPC if were not necessarily political but who we can salvage it. Absolutely not! If we wanted to beincluded," hesaidofhistown wanted to do that, we would have done meeting experience. "And if we reaHy that years ago. want our political organization to be as "But what I think's going to happen is strong as it can be, we'd invite the presi· that another group that wants to be effec· dents of KS/ AIDS, the Dianas, EPAH, tive is going to create itself anyway and Mardi Gras Madness or whomever and sit have a desire to do something positive." down and come up with an agenda and Such a group did form after Shiflett have some community discussions about resigned from the GPC in 1980-a group their issues. Shiflett and the members who left with "I don't think we know what our com­him created out of a sense of community- munity wants," he added. "We've played CHE: Citizens for Human Equality. the game of politics with mirrors. We've ''There were a lot who left the caucus been talking to ourselves, and factional­with me," Shiflett said, "and we wanted to ism is perpetuating itself. stay involved in community affairs, not "Weneedtohaveanothertownmeeting. necessarily political. We spent six months I think it's very important now to sit down discussing the community needs and and talk about an agenda for the next few found the need for an isau~action group, years/' he said emphatically, remember­the lobbying arm of what the caucus really ing the agenda he helped create at his first wasn't doing. town meeting and one to which he adhered "But we really didn't want to be just gay to throughouthi.opresidencyoftheGPC-rights oriented," he said. an issue he returned to, perhaps because Since its incorporation in January of he sees its formation as one of his major '81, CHE has been involved in, to name a contributions as a political leader and few areas, fundraising for the 21.06 i88ue, does not want to see it die. ma88 transit issues, tax referendum and "And the community is ripe-very property tax issues, the controvers~al con- ripe-for a Political Action Committee vention center issue and a fundr8lser for organization. It just makes sense. It's the the Montrose Clinic. According to Shiflett., next logical step. Those quantum leaps we the group was also a catalyst in the com- have been doing for years on end-this mumty's response to the AIDS crisis will continue it. It could be the thing that "We are dedicated to serving the com· keeps our integrity in tsct at City Hall in munity and supporting organizations light of the controversy that occurred over that need support," Shiflett said. "And we• the Hightower/ Hall race. perceive ourselves as being on the cutting ''Then politics is a process by which peo­edge of some of the most significant issues pie help people, and if the caucus is going in the community." to be the organization that does that, it Sbinett io idealistic about CHE, of needs to help people, and that means all whichheispresident,becauseitisaforum organizations and groups that have an wherein any idea can be discu88ed, and a interest consensus of opinion is not necessary to "Andsomeofthosethingsarecertainly achieve action for the benefit of the com· conflicting, I agree, but we need an organi­munity. zation to sort that out before we go down- "Each month we have a discu88ion on town and start falling all over ourselves.'' an issue. And it's where anybody of any Shiflett paused for a moment, then philosophy can come and talk about any· added .. butnotquiteseeingtherainbow, "I thing and not be criticized for it, because 1ust WlSh we could acknowledge our wea· CHE doesn't stand for a particular philo- kn eases and support each other's sophy or a particular party-anything etrengtho and sit down and diocuss thing"' likethat-it'sanopenforum. Wedon'tget in a community discussion group with a~ "We're destroying ourselues by not sitting down and talking with one another." common agenda. But it's going to have to be in a different tone than it has been in the last few years. ''We need to trust each other more and be willing to discuss that issue and be willing to acknowledge to one another the mis­takes we have been responsible for as indi­viduals and make the necessary apologies." But Shiflett is concerned about who will be the person-the leader-who will pull the community together in this time of diversity. "I think a vacuum hae been created by people like myself not taking the time to reach out to others and get them prepared for the kind of responsibilities I have taken on. We, as leaders, get too busy and just don't spend the time planning for other people to follow us. And that's a shortcoming ofuo all that we need to start paying attention to a lot more, because.th.e movement is getting much more sophisti­cated and diverse. "But how can you groom leaders who are not willing to come out of the closet and be up front like I have been?" Shiflett asked. "I don't advocate that people sacrifice their persona] lives when they're not wil­ling to and not ready to. I think they need to think about doing tt. I'm a very strong advocate of that. Bui I would hatetothink that this community cannot come up with Jeaders. "Ray Hill has always said that when a community needed a leader, someone has always come up through the ranks. It's becoming hard to fill shoes like Larry Bag­neris, Debra Dan burg and Steve Shiflett. You just don't develop that overnight." Understandably, Shiflett is proud of his accomplishments for Houston's gay com­munity. He's roared a lot. He's fought a lot. He's bitten and he's been bitten back. Now he's bailing out-with his ego in tacl "Ego gratification is a large part of being involved in politics," he said. ''That's on top o( the tsble in any highly visible job. But using your ego to com­promise a community's standing or direc· tion is when ego get.a out of hand and needs to be managed. And I've had to be called down on that a couple of times, and I think a lot of people in the community wiJI agree with that for sure." But Shiflett still gropes to understand why some members of the community dis­like him so intensely-why the image he is leaving behind in Houston is not the crys­tal clear Don Quixote image he has of him· •• 1r ''They (my adversaries) try to project onto me their personal self-intereet­attempt to cover upthatself·interest-and ~rt\ confusing &.heir desire to gain power 1and controJ wiU. m! d.eei.re to hay! influ- ence and strive for success. And control· ling indicates to me a desire to make people do things against their will. lnflu· ence means including people and getting them to go along with you and attaining your goals without oppression. ''The people who continue to critize me are people who've heard something from somebody else-from somebody else. And that's a fauJtoCmine, too, that we continue to take a second source ofinfortnation and use it as fact and then create doubt and distrust. "We're destroying ourselves," he said sadly, "by not sitting down and talking with one another." So even though Shiflett is on his way out, after having his finger on the pulse of our community for over eight years, delighting some-distressing others-one can't help but feel that he will take with him the concerns of Houston's gay com­munity which have dominated his life. It will be hard to let go. You can see it in his face. "The 'thank you 's' I've gotten the last few weeks when people have realized that I was going have just been overwhelm· ing," he said. "I've left the bar many nights with teals in my eyes thinking what's it going to be Jike when I don't know anybody?" - As his last farewell, it would only be appropriate to quote his first-the fin al paragraph from his letter ofresignation to Houston's Gay Political Caucus-the let· ter he penned in 198,IJ that still speaks to us today: "/ would /i.ke to extend my sincere thanks to the Houston gay community for giving me the opportunity to serve as their leader and spokesperson in the unending struggle for civil and humanitarian rights. "The battle, however, is far from won. "We all must continue to pull together if we are to realize a just and honorabk con· clusion i.n the struggle for freedom to be unfettered, f ult-ti.me participants in a dem· ocratically free society. Spirits! Your Best Holiday Gift Value! Enjoy Problem­Free Shopping (no size/color/style doubts) GIVE THE GIFT THEY WON'T RETURN Complete spirits gifts selections 1402 Welch at Waugh Call 529-9964, We Deliver Miike Waugh Drive Liquor Your ONE STOP Shop for ALL Your Holiday Party Need•. • AU. BRANDS ICE COLD KEG BEER• ~-~~ AM/PM SHIFT EARN OVER $300 WEEKLY Join the hottest radio promotion to ever run in the Houston area. We need 50 people in our promotional office with pleasant personalities and voice. No experience neces­sary. We will train. Our office has a cheerful. comfortable atmosphere. Plus cash bonus daily. Guys, girls. homemakers welcome. HIRING NOW. Apply in person 10am-3pm or 5pm-7pm every Monday thru Satur­day. 2727 Kirby Dr .. suite 203 (on bus route) DEC. 9, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 SPANISH FLOWER ~=--­ © -. RESTAURANT rt» @. :2) © TREAT A FRIEND FREE NACHOS «J 3921 N. Main 869-1706 with your choice Lunch Dinner FELIZ NAVIDAD A TASTE OF MEXIC0-24 HOURS DAILY THIS COUPON GOOD THROUGH 12-31-& closed Tuesday 10pm; re-open \\led . 