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Montrose Voice, No. 265, November 22, 1985
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Montrose Voice, No. 265, November 22, 1985 - File 001. 1985-11-22. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2381/show/2356.

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(1985-11-22). Montrose Voice, No. 265, November 22, 1985 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2381/show/2356

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 265, November 22, 1985 - File 001, 1985-11-22, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2381/show/2356.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 265, November 22, 1985
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date November 22, 1985
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Editorial: Vote Tuesday for Hall and Robinson The election is not over. The polls will open this Tuesday, Nov 26, 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m., to decide the final two city council races. And these two seats will decide which of two groupi; of political thought will have the majority in City Council for the next two years. Six years ago, there was no Kathy Whitmire, no George Greanias, no Elea­nor Tinsley on City Council. Instead, positioned smack in the middle Frank Mann, Jim McConn, Larry McKaskle and others, there was only one man of rea11onable thought on issues of human rights. There was Judson Robinson Jr. It was Judson Robinson Jr. who lent the weight of his office to helping vic­tims of illegal police harrasment against gay people in the late 1970s. It was Judson Robinson Jr. who stepped in and coordinated the closing of Wes­theimer Road for the first major Gay Pride Week Parade. Now it is Judson Robinson Jr. facing a vehemently homophobic Jim Kennedy in a run·off election for his at­large council seat. Kennedy-the last survivor of the fear and hate campaign of the Straigh t Slate-is running his race solely on the idea that if he is elected he will use the power of his office to keep certain adults from using certain city parks to play softball. Which adult11? Those which are not of the same sexual persuasion that he is. Which ballparks'? Those which are the ones that he wants to use. Based on this, he wants to be your councilman Does that sound like a sane reason for aspiring to public office? ONE YEAR AGO, Anthony Hall took a major gamble. HP knew reactionaries would come out of the wall, spouting their hatred. Rut he knew also it was the right thing to do to sponsor measureR prott-cting the rights of those in city jobs if they ramp undE'r attack for CE'rtnin non·joh-related factors, such as one's sexual orientation Tht• referendum is history. And Anthony Hall is still on City Council- New Shopping Center-With Movie Theater- Planned for Montrose. See p.5 but barely. We must all vote next Tues­day to see that he stays there. Anthony Hall and Judson Robinson Jr. need your vote Tuesday. We know virtually every reader of the Montrose Voice favors Judson Robinson Jr. and Anthony Hall irregardless of this edi­torial. But favoring them, liking them, even speaking out for them, is not enough. Only your presence in the vot· ing booth will accomplish the mission. Your votE'. Next Tuesday night on TV and radio, next Wednesday in the daily papers, and next week in the Montrose Voice, figures will be broadcast and printed with the outcome of these two important races right down to the last digit. Your one vote is going to mean that the~e reported figures are going to be one digit higher. You will see your vote. It will be that last figure, one number higher than it would have been without you. We'll see you at the polls. (If you need advice, or help, or any information; if you don't know where to vote; or you don't know if you can vote, the GPC can provide the answers. Call them at 521-1000. Then after you vote, you are welcome to party at the GPC Election Central at Just Marion and Lynn's, 903 Rich· mond.) o At the Rodeo Mary Thelma, better known as "Disco Grandma," is flanked by two cowboys at last weekend's Texas Gay Rodeo. Photostory on p.6 Montrose Voice "The Newspaper of Montrose" November 22. 1985 Issue 265 Published Every Friday (713) 529-8490 Carl Hays, Community Arts Organizer, Dies Carl Don Hays, 69, a well-known educator and Montrose community arts organizer, died Nov. Ill. Hays, the first male art teacher in the Hou ton Independent School District, was founder of 27 existing organiaation. including the Montrose Art Alliance and !IH. Inc., an umbrella organization for community arts groups. Hays was also active with Metropolitan Ministries and was in$!rumental in the development of its cottage industry pro· gram. The Houston native's Christmas deco­rations program, incorporating the works Carl Don Hays of Houston schoolchildrm, won him recognition from the American Red Cross. Ha~·s is survived by three sisters, Mrs. Bermcc Walters, Mrs. Clyde Lauersdorf, Mrs. Ocie Barrier, all of Houston; t\\O brothers, Jame B. Hay~. Bastrop La., George D. Hays, Texas City, Tx., and friend, Richard Burckhardt, Hou.-ton. Funeral services were held :-\ov. 20 at Bering Memorial United Methodi~t Church, Rev. Ron Pogue officiating. Inter· ment was in South Park Cememtarv. Pal­lbearers were William Buie, Robert Rogers, Richard Altman, Joe Da,;s, Bill Love and Lee Kleeman. Memorial donations mav be made to Bering Memorial Unite.d Methodist Church, 1440 Harold. Gay Community Protests at Minneapolis TV Station The Saga of Fabian Bridges Meets a Tragic End By Linda Wyche Monlros1· Voice Managing Editor Fabian Bridges, a 30·yenr·old AIDS, patient dil•d Sunday Nov. 17, in Jefferson Davis Hospitnl Bridgl's garnered national m!'din attmtion when city h!'alth officials wt-re notilit·d in late September thllt Bridges was a male prostitute that would continul' to have sex even though he had been dingnos!'d with the disease. Tht• sagll of Fabian Bridgl's is a tragic one shroudt•d in mi8information and pos· sibly unethical prnMic·es involving a Min· neapolis U-levision station. On Oct. :10, gays in Minneapolis demon· strnte<l in front of TV station WCCO against !ht• questionable methods used in filming a documentary initially intended to focus on gay life in Houston following the referendum. According lo Mike Sullivan, public affairs din-ctor at WCCO in an interview by John Davies of Equal Time, a Minne&· polis newspnpt·r, n news team was sent to Houston Inst summer be«ause thev knew the gay c·ommunity had been "hurthndly" in a refrrendum here, were "kind of on !hi' run politirally," and ''very vulnerable" to an outbreak of AIDS hvsteria. After arriving in Houston, the crew could not find mough happening to war­rant an entire documentary but learned from n rnntnct about Bridges. At the timl' Bridges had left Houston because he could not find housing WCCO found Bridges in Cleveland, Ohio, after he was sent there by an India· napolis judge following an arrest for steal­ing a bicycle. When the judge learned that Bridgl's had AIDS, he gave Bridges some money and told authorities to get him out of town. Bridges had gone to Indianapolis in hopes of living with his sisters. His sis· ters turned him away because of obiec· tions by their husbands. Bridge.s went to Cleveland where his mother lived. According to Sullivan, when WCCO found him there, Bridges told thE'm he wee continuing to have sex. It was then that the news tE'am contacted the Cleve­land Health Department. It was in Cleveland that WCCO began to "pay" Bridge,; to coopers«' with the film· ing of the documentary. Sullivan admits that Bridges was paid. at Bridges' request, at least $112 for food and lodging in both Cleveland and Houston. When Bridgt's arrived back in Houston, the news crew came also. When Bridges informed a doctor that he was continuing to have sex, Houston Director of Health Dr. James Haughton wa.: notified Haughton immediately is~ued an order on &pt. 30 for BridgC'.s to "desist from ha\fol! 'exual relations and donating blood." That order led Houston ,;ce officers on n two-day spree in an attempt to apprehend continued page 4 2 MONTROSE VOICE I NOVEMBER 22. 1985 Cheese Slicer, rz. a tool used in ~/fe.Y/ ~[}{]~~~~The Gourmet Shop & Deli to sample the vvorld's finest cheeses~ )':~ --- sampling, z; pp1; our vvay of assuring your con1plete satisfaction, taste before you buy! Spn:1alt't m l uropean <.ht:<.',t', Wint', Cofkc and Pa.\ta lhghlaml \ illagc ~hopping Ct'ntt'r ~>!6 \\1:-tht'unt:r • ltou,ton li.-:xa' --o.r Phont' 6.? 1-1 H2'i J.,.GRAJVD OPEN/JVG SPECIAL A, S 1 rXJ fX'T" pozmd off tllll of our 11 ule 1 am tJ of ft11e mrported Furopemr a11cl !Jonu ·11c Cbe~'5l'S / 111111 5 lbs /K? u~\10/lll?. Fxpires lkYem/J('r .!5 l<JH5 In the heart of The City" $44.00 • FRH AIRPORT SHllTTI.! ·COMPLIMENTARY CKAMPAGNE l WINE • COMPLIMENTARY CONTINENTAL IRUJCFAST (large s1ngle!double occupancy • VALET SHVICE • Special Weekly and Monthly Rates Reservations required please call Toti ~ree 800-253-5263 (Notional) 800-521·4523 ((..a:1f) (415)·44' 5141 (So~ Fro·ic sco: 1315 POLK ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94109 ALL CATS VETERINARY CLINIC Exclusively Feline House Calls Available for Multiple Cats and Catteries D~R. CYNTHIA RIGONI D.V.M. r 664-CATS ] f \fill) 9119 B Stella Lrnk Rd ~ Houston. Tx 77025 Burlington Apartments GREAT LOCATION Close to Downtown in Montrose Area. Small community, Adults only, Nice pool, Large cl!Jsets, Big windows, Free movie channel, Well maintained 1 and 2 Bednn. Effective rent from $249 3502 BURLINGTON 523-0249 '-~~~~~~~~~. ...............~ . ...1 ~ An Announcement to the Montrose Business Community Changes at the Montrose Voice In order to better serve the Montrose business community, the Newspaper of Montrose™ announces the following changes. EFFECTIVE IMMEDIATELY • Next Day Proof Service on All Display Ads 24 hours (including weekends) after you give your ad copy to your per­sonal Voice Sales Representative (either at our office or at your office), we"ll deliver to you at your office a "proof " • Camera-Ready Ads for Other Publications If you are also running the ad w1lh another publication. we can provide the other publication with your camera-ready ad (and save you their production charges) . At the same time we furnish a proof to you. and after you approve, we can rush a camera-ready copy to any other publication in town. We will even make copy and size changes necessary for the other publication's format. • No Charge for Art Work through Christmas Ho! Ho! Ho! Through the end of the year, the Voice is not charging for art· work. halftones. typesetting or pasteup. You pay only for space, color (if desired) and special placement (if desired) And that includes artwork, typesetting, etc., for ads we produce for you for other publications • New Sizzling Artists We now have more artists and more art services available than ever. Leave 11 to us to match your need with the right graphics-with the proof in the "proof." • New Columns and Features You've already noticed 11 in recent weeks. The Montrose Voice is brimming with indepth lnvest1gat1ve-style articles And they'll continue Our new ··Montrose Crossword Puzzle," an exclusive puzzle with special words and clues relating to Montrose and Houston's gay community, 1s returning (This popular feature originally appeared in the Voice in 1981 ) Sponsorship of lh1s feature IS available. Other new columns will begin in the next few issues and revolve around ( 1) antiques (Montrose 1s the antique shop capital of the Southwest). (2) cars (after all, we are a newspaper and what's a newspaper without an auto section), (3) operating a small business (Montrose is also the small business, or entrepre­neurial. heart of Houston). and (3) travel (not your normal travel column you find in the dailies. which seem to be mostly written for little old ladies, but one written especi.ally for the interests of our liberated readers). Businesses and business services which appeal to these spec1f1c areas can have their ads placed in that section without a special placement charge. EFFECTIVE FIRST ISSUE OF 1986 (RELEASED JAN 3) • Local Rate Schedule Eight This will be a more complicated schedule than our current one, in effect since October 1984 (These "comphcat1ons" reward advertisers for loyalty and frequency.) Our new rate structure will follow formulas used by mainstream newspapers The changes include 1. Years contract. If your business is such where you can reserve your advertising space through a year (or even a few months), we can offer you our most favorable rates By indicating your space requirements ahead, we can better plan our issues We'll reward you handsomely for that convenience. 