1oam © ~ "@ © ~ ~~~~~~fti,~ VENTURE-N, 2923 MAIN ST. HOUSTON Open Monday-Friday at 4pm Happy Hour till 7pm Saturday & Sunday Booze/Beer Busts from 3pm Tuesday & Thursday Beer Bust with open pool table, 9pm-2am Christmas Lighting, Sunday, Dec. 11 at 5pm ... Yea, Party! 10 MONTROSE VOICE I DEC. 9, 1983 Are Gay People Chewing Up Their Leaders? Disturbed Peace By Brian McNaught There are too damn few gay men and women who have put themselves on the line for us to allow one of the better ones to leave the scenewithoutan overdue"thank you." Steve Endean, the executive director of the Gay Rights National Lobby, has announced that he will leave the Lobby within the next few months. He does so with ~ome bitterness, to which he is entitled. He also does so with some peace, for which I am pleai;ed There are numerous versions of the story which led to Endean's decision to leave GRNL, none of which concern me at this point. Nor am I presently concerned as to whether or not his departure is "good'' for the community. I am more con­cerned that the move is good for Steve Endean and concerned that he not depart without someone publicly calling atten­tion to his contributions to our lives Steve Endean has given hiH entire adult 1i£e to lobbying for gay rights, first in Min­nesota where he earned himself a reputa­ti n of professionalism and hard work, and then in the United States Congress where he brought class and respect to our pret;ence on the Hill. In his many years of work, St.eve has educated thousands of gay men and women acros6 the country on the int; and outti of political strategizing, educated hundreds of legislators on the legitimacy of gay civil rights and been an articulate Rpoketiperson in the press on the JStiUes that gay men and women face on a daily basis. Endean was a primary reason why many gay men and women decided to get involved in the movement, insofar as they saw in him a maturity and sophisti­cation they had not often seen in gay lead­ers Perhaps it was time for Steve Endean to move on. as his critics insisted. If this is so, we can only hope that his next endeavor will appropriately tap his many skills, and that he will continue to share his insights with gay men and women who recognize the need for poHtical involvement. We also can hope that Steve Endean never regrets the time and energy he gave to the com­munity above and beyond that required by his contract, and that the community will always appreciate his commitment to us. Just as the community responded so brilliantly to Rep. Gerry Studds in hi~ hours of anguish. I encourage you to write Steve Endean, in care of the Gay Rights National Lobby, P.O. Box 1892, Washing­ton, D.C. 20013, and say "thank you and good luck in your next endeavor." For as long as I have been involved in the gay movement, I have heard it said that the community wilJ chew up and spit out its leaders. We have all seen it happen over and over again. Our tendency to do so does not indicate that we are less humane or gracious than other people. It suggests to me that we are perhaps desperate for change, a little presumptuous and a wee bit homophobic. We often say "thank you" when it's too late, such as at the person's funeral or departure from town or our organizations. A little encouragement can go a long, long way. People who lead our organiza­tions or edit our newspapers or run for office as openly gay individuals are under far more stress than their salaries com· pensate. They often sacrifice a home life and career options because of their com· mitment to the community. They do so believing that il will make a difference and hoping that gay men and women will care. Yet, the mail and telephone calls they receive are often threatening mes­sages from anonymous people. Many times these heroes of the move­ment lie in bed at night wondering if it's all worth the effort. Most of them know they could be making more money, have more vacation, enjoy more of a private life and have far fewer headaches if they left their movement work and stepped into the public marketplace. Getting their names in the paper or appearing on the.Donahue Show was perhaps fun in the beginning, but il Josee its appeal. especially knowing that every appearance is bound to gener· ate a new wave of death threats. Sometimes I think people are afraid to acknowledge the sacrifices made by oth· ers, because it might make them feel guilty for not being more active themselves. Other people may fear acknowledging the accomplishment of a gay leader because they think it would diminish their power and make their relationship unequal. Some people, I suspect, don't thank or compliment a leader in the movement because they don't think a homosexual should be allowed to get a "swelled head," either because they politically oppose the idea of individual leadership, or they are simply homophobic. These fears are unrealistic. Nearly every gay man of woman I have met is the last 10 years who is working full or part time in the movement lights up when you take a moment to say "I want you to know how much I appreciate what you are doing for us a11." They smile with gratitude because they rarely hear it, and in saying it, I feel no less active, powerful or secure. This holiday season, as we reca11 how cease fires are negotiated throughout the war-torn world in respect of religious observances, I suggest a cease fire among warring political factions within the gay community and an extension of gratitude to all those people who give themselves to us. In addition to Steve Endean, I encour· age you to write: Ginny Apuzzo, Executive Director of the National Gay Task Force, 80 Fifth Avenue, New York, N.Y. 10011; Larry Bush, political columnist and repor· ter, 410 11th Street, NE. Suite 13, Washington, D.C. 20002; David Good· stein, publisher of The Advocate, 1730 South Amphlelt. Suite 225, San Mateo, Now ... Calif. 94402; Jim Kepner, director of the National Gay Archives, Box 38100, Los Angeles, Calif. 90038; Rev. Troy Perry, founder of the Metropo1itcan Community Church, 5.'lOO Santa Monica Boulevard, Suite 304, Los Angeles, Calif. 90029. The directors of your local political and service organizations and the editors and publishers of your local newspapers would also be delightfully surprised to hear from you, especially if you have never politi­cally or socially seen eye to eye in the past. A simple "thank you for your efforts" will give a major boost to them and enable you to feel that you have not allowed one more dedicated person to leave the scene with· out acknowledging his or her commit· ment J9i3by Brta-;;_ McNa°ught, who lives-in Massachusetts. Ride in Widebody Comfort to Los Angeles ... EASTERN'S L-1011 Wisperliner Departs Daily at 5:35 P.M. -o- Starting January 9 New Widebody Service to New Orleans, Miami and Las Vegas. Check our Affordable Fares! Call your travel agent or Eastern Airlines in Houston at 738-861 5. EASTERN, Houston's oldest and largest major carrier serving you since 1936. EASTERN America's favorite way to fly .. Letters GPC Thanks Copa, Numbers From the officers and board of directors of Gay Political Caucus The officers and the board of directors of the Houston Gay Po1itical Caucus would like to publicly thank the owners, staff and management of both the Copa and Numbers Disco for hosting the GPC Elec­tion Centrals during the last municipal election season. The contributions received from both clubs helped greatly to defray the expenses incurred by the cau­cus during the elections. The caucus is pleased to be able to count on both discos for their continued moral and financial support. We are able to func­tion more easily because of the backing we receive from the business community. This backing is exemplified by the Copa and Numbers. GPC Member Wants Another to Stop Criticism of Group From Leslie Larson I've been involved with GPC for two years. During that time, I've seen Neil Isbin cri­ticize this organization incessantly. I've seen him behave in an insufferably smug, arrogant, disruptive manner consistently. What I haven't seen is Neil lsbin doing any work in this organization. Frankly. l'm tired of his smug, cynical attitude. His letter to the VOICE regarding the "desperate negativity" of Nikki Van Hightower's run-off campaign is further evidence of his willingness to mouth-off inappropriately. He refers to Nikki's "strange coalition," a term I personalJy resent as I'm sure do the rest of the people who spent their time on this campaign. Who is strange, Neil? Gays? Feminists? The Sierra Club? As to his personal attack on Shari Val­cnHne, Jet me remind Mr. Isbin that she is an active worker in this caucus, and she is definitely not a racist, nor is Nikki. Nor is anyone else who was involved with that campaign. Are we not allowed to criticize black elected officials without being labeled racist? It was inappropriate for the mayor to endorse a candidate in that race. That's the message the so-called racist ad was intended to convey. And there are many people who feel that she made a mistake, many of whom are-or, at least were­Whitmire supporters. I know I'm not alone when I invite Neil Isbin to either start participating in this caucus or stop critizing the people who do work. ~ The Christmas * Season is here again! Beautiful Virginia Christmas Trees by LAN~r comer Holcombe & Greenbriar 10am-1[pm ~ Delivery Available ._ -r-529-0027 & 520-6069~ DWI CRIMINAL DEFENSE PERSONAL INJURY FAMILY LAW FREE CONSULTATION JOHN PAUL BARNICH ATTORNEY AT LAW 3317 MONTROSE, SUITE 318 1713) 523-5006 DEC. 9, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 .