2. "Advert1sment Averaging." If you don't want to plan your ads ahead of time-or you prefer not to sign a contract-we can still grant you a very favorable rate by looking at your past advertising in the Voice. Each display ad you've placed in the last 12 months lowers you into a reduced rate level for your present advert1s1ng And it's cumulative, revised weekly Example: any ad you place today helps get you a lower rate for any ad you place through a year from today. • New Higher Press Run The Montrose Voice will increase its weekly press run from 10,000 copies to 12.000 copies (a 20% increase). This should increase our estimated readership from about 27.000 people weekly to about 33.000 people weekly. (Even at an estimated 27.000 Houston readers weekly, the Voice 1s already thousands ahead of the other two gay publications) • Regional Combination Rates Beginning 1n January, the Voice will offer regional combination rates with other gay community publications elsewhere in Texas plus New Orleans. If you have a maior campaign that needs regional exposure, we can place you in several local publications guaranteed to saturate the maior markets of our region • New Features, Community Involvement The Montrose Voice has over the past 5 years taken the lead among gay community publications for community involvement We are part of the Montrose neighborhood and we work very hard to see that Montrose 1s a growing, vibrant, healthy area of the city 1 We will continue to cover and promote the worthwhile activities of com­munity organizations. 2 We will continue to make financial contributions to many groups 3 We will continue to be politically active and endorse level-headed, non­reacllonary, human-rights-oriented candidates 4 And we will continue to ioin and be active in our community's varied social political medical. business. rel1g1ous and sports organizations No one has a greater interest in you and Montrose than you and the Montrose Voice. NOVEMBER 22. 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 New Federal Guidelines on AIDS in Workplace Discourage Screening Compiled from AP and UPI News Stor ies, as Reported in t he Houston Ch ronicle New federal guidelines on AIDS in the workplace recommend against screening workers for exposure to the virus that can cause the deadly illness even when their jobs brmg them close to the public. The new guidelines were announced by the Department of Health and Human Services last Thursday. The guidelines suggest that people who work with food should not be restricted from work even if they are known to have been exposed to AIDS, unless they have another infection or illness that would warrant restriction. Health experts say AIDS is not transmitted through food preparation. A number of public officials around the country have urged that workers in cer­tain fields, including food handling, health care and classroom teaching, should be required to undergo a test that can determine the presence of antibodies to the AIDS virus in the bloodstream. Presence of the antibody indicates that a person has been infected by the AIDS virus at some point. Scientists are unable Montrose Voice N TEX.A.~•' AR MONTROSE TEXAS Population test 1985) 32.000 Cenaus iracts 401 01, 401 02. 402 01. •02 02 •05 02. 403 •nd 404 01 Z•P COdel (roughly) 70000. 71019 (portion), 77098 Bounded (roughly) Sl'lepherd Or fWMt), Allen Parkway (north), Main SI (east) US 59 (IOulh) latitude 1Montroae Blv<f al Westhe1mer Rd) 29•44·13·N Long•ludt 95•22·50' w All•lude 40· ELECTEO OFFICIALS FOR MONTROSE ~rge GrHmH HO!Aton City Council fd111 Cl 90f Bagby 1713J 222-5933 E Franco Ue. Harris COUflty Commissioner (pct 1) 1001 Pttston. tll3J 221·6rr1 W•lter Rarik1n. Constable fpc:t 11 301 San Jacm10, 1113J 221·5200 o.t>ra Oanburg. Texas Houae ol Representatives (dial 137} 191 IS W Fwy_ (713J 520-8068 Cr•IQ WHh1ngton Te•as Senate fd1s1 ll) ?313 C.rol1M. (113) 459-4343 M•ckey l•l•nd US House ot Repretertlat•ves •d1$I 18) 1911~ Sm1,h •820. l113J 739-7339 The Newspaper of Montrose Established 1980 OUR 265th ISSUE. NOV 22, 1985 Published every Friday Montrose Voice Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006-3028 Phone (713) 529-8490 CIRCULATION 9.000 cop•ea weekly through 140 meror d11tnbut1on po1nt1 in Montrose. the V1/11ge and the Heights nl1m11«1 pan-on rare factor 2 8 est1m1tkl reecJership 25.200 wHlrJy p1u1 1.000 copies weekly through 30 other Te.11as d11tr1bu!lon points Hl1m1ted pau•on rate factor 2 5 estimated rHdersh1p 2,500 wHkly TOTAL CIRCULATION !GUARANTEED! 10.000 cop• .. weekly tot1J Ht1m1t1d reade;shlp 27.700 weekly Contents copyright c 1985 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry MCCiurg publ~~r-«Mor Linda Wyche managing ecJitor Roger Lackey ott1c• managM Mark Blazek Austin corre•pondent Scott Cutsinger, 8111 O'Rourke /oul contr1txitors Steve Warren n111on11 correspC>ndent Jerry Mulholland account e.11ecut1ve Rick Hill account e...ecul1ve Paul Ganter .ccounr t•ecutiv• Foundmg Mem~rs Greattr Montrose Bu!!1nes1 Guild. Gay 1nd Lnb11n Press Aatoc11t1on N1nArS Services New1·0ne. P•c1hc News Se~ice Syndicated FHlur• Serv1cH & W11ters Bn1n McNaughl. Unt· verul Prell Synd1ce1e. Nt-wt Amence Syndicate POSTMASTER Send 1ddre11 corrections lo "°8 Avondale. Houtton. TX 77006·3028 Sub1cnpt1011 r•t• m US m IHl•d envelope $49 per year (52 Issues). $29per111c month1 (2'6iuues),0<Sl 25perwwk (less lh1n 26 IHUCS) Bick IHUfl $2 00 uch N1t10nal edv•rt1s1ng 1eptes.nt•t1ve Joe 01$aibalO. R1vendell MArket1ng 866 8th Avenue Ntw York 10011. (212) 242·8863 Adve<liJing d•MJlne TueS01y. 5 30pm, fOf tuue reteasect Fri· day evening N011C• to advwt11•ra Loc1t 1dv•rt111ng rateachedufc Shen-A '*&Stffect1v•OCt 12 19M andEtg:hl-Aw1Jlbeettec11veJan 3. ISM RNponslbl11ty The MontrOM Voice don not assume respon- 1<1bthty lot 1dv•rt1s1ng c111ms Readers shoulct altf1 tne NWt· paper 10 any deeephve advef1151ng to say how many of those people will actu­ally develop the fatal ailment, but it is believed that carriers who show no symp­toms may spread the disease to others tho­rugh the sharing of blood or through sexual relations. Health officials estimate that more than a million Americans have been infected by the AIDS virus, and civil rights advocates have argued that proposals for screening can be an attempt to discriminate against homosexuals. The department has already recom­mended that, in general, children who have been exposed to AIDS be allowed to attend school, on a case-by-case basis. KS/ AIDS Foundation TV Phone Bank gets Over 1200 Calls A phone bank manned by volunteers from the KS/ AIDS Foundation and four doctors received 1,261 calls during the airing of NBC-TV's "An Early Frost." The made­for- TV movie concerned an AIDS patient. The calls were handled by volunteers manning 20 phones. The phones rang con­stantly from 8:00 p.m. when the program began until 11:00 p.m. when the phone bank was shut down. The foundations' own AIDS Hotline continued to take calls until midnight. Questions asked by the callers ranged from "Does it hurt," from a 10-year-old boy, to those seeking general information, which made up the majority of the calls. ~ w STEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D. IN1ERNAL MEDICINE INFECTIOUS DISEASES SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES AIDS/KS DIAGNOSIS OPEN MON. FRI, 8:30AM·5 PM SAME DAY APPOINTMENT MON. WED .. FRI EVENINGS AND SATURDAY MORNINGS BY APPOINTMENT ONLY 2801 EUA BL VD., SUITE G HOUSTON, TX 77008 (713) 868-4535 __.. ,_IN,_,1liE HEIGHTS .. [ )r] v/S4] Also, the majority of the calls, 55.75 per­cent, were from those in the 20-35 age group. The average caller age was 27. Most of the callers were female. Women placed 64. 78 percent of the calls. Residents of northwest Houston made the highest number of calls for one resi­dential neighborhood. Callers from zip code 77091 alone placed 31 calls. Sixteen of the total calls came from the Montrose area. The oldest caller was 81 years old. Gay communities throughout the coun­try held various activities in conjunction with the program. Fundraisers were held in several cities. Business Guild to Hold 'Share-Abration' On Friday, Nov. 29, the day after Thanks­giving, the Greater Montrose Business Guild will host the first "Friday After Thanksgiving Share-Abration" to benefit the KS/ AIDS Foundation, Bering Memor­ial United Methodist Church, Metropoli­tan Community Church of the Resurrection, Aid for AIDS, and A Place in the Sun Located as a drive-though event on the parking lot of This Week in Texas, 2205 Montrose, guild members will accept canned and other non-perishable food items from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. Cash or check donations will also be accepted. All donations received will be divided among the five organizations to fit their needs and requests. "The theme was selected as a way to share the bounty that we celebrated the day before. Hence, a share-abration," explained guild board member Phyllis Frye. Everything collected will go back into the Montrose community_ All costs are being borne by the Greater Montrose Business Guild. 4 MONTROSE VOICE I NOVEMBER 22, 1985 Fabian Bridges Dies from page I Bridge,, The ,;ce officers attempted to entrap Bridges into having sex. When that tactic failed, they threatened to arrest him on the charge of urinating in public. Dur· ing the Inst weekend Bridges was on the street.;, Sullivan says the crew gave him $15 a night for lodging. Ray Hill, a community activist. found Bridges in Montrose and convinced him to seek medical help. By this time WGBH, a Boston public tele· vision station, had joined WCCO in cover­ing what had become "The Fabian Bridges Story." WGBH is producing the documentary m partnership with WCCO for u~e m its nationally telt',;sed "Fron· tline" series. The hysteria over Bridges led state health officials, as well as Dr. Haughton, to consider the po,sibility of having AIDS listed ns a quarantinable disease. It is also believed to be responsible for a San Anto· mo Health Department policy, begun on Oct. 14, that warns AIDS victims by letter that sex with anyone other than other AIDS patients would be considered a fel­ony subject to criminal prosecution. The diligence of the news teams did not cease when Bridges was initially hospital­ized. After leaving the Ben Taub Hospital psychiatric ward, John Barnich, counsel to the Houston KSIAJDS Foundation, They knew the Hous­ton gay community has been hurt badly in a referendum, were "kind of on the run" and "very vulnerable" to an outbreak of AIDS hysteria. offered to allow Bndges to stay in hiti home. Barnich recalled that the reporters constantly attempted to talk with Bridges and himself. They told Barnich that they qjmply wanted to show "how wonderful the foundation wa-." Barni<"h relates one incident that exem· plifics WCCO's tactics. One day while Bar­mch wns away from the house. members of news w.am came up the drivewav and called for Bridges to come outside A fnghtened Bridge< called the Houston Police Department to disperse the gather· ing of overzealous journalists. Once word of the WCCO"s actions reached ~1inneapolis, cries of unethical journalism began to nng out from both the gay nnd general population media. Min· neapolis Star and Tribune teleL'l.,1011 u•n ter Nick Coleman called WCCO"s ethics u ·ed m the Bridges story a "dumb mis· takf'." Claude Peck, co-producer of thf' "Fresh Fruit Show," a gay radio program broadcast over KFAI 1n Minneapolis, said rn a commentary in Minneapolis' GLC Voice that "WCCO's dealings with Fabian Bridges have been despicable, heartless and cnlculating0 Peck and those partici­pating in recent protests nre calling for WCCO to delete portions of the documen· tary dealing with Bridges' stays in Cleve· land and Houston. Signs carried in the Oct. 30 demonstra· ti on carried messages like "WCCO Shame· ful Conduct," and "WCCO Document Your Won Dirty Trick" The demonstration was organized by the Gay Rights Alliance of Minneapolis. Sullivan told the.Montrose Voice that no declsion has yet been made about the Houston footage and that no date has been set for airing of the documentary. Sullivan added that work is still being done on the program. Even Sullivan admits that there are some questions concerning the Bridges story. There is no accurate account of how much money was given to Bridges or how it wai; spent. It is also questionable as to whether Bridges was telling the truth about his sexual activity or lying to the crew in exchange for "meals and a few mghL~ in a cheap motel." Sullivan has already denied that Bridges was a prostitute. He revealed that Bridges told WCCO of only one encounter where he accepted five dollars. Those who knew Bridges, including Barnich and Hill, feel it was highly unlikely that a person in Bridges' condition could have practiced prostitution. Bridges was nearly six-feet tall and weighed barely 125 lbs. whilP in Houston He also had skin lesions on the lower portion of his body. Barnich said Fabian Bridges "couldn't give it away." Bridges wai; re-hospitalized at Jeff Davis after living with Barnich for a week. His condition appeared to have been improvini' until last Saturday when a form of pneumonia assoicnted iwth the disease forced his temperature up to 105 degrees. Now that Fabian Bridges is dead, all those involved with the tragic fate of the 3().year-old gay black man admit he was a hungry, sick and homeless person, not a criminal. The question now arises as to whether a Minnesota televison station will capitalize from this tragedy WCCO has ogrccd that if the Houston and Cleve· land material i, used, it will qualify it by revealing the conditions under which the ·information was gained. Protestors are calling for the same qualification when the story is aired by the Boston station. Incid!'ntally, ai; of Tuesday, Bridg!'R body remained at Jeff Davis. Doctors were attempting to contact relatives about deal­ing with hi~ remains. Even in death, it >eems Fabian Bridges has nowhere to go. ~q Nobody luus foR lus. We can put you in the car of your choice without putting you into debt WE LEASE ALL MAKES & MODELS BUICK OLDS CADILLAC '86 Somerset .. 164 Mo. '86 Ciera ...... 164 Mo. '86 Deville Coupe '86 Park Ave .. 263 Mo. '85 98 Regency 244 Mo. FORD BMW '86 Mustang 149 Mo. '85 325e ...... 314 Mo. 86 T ·B1rd . . . 176 Mo. '85 535 ....... 409. Mo. Call MOODI LOVE 973-0070 1303 UPLAND •(I.AMP\.£ lb(• l(C:Oup•('koy.nro a.'SnPS20,9000 '~P~S~l'946 A~V ,,.,, 86"'1 , ..... .. . 289Mo. '86 El Dorado . 319 Mo. NISSAN '86 200SX . 164 Mo. '85 300ZX ..... 249 Mo. £.}Jf..PfSJ~i :.lllJDSJ:J!J "Where the World Meets Houston" 106 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006 (713) 523-2218 ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED YOUR HOSTS. Albert G. Nemer f John J. Adams and Gordon A. Thayer NOW LEASING ---With Option to Purchase--- large Beautiful Swimming Pool Controlled Entry Security Remote Controlled Garage Entry High Efficiency AC & Heating One Bedroom - One Bath One Bedroom With LDft - One Bath Two Bedroom - Two Bath Two Bedroom - Two Bath Townhouse From $375.00 a month FREE! 19 INCH COWR TV WITH A TWO YEAR LEASE Offke Open Dally 11 :00-6:00 2507 Montrose Houston, Texas 524-0830 NOVEMBER 22, 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 N. Y. Mayor Says Absolutely Not N.Y. Health Official Favors Hotel Room Searches The New York state health commissioner said last Sunday his investigators would enter hotel rooms if necessary to stop sex· ual activity linked to the spread of the deadly disease AIDS. This is according to UPI. "I think that if we find that a hotel, by virtue of information that we obtain, is catering to that kind of activity, then I think we will have reason to take an action, and if necessary, a warrant to go into rooms-if it becomes essential," Dr. David Axelrod was quoted. Axelrod, who spoke in a taped interview aired Sunday on a New York TV program, said the city haA not searched any hotels. "But from the experience that California had, my expectation is that there may be a point at which some hotels may be the primary venue for this kind of high-risk activity," he said. Dr. James Haughton, Houston's health dirl'ctor, told the Houston Post he do<·sn't see the need to invade hotel rooms or, for that matter, to close bathhouses. He said public health workers have screrned the city's bathhouses for I 0 years, looking for syphillis, which can be transmitted through the same kinds of sexual activities as AIDS. "We really can't get as excited about closing the bathhousei; in Houston as in New York City, because people have changed their pratices and they're becom­ing more careful," he was quoted as say­ing. Mark Senak, legal services director of the Gay Men's Health Crisis and chair­man of the AIDS Resource Center in new York City, said the action could bea "prec­ursor" to a sodomy law. "It's the law trying to get in bed with people and it's not going to be successful," UPI quoted Senak. "It's not going to work. They have a law against prostitution and there has always been prostitution. It's a waste to see resources spent in that matter . . . The key to this education. It's opening minds, not closing doors." Mayor Edward Koch of New York Mon=­day rejected the call by state health offi­cials to extend the crackdown on "high-risk" sexual activity to include hotel raids by investigators. "We will not send in sex police to hotels to ascertain the nature of sex practices between consenting adults," Koch was quoted in another UPI report. Speaking to reporters by phone from Tokyo, where he is vacationing, Koch con tradicted state Axelrod. Gov. Mario Cuomo Mrmday supported Axelrod's statement, saying if a hotel pro­moted "high-risk" sexual activity or "if it were a substitute for bathhouses, it would be vulnerable" to the regulations. The city has been enforcing emergency regulations banning "high-risk" sexual activity, defined as anal and oral sex. on the premiseR of bathhouses and gay clubs that charge a fee. The mayor said the city did not intend to extend its investigations to hotel.;. "I don't believe any responsible person would extend that proposal to hotel rooms and private homes. We're not going to engage in sex cops breaking into hotel rooms or private homes for that purpose," the mayor was quoted. Meanwhile, legislators in Trenton, N.J., introduced a bill Monday that would require adult bookstore owners to record Grand OpQlling F1flun year$ aqo Whole Earth Provt!>ton Co wa!> founded on the. principle of offering alternative merchandise chonn for quality, fund1on, durability and comfort Come help u!> celebrate. lhe. C.rand Ope.rung of our beaubfu I new slore. Our fe$bv1lie' 90 on 'ltl Thankt.qiving ,.~"""'_. Brmq a friend 'join us. Enter our colorinq conle$t. Pick up our fret Halley'' Comet V1ew'1n9 Schedule C rtqi6ler lo win J over lwo thou.and dollars in pnzesl Stop by £ v1s1t U$ soon , al our uc1bnq new store \~11tole Eartlt·<~~llM. I:>~2x!,~i2}l ~!.2.'11pa1ty Houston Alabama 5~ph.rd C•nl°' 526-5226 customers' names and make the owners liable if a customer contracted AIDS on the premises, UPI reported. Reports of sexual activity between males in X-rated shops prompted the prop­osal , according to its sponsor Assembly-man Thomas Paterniti. Jeffrey Fogel, director of the American Civil Liberties Union of New Jersey, said the bill was a veiled attempt to impose Paterniti's own "moral objection" to adult bookstores. The 3317 Montrose office building is slated for remodeling as part of a new one square·block shopping complex. (Roger Lackey photo). New Shopping Center Planned for the Montrose A new shopping complex, featuring shops, restaurants, and possibly a movie theater, is being planned for the Montrose. DMI Properties, headed by president Dennis McKenna, plans to spend $14.5 million to renovate the office building located at 3317 Montrose. The remainder of the block, which is bordered by Rose­land on the east; Hawthorne on the south; and Lovett on the north, will be developed into a 58,000 sq. ft retail center with a 400-car multi-level parking garage. McKenna is also negotiating for a six­screen movie theater that would seat 1,500. The closest movie theaters for Mont­rose residents are located on South Main and in the Galleria. Renovations to the 3317 building will include exterior refinishing and new paint and carpeting. When completed, the shopping complex, nearly half of which is pre-leased, will lease for between $18.50 to $20.50 a square AMC ~I ERIC JOHNSON 933-9000 Your Friendly Representative at ARCHER CHRYSLER-P LYMOUTH­AMc/ j EEP 11614 SOUTHWEST FRWY. HOUSTON, TEXAS 77031 foot. Office space will rent for $15 a square foot. Construction of the new development, to be known as Montrose Park, is scheduled to begin January 1986 with completion slated for September 1986. Terrigno Arraigned The Hou.•ton Post reported on Tuesday that West Hollywood City Councilwoman Valerie Terrigno, the first mayor of the nation's first city with an openly homo­sexual government, was arraigned Mon­day on charges she embezzled more than $10,000 in fenderal funds while running a gay counseling agency. The indictment claims Terrigno, 32, embezzled $10, 795 from the Federal Emer­gency Management Agency while serving as executive director of the now-defunct Crossroads Counseling in Hollywood in 1983-84. PISTONS UP /Auto Repairf r----------, 1 Oil, filter, and I 1 lube job 1 I with this coupon I I ~95 I L __ ~p:es _:1~/~ __ J 1901 Taft 5~8-1901 6 MONTROSE VOICE I NOVEMBER 22, 1985 A bull ridtnR conte,.tant Mr TGRA, Jimmy Golden, 1s flanked by Miss TGRA, Magnolia Spirits (left), and Ms. TGRA, Laura Lee. Walter Strickler, TGRA grand marshal Montrose Country Cloggers Photos by Roger Lackey Texas Gay Rodeo Raises $30,000 for Charities Royalty contt>.stant.; in the Second Annual Texa~ Gay Rodeo rai;;ed over $30,000 for various charities in citit's participating in the gay rodeo circuit. Royalty winners were announced Fri· ENt:RAL REPAIP TAFT -iiA!ut omotive 1411 Taft 522-2190 *Cooling System check & nush $2795 * A/C Charge & Check $2695 • * O il, Fiiter & lube $2A'$ ASX FOR CHIEF BUTTl!OCIC TllTIEl to check voui cuo. ng . ,..stem• day night at the rodeo held at the Houston Farm and Ranch Club For the second con· ~ecutive year, Laura Lee of San Antonio was named Ms. TGRA. Magnolia Spirits of Magnoha is the new Mii;.s TGRA, and SERVICE LUS Jimmy Golden, also of Magnolia, was crowned Mr. TGRA • Sherry McNutt, of Denver, was named Best All·Around Cowgirl. David Vicker~. of Alvin, was the Best All-Around Cow· boy. Approximate attendance for the four· day evmt was 4,000. Ribbons were awarded to 150 event winners and $7,600 in prizes were awarded. 