&/Yl~ 0 "'QF~wp~~ * LP's * EP's * T-Shirts * BUITONS *IMPORTS* ETC. Don't buy until you check our prices on "Top IO" and most new releases Reg. retail 899 OUR PRICE 699 Come in and Face the Music 2024 Westheimer-next to Academy-520-8800 POPULAR WEST COAST MUSICAL COMEDY TEAM GALA RETURN ENGAGEMENT DECEMBER 13-23 -.... ... ~ ..... , HI ... __••.,••,. ••._ 2702 Klrby-524-6272 DfnnerMon-Th"5 6-11 Fri & Sot 6-12 ~seNOtlons requested Shows 9:30, 11, 12:30 JOIN US WITH SAMANTHA SAMUELS FOA NEW YEAR'S f>IE 12 MONTROSE VOICE I DEC. 9, 1983 Fosse's 'Star 80' is Good but Unpleasant Film Films ~[. ~!~v:r!'!T.:!iation Wire Service Dorothy Stratten (36-24-36) was the one right thing Paul Snider ever clid in his life. Her flaw was her loyalty, not having the sense to dump him once he'd done all he could for her-and it proved to be a fatal flaw. Star 80 is Bob Fosse's docu.-drama about the relationship between Dorothy and Paul-from their 1978 meeting at the Van­couver (B.C.) Dairy Queen where she worked as a high school senior, through his 1980 murder-suicide when she finally tried to divorce him. In between, it's a feature-length com­mercial for Playboy, with Cliff Robertson playing Hugh Hefner playing God as a father figure in pajamas. His mansion is a place where deals are magically made between nice people, and no one so much as thinks an impure thoughL As for the magazine, " Playboy's motto is 'the girl next door ' They look for girls (sic) that are wholesome and fresh and young and naive." It sounds like bullshit but appears to be true in the case of Stratten, the only one taken in by Snider's sleazoid charm. Her mother (Carroll Baker) laughs when she meets him, and Hef tells Dorothy, "He's got the personality of a pimp." She tries to pass it off as the way he used to dress, because by then Snider's stopped dressing like a Vancouver pimp and taken on the unage of a Loa Angeles pimp. Snider'e a fuck-up, a small timehustler l promoter whose marriage to the star­bound "Playmate of the Year" only advances him from staging wet t-shirt contest.A for horny guys to staging wet Jockey short contests for horny house­wives (both to the tune of the Village Peo­ple's "YMCA"). Having made the Playboy connection the Mercedes he buys with her money). They get hitched, but he's constantly inse­cure. Not that she gives him cause to be, but if ever an inferiority complex was mer­ited, it's his. Her New York affair with a fictionalized version of Peter Bogdanovich gives Strat­ten the strength to leave Snider and sel)ds him over the edge. By flashing forward, backward and sideways, FoBSe telegraphs the ending to anyone who may not know what to expect. To his credit, he makes it suspenseful when it comes around for real, making us want to scream "Run for the door!" like in a Grade Z horror flick. Otherwise Fosse's direction is not up to the inspired standard of All that Jazz or even Cabaret. From someone else, the cal­culated cutting and pasting might be impressive, but for Fosse it's a backwad step. He fills the screen with more beauti­ful women than anyone since Busby Ber­keley; but even though feminists may rightly cry "Exploitation!" the atmos· phere is surprisingly sterile, coming from the director who put "divine decadence" into the vocabulary. Mariel Hemiongway gives a reasonable performance as Stratten; but the part as written calls mostly for posing and whin­ing, an unattractive combination. Eric Roberts has the meatier role as Snider, and I've never seen such an appealing man make himself so unappealing. He's frighteningly believable and even pumps himself up to where he almost resembles his "King of the Gypsies" poster. ~~g~!ri:!~·S'u!n~g,~r(U:~ce~hlp1f:te ~~ Markl Hemmmgway does a stint as a Playboy Bunny on her way to stardom With his demonstrated skill at captur· ing a showbiz milieu and Sven Nykviston hand to photograph it for him, we might have expected Bob Fo88e to make Star 80 something more than just a good, unplea­sant film. TIMES ARE A CHANGING AND SO .1~ ~-~ 60611«~ 2327 Grant at Fairview 528-8342 BEGINNING MONDAY, DEC. 19 NU MUSIC and guest bartenders-watch our ad for your favorite one Happy Hour Daily 12pm-6pm Krazee Hour Nitely 9pm-10pm or 11 on ... Tuesday 75¢ Well Drinks & Beer 9pm-2am Wednesday 2-for-1 Well Drinks 9pm-midnight Navy Still Trying to Unload Its Gays The verdict's in on that Navy commander who waa accused of sodomy with a crew­man, report.e the ASBociated Press, and the outcome is what was more or less expected throughout the gay community. Cmdr. Gerald M. Vanderwier, 42, was dismissed from the service and ordered to come up with $1 ,200 in back pay. He got off light-he could have received up to 15 years in prison and been forced to relin ­quish his benefits and all of his back pay. But since he had been in the service for over 19 years, Capt. Maitland G. Freed, the court-martial judge, felt he let him off easy. Petty Officer 3rd Class John E. Rain· ville, the hospital corpsman who was the other party in the oral sex act that led to Vanderwier's conviction, was released from the Navy with an honorable dis­charge since he was granted immunity from prosecution. All this is nothing new for the Navy. In 1983, 1,167 men were kicked out for home>­• exuality. In 1982, the Navy unloaded 918 gays, including 17 officers. National Gay Task Force Seeking Leaders The Nominating Committee of the National Gay Task Force Board of Direc­tors is seeking experienced gay leaders from around the country for consideration as candidates for election to the Board, reports the NGTF newsletter. Prime criteria are expertise in and/ or willingness to do fundraiaing and a proven leadership role with a gay consti­tuency. Interested persons should call or write NGTF (80th Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10011; (212) 741-5800) prior to January 31, 1984. Foster Homes Won't Accept AIDS Baby ~re 2!';'\:.~~~~~~\:,0n 8w7~: Serv;ce MIAMI-Despite pleas from officials of the Florida Department of Health and Rehabilitation Services (HRS), almost 20 foster homes have refused to take a 14- month-old girl suffering from AIDS. The infant, who weighs lees than 10 pounds, is thought to have oontracted the disease from her mother, a Haitian immi­grant. The mother perished from the dis­ease three weeks ago, and the father abandoned the child. Meanwhile, Jackson Memorial Hospital is in need of the $437 room, and the state wants to stop the payments, now amount­ing to $57,684 for the baby's 132-day stay. "We've tried everything, we've run out of alternatives," said Jay Kassack with HRS. "She really has nobody." If foster parents were found, they would have to learn to give the infant special care for the next three years, the maxi· mum life expectancy given by the attend­ing physicians. The little airl is but one of an estimated 100 children in the country who have AIDS. Lansing Puts Prostitutes Back on Streets Lansing, Michigan, has decided to put its prostitutes back on the streets thi~ winter shoveling snow, reports the DetrOlt News. First-time offenders will be diverted to a community service program which will include snow removal and cleaning up yards for the elderly. Lansing Mayor Terry McKanesays he's taking the step because the court.e are glut· ted with prostitution caeee Dec. 9, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 13 ~ • GE NER A L REPAIR • AUTO INJ<O>W S IH! <O>WDINJGI STA.A TRICK () -i :0 0 z () -i. c z m C: "O . )> :ii () 0 z 0 =t 0z * Transmission Service s24ss ~ 1411 TAFT-522-2190 1- • AUTOMATIC TRANSMISSION • ;;t 2700 ALBANY 523-4084 A PARTY Friday, December 16 9pm til ?? DJ David Oleson-NO COVER Thursdays in December ALL 'gitt g:::~= 2 1 TOP SH~'iE~IQUORS FOR 9pm til 2am 14 MONTROSE VOICE / DEC. 9 , 1983 New books from A L y s 0 N PUBLICATIONS C THE MOVIE LOVER, by Richard Friedel, $7.00. The entertaining commg-out story of Burton Raider, who is so elegant that as a child be reads Vogue in his playpen. ''The writing is fresh and crisp, the humor often hilarious," writes the L.A. Times. ''The funniest gay novel of the year," says Christopher Street 0 ONE TEENAGER IN TEN: Wri tings by gay and lesbian youth, edited by Ann Heron, $4.00. One teenager in ten is gay; here, twenty-six young ..people tell their stories~ of comm.g to term!' with being different, of the decision how - and whether - to tell friends and parents, and what the consequences were D THE BUTTERSCOTCH PRINCE, by Richard Hall, $5.00. When Cor­dell's best fnend and ex-lover is murdered, the only clue is one that the police seem to consider too kinky to follow up on. $o Cordell decides to track down the killer himseH - with results far different from what be had expected C ALL-AMERICAN BOYS, by Frank Mosca, $5.00. ''I've known that 1 was gay since I was thuteen_ Does that surprise you~ It didn't me. "So begins All-American Boys, the story 0£ a teenage love affau that should have been simple - but wasn't U CHINA HOUSE, by Vincent Lardo, $5.00. A gay gothic that has everything: two handsome lovers, a mysterious house on the hill, sounds m the night, and a father-son relationship that's closer than most. [) THE ALEXANDROS EXPEDITION, by Patricia Sitkin, $6.00. When Evan Talbot leaves on a mission to rescue an old schoolmate who has been imprisoned by fanatics in the Middle East, he doesn't realize that the tnp will also involve his own coming out and the discovery of who it is that he really loves. :::; DEATH TRICK, by Richard Steven<on, $6.00. Meet Don Strachey, a pnvate eye m the classic tradition but with one difference: he's gay TO ORDER Enclosed is $ ___ ; please send the books I've checked above. !Add Sl.00 postage when ordering just one book; if you order more than one, we'll pay postage.I U Charge my (circle one): Visa Mastercard acct no .. ------- expiration date: __ _ signature------------- address ---------------- cny state __ z1p ____ _ ALYSON PUBLICATIONS, Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton St., Boston, MA 02118 THE 1 I a• PLACE CHRISTMAS OPEN HOUSE FREE COUPONS, BEER, SNACKS, SOFT DRINKS AND GIFT CERTIFICATES SUNDAY DEC. 111:00PM 1307 FAIRVIEW 11 *I I! 5;;;:;4 11 ON 527-9866 • e • come see our new look downstairs BC Club Houston 2205 Fannin 659-4998 MEMBER CLUB BATH CHAIN Dining Room Hours Lunch 11:30 to 3 Mon.·Frl. Dinner 7 to 11 sun.· Thurs and 7 to midnight Fri. & sat Sunday Brunch noon to 3 Ring in the New Year at Baja's NEW YEAR'S EVE SPECTACULAR Starring Luisa Amaral-Smith 2 shows at 9:00 and 10:45 Saturday, December 31 New Year's Eve Package Includes Special Menu Dinner, Champagne & Party Favors­only $30 per person ror $10 door charge Includes champagne and party favorsJ watch for our 2 December Cabaret Shows starring Bubba and Bear Saturday, Dec.17, & Sat, Dec. 24 Baja's stiff has a few open dates In December avallable for holiday group parties DEC. 9, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 15 Love is in the Air Commentary By David Meunier "This is your head flight attendant Trudy speaking. We have an emergency. I repeat: We haue an emergency. One of our ste­wards has lost his gold neck chain!" It was every airline passenger's nightmare-cruising at 37,000 feet when a11 of a sudden disaster strikes! If you think cruising on the ground is tough, you should try it at this altitude. Piercing ear­aches because of fluctuating air pressure makes conversation almost impossible, not to mention airline meals which cause nausea. Plus, there's little privacy trying to shout across a retired school teacher from Ohio or winking at the object of your desire only to have him tum away for you to confront the cold stare of a business­man from Des Moines. Wait a minute! Let's backtrack to how this whole mess started. I was on my way home to Texas after a wonderful vacation in Key West. Origi­nally, I had decided to take the bus to the airport in Miami, but at the last minute a group of my friends had chipped in the difference so that I could fly. As Amy said, "Buses are so tacky, and they don't serve cocktails!" How could I refuse? I had my apprehensions about using Air Sunshine-Air-Sometimes, as the locals quaintly referred to it. But my mind was quickly put at ease when I learned it would be the popular Tea Dance flight, so named because it leaves Sunday at 8:15 p.m., right after the biggest Tea Dance on Key West as La-Te-De's is ending. You could still catch last minute sun, dance and drink and gather a few more addresses. It was a frantic scene at the airport, as cars screeched in at breakneck speeds deposit­ing disoriented and inebriated passengers at the last minute. I eyed the plane nervously. It wasn't even a jet. It was one of those two-engine prop numbers which had probably last seen service in World War II. The stewar­dess at the door looked like she was from the same era. It did not bolster my confi de nee. Once inside the plane, I was distracted from my misgivings by the frivolity of the crowd. It looked like it was going to be a fun flight. What Air Sunshine lacked in opulence was more than made up for in special features other airlines did not offer. Even though it was a small plane, it had two male flight attendants to meet our every need. They made a nice addition to Trudy, who turned out to be one campy old broad. Clint and Clark both had marvelous tans and looked stunning in their airline uniforms of navy blue tank tops and kelly green running shorts. Those bright and bold colors somehow didn't look as good on Trudy, but her constant mugging of Mae West made you love her never the less. I have always felt that airports and air­planes are such romantic places. I was hopeful that somewhere among the crowd Mr. Right would be seated. About three­fourths of the passengers were gay. The rest didn't seem to mind. I waited with great anticipation for my seatmate to arrive. Would it be the hot number in the violet Polo shirt? Perhaps that hunky blonde still wearing just his Speedo bathing suit? Unfortunately, it was neither. George was a middle-aged, heavy-set funeral home directqr from Dania. He imme­diately engaged me in conversation. "How far do you go?" he asked sugges­tively. "Only to Miami. Then I'm transferring to Pam Am for Houston," I replied curtly. "What a shame. How long is your lay­over?" He leered. I didn't like the way he put emphasis on lay. "Only 15 minutes," I lied. As I was pushing his hand off my knee for the third time, Trudy arrived to inform us that Au Sunshine provided free cock­tails. What a nice gesture, I thought. "It's to get your mind off this old wreck you're flying in," she roared. "Would it be possible to change seats?" I inquired. "Flying in the back always makes me airsick, ahd I wouldn't want to puke all over George here." "I'll see what I can do, hon," she prom­ised. George, in the meantime, was leaning halfway out into the aisle, giving me apprehensive looks. At least if I could be in Clark or Clint's section, the flight would be tolerable. Soon I was up front seated next to Lucy, a retired school teacher from Ohio. But at least I had an aisle seat. Just as I was establishing a rapport with Clint, the unthinkable happened. Trudy's voice crackled over the intercom: "This is an emergency. I repeat, an emer­gency. One of our flight attendants­Clark- has lost his gold neck chain!" Total chaos erupted. Screaming queens ran up and down the aisle. It was horrible! How could this be happening only 10 min­utes from Miami! A Gary Larson cartoon flashed in my mind-Fifi, the french poo­dle, saves the day by taking over the con­trols of a plunging airliner. But there was no french poodle on boar~! We were doomed! I knew I had to act quickly. If I could find Clark's neck chain, I could restore order. Plus, the hunk would be indebted to me for life. Everyone was searching frantically-even the pilot. (What was the pilot doing back here?) Clint led us in show tunes, while Trudy did Ethel Merman impressions. Then, like a miracle, I spot­ted it lying near one of the johns. A hugh cheer arose as I announced my find. Clark ran towards me. At last-love was in the air! As we embraced, I felt the plane drop­ping. "Oh, my God'" I screamed. "We're los­ing altitude!" "Of course," smiled Clark. "We're land­ing in Miami!" The restroom door sprung open, and we fell in. On the ground, as Trudy gave an interview to the assembled reporters, Clark and I had a passionate restroom romance Later. Amy called to ask how my flight went "Remember Erica Jong's book, Fear of Flying, that you promised to loan me?"' I said. "Well, I won't be needing it." Meunier is a free·lance u·riter lil·ing in Houston THESE GORGEOUS LEATHER SOFAS REI AIL FOR OVER s2000 WE'LL SELL THEM FOR s999 EUROPEAN STYLING SUBDUED ELEGANCE TOTAL COMFORT VJs1i1.·MastercOilrd Financing Available Lay1tw ay Vittal Sofa Italia Sofa Sunrlae Sofa LEATHER CENTER Designers & Builders Delivery AvailabJe FivP Year Warnt.nty 10175 Harwin # 102 981-5874 Monday 10-8 • Tuesd1&y·f"riday 10-6 • Salurday 10-6 (Browsing)· Sunday 12-6 16 MONTROSE VOICE I DEC. 9, 1983 Not Quite Priest, Not Quite Nobleman Commentary By Patrick Franklin Frederick William Serafino Austin Lewis Mary Rolfe will not disappear. His flam­boyant writing and even more flamboyant character have always branded him as a "minor" prosodist, and yet after many of his more highly regarded contemporaries have been relegated to the dusty corners of old libraries, Frederick Rolfe, "Baron Corvo," bursts forth every few years when a new group of avid readers discovers his florid soul and acid words. Rolfe was born in London on July 22, 1860, and died in Venice on Oct. 25, 1913. Between those dates, he managed to write 18 books, innumerable stories, dabble in several other arts and alienate anyone who came to him in friendship. He was a staunch Catholic who revelled in orthod­oxy and a socialist who hated conserva· tives. He indulged himself in making ur new and wonderful words, while writing in an antique style that is nearly undupli· eatable. He was born into a family that was at best "shabby genWle." His ancestors had founded a piano manufactury that fur­nished instruments to the royal family in George IIl's