110oi. O'FFPA~nm5' m'ml "iOrl.o~ I~ e A/C. REPAIR ~ ,..., e VW SPECIALISTS ~ ~ & FOREIGN CARS IC' I :D ALSO • OVER 10 YEARS OI 1-:4 OPEN EXPERIENCE ill SAT eENGINE ~, 1z CARS OVERHAULS Q :?TRUCK e ~~~:RICAL ~I 521-1015 l:,cvCLES ~I As many meats as we all eat, there's 10 a: absolutely no reason why each one ~ TEXAS STATE ~I shouldn·t be en1oyable. ~ j ... , weekday Specials I~ INSPECTION STATIO I POT LUCK 1: 238 WEST GRAY ~ Lunch or Dinners I~ 528-2886 (Tea or Coffee included) 1111 • OP~N only $399 ~ SAM 5 30PM NOW with all Egg Orders- I::?• TWO LANES Hash Browns or Gflts included I~• FAST SERVICE: <nl ~ Rediscover the 0. AUTO REPAIRS .... wag BOULEVARD CAFE ~ I~. MUFFLERS . TIRES • CONVERTERS :1 lil11111111!11!lm:!l!lil'n!lm:llllllll ~ t.-.. .... ..,.r::;. _______ .._ ________ _, ~._---------1-h.1 s.w_ee_k_' __________ ~ l.!?~o::..,o!f,~R,!!~12.!;:'!2'!.l~Off.I NOVEMBER 22, 1985 /MONTROSE VOICE 7 Underground Drug Trials-AIDS Patients Consider End Run Around Medical Establishment By Barry Vinocur Pacific News &ruice Special to the Montrose Voice SAN FRANCISCO-Frustrated by what they say is the excessively slow pace of current AIDS drug trials, a group of San Francisco AIDS and ARC (AIDS Related Complex) patients are laying the ground­work for an unsanctioned study involving drugs not yet approved for treating AIDS. According to Richard Rector of the San Francisco chapter of"People With AIDS," the trial is being designed with the assist­ance of Bay Area health professionals, including some physicians and a clinical re11earcher. "Our goal," says Rector, who is himself an ARC patient, "is to provide both AIDS and ARC patients with a treatment option while at the same time gathering mean­ingful scientific data. "There are hundreds of patients pursu· ing all sorts of different therapies, from Vitamin C to isoprinosine, and nobody's collecting any data." The two drugs the trial will monitor are Ribavirin, an anti-viral agent believed by some to prevent the AIDS virus from mul­tiplying, and isoprinosine, an immune­stimulating drug. Neither is available to AIDS patients in the United States but can be purchased over-the-eounter in Mexico. According to Rector, the government at one time sought to ban the drugs from entering the United States but now allows people to bring them in for personal use only. Patients who want to participate in the trial will have to acquire the drugs on their own. They will then be asked to follow a set treatment period and to agree to have certain testa done before starting therapy Both doctors agree that the federal govern­ment is not moving ahead as rapidly as it could, nor is it coordinating what experimental drug trials are underway. and during its course. Following baseline blood and urine stu­dies, Rector said, participants will begin daily oral therapy with two drugs-with 10 days of therapy, followed by five days off the medication, then five days on and five days off for a year. For some AIDS researchers, such under­ground trials-no matter how well designed-could pose serious problems. Dr. Marcus Conant, professor of dermatol ogy at the University of California-San Francisco and chairman of the state's AIDS Task Force, worries that unsancti· oned trials of untried drugs might not only harm patients but also eliminate some options. Conant asks, for example, what would happen if an ARC patient who is doing reasonably well decided to participate in an unsanctioned trial only to discover later that the drug he had been taking was actually an immune suppressant. Conant also worries that without the informed consent process built into all sanctioned trials, some patients may not be aware that taking a drug like an anti­viral agent may preclude their enrollment in another trial at some future date. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ "This isn't punitive. There are just some trials that may require that patients haven't been treated with another anti­vrial drug for some specified period of time." Dr. Martin S. Hirsch, associate profes­sor of medicine at Harvard ~edical School and an infectious disease specialist, shares many of Conant's concerns. In addition, he emphasizes that it is extremely unlikely underground trials would produce any meaningful data. "Unless they have the proper control and laboratory backup, including the abil­ity to do viral cultures," Hirsch maintains, "the net effect from their well-motivated effort may be to impede rather than facili­tate our gathering of scientific data." Rector agrees that not being able to obtain viral cultures could be a significant block but says they plan to obtain all of the other laboratory tests currently used in AIDS drug trials. Moroever, he believes the technology may be available within the next six months for conducting such tests outside of research centers. Were the federal government moving ahead more quickly with large-scale.clini­cal trials, Rector emphasizes, there would be no need for the study in the first place. Conant and Hirsch both agree that the federal government is not moving ahead as rapidly as it could, noris it coordinating what trials are underway. "The fundamental problem is that they still don't have a coordinated AlDS pro­gram," Conant notes. "Everyone may think that each office within the federal government knows what the other is doing, but those of us working on this problem can tell you that isn't the case." There is also a need for the federal government to establish a clearing house that would let researchers know what trials are underway. Both Conanat and Hirsch acknowledge that in some cases they learn about new trials only from patients. "There's no clearing house we can call to find out what other centers are doing," Hirsch said, leadingtoa lot of time spent on the phone talking to patients and colleagues about various trials. "What we need is a computerized system that we could plug into and find out what trials are underway and where," Hirsch said. Such a system may be forthcoming. "I have heard from people at the NIH that they are trying to implement a system that would make that kind of information more readily available," Hirsch said. In the meantime, Rector says that unless the federal government acts soon to speed up and better coordinate AlDS trials, they plan to begin their unsancti­oned trial sometime "'-ithin the next sev­eral months. "There are two new cases of AIDS diag­nosed and at least one AIDS related death every day in San Francisco alone. So I don't think we can afford to wait much longer before taking action." 8 MONTROSE VOICE / NOVEMBER 22. 1985 Dan White's Political Suicide Says a Lot About Changing U.S.A. More Than a Personal Drama By Franz Schurmann Pat:ifit: Neu;s Service Special to the Montrose Voice Political suicides are rare, and when they occur they invariably shed light on broader political and historical proceses which happen to intersect with the suicide VJct1m's life. This is the case in the suicide of Dan White, the former San Francisco supervi· sor who took his own life seven years after k1llmg two of the city'• leading politicians. White's targets were Mayor George Mo•· cone, who was politically close to minori· ties, and SupcrVl,Or Harvey Milk, the city's first openly gay political power holder. White himself belonged to a different constituency, one shrinking in San Fran· cisco, acros the country, m many parts of the world Dan White c:ame from working cla" people who, in the generation of his fire­man father. believed San Francisco was their own, a city which, in the aftermath of World War II, was largely white. There were a few blacks, even fewer Latinos. and the Chinese were walled up in Chinatown. A Cnthohc and Jewish elite ran the city, but in many ways the powerful unions called the shot• The unions were by and large liberal, but were run patriarchally by strong white men of Irish, Italian and Jewish ethniot1C'S. Behind it all was an omnipresent and arch-roru ervative Catholic church which reinforced an elemental working class morality. Then an Italian mayor drifted way from his ethnics to court blacks and Latins, and a prommtent Jewish gay went his own way to blaze the trail for gay political power m San Francisco. An Irish Dan White began to realize that his seemingly rock·solid San Francisco world was van­ishing. And when he felt he had been tricked out of his supervisor's post, his temper flared and he murdered two fellow office-holden; whom he saw as traitors to that world. Dan White's class of people can be found all over the United States and other ocun· tries now de-industrializing They are the blue collar workers of our Midwest ind us· Dan White came from working class people who, in the generation of his fireman father, believed San Francisco was their own, a city which, in the afterma­thof World War II, was largely white. trial triangle or the factory towns of the British Midlands, the French Lorraine, the German Ruhr. This is the class whom 19th century socialist philosophers had proclaimed would inherit the world in this century. !"ow. however, in advanced coun· tries most of their work will soon be replaced by robots. But the working class is not vanishing silently There is resentment among older workers as among older farmers. and in their children frustration and anger. It is evident in this country's Rambo craze. and in the rowdinesi; of British youth. It can be sensed m the hatreds evident m police force,, into which so many children of the white working class have gone. Much of that hatred comes from a per· ception on their part that they have become forgotten people. The same can be said of inner-city blacks. Who, watching all the up-beat black·oriented TV shows, would ever guei;s that a huge sector of U.S. blacks has been abandoned by an economy that by and large still generates affluence for whites? Yet the horrendous figures on ghetto crime show that resentment, frus· !ration, anger are there. Forgotten, too, are youth as a whole. It used to be that youth was widely regarded as the most desirable stage oflife. Now the heroes have ever more gray hairs, and the heroinei; are seductive women of wisdom. Meanwhile. young people are told in Dar· w~ninan fashion that life is a rat-race, and not unexpectedly suicide rates are highest among young adulti;. The San Francisco press was full of musings on Dan White's suicide. Most mentioned the gay ii;1;ue. Others saw a haunted man unable to get a job, show his face, raise a family. It was generally assumed that he was mentally unbal· anred, particularly because of his unwil· lingness to repent for his crime. The general tone has been that, at last, his own death has evened things up, finally end· ing the drama. But the media in this glittering, Cosmo· politan everything·goes city do not reflect the thoughts of the large and growing pop· ulation of forgotten people: not just work· ing class whites, but blacks, Latinos, non·mam. tream elderly, immigrants, and the poor and untidy looking in general. When the U.S. still had a strong liberal state, the country busily tried to absorb the forgotten people into the mainstram. Dan White's working class in the end accepted integration, so long as it meant minorities adapting to their way of life with its manly ideals and modest lifes· tyles. But the 1960s brought in an American cultural revolution which unnerved Dan White even more than integration. In quick sucession, all the old pillars of honor, family and faith were knocked down. And all this at the same time as deindustrialization set in, reflected in San Francisco's vanishing docks and shop,;. Government data now consistently show some seven percent unemployment. That figure is con8ervative shorthand for designating the country's forgotten classes. They may be the debris of older working and farming classes, but their nothing·to-do and nowhere-to-go children are still around. Dan White was one of those children. He killed two political figures he saw as alien enemies and himself when he had nowhere else to go. Both the murders and the . uicide ll&Y a lot about contemporary U SA, if we are willing to see and hear. Gay Hispanic Caucus Changes Name The General Assembly of the Gay His· panic Caucus, during a regularly schedule meeting, voted to change the name of the organization to Gay and Lesbian Hispan­ics Unidos. Members felt that the old name did not effectively describe the functions of the group. It wa;; also noted that the former name gave no mention of Hispanic women. The political implications of the word "caucus" was one reason for the change The group wishes to remain politically active, but also wants to reaffirm its com· mitment to educational, cultural and social activities within the community. The word "unidos" is Spanish for "uni· ted." In accepting this term, the Houston group follows a pattern set by the largest gay Hispanic organization in the country, the Gay and Lesbian Latinos Unidos of Los Angeles. The Gay Lesbian Hispanics Unidos meets the second Monday of every month at the Dignity Center, 3217 Fannin, at 7:30 p.m. --- Thl' ni'w Montrose branch library u:ill bi' on one of these tu:o .'lies. It will be located at eilht'r the former Cmtral Church of Christ (left), 4100 Montrose, or rity·owned property at Mandell and Richmond. (Rogi'r Lacki'y photo). Site Problems Place Library Plans in Limbo Plans for the propo~ed Montro;;e Branch Library have been put on hold due to prob­lems in the final selection of a site for the new facility. According to Margo Diggs, communica· tion specialist with Houston Public Librariea, two sites are under considers-lion for the Montrose's first branch library. The first site considered was at 4100 Montrose in the building that was for· merly occupied by the Central Church of Christ. The city had considered leasing the sanctuary and some of the classrooms on the property. However, negotiations between the city and property owner John Hanson apparently have broken off. An alternate site, located on the sou· theast comer of Mandell and Richmond, would involve construction of a new build· ing, which would have 12,000-13,000 sq.ft. and cost approximately $1.2 million to build. The city already owns the property. According to Diggs, the city will proba· bly choose to build on the property it already owns. However, no final decision has been made. WE MAKE THE DIFFERENCE DRIVE THE CAR OF YOUR DREAMS FOR LESS!! Cash for Your Trade ... 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THE BEST COMPLEX FOR THOSE OF DISCRIMINATING TASTE • Spacious Floor Plans • Sparkling Pools • Unique Picnic Area • Near Greenspolnt Mall • Beautiful Landscaping • W/D Connections MOVE-IN TODAY AND RECEIVE A TRIP TO HAWAII, AUSTRALIA OR MEXICO 16250 IMPERIAL VALLEY DR. 448-6738 One block north of Tower Theater e NO MEMBERSHIP 1' e ~~E OEPOSIT ~ FOR MEMBERS e SAME DAY DELIVERY FOR MOST SPECIAL PURCHASE ORDERS Yes, we are - OPEN... ~ WE~;~\~C!» ~ 817 Fairview ~ 11amto2am Kody, Curtis, Chops, Rick, Keith and Ron 528-9204 THANKSGIVING DAY Happy Hour Prices from Opening 'tll Closing! NOVEMBER 22 1985 MONTROSE VOICE 9 c1J n 3ffilenwriam Michael Hoskins Michael Hoskins. 32, died in Oklahoma Nov 1, 1985. following a brief illness He 1s sur· v1ved by his parents, Ed and Fran Hoskins: a brother. David, two sisters. Becky and Linda; and his lover of eight years. Daryl Hayti. Hoskins was well known for being Disco Grandma's first friend in the gay commun­ity. Memorial donations may be made in his name to the KS,AIDS Foundation of Houston Miguel Angle Soler Miguel Angle Soler, 29. died Oct 25. 1985, in Ben Taub Hospital. A native of Cobre, Santiago, Cuba. Soler. over the years. lived 1n Miami. New Orleans, Los Angeles. Dallas, as well as Houston. He 1s survived by his mother, Celida: a sister, Barbara, and two brothers Ricky and Jose. Funeral services were held in M1am1. A memorial service was held November 19 at the Metropolitan Community Church of the Resurrection in Houston Memorial dona· lions may be made to American Cancer Research and the McAdory House Carl Hays Carl Don Hays. 69, a well-known educator and Montrose community arts organizer, died Nov 18. 1985. Hays. the first male art teacher in the Houston Independent School D1stnct, was founder of 27 existing organi­zations Including the Montrose Art Alliance and l/H, Inc . an umbrella organization for community arts groups. Hays was also active with Metropolitan Ministries and was instrumental in the development of its cottage industry pro· gram The Houston nallve's Chirstmas dee· orations program, incorporating the works of Houston schoolchildren, won him recog· nition from the American Red Cross. Hays 1s survived by three sisters, Mrs Bernice Walters, Mrs Clyde Lauersdorf Mrs Ocie Barner, all of Houston, two broth· ers, James B Hays, Bastrop La., George D Hays. Texas City. Tx.; and friend, Richard Burckhard!, Houston. Funeral services were held Nov. 20 at Ber­ing Memorial United Methodist Church, Rev Ron Pogue oflic1ating. Interment was In South Park Cememtary Pallbearers were William Buie. Robert Rogers, Richard Alt· man, Joe Davis. Bill Love and Lee Kleeman Memorial donations may be made to Bering Memorial United Methodist Church. 1440 Harold O'uR POLICY The Montrose Voice w111 corrmemorate the pa$S1ng of Montroae residents and Houston gay c..mmunlty rncnnberl "With an announcement Fnendl or relat ves ot U'le deceased may provide u1 w•tl'I f.cts at>out lhe persons 1 fe names of trieclosest 1urv1vor1 and buriltarrangementa Prose or verse can be included Ptcturea are appreciated ancs will be returned Name of the deceased shOuld be attached 10 the photo Information should be provlded to the t.Aontroa.e VOM:e at the Hrhcst possible date and w II be pubkshed '" the next av1il1ble edtl on Thefe IS "° charge for uus ~ Tom Coleman Resigns GPC Post Thome~ Colemen, on ~ov. 13, officially announced hio reoignat1on as vice prei;i· dent of the Houston Gay Political Caucus. Coleman has been named executive direc· tor of the Texas Human Rights Founda· tion <THRFJ, the group working with Donald Baker in the Supreme Court appeal of Texas Penal Code 21.06-the sodomy law. As executive director of TH RF, Coleman will supervise all fundraising, legal and public education activities associated with the case. The demands of the new position have also forced the Houston attorney to interrupt his private law prac· tice. In his letter of rei;ignation to GPC Presi· dent Sue Lovell, Coleman states, "The gay community, locally and nationally, is now facing legal, social, political and medical challenge. of an unprecedented and his· toric nature.. However, as a community, I am convinced that we possess the resour· ces. along \\~th those of our friends, not only to meet those challenges, but to take advantage of the opportunities that are presently ours to give birth to a new age of freedom for our people." Coleman·o GPC office will remain vacant until the regularly·scheduled GPC elections in January Study Says 1.8 Million Americans Exposed to AIDS Nearly 1.8 million Americans have been exposed to the AIDS virui; and risk devel· oping the di;:;oase, two New York Medical College doctors reported Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine. This was reported b~· the Reuter news agency. The doctors' ei;Umate meant that for each of the 6,000 li\;nl!' AIDS sufferers, there were 300other people who have been expo. ed. How many will actually develop the dis­ease was not estimated, Reut.t>r reported The fil!'ureF by Steven Si\;k and Gary Worrnser also said there were 64,200 exposed Amencans who did not belong in any oft he usual risk groups such as home>­$ exuals and intravenous drug abuser,;. An estimated 14,400 people were exposed w the ";ru~ through heterosexual contact, the •tudv said. The report alo~ said there were 1.3 mil· lion homosexual and bisexual exposed men (compared to 4,485 living \;ctims), 270,000 exposed drug abusers (compared with 923 alive) and 8,970 exposed heme>­philiacs (compared with 31 alive). Tl IE BEST Ll'nlE GUEST HOUSE IN TOWN REASONABLE NIGHTLY & WEEKLY RATES PRIVAfE BATIIS FREE PARKING FOR RESERVATIONS CALL (504) 566-1177 1118 l lRSl'LINES STREET, NEW ORLEANS, IA 70116 10 MONTROSE VOICE • NOVEMBER 22 1985 The Far Side by Gary Larson •1985UN VERSALPRESSS "IL-"'-- l I~ "Fuel ..• check. Lights ... check. Oil pressure .. check. We've got clearonce. OK, Jack-let's gel this baby off the ground." Dog endorsements 'Whoa! This iust looks like regular spaghetti! _ Whefe's my Earthworms Alfredo?" -~6=--=---==---· "C'mon, c 'mon! You've done this a hundred limes, Uzula; the vines always snap you back just before you hit. ... Remember, that's National Geographic down there." In God's kitchen Fortunes Pre-Thanksgiving Admirer for Scorpio By Mark Orion For foday. Nov 22 1985. through Thursday. Nov 28. 