time, but had in following years come the full round to poverty once again. Rolfe never even had the satisfac­tion of calling the capital his home; eco­nomics forced a move to the provinces when he was very young. Nor could he claim the distinction of a university education. He says himself that '"all the education I ever had took place in third-Pate schools and terminated by my fourteenth birthday." All those elements combined to create a personality that simultaneously loved and hated the advantages it had been denied. Despite his lack of formal schooling, Rolfe found employment as a teacher in a provincial boy's school. He was regarded as eccentric even then, and his attach­ment to an obscure local saint, .. Little Saint Hugh," was thought strange. So was his depiction of another boy-saint, William or Norwich, in which he painted over 100 figures that hon a resemblance to the child, who in turn had an uncanny similarity with his own features. He somehow wheedled an appointment to the Scots' College in Rome, where he was to take up holy orders. His eccentrici­ties and abrasive personality mage him as Army Disallows Use of Umbrellas for Men Sex discrimination may lead to sniffles at the nation's army bases, reports the Los Angeles Times. The Pentagon brass has been mulling over whether GI's should be allowed to tote umbrellas in the rain. Their decree: " Bumbershoots are okay for female soldi­ers, but they're too wimpy for the guys." unpopular there as it had elsewhere, and he was soon ejected from the school. That turned him against his fellow Catholics, but he maintained his deep affection for the church. It was then that he took to signing his name "Fr. Rolfe," an ambigu­ous autograph that could be understood as "Father Rolfe" or "Friar Rolfe," as well as "Frederick." Back in England, he worked what in our own times would be called "confidence games." He assumed the title "Baron Corvo" and pretended to be a nobleman. Using the bogus title for entree, he drew funds from naivr d.cquaintances for ficti­tious proiects and lived by cadging meals and lodgings from kind-hearted friends. However, some of ltc>lfe's projects wer­en't bogus at all; they merely sounded that way to suspicious ears. He tried to raise lunds to finance underwater photo­graphy, something thought laughable at the time. Rolfe had become fascinated with the new art and pioneered some methods of camera work and film develop­ing. The underwater scheme never came to much. Hie writing was better accepted, if nar­rowly published. The Yellow Book, fam­ous for its Beardsley covers and associations with decadence, accepted several of his stories, and of all the short pieces in those volumes, Rolfe's tales stand up today as still interesting. He devised ways of telling Biblical tales as if they were pagan legends and also man­aged a turnabout that made tales of Romans and Greeks sound as if they were stories of the Saints. After gulling so many important people, he found it prudent, as well as cheaper, to move to Italy. There he continued his prac­tice of taking lodging wherever possible, often from unwilling but courteous hosts. He also found an outlet for his taste in boys in the street urchins of the city; one of them he called "Toto," and he collected his stories as Taks Toto Told Me. ar!~t:~: :~cli:a~~!k~ :~:Ui;11~~~ Rolfe took in Venice a nd elsewhere. He used their personalities as thinly-veiled gi rl• in his books; The Desire and Pursuit of the Whok, and Nicholas Crabbe. He continued his interests in painting and even built himself a boat with beautifully­painted sails so that he could travel the canals and lagoons of Venice. And he wrote. His fascination with the Borgias resulted in an extraordinary book, The Chronicks of the House of Bor­gia, which he frankly admitted to writing as a whitewash of a family for which he felt respect. The book recounts the family history from early beginnings in Spain through its 19th century descendants. The Borgia book fascinated some, infur­iated others. He did not limit himself to strict history, but made other comments along the way, such as his claim that the rightful ruler of England was Vittorio Emmanuele of Italy because of a tenuous connection with the deposed Stuarts. He TRAVEL CONSULTANTS lim&~lb ~~ru~ t'&~~ ~~lL ~~ru~tr&m ~~ ~~~tr&~~ ~~ ~@f!lru~tr&~~ e~ Special Texas Departure January 31, 1984 Call Bruce for Detarls Key West/ Ft. Lauderdale extensions available Houston phone 529-8464 Texas Toll Free 1-800-392-5193 used exotic words and spellings, insisting that the 0 Sistine" chapel was more prop­erly the ''Xystyne," and peppered his prose with terms such as "fumicables" for tobacco, "fylfot" for swastika, and so on. Rolfe might have described his life as "contortuplicated." The sheer effort of maintaining his precarious independence and self-esteem in face of continued pov­erty and disdain from critics took its toll. He died at the age of only 5.3 and was buried in a free plot in the cemetery in Venice. If his talent had been totally expended in cadging a living, he would have soon been forgotten. Buthisexquisitely-written prose still attracts readers. Its attraction is never enough to insure commercial suc­cess; The Modern Library published an edition of A History of the Borgias which NERf;?'POlJN GR ~ RGE GAY OWNED AND OPERATED 1901 TAFT (AT WEBSTER) 523-2794 remained on the list for only a few years. Alfred Knopf put out several luxurious edi­tions of his novels which couldn't quite stay in print. Sill, periodically, he becomes redisco­vered. A.J. Symonds renovated his image with "The Search for Corvo" in 1934. Broadway, in the 70s, produced Hadrian VII, a dramatized version of his best­known book. Biographies came out in 1971 and again in 1979. Toast his memory with a bottle of the Sicilian wine from which he drew his title. uBaron Corvo" was a fraud and an unprincipled rogue. But he was a writer of great talen t and a stylist of incomparable skill. Franklin, of Carmel, Calif., is the director of Stonewall Features. © 1983 Swnewall Features Syndicate. . . nne o·Kane patnc!~frney at Law neO'Kane PatriC!~fr!v at Law A ne o·Kane Patricia ne"y at Law Attor eO'Kane Patricia A~at i.aw AttOll\Yr neO'Kane patric!~fr! at LB"' 3212 Sm1tn. Suite 102 526-7911 Plan Now to Attend the Gay Press Association Southern Regional Conference January 27-29 Hotel Savoy Houston Workshops, Speeches, Entertainment ~~e:i~'?e/!/,:,,~oe~a~1~~[~n~ ~~~~r=).gp/~~~ Join your colleagues In Houston Also. for officials of gay organizations who are NOT In the gay media but who would like to learn how to better Influence the gay media. local and national. we'll have a special worl<shop To Henry McClurg, vice president GClf Press Association. 3317 Montrose #306. Houston. TX 77006 ~=Ais~~J1:':1~~~~n~~=~f~~6?11~1u~~~ addrt10nal ffpostmarkedaflerJan. 13) . I am In the gay media I work for the non-gay media I do not work In the media but would like to attend the workshop on influencing the gay medlO and other events of the conference. Address ________________ _ Phone(s) --------- - I am a member of the Gay Press Association ' I am NOT a member of the GClf Press Association (lfmlvlng Wi Houston by plane. tran or bus. let us kno.olya.w lmec:imlYolondVi.'9wllP'Ckyouup al the OfPO'I or depot ) When we recetVe your form. we·n send you a conference schedule and a t::.ochure on the ~ Hotel so you can make reservation~ (You do not have to stay at The Savc:lf to attend the conference.) The Savc:lf is within walking distance of several gay clubs. Addrtionally. busseo will be available tor loon of Montrose nightspots. Your registration fee will Include tickets for free and discounted admissions to savera l clubs. 99~ BREAKFAST SPECIAL EXTENDED THROUGH DECEMBER WITH THIS AD .. ____ serving Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner ____ ... ..._ ______ Or5d2e1r-s1 0to1 5G o _______. . ... ______ Open Weekdays 7am-11pm ______ _, Weekends ti/ Midnight ..._ _____S aSt. u&n dSauyn .S Buprepaekrf at1s/ t1 a0tp m9a m ______. .. Christmas Party Saturday, Dec. 17 Sunday Buffet just like spindletop YOU NEVER HIT A DRY HOLE IN A FIELD OF GUSHERS! STRIKE IT RICH EVERYDAY! Enjoy the Holiaays with us. Wednesday Steak Night Bartenders Christmas Show Friday, Dec. 23 HOURS Mon-Fri 10-2 Sal 7-2, Sun 12-2 HAPPY HOURS Mon-Fri 10-7. Sal 7-7 DEC. 9, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 17 Montrose Live Whatever Happened to the Boys from 'Bent'? By Billie Duncan It was more than a play. It was an event. And for some, it was an education-a hor· rifying education. Bent was the play, and it shpwed to sold· out houses every single night of its run in the spring of 1982 at Stages, 709 Franklin. Chris Kincade and Kent Johnson were the actors who played two gay men who met in a Nazi concentration camp and fell in love, while a11 around them death biJ· lowed and beckoned. People who saw the play have not for­gotten it. Nor have they forgotten the two excellent actors who brought the main characters to life for them. One of the ques­tions I am still asked is, "Whatever hap­pened to those boys who were in Bent? Are they doing anything now?" Well, now, Kent Johnson is with the Young Company at the Alley, and Chris Kincade is the lead singer with the Noo­dles. Kent has stuck with his acting career, appearing in pJays at Stages and Main Street Theatre, as well as doing the Hous­ton Shakespeare Festival. He appeared in two of University of Houston's Children's Festival plays, and even did a Gay Pride Week show with Houston Off-Broadway One of his more interesting roles was that of Merlin in Sir Dynadan and the Dragon. "It was a really lousy script I thought," said Kent. "There's nothing you ~~~ !