1985 ARIES Make a wish, then do your part toward its realization. Your agenda includes a party, words spoken in confi­dence and a secret yen. This weekend will find you in the lead role, center stage. To an S.RO. house, of course! TAURUS The rules of the game are what's important to you this weekend. Strategy and moves are what you get involved in. Be able to bend with a sudden wind. Think about what would happen if you got caught with your pants down. Remember to laugh. GEMINI -Mysterious event will hand you more charm and appeal than usual (and that's quite a bit'). Use 11 wisely; choose carefully those you really want to attract. November days close with happy buzz. CANCER What or who you were carefully watching last weekend has become understandable now In fact, you're catching on to things you never before considered important. You can make this a period of expansion and rapid growth just prior to a giving of thanks LEO There's a whole lot of difference between your 9 to 5 and what comes later. The work routine is getting you down, and the after-hours are getting you up. You're good at sticking to your course, but 1t may be time to consider some changes somewhere VIRGO You have oodles of 1magina­t1on You can create a dream picture of anything you want. Now, let your fertile imagination help you find ways to turn your dream into reality. (Probably a little work 1s needed, too.) LIBRA-Dressing up or dressing down. wearing a mask or a strange d1sgu1se-you don't mind You know what it's for You· re carrying out last wee­kend's plans l'ke no turkey could. Per­haps you're a spy in the house of love Investigate Examine SCORPIO- There's someone out there who'd iust love to gobble gobble with you a secret admirer who probably won·1 be so secret when Thanksgiving 1s gone. This one could blow more than just your ordinary cool Are you in for some surprisesi SAGITTARIUS -Scattered fragments of an idea have just been flirting with each other in your head. This weekend they get 1t on, and you can proceed with vigor. Do be prepared for one who disagrees with you The weekend ends with a kiss and 1s followed by a Juicy bird. CAPRICORN-You're full of energy this weekend, and that's good, because you have lots to do Others ask quite a bit from you You may find yourself doing more coordinating than actual doing­though that's plentyi AQUARIUS-In-depth exploration of a particular relationship can bring real joys Get to know this person on a new level. Your personality bubbles over with calls and a proposition to consider fol· lowed by a happy Thanksgiving gathering. PISCES-The buzz of gossip and whis­pered innuendoes are flying all around you While your ears are burning with all those crazy sounds, you're concerned with more important things-like loving what you have and knowing how how deep that love goes NOVEMBER 22, 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 11 New Voices in Women's Lib-Female Rappers 'Cap' the Guys in Funky Poetry of the Street By Stan West Pacific Nt>wB &ruice Special to the Montrose Voice SAN FRANCISCO-"Me the Rox, give up the bucks? So you could brag about it the next six months? S- , you must be crazy!" Not exactly a love croon, but Roxanne Roxanne's message gets a wide listening these days. She is one of a growing number of black and Hispanic women who have made "rapping" -street poetry set to electro­funk music-their own language of libera· tion . At first, some detractors thought they were just a temporary response to the male rappers like Kurtis Blow who hit it big with "gold" rap records. But it's now apparent that women rappers will be here for quite a while. The reason, say the women themselves, is that rapping is one of the few vehicles of expression left to grassroots black women. Most will never have a commercial record and they know it, but that doesn't detract from the strength of their lyrical litany, or their determination to show an art-starved, male-dominated world that women of color have something to say. And though their words are intended for other women to hear, these rappers are purposely talking loud enough so their male counterparts will get an earful too. Their heroines include Tina Turner and Aretha Franklin, women who overcame rough treatment by the men they loved and lived to tell their story in a way that sings of sweet revenge. Unlike male rappers, whose swaggering braggadocio often turns into self-eentered verse, women rappers lean toward a var­iety of themes. They rap about South Africa, hunger, nuclear war, Pan· African ism, tenants rights and feminism. "I talk about healthy, human positive We talk mainly to women because we want them to have more confidence and strength. And believe it or not, most guys that hear me and the other ladies rap respect us for hav­ing the courage to say how we really feel. issues. I'm anti·schlock. I'm pro-human," says Tequila Mockingbird. "Much of the stuff men rap about puts women down. I reject that superficial garbage.That's why I rap." Mockingbird, 28, wears a short-cropped orange Afro, dresses made from shower curtains and rusty paper clip earrings . .. I hate the cookie-cutter look," she explains. With her new wt>ekly cable television pro· gram, "Girlz Own TV Show," Mocking­bird has become "the first scratch-punk video rapper." Shonise Rochon Bradshaw, 17, who goes by the name "Niecey B," explains that she started rapping "because I could do it better than the guys" -a point echoed by all the women. "We're the new voices of women because we're out there on Front Street telling the stories of how other women feel who are still afraid to speak up about the mistreatment they get from guys," she says. "We talk mainly to women because we want them to have more confidence and strength," she goes on. "And believe it or not, most guys that hear me and the other ladies rap respect us for having the cour· age to say how we really feel." Bradshaw says her first raps "capped (put down) the guys who used to talk SANCHEZ FINE AUTO REPAIR G E N • Wrecker SeMCe • Pager# 5494740 • 24 Hour SBMCe • SeMce HOUIS Serw:e HOUIS Mon. · Fn. 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Proctor, MD,PhD MPB Clinic Suite ID, 5401 Dashwood, Bellaire 661-2321 mess," but she has now graduated to themes such as hunger in Africa and apar­theid. A similar story comes from Dominique DiPrima. "The stuff guys were rapping about, such as eg~ and how 'bad' they were, turned me off so I started rapping when I was about 15 on New York City streets. I knew it was something females could be good at. "It's been a no-no for so long for women to speak their piece," she goes on. "People thought I was crazy in 1979 when I started rapping to cap on they guys who were cap­ping on the girls ... But now she says, female rappers are "the new voices of ghettoi;_'' DiPrima, or "Lady D," raps in Spanish and English-she says rappers often think in one language and feel in another, and tend to interweave the languages in a mosaic. A junior at San Francisco State Univer­sity majoring in drama, DiPrima is consi­dered one of the top rappers in her area, male or female. She hosts a local TV pro­gram directed to young people, has made several records and appears as an opening act at major clubs. DiPrima herself points to other artists she calls "underrated"-including Lisette Salinas, a 6-year-old Salvadoran­American. "Girls are rapping now because they want to be cool just like the boys," says Salina, now in second grade. "I told my brother I could rap as good as he does, and now I'm the best rapper in the whole school." She raps: "My name is Lj,ette/ Hello out there/ I'm a little girl With long, black hair Sugar and spice/ I look so nice/ Big brown eyes/ And I tell no lies/ Come on and get down/ But no foolin' around/ I ain' t no fool/ I went to rappin' school." One woman rapper who has rewritten the rules of narrative street poems is Pha­via Kujichaguha, 27. She traces the form to the "griots" of West Africa, who would take items of current interest and weave them into poetic historical chronicles that were passed from generation to genera­tion. "People get turned off with the term 'rapper' because it signifie" disco and mindlessness-a J>l'('Udo art form with no focus and no identity." She herself per­forms to African muisic, jazz and poetry which "draws from heritage, past expe­rience, mal(ic, heredity, art, science and self." The dreadlocked Kujicjagulia-Swahili for black beauty and awareness-has pro­duced three volumes of poetry, and has performed for seven years with Ancestral Wisdom, a collective ofrappers, musicians and dancers. She says, "The people who have the message and the true creativity are rarely seen or heard. But the people wh~e art forms are detrimental to our souls, spirits, myth and growth get all the publicity." Some women rapper have a special message. Jamaica-born Farika Birhan, for example, raps of the female vision of Rastafar life to ttggae music.. But not all are concerned with political or religious subjects. Saundra Jones, 20, raps about the bittersweet problems of being a teen· aged woman. Though women' is rapping seem" to be catching on most quickly on the West Coast, East Coast rappers seem to be get· ting moi;t of the recording contracts and air play. These include the humorous Sula, Lisa Lee. and the most popular female rapper, Roxanne. But the woman who has made the most money from rap records-primarily male rap records-is Sylvia "Pillow Talk" Robinson. In fact, Robinson is credited with kicking off the whole rap movement with "Rapper's Delight" by the Sugarhill Gang on her Sugarhill label in 1979. She has a lso produced a number of top rappers-like Grandmaster Flash and the Furious Five-who have hit it big in this country as well as Europe and Japan. 12 MONTROSE VOICE I NOVEMBER 22. 1985 Music You Asked for It, You Got It With nil the competition between Mont· rose audio art1sti, the Montrose Voice is resuming its weekly Top Tunes listing. Dceiays wishing to let the community know what i. pleasing to the ears at their respective club" should call Linda at the Voice no later than Wednesday 12:00 noon Wednesday of each week at 529-8490. Lary Thompson, of Mary's leads off thii; week Of course, the the tastes at Mary's are so diverse. he has submitted a top 20. According to Lary, Five Minutes by Main­frame is themostpopulardiscat 1022Wes­theimer. :'\ot true on Pacific? Fairview? Hyde Park? Richmond? Call Linda by next week and let the Voice Vinyl View knov. . The tunes that came in behind Five Mm· utes are: 2. Shock Wave-David Knopfler 3. Jma!(matwn-Telekin 4. Eaten A/11·e - Diana Ross 5. Thinking About You-Whitney Houston 6. I Like You-Phyllis r-;eJi;on 7. My Hea1t Goes Ban!(-Dead or Alive !!. Hell in Paradise-Yoko Ono 9. Enter the AnRel-John Goxx 10. It's Called A Heart-Depeche Mode 11 Who's Zooming Who-Aretha Franklin 12 Who Needs LoLe Like Thal­Erasurc 11 Hurricane-Topps 14 Be My Lover Sow-Oakey & Mor· oder 15. Tarzan Boy-Bolttmorc 16 Gimme Gimme, Gimme-Three Degrees 17. Say II Agam-Danse Society 18. Dare Me-Pointer Sisters 19. Temptation Eyes-Gino Soccio 20. P Machinery-Propaganda Letters The Most Important Health Problem From Loran E Doos Recently, a newscaster said that the chance of a person contracting AIDS was one in a million. Evidently. this is based on the population living in the Arizona desert. With over 365 cases in Houston alone, the risk is quite higher. The news media is very negative in its approach to the AIDS issue. Since AIDS is the most important health problem that we have faced in some time, a more positive atti· tu de should be given. (Editor's note: The newscaster's figure is reasonably accurate at the present time whether you arl' /wing in the Arizona de.•ert or Houston IF you are a helerosex· ual for lesbian) and not an intrevenouo drug user or hemophiliac. If you are a male homooexual, lwtn!( in a ma1or metropolitan area, there's perhaps better than an even chance that you have already been exposed to the AIDS-caw; in!( virus. One exposure may or may not later cause symptoms of the disease to deve· lope. Repeated exposures perhaps will. Practicing-and enjoytn!(-"Safe Sex" will !(really 1mpr0Le your chances of con tinued good hPalth J SANDSPOINT COVE APARTMENTS •All Adult • Pets Accepted w/Deposit • Secure Complex • Spacious Floor Plans • on Metro Bus Line • Convenient Location • Door to Door Trash P.U. • Satellite Coble • O~Site Management •Swimming Pool • 24 Hr. 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One Pine !1 - Under New Management •- Efficiencies sta rting at .. . ... .. .. . ..... . .. . ............. $310 1 Bedroom starting at .... . .. . ....... . .. . ............... $330 1 Bedroom Studios starting at ... . .............. . ....... $365 1 Bedroom w/ Den starting at ......... . . ............... $365 2 Bedroom 1 and Ph bath starting at .... . ... . ... . ... . . . $425 ********************************* BRING THIS AD TO ONE PINE APARTMENTS AND RECEIVE YOUR FIRST MONTH'S RENT FOR $25.00! ********************************* 4300 Sherwood Lane• Houston, Tx 77092 • (713) 680-3922 NOVEMBER 22. 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 13 Dr. Didato's Personality Quiz Are You An Effective Decision-Maker? By Salvatore V. Didato, Ph.D. Neu·s America Syndicate Special to thf' Montrou Voice There's the story about the man who quit his job of sorting large from small apples. "It's not the people, wages or the hours that I dislike," he told the boss. "It's the decisions, decisions, decisions." Indeed life is an endless chain of deci· sions. You might think that with all our experience at making decisions we'd be experts at it. With most of us, however, this isn't the case. Unlike other skills, decision-making does not necessarily improve Wlth repeti­tion. When someone announces proudly, "I have 10 years of experience in a job," it might not mean that he is skilled. It could posRibly mean instead that he has made many of the same incorrect decisions for 10 years, yet got by without much advancement in his chosen career. Can you say with assurance that you make wise decisions often? If the answeris no, then perhaps our quiz will help. Answer True or False: I. I usually trust my gut feelings when I make a decision. 2. I believe that my life depends on fac­tors outside of my control. 3. I try to increase my decision-making ability by making as many decisions as possible. 4. When going out for the evening, I often change my mind about what I will wear .5. I have made the same New Year'F resolution more than once. 6. I believe thnt luck, more than cheer­ing, makes a team win. 7 When dining with others, I am usually the last to select from the menu. 8. I own many things which I thought I'd use or enjoy, but now I regret having bought thf.'m. o Explanation People who are judged to be good decision· makers tend to answer FalRe to the state­ments. I. Feelings or "gut"reactionR are often prompted by our wishes and are poor guideposts when making a decision. It's better to calm down emotionally, and then allow your cool reasoning to take over 2. Thost' who believe that their decisions don't matter because their future is beyond their control are trapped in a self· fulfilling prophecy. Surveys by psycholo­gists John H. Sims and Duane Baumann found that those who believe they control their own lives make more accurate deci· sions than those who trust fate. 3. If you closely examine a crisis, you might be surprised to learn that the deci· sion may not be yours to make. In fact, too many bad decisions could erode your self· ~·411 Good deC'ision skills are necessary to pick the rif(ht paths in life confidence. Although you govern some areas of your life, the responsibility for taking a course of action might well be up to someone else. 4 People who often vacillate between alternatives, more often than not, make poor decisions. Furthermore, their anxiety is too high to cope with a bad decision, should it happen. After you chooRe a course of action, it's better to stick to itand have a back·up plan should it turn out to be wrong. 5. Poor deciders often don't have insight. Like Mark Twain, who gave up smoking a thousand times, they often resolve to do something which is noble but unrealistic. The trouble is they don't know themselves well enough to foresee that they'll fail to live up to their vow when the going gets tough. 6. (Sec 2 above.) People who put luck over human influence usuallv don't take the kind of action which gives \hem con· 11cioui; control over their lives. 7. (See 4 above.) It might be better to decide beforehand that if vou order a dish which is unsatisying, you;ll make the best of it. 8. Impulse buying accounts for 15 per­cent of all sales. This "buy now, regret later" syndrome is common among weak decision-makers. Their choices are based on emotions which dominate them when something delights their fancy. Often they buy out of fear that there won't be another chance to possess the item. o Score 7-8 correct-Good decision-maker M E R I D I E N L EA S I N G I N C. We Make Your Automotive Needs A E_/easant Experience '86 MERCEDES BENZ 190E JOOE 560Sl 349,mo 498mo 725.mo __ '8ij~GUAR XJ6 569 mo '86 PORSCHE 944 944 Turbo 398 mo 498 mo '86 HONDA Al: cord Prelude 159 mo 17'} mo 325i 528e 735i '85 BMW 345.mo 425·mo 549.mo '86 CADILLAC DeVille 329mo 4-6 correct-Fair decsion·maker 0-3 correct-Weak decision-maker Note· Decisions requiring continuou' commitment are the hardest to fulfill, (i.e , eating, drinking, smoking less). This spe­dal class of decisions takes more will· power Expcnmmt.s at Yale University show that here it might be bE·st to use the buddy system, i .e., ~hare your decision ";th someone who can give you moral sup­port along the way. This methods works in Alcoholics Anonymous, Weight Watchers and other such groups. No matter what your score, your decision-making can be improved. Profes­sors David Wheeler of the University of Cincinnati and Irving Janis of Yale, authors of "A Practical Guide for Making Decisions," teach Ruch skills in their classes. '86 BUICK '86 MAZDA CALL LEE BORBA Skylark Electra ---- 179mo 279 mo RX-7 209 mo 626 178 mo NO 00\\'N PAYMENT • LOWER MONTHLY PAYME T • CASH FOR YOUR TRADE ~EAR THE• \ r- (713) 975-1986 14 MONTROSE VOICE I NOVEMBER 22 19A.'i Female Friends By Bill O'Rourke Montrose ~'oice Theater Critic Great minds run in the same trackb. Paul Zindel WTote the much-honored Jo:ffects of Gamma Ray• on Man in the Jfoon .WaTlgolds. Theater Suburbia is cur­rently showing hib Ladies at the Alamo. John Ford Noonan wrote an Emmy­award "inning episode of "St. Else­where " Hi.- A Coupla White Chicks Sitting Around Talking is on hand at the Tower Both play,, deal with female pair bond­ing. Why is friendship-in these cases between married women-so important? What needs, intellectual and emotional, do these relationships pro,; de women that are different from the one;; met by their relationships ,.,;th their hu .. bands? This 1s not a new i;ubJe<'t. Male friend­ships have probably been given more examination. Remember Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid and the avalanche of article.•, TV •hows and movies that it started? But the ladies have had their way at lea,t as far back as Lucy and Ethel That's all right. Thi;; is one of those com­mon, human Rubjects that will never grow old What is amazing ib that in both shows a woman must come to grips with the fact that her husband and her bebt friend have been to bed together. (In Alamo, one of the ladies 1s a bit of a nymphomaniac. In White Chicks, the huRband has "roving hands.") Hoth sets of friends transcend this setback. Their main focus 1;; else­where They don't put 1t behind themselve• eas­ily And nobody is a goody two-shoes with three gold stars. It's to the writer's and actresses' credit that none drops out of character to accompli;;h it These are real women faced with larger is•ues. For the White Chicks, it is finding them ­selves. Elizabeth Ashley's Hannah Mae Bindler 1s a twanging braHS belle fresh from Texas. But her husband intimidates her. She n~ds to team to stand up and demand h€'r equality. Susan Anton's Maude Mix is a repressed, West Chester housewife. She not only has to overcome her hu•band's lack of attention, she also must lay to reRt the ghost of her nagging mother. She u< obsessed with neatness. Everything i,; too planned and she has to break out. With eaCh other's support, they come to some surpnhing solutions, or ii; it the actresses' abilities that make them seem surprising? Nothing ii; glib or pat. !l:l'arly everything ii; funny. There are some very memorable linei;. There is no innpired lunacy, no slapstick. This is a very quiet tour de force Thei;e ladies are, 1 / after all, Just A Coupla White Chicks Sit­ting Around Talking. This ii; another play where most of the action happens off-stage or between scenes. Ladies at the Alamo isn't. The fighting happens there on-stage in front of you. These ladies know who they are. The question here is survival. A friend who believes in you-not blindly, but with both eyes wide open-can be a bulwark when you have those sudden self-doubts and re­evaluations, or when other people are try­ing to take from you that which seems necessary to your self-definition-even, as in this case, when both thei;e problems hit you at once. A snide wealthy lady (Susan Lee) is the chairman of the board and prime patro­ness of a theater much like what the Alley must have been like shortly after it moved into its pre;<ent location. She's decided to wrest the real control away from the theat· er's founder and artistic director (Dixie Taylor). Unfortunately for her, she has chosen for her henchlady a failed actress (Golda Deadrick in a fine, raw-edged per· formance). Except for a few small line-memory problems, Dixie Taylor is perfect. Her fist-that of a true daughter of the Texas pioneers, all homespun, nearly-brutal energy-was encased in a grey velour glove of purposefully chosen and self a'sumed culture. Her mother has just been buried and she 1s fighting the first part of the evening ";th one hand tied behind her back-bound by threads of self-doubt. Carolyn Montgomery is equally, astoundingly good as her best friend and staunch ally. This lucious lush also take,; an infectiously natural delight through the evening in trying to thwart a teenage orgy taking place in a vacant building across the street. The only hint of lesbianism in either play is in the poor role played by Tess Wells·Dunlop. This admirable but self· repres. ed lady is used as a pawn by both sides. However, Zindell does let her make an eloquent case for herself before she slowly flees the f;tage. Tess did a superb job with a role in which she was just ,;lightly miscast. That could have easily been, but was not, overcome simply by adding padding to her C08tume to make her appear fat. That's characteristic of director Bruce A. Mather's work in this play. He did excellent work with the broad sweep of things but did not pay enough attention to details. I couldn't believe how many times all of these ladies just walked around the BBQ ribs lying on that beautiful carpet before someone finally cleaned them up. l Montrose Live Tes8 Wells (left) and Carolyn Montgomery in "Ladies at the Alamo" And he allowed a cake designed by Clara Mather (his wife?) to appear onstage with­out conforming to the •cript. It was a beau­tiful rendition of the imaginary theater Elizabeth Aahley co·stars with Susan Anto m "A Coupla White Chicks Sitting Around Talk inf' building but it did not possess one single flying buttress when the script makes a large point of it having several. Small things like that. This play was often very funny. Then it could tum around and nearly make you want to cry. Depending on your point of view, it's either more substantial or more mellowdramatic than White Chicks. I liked Alamo slightly more, but I heartily recommend either one. This is the last wee­kend for White Chicks. So you might want to go to it first. o Notes Houston Symphony Orchestra's recent tour ended with a concert in Carnegie Hall, NYC, November 16. It had been sold out since the 6th. It also reached millions of radio listeners through about 175 stat· sions, including KLEF. This performance was conducted by Christoph Eschenbach. The orChestra's music director Sergiu Comissiona had been scheduled to conduct, but had to be hospitalized after an attack of dizziness following the Nov. 8 performance in LaCrosse, Wis. Maestro Comissiona has returned to Houston. He has been able to resume a light workload pending further tests. Pin· chas Zuckerman who had been scheduled to play his violin in the Nov. 22-24 concerts has graciously agreed to conduct as well. This has necessitated some program changes as well. The evening will now fea­ture the Beethoven Violin Concerto and Schubert's Second Symphony .. .. The Chase Manhattan Corporation has provided $50,000 towards Faust, a joint production of Houston Grand Opera and the &attle Opera (which opens here next Friday). Over the next year, Chase intends to quintuple its grants given outside the NYC metropolitan arl'a . . . . If attending the Golden Grotto at Main Street, plan to arrive well ahead of time. Christmas is here and parking in the Vil­lage area is nearly impossible . .. . Theater Suburbia's next show is an orig­inal murdl'r mystery comedy by Houstoni· ans Joe McHale and Eddie Cope. Pasties is set in a school for burlesque entl'rtain· ers. Mc Hale, who's also directing, wants a technical advisor, a rl'tired stripper who remt>mbt'rs the lady-and·the-wolf routine. 