>s~~:=~·~uation like that until you get Chris Kinkade Soon after that, he auditioned for the Young Company of the Alley and was hired for this season. He just finished a small role in The Dresser. Kent was very pleased to work with Tom Toner. "He's a great old man of the theatre. He's back in New York now. He makes more money doing TV commer­cials than theatre." On Decembver 16, Kent will appear in a workshop production of two one-act plays at the Alley with other members of the Young Company. "We're all frustrated because we're not doing more. They try to appease us with the workshops." But he said that he is very glad to get the experience and to work with the talent at the Alley. One thing that makes everything easier is the fact that he has ssomeone with which to share his ups and downs. During Bent, Kent met his co-mate (he was working on the set), and they've been together ever since. "He's not a theatre persOn by any means. He says he did it (worked on the set) because he wantd to find someone. He did." Kent thought for a moment and added, "Doing Bent helped me with my own com- 18 MONTROSE VOICE/ DEC 9, 1983 ing out process." mate professional, too. Behind that big There is a rumor that Bent might be laugh, there'• a big heart." revived with many of the same cast While he was out in Los Angeles, Chris members. That prospect is exciting to ran around with tapes of the Noodles and Kent, although he admitted, "It was rough tried to promote the band. He got some the first time. Bent became a real strain of very good responses. the emotions-especially working with One reason that Chris feels the band Chris. He's so intense.'' will make it is that they have a aoJid musi· Kent Johnson is not the only one who cal base. "Punk and Nu Wave-which is thinks that Chris Kincade is intense. Said old wave now-are just passing fashion. Chris of himself, "l'malivewirethat'snot Once the fashion is past, the band is fin. connected to anything." ished." After Bent, Chris did some dinner thea- The other four members of the band are tre work, but then he went back to one of Ben Boykin on bass, David Turner on gui· his favorite performance situations: sing· tar, Barnet Levinson on drums and Randy ing in a band. Jackson on keyboards. They all sing. heB!:e,.i:~hh:~~e~~~~ :f::t~:':l~!':i "Barnet is the heart and soul of the some popularity in Houston (but will band," said Chris. ''The noodle behind the remain nameless here). "They were a Noodles.Oneofthegreatestpleasuresl've bunch of coke-heads who were 80 tripped had in this town is getting to know hi'm." out on their own egos that the idea of a Describing Ben Boykin was a little more ~=iddc";:ri~d ,;~~"hl."ue:.,t~t~:.:~::~ghts," difficult. "H?w do you d"."cri~ Ben? He ¥ually~ Chris is a little more res- . ~::h•u:h:~ha'!:f:eS:: 1 ~~a1:~·~cC~~ ~~~e:h:~:e ~~%~ ;:n~~n1::,~~~t~ paused. HHe has his head in the clouds-sli ped and fell last July while the Noo- and feet are up there too. The guy h.~s a dh::. were playing the opening for UB40, little too much brams for this world. and he tore all the ligaments in his leg. About David Turner: "He knows how to Two operations later, it will still take make a guitar sing, dance, play the another year to heal. In the meantime, he rumba." had to slow down, and in slowing down, he And Randy? "He's our salesman. He's had the chance to sit and think about the guy with the joint at the end of rehear- ::'.':,';Yu~i~::~J:..'\f;"~"';~;i!!f~~e g~~~ sal. And the joke." off." And what does Chris think of Chris? "I Now he is doing much better. ''Things consider myself to be the eye of the hurri-are just starting to happen again." cane." One thing that happened r~tly is He is also an excellent lyricist. In fact, that he was chosen to be on "Star Search." all the members of the Noodles write The Noodles' agent submitted the band for songs. And they have some really incredi­an audition and, though the band did not hie oriainal material. make it, Chris was asked back to audition as an actor ":Star Search" flew him out to California where he acted with Susan Lucio (Erika form "All My Children"), whom he des­cribed aa "a sweet, family-oriented lady." Ed McMahon impressed Chris also. "He's very big. A big guy. The consum- The Noodles will be appearing in Mont­rose next at the Ale House for New Year's Eve. As for the rumor that Bent will be revived BOOn, Chris explained, "I would do anything to do that part again. It is one of the best roles ever written for an actor." 2 Blocks East of Kirby Suptrb pint Imh slylt drtsstr, with "Chicktn Coop" bRSt, 84" widt, 81" in height &ctplion•I <Rrvtd m•hog•ny tubulor ch1m1ng h•ll clcxk; signtd fr•nk Hmchtdt. Cir<• 1900: 8'3" in htighl o Duncan's Quick Notes If you want the answer to the question, "Where have all the hippies gone?" check out A Place in the Sun, 704 Fairview. Besides a used book store, a counseling service and a ltruggling women's music publishing company, the place offers the opportunity for single musicians to explore their art and for a small audience to enjoy it. The feeling is very blue jeaned and strictly love generation. Entertainers per­form just off the sidewalk in a courtyard the size of a breakfast nook on a stage set up on old plastic Bordan milk carriers. Over the stage is a wooden baton with obviously makeshift lighting. Seating is on wooden bleachers (wear jeans or watch out for splinters), and the background for the performers is a dusty window. The proprietors of this establishment are Gracie Lee and Lynn Herrick, who are definite throwbacks to the idea that love is the answer. To everything. They came up with the idea of supplying a stage for audience-hungry musicians, ~ Adam Fythe finds his "Place in the Sun" at 709 Fairview said Gracie, "because musician& need an opportunituy to have a place in the sun-a place to express their music, their art, their poetry." These two women aeem so genuinely concerned with people and with opening their hearts to the world, th atone wonders how long they will be able to continue doing whst they are doing. The problems of the world-such as paying bills-have a way of infringing on the lives of people like Gracie and Lynn, no matter how goOd their intentions are. Personally, I wish them the very best. In the same physical block as A Place in the Sun is the Ripcord, which is planning a rip-roaring show this coming Monday. Vince Jan is told me a couple of secrets about the show, so if! tell you, just don'tgo around and let everyone know. In other words, better not tell mama. Said Vince, "Maude (Richard Smith) is going leather. He's going to be 'Motorcy­cle Maude' from now on. And he will appear on atage with some the hottest men around , including Mr. Southwest Dummer." Hmm, coming out of the feather closet to the leather world? Or as Vince put it 0 Going from lace to lashes. And I don•i mean eyelashes." Boots Adams will be directing the show which will feature the talents of Tom Beck and the incomparable Danny Villa. Vince confirmed the rumor of last week that Clare Clitoris, Vickie Vagina and the Rev. Mother Christine will per­form. "We will also have the untraditional lighting of the Christmas candles," said Vince with a smile. That will be on Monday. On Tuesday, Private Live• continues its run. Actually, it was supposed to end this Tuesday, but the demand for tickets was ao great that the Pink Elephant had to extend the run for one more week. Perhaps you remember that Joe Watts, reviewer for the VOICE, is in Private Liue•, so Yours Truly reviewed the play. In turn, I am in Dogg'1 Hamlet, Cahoot'• Macbeth at Chocolate Bayou Theater ft•luring A Spectacular Collection of Antique Furnishings and Objects of Art from the River Oaks estate of HELLENE W. CHRISTIE togtlhtrwilh Fine Antique Furniture and Property Ordered Sold by a Corpus Christi Bank Foreclosure Select Group of Antique and new ~1(ujS AUCTION SCHEDULE FRIDAY EVENING, December 9th ............ 7:30 P.M, SATURDAY EVENING, December 10th ..... , . 1:00 P.M, SUNDAY AFTERNOON, December 11th . . . . . 1:30 P.M, Preview i1~Wli~0t~e~b:;":h' 8.t~- . : : : : : : . 9~~0A~M~~~Wl~!l!0ii~~ SATURDAY and SUNDAY . . . . . . 2 Hours Prior to Sale Time lcomplimtnl•rv CRIRloRuts •v•il•blt •I lht door) (clooinr thia Saturday), so Joe reveiwed that. And we even managed to eay nice thing• about each other. However, Joe used a picture with me in it for hie review, and I used a picture without Joe in it for mine. Joe, I am submitting a picture of you Joe Watts finally gets his mug in the VOICE this week, dear. If the editor does not use it, it is not my fault. And speaking of Montrose theatre peo­ple, Max Pearson is at it again. Max is a very talented playwright who is getting more and more exposure as he merrily writes along. His latest public showing will have three performances this weekend. It is The Horned Toad and it will be presented at the Theatre of the Southwest at 8:30pm on Friday and Saturday nights and at 3pm on Sunday afternoon. Max has a proclivity for setting his plays in other times and researching the era so that the audience is not only enter­tained, but also gets a dose of facts, some of which are always startJing and wonder­ful. The Horned Toad is set in 1870 in Colo­rado and concerns two doctors of the Old West-one, the traditional country doctor, and the other, the new guy from the East. Max also hae a one-act that will be pres­ented at Theatre Suberhia in January. It is set in 79 A.O. Rome. Explained Max,"There's not that much happening in 1983." One thing that's happening in 1983- and right here in Montrose!-is the light­ing of the community Christmas tree at Mary's. That will be thie Sunday at 5:30 with all the trimmings, including music and song. Immediately afterwards, the GPC has invited Houaton Off-Broadway to per­form their own carols (the infamous Mont­rose Yuletide Carols) for some extra fun on the patio. That will happen about6 or 6:30. Houston Off Broadway will also be doing their entire Holiday show at E/J's on the 20th and will appear with some surprises at the Outlaw& on the 24th. Oh, yea, do not forget that on December 15, at the Shamrock Hilton's Emerald Room we will have the Female lmper­aonator of the Year Pageant, hosted by Lyle Waggoner and Ruth Buzzi. Now, I have always 1uspected that Ruth Buzzi was a female impersonator, but Lyle Waggoner! The show should be terrific. After all, th.,.e will be $15,000 in cash prizes given away. Wow!Thatwill buy a wt of sequins. The show was to have been at Cullen Auditorium, but since it was to be tel~ vised, the people at U of ff felt that it might hurt future fundraisinr efforts because of the type of show it wao. Now don't tell me that there's never been a boy who hao worn a dress to the U of H! The show to mi&1 thi• weekjuat mirht be Steve and Leana at Raacals (clooing Saturday). They seem to be very nice people. Maybe in a couple of years, they will be up to playing a top-notch room like Rascals. It'e not that they have no talent. It's just ... Well, po88ibly he arranges things in keys that he knows will be good for him, but are a strain for her. Perhaps they should find other partners. Maybe the sound system needed adjust-ini;,.. ibly, perhaps, maybe ... It all boile down to the fact that on laat Wedn.,.day niaht they were much leas than perfect. Oh well. By the way, i!you disagree with me, drop me a note. It'1alwayanicetohear from the fan•. DEC. 9 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 c.1 VRc )TA.\' • 'l.\1TF.R.\'AT1C ).\'AL 61. T-0 FF i.tm )/)( ·c Tic ).\'S I\ \\'HL\lll>\ \\'/Ill ~ '16RMA .ffiISTIE ~CORPORATED it'AGEA..\T'i /'HF\/:"\ T\ & 9lurn afuzzr ~apartof this extraw.ganza l:x!ing taped fcrr teletiision &:; a Hol.l-ywaod /noduction compan:v as 30 of the most heautifiil entertainers eiier assembled on one st~ compete far $15,000 in cash priZf!S. SPONSORED BY EURGiAN PROUDLY SERVING OUR COMMUN/TY New Location SHAMROCK HIITON HOTEL 6900 Main December 15, 1983, Bpm General Admission Tickels available al all Tickel Mas/er Ou/leis including Sound Warehouse VIP tickets available al Eurolan on Montrose 529-5100 20 MONTROSE VOICE I DEC. 9, 1983 Changing Lifestyles, Changing Names Dateline S.F. By Randy Alfred NUMBERS: A pronounced downward trend in a key venereal disease statistic indicates the extent to which sexual behavior among gay men is changing in the midst of the AIDS epidemic. During the first nine months of 1983, the ratio of rectal gonorrhea to genit~urinary gonor­rhea at San Francisco public clinics declined from .48 to .25, according to Dr. Erwin Braff, director of the Health Department's Bureau of Communicable Disease. Braff said the figures indicate either a decline in rectal sexual activity, a decline in rectal sexual activity with new (and possibly infected) partners, increased use of condoms in rectal sex, a general decline in overall sexual activity among gay men, or some combination of these. Braff said he finds the data encouraging. AIDS risk reduction guidelines gener­ally suggest having fewer sexual partners and using condoms to avoid the direct exchange of bodily fluids (namely semen. urine and feces). Some guidelines specifi. cally list receptive rectal sex as a risk fac­tor Braffs figures cover the San Francisco City Clinic and the district health centers Although they include the statistics for women and hetero8exual men as well as for gay men, Braff said the proportion of males and females with gonorrhea is ·essentially constant over time. More than 90 percent of all the reported gonorrhea ca,;es in the city are diagnosed at City Clinic or the health centers. The others are reported by privately run clinic.a or by doc· tors in private practice and are not included in this accounting. Here are the data for the first nine months of 1983 (ratio of rectal to genii& urinary gonorrhea): January -.48; February-.44, March-.4.1; April-.45; May· .41 ; June-.38; July·.39; August-.36; September-.25. Thu", in September there was one case of rectal to every four cases of genito­urinary gonorrhea, as opposed to a one-to­two ratio in January. Note, however, that the ratios would be higher among gay men, who constitute almost all the rectal cases. The genito-urinary cases include many women, among whom rectal gonor­rhea is rare. and straight men, among whom receptive rectal sex (and hence rec­tal gonorrhea) ia definitionally almoat unknown Comparing the same ratio over the first nine months of each of the past five years, Braff found: 1979 .51; 1980-.49; 1981-.46; 1982-.53; 1983- .40 Last year, there were over 14,000 cases of gonorrhea overall in the city. The fig­ures for the first nine months of this year are the lowest in the last five years, Braff said. Compared to five-year highs for the first nine months, the nine month figures for this year show genito-urinary gonor­rhea down 46 percent and rectal gonor­rhea down 56 percent. That differential, Braff said, ia another indication that patt- NEED A LAWYER? YOU CAN AFFORD Judith ~uc/aj ATTORNEY AT LAW DWI POSSESSION DEBT RELIEF BANKRUPTCY PERSONAL INJURY FAMILY LAW Reasonable Fees & Terms Sal & Evening Appts. 303 W. Polk at Taft 520-1370 24 hours Gen~r•I Practice of Law ems, as well as levels, of sexual behavior are changing BY ANY OTHER NAME: There has been a spate of name changes among our political clubs recently. Here is a brief his­tory of their nomenclature, with thanks to Frank Fitch, Jim Gordon, Armand Bou­lay, Paul Boneberg and Tom Isenberg for their help. When it was founded as the nation's first gay political party club in 1972, the Alice B. Toklas Memorial Democratic Club chose not to use the word 'gay' for reasons both of discretion and its inclu­sion of pro-gay heterosexuals. A move to rename it the "Alice B. Toklas Gay Demo­cratic Club" in 1977 was amended first to add the word "lesbian," then the words "and other." The amended motion was then defeated. In September 1983, adopt-ing punctuation chosen by the Lesbian· / Gay Freedom Day Parade in 1981, the club became the Alice B. Toklas Lesbian­/ Gay Democratic Club. Although Alice was the first San Fran­cisco club to add the word "lesbian," Bay Area honors go to the East Bay Lesbian­/ Gay Democratic Club, founded in May 1982. The San Francisco Gay Democratic Club was founded in December 1976. It was the first in the city and perhaps in the nation to explicitly name itself that way. A motion to change the name to the Har­vey Milk Gay Democratic Club was intro­duced on the day after the assassinations of Milk and George Moscone. The new name was formalized by a bylaw amend· ment two months later in January 1979. In October 1983, the name was changed, with punctuation differing from the ~ast Hay and Alice's to the Harvey Milk Lesbian & Gay Democratic Club. City & County Reform Democrats, founded in 1974, became the Minuteman Democratic two years later and the Stone­wall Democratic Club of San Francisco two years after that. In 1980, it became the Stonewall Gay Democratic Club of San Francisco. Its executive committee has recommended a fifth name, "Stonewall Gay/Lesbian Democratic Club." The club could effect the change, which drops "San Francisco," by January. Concerned Republicans for Individual Rights was founded in 1977. It is still Con­cerned. Alfred's column originates at the "Sen· tine[," a San Francisco gay newspaper. '< /983 Randy Alfred, all rights reserved. FREE! 'PERSONALS' UP TO 15 WORDS IN THE 'VOICE' CLASSIFIEDS The MONTROSE VOICE is now offering you free personals (up to 15 words) in the classified ads. You can reach gay people of our area directly through the largest gay publication in Southeast Texas. And to increase your exposure, we'll run your ad up to three weeks. Your first 15 words are free, including three words in bold to attract attention. Additional words beyond the 15-word limit are 30¢ each, each week. No commercial or professional services and no products for sale under this offer. (Those services or items for sale can still be advertised, of course, but the regular rate applies.) Want secrecy? Blind box numbers can be assigned for $3 each week the ad runs and we'll forward your replies to you, confidentially. Fill out the form and mail or bring it to the VOICE Office. (Sorry, no free personals by phone. Credit card customers can charge personals by phone at (713) 529-8490, but the regular rate applies.) Deadline for each week's paper is 5:30pm Tuesday. (up to 3 normal-size words in bold capitals, free) (free) ___ _ (free) ___ _ (30¢/word) ___ _ (30¢/word) ___ _ (30¢/ word) ___ _ ·(Use additional paper if necessary) up to 3 bold, capital words free up to 15 total words free __ words beyond 15-word limit at 30¢ each Blind Box at $3 per week __ _ Total Name __ Address __ - Run ad o 1 week o 2 weeks o 3 weeks" -­Amount enclosed (a check a money order. a cash in person a VISA charge a MasterCard charge) If charging by credit card # _ eJCpdate - Mail or bring to Montrose Voice, 3317 Montrose #306, Houston, TX 77006 Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat DEC. DEC. 9 10 DEC. DEC. DEC. DEC. DEC. 11 12 13 14 15 For •ddttlOnel inlormellon or phone numbers lorevents l1sled below, loolt !or lhe •ponlOfll'IQ or~n1Hllon under "Org1niu11ons·· In the Montrose Cleurlled Selected Events through 7 Days mFRJDA Y: Committee for Public Health Awareness's "Sharing Group for the Worried Well," 7-8pm, Montrose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett llSUNDA Y: Montrose Tennis Club plays 10:30am-1:30pm, MacGregor Park llSUNDA Y: "Gay Bakeoff' benefit Dec. 11, 4pm, the Barn, 710 Pacific mMONDAY: AIDS victim oupport group meets 6:30pm, Montrose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett Blvd., Suite 203 mMONDA Y: MSA Bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain • TUESDAY: Montrose Symphonic Band meets at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30pm •TUESDAY: Citizens for Human Equality (CHE) meets Dec.13 •TUESDAY: Houston Data Professionals meet 7:30pm Dec. 13, East Room, Holiday Inn Central, 4640 South Main • TUESDAY: Lutherans Concerned meets Dec. 13, Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh • THURSDAY: Wilde 'n Stein gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KPFT Radio, FM-90 •THURSDAY: MSA Mixed Bowling League bowls, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain Selected Events in Future Weeks m/N 1 WEEK: Choice's Lesbian Mothers' Group meets 6:30pm Dec.17, 210 Fairview, apt. 1 m/N 1 WEEK: Winter begins at 4:3lam, Dec. 22 m/N 2 WEEKS: Christmas, Dec. 25 ANNOUNCEMENTS ~ERSW1ll1tfrMHChWHk in th ls d1rKtory MonlrOM community orq1ntza- ~k,'tl~U: ~~C:~o~E'~1fiC: d11tributlon e lndlcat• thl1 U1tlna 11 • MONTROSE VOICE dl1tr1butionpolnl ~CKS •FIREWATER 1 !;>;111t~~!~i~5 ~°:~~~~:r_folks at The BAKLAVA! GREEK PASTRIES! Just In time for X·masl Holiday bake Hie-proceeds benefit Annunciation SchOol Dec. 9--10 pre-ule orders wel· comeiCall777·55CM, 771.eo.49,497.J667 or come by 3511 Yoakum GAY BAKEOFFI Sunday, Dec. 11 . 4pm at the Barn, 710 Pacific. For Info cell Gey Switchboard, 529--3211 HOLIDAY BAKE SA~ - ~~kl~"!. G;.~~ ~~~d·fc:~~1:, ~~~~~; orders welcome! Call 777·5504, 77H;049, 497·3667; benefltllng Annunciation School CARS & BIKES 1171 YAMAHA 750 Low mileage $1200 or best 52&-8216, 688-4184 COMMERCIAL SPACE AN INTIMATE WESTHEIMER Boutique 1nd/or club space. wlll d1wde 1000to4000sq ti Ca1166&-6373 DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES ~TRALPIPE~ (A gay roommate service.) The belt bus I· ~~ desl you wilt make thls year 523-- ~IN HEIGH-TS-­Just minutes from downtown or Medici.I Center Remodeled, extremely attractive. 1 bedroom. separate d1ningroom, all appliances including w/ o, energy fans, yardmaintalned, excel\enl securitysys· tern avallable Water, gas paid $400+ ~;;i;. Deposit, references required CONDO FOR REN_T __ 1·1.secuntybars.dishwasher, freecable, ~~~~~'!:J. ~4~~ubon. no pels $350 per HOUSE FOR LEA-SE-­Sharpstown, near BlssonneVFondren. 3 bedroom. 2 bath, LR/ DR, den, large kit· chen with stove. refrigerator, breakfast ~~A· ~~~1~~n~a~:'.0~~~~~:;~:J~~~;~: large corner ,lot, covered patio, fenced yard, quiet neighborhood, yet convenient to shopping, Medical Center, lreewayt Ideal for small family or roommates who enjoy comfortable living in an attractive setllng $650+ bllla. Deposit, references requ1red864·4154 EMPLOYED ROOMMATE WANTED To share two bedroom 1partmen1, 1706 Weelheimer No 4,$2QOi- · bills Call771· 1143 HISTORIC HEIGHTS HOME Outstsndmg opportumty for gracious hv· mg in a beaullfulty restored Victorian ~?n~=~ o~~h!~~es~~t:g~:~ si:.~e:r ;;s~ toratlon Awsrd. this 4000 square foot, 3-- · story Houston Heights Home may be used resldent1ally or commerclally. Built in 1905, It sits on acornerlotw1thover 13,000squareleetofland, anEnglishrose gaden, 2nd story deck, enclOMdpa!lo, quartersabovaa3·cargarage,androom for a pool. The home has 4 unusually large bedrooms, 2 baths, wrap--around veranda, leaded glass, an updatedcoun· try kitchen, high ceilings, hardwoods, stenciled walls, roomy formals. foyer, dramatic staircase, sleep porch, 10tona of 11r conditioning (zoned). 2 fireplaces and charm beyond description For further Information catl 713/861·9996 S239.500sub1eci to prior sell -eMPi.OYED ROOMMATE WANTED to share two bedrooms apartment 1n 1706 ::::1~ji~~~ 43umber 4, $200/mo plus -..0RTHWEST AREA ROOMMATE to share 2/1 condo with many extras_ $250 allbfllspatd 682.e16l -- $175 PER MONTH Gay couple seeks mature roommate Share 2·2 Alie! townhome. 87S.0821 ~RACTIV~LEX Near downtown. Glassed 1reas for plants «S.2773 - GRE=E-NW_A_Y P- L. -.V - . AR_EA_ _ Roommate. 2 br/2 bath on Timmons Male D.~~~ll~5 per month • \+ electrlc EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED TYPESETTER "Graphics Typeaetter"wanled. We have the lastest Comp Edit equipment and are looklng for 1omeone who knows the m1chine codes Inside and out-who can ~,~~i~~~:~gr~;;~~~~r:: ~~~~:~ 529·6490, Monday or Tuesday, 10 ; appointment --B- ARTENri£AiNEED r~~~c:iv=f~g~~y10.rT;ed~~:1~,~~:. ~~~~ Weslhelmer -- GAYS TO SHARE good times and good drinks. The Trall· ride, 1225Westhelmer ADMINISTRATOR- - OFFICE/TELEPHONE Start lommed1ately. Good income now ~~: l~!,~u:~~~,!h~)gr~,~ur11~)58: 5524 PART-TIME EVENINGS Consider doing anything toryout Ad 162· 0 , c/o Montrose Voice - OUTSIDE SALES Needed for travel agency Comm1ss1on onty No experience neceuary C•lt Bruce 529-6464 FOR SALE, MISC. GREEK FESTIVAL PASTRIES for X·mas-Baklav1. bread, and appellz· era from the Annunciation School's holi· day bake sale, Dec S.10, 3511 Yoakum in the Montrose area. Avoid rush- order frompr~saletelephonea777·5~. 771· 6049, 497-3667 FREE CATALOG Eelskin-teathergiflsformenandwomen ~~~~,~~ f~e:fou!r:n ~j~~efe com· EROTIC VIDEO CASETTES $2S.35. Both formats, VHS, Beta Danlel 526-9112 HANOVER SHOES Finequalitymen'sshoesatlactory/dlrect prices Call Hank, 664-8393 (answer service) WILD BILL'S JEANS New and used-worn and lornl Coats. sweaters, slacks. shirts Lots of party· !~~~ i~!'~~~~~s,,°y~~~~k~a~~ ~ 68« (Across the street from Salvallon Army Thrift Store, 2201-03 Washington.) GAY BARS •B•)l'l-402LOW:tt 527-98M dining • Bern 710Pecilic--S28-9'27· counlrY- ... •Brazos River Bottom-2400 Bruoa- 528- 9192 country e &;.r Patch-2294 w Holcom~"9i18 :.~c~1-49&5 Martin Luineri<.ng--&41 -2521 ChickenCoop-535W91th .. mer~ :~-26:J1 R1ctimOrni=sia--2259- --d---;-•co e OirtySali).;1-_'220°A~-~7525-­iOOub1e R-sa.o..;n::57:f1Kkt>Y-521--,-.u. e EfJ"a-1213 R1chmond:..~21~i071-­~ s;i1=i5~53 - e Gaii9on- 2303 R-ictimond--522-7618 e Ho1e- 109~m=528-9 i2e­i: iffS:.eOe---"Pac 11ic-S2i~51i - :,~o'\::.:n&l.yr;n:i_:-817 Fe1rv1ew-52&- ::,g?~ .!~~~75245- Bullalo- sPeeaway • Luy J-3-,-2~Tuam.:-52i.G34J - ~09POl-"':2327Gran1 -S2-1-a342- • M•ry·1....:.-,-022w91,r..mer-52j:"8e51 DEC. 9, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 21 Montrose Classified ~3~morial P1t11 Motet8er- 50W ... gh0r-8e1 - • M•dn•I• Sun- 534 Westheimer- 5~7519 d11C0, 1hows =~~ cneriono-1>11 w o,...-!28-U40 • Montl'OM Mtning Co-805 Pac11ic-529-7481 :.:!:~mbers 2 300 WHttlelmer 529·8338 e OHICef"1 Club-t700 Alba:ny 523--4084 • One on One-1019 W Grty-529-&503 e OUtlawa 1419 Richmond 521--HOO :~Elephant 1218Leel1nd &5fMXl40 • R1nch-Be20'1 Mam-52&-8730 ::~le-2702 Kwby-524--6272 dining. h.,. e A11:tl'1-2401S.nJecin~99· d•IOO e Ripcord-715Feuview-521-2792 FULL BODY MASSAGE Tensionrelease. relax&enfOY. Verysen· sual. Call for tppomtment Tom (713) 524-7163 RUBDOWN Your place. Call Van, 493-4850. $20 IE GOOD toyourselftoday.Llcensedmassagether­ap1s1 on duty 10am to 10 pm, 7 days a week By appointment. 528-3147 Ran· dolph Alan RELAX & ENJOY The Bodywork• mas5age For appoint­ment, call Biil, 526--2470 FULL BODY MASSAGE Tension release. relax and en1oy. Very sensual. Ca:ll for appointment Tom 713/524--7163 e R•P.y Butinesa-2700 Albany-52&-3911 •Th••11-<111Hyd<••" PERSONALS :.~f" Renegadel-1318 W•theimer-521· 9Trailride-1225 WMthelmer In 1oeai\"t!~ ~~~~!°J~~ .~-:et with • Twin1-!35 W•thlffrner-520--0244 leab1en . ... tie in pocket was 4000 Drsc camera with OJICO fllm Reward given. Contact Bill at 529-- e venture--N-2923 Mem-522-0000 6994 or 864-7185 e Co1>9--304Qi-lean1-832 .... 20e dlSCO • SundowMr--497 Crocket'l--833--3989 eFly-21010'4-78:).9842 e Mary'a 11- 2502 0~7&3-9435 e Aot.rt'1Latin.-213K.mpner-7&5-88915 e Tremmpe-e27 Winnie--763-1247 eF1n1u
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