771-7888 . ... Celebrate! Even in the midst of adver­sity and trials, we have so much for which to be than kful! Prepare for yourself a truly joyoua Thanksgiving, please! Meanwh ile, a few birthdays: 22-Andre Gide, Benjamin Britten; 23-Manuel De Falla , painter Il Bronzin o (may your tan never ,fAdel); ~nftml(h S,ieou; ~ Virgli Thomson, Dr. Mary Walker (Per· mitted hy an act of Congress to wear male attire, Dr. Walker was awarded the Con· gressional Medal of Honor for her service during the War Between the States.); 26- Alma Routsong (author of Patience and Sarah); 27-James Agee, poet Edmund John; 28-Rita Mae Brown! "An army of lovers shall not fail."­R. M. Brown. Enjoy! o Openings Christmas Arts and Crafts Exhibit (Mis­souri St. Gallery, 22)-The Montrose Art Alliance (member: IH, Inc.) Chrysalis Repertory Dance Company (Heinen, HCC, 22)-HCC's dance artists­in ·residence. Pinchas Suckerman (Jones, 22)­Tuesday Weld's new husband at the HSO. See above. Showtix in the Village (University Vil­lage, 23)-For three Saturdays, noon to 5, the popular hall-price, day of performance box office, usually located in Tranquility Park, will open a branch office in the Vil­lage, surrounded by performances by the Montrose Symphonic Band, Sister Song, etc .. etc., Freebies . ... Meet the Artists (Museum of Fine Arts, 24, 1:00)-a brief preview of Faust and a question and answer period. Freebies. ONO! HSO (Ball High School, 25)-their first series of concerts for Galveston school­children. Bill Hicks (Showstopper's, 26)-a native Houstonian, this stand-up comedian has appeared several times on David Letter· man's show. Macready (Heinen, 26}-a one-man play, written and performed by Frank Barrie, explores the life and times of one of 19th century England's greatest actors. Barrie, often seen with the Royal Shakes­peare Company and the National Theater of Great Britain, was Richard III in last summer's Houston Shakespeare Festival. ~ WESTERN INN MOTEL .LIL. WHERE THE SCALES Of VALUE m IW TOU! fAVO! (,UL AO RAT[ 170.00 7. 70t • . I i17'0"fn I AL ™y(j] SAVI Cl [I Cl [I II II tfll YLlU -0 NI 1500 Norlh Loop Hous1on. Texas 77009 (713) 664 7600 PAY y. us.no TA• l~lJlU S"• . '11' "§Till~• § \ § § § .. § \ § \ \ \ § § § § § § \ § § § § § § ~§ § § § § § \H § t' 10\ orr WI ltt IHI) COUPl.t~ \ - - ROC>M ON\ v-- ) ~ §COUPON COUR'[5Y or:_ "...1-: L - § i (XPIR£5:_ '1.\.!.!~ t ~---··-00 NO! WOil£ HfLO W ·--······-~ \(1110. Int. Datt- f<M.I \ § § § §\ §§ .. §§fin§§§§§ finfi § § § § § §§§ §§ § NOVEMBER 22. 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 15 Cash in on your Crabs Earn $50 and treat your pubic lice. Call 590-CRAB 16 MONTROSE VOICE I NOVEMBER 22, 1985 Tennis Challengers Leap-Frog By Rich Corder Specwl to the Montrose Voice Someone will have to check the archives to find as much "leap-frogging" as took place this past Sunday as the Houdton Tennis Club Singles Challenge ladder really took a beating No less than three players jumped four places in the rank· ings, and that is the maximum any player may challenge at any given time. The Top Ten ladder saw No. 7 JC Bar· rera knock off No. 3 Arrni Alabanza to gain hi;; highest ranking in history. He did it in straight sets, 6-3, 6-3. Arrni has really been 1mprovrng hi.s game; but it looks like he wasn't ready for J.C.'s baseline game. Arrni mu't wait a week before he can rechallange. No. 8 David Hciland secured his rank­ing against the challenge of No. 9 Tiny Tim by the score of 4-6, 6-2, 6-4. Tim won last June ma tie-breaker second set. So the improvement m David's game is quite evi· dent. No. IO Rich Corder defended his rank against newcomer Bill Santaiti, who was usmg a new member freelance cha!· lenge on the Top Ten ladder. Rich won 6-2 and came back from 3-5 to take the ~econd set and match 7-5. The B ladder witne"cd No. 8 Steve Beardon hop, skip, and IPap-frog to :So. 4 as he beat Richard Pregei>nt 6-3, 6-2. This was the1rfir,tchallenge match, as Steve is one of the new members climbing his way up the rungs. Look for him to add a few more "broken racquets or i;calps" to his collection before he settle, down Maybe not this com mg week, as he makes his first Top Ten challenge, against ole No. 10, Rich Corder The C ladder saw only one match, as No. 1 Ronnie Rodnguez defended against No. 5 Joel, thereby saving thi~ ladder from a leap-frog. The D ladder had a frog on it too, as No. 8 Randy Miller smashed :So. 4 Oaiwid Hendrickson 6.0, 6-1. o Houston Tennis Club Elects Officers At its annual mcellng last Saturday, the Houston Tennis Club re elected Donny Kelley to serve as president for a second vear He IS 1omed by Tim Syers as vice president, who v.as elected in his own nght this time, having been appointed to fill the remaining term of vice president this past year. More Activities for Frontrunners Members of the Frontrunners will run in the "Victona 10,000" lOK race in Victoria. Texas on Nov. 23. The following Thursday, a Thanksgiv· mg Day Party will be held in a member's home DCCt'mber marks the beginning of the annual membership drive. While anyone should feel free to run with the group, membership entitles one to receive monthly newsletter~ and voting status in the group. HOGs Kick Off Busy Winter With Trip to South Padre Island The Houston Outdoor Group will spend Thanksgiving holiday, ::-;ov. 21l·Oc.'C.. l , on South Padre Island. The group will be staying at Lyle's Deck and will enjoy swimming and sunbathing The following weekend. two trips are planned. On Dec. 7, some HOG members will iom the Golden Triangle Group for a day in Galveston for n :.Ken. ·on·the­Strand. Also on that weekend, other ml'mbers will visit San Antonio for a two day outing wh1t'h v.;!1 include looking at the Christmas lights along the River Walk and a Christmas dinner A Ski Aspen tnp is slated for March 2-8. Snow skiing enthusiasts should enjoy the week-long trip to Aspen, Colorado. The trtp will inlude round·trip direct flight from Hou;;tori to Aspen via Aspen Air· ways; condominium accomodations at Snowmass Village, plus three days lift tickets. The week is scheduled around "Subaru Aspen Wintemational 1986." More than 1000 fi rework shells will open the event week which will be filled with parties, parades, and films, capped off by the BASF Alpine World Cup Races. A meeting of the group is scheduled for mid· December to dicuss the cost of the trip. Dunng the Christmas holidays. the out· door lovers will venture to Florida for Those intere8ted in a ny of the HOG's trips may contact them at (713) 68-3144 or '"M!!m~.-tfti.,..,.; ..... ~~~~--~~-~}:---·~-~~ · Sports Voice o HouTex V Winners Here arc the winners from the Houston Tennis Club's recl'nt im;ttional, held Nov 1!-11. (from left to right, top row) 1. B Singles winner Joe Phillips of Dallas, right, with runner·up Doug Ford of San Diego. 2. Consolation doubles champions Duane Gabriel· s?n, left, of Ka~sas 9ity and Tom Faucett of Dallas. (lower row) 3. Ch ampion~hip S11.1glcs consolah.on wmnerJoe Arnold of San Diego. 4. No. 1 sc·ed Fred Orange, left, after b~ng upset by Jl,;o. 3 s~d Sheba. 5. B Double. winners Manny Pecans, left, and Mike Nelson, both of Dallas Oak Lawn Tl'nnis Club Sports Voice Calendar & Standings Houston Tennis Club Challenge Ladder matches through Nov 17 TOP TEN LADDER 1 Jim Kitch 2 Rardall 01ckcrSOI" 3 JC Barrera 4 Arm1 Albanz a 5 Donny Kelley 1 Rick Dupont 2 Oscar Mat11f\CZ 3 Edward de Leon 4 Steve Bearden 5 Richard Pregeant 6 R ck Hadnot 7 Ron Bell 8 David Heliaf\d 9T1f\y Tim 10 Rich Corder BLADDER 6 Ron Mccauley 7 Sabe Velez 8 Lou Garza 9 ThOmas Cortez 10 Larry Jarv11 C LADDER t Ronnie ROdrlguez 6 Rick Knapp 2 Ronnie Mauss 7 Gabe Herpm 3 Oav1d Garza 8 Rick Massey 4 Eddie Chavez 9 Billy Green 5JoeL 10Mr B•ll DLADDER 1 Sieve Bry1nt 6 Oscar Ysass1 2 Roy Mendiola 7 Joe D 3 John Murphy 8 JV Kltnger 4 Randy Miller 9 M ke Holloway 5 Oa1wid Hendrickso" 10 Steve Chesney E LADDER I DIY•d Moskowitz 3 Rudy Garcia 2 Howard Brown DOUE:.ES LADDER 1 Bob Hopkins & Rick Hadnot 2 Arm1 Alabanza & David Garza 3 Ronn o Rodnguez & Richard Pregeant 4 Stove Bearden & Bill Sant••ll 5 Billy Green & Paul Brown 6 Edde Cl>avez & Randy M•ller Regular Weekly Events SUNDAY: Frontrunners, Memorial Park Tennis Center Houston Tennis Club 10 30am-1:30pm. Homer Ford Tennis Center Women·s Bowlmg League Spm, Stadium Bowl WW B Bowling League 7·30pm, Post Oak Lanes MONDAY: MSA Men's Bowling 9pm, Stadium Bowl TUESDAY: Frontrunners. Memorial Park Tennis Center MSA "Fun Volleyball League." 7pm WEDNESDAY: Houston Tennis Club plays 7 30pm Homer Ford Tennis Center MSA Pool League plays Bpm. various locations THURSDAY: Frontrunners, Memorial Park Tennis Center MSA Mixed Bowling League 9pm, Stadium Bowl I NOVEMBER 22. 1985 /MONTROSE VOICE 17 Feature Pauline: Montrose's Gypsy Queen of Smiles By Donalevan Maines Special to the Montrou Voice Most days at Tim's Coffee Shop, waitress Pauline McCollum sweetens the morning coffee with a jolly smile and a hearty laugh. When "Ms. Pauline" (or, as one cus­tomer calls her, "the gypsy queen of smiles") serves Montrose, Montrose is a happier place to be. "I get along real good with most of Montrose,'' says the devastating Pauline. "Everybody doesn't care for me, but that's okay, because the ones I do call friends add that special ray of sunshine to my life-and that makes it all worthwhile. "Waitressing is my first love, and the freedom to be and do what I want is what I really enjoy," she says, adding a bit of maternal advice: "No one shold be in a job or relationship they're not comfortable m, as they're not only miserable themselves, but they make others that way, too." Pauline was born Nov. 6, 1937, in the town of Pampa in the Texas Panhandle. "I actually had three parents, because my parents were divorced when I was eight," she says. "My stepmother, Mama Doris, contributed a lot to my life, but all three were a definite influence on me." Pauline's first "real job," at 13, was working in a "spudnut" shop. "A spudnut 1s a donut made with potato flour," she explains. "Oh, they're good," she laughs. "Oh, they're so good." But before that, when she was only nine (going on 20), the young go-getter went door-to-door selling greeting cards and religious mottos. "I was terrible," she laughs. "I would go into beer joints and sell those religious mottos by telling the guys, 'Hey, if you take one of these, your wife won't know where you've been."' (The image comes to mind of Tatum Pauline McCo//um, Montrose waitress O'Neal as the young con artist in Paper Moon, helping her no-account papa sell Bibles and swindle the unsuspecting.) I 'T IS T~H_E_S_E_A_S_O_N__JI GIFTWARE PARTYGOODS STATIONERY • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • [p - - - A p E R . I 1 E T c """"'°'"" 81}1 KOi'( f WV 46~ ~1)1 ~1>+· ()ok• !1 1W>OW ,fay '>10 ~100 '°''. "' 20J~ Post Ook lllYd 9011163 .. fM1QOO 3:141fM1900We51 ~QQ11 "''"''"°"' 11161 \Ne>lheome1 952 ~ "Yes, I was terrrible." Married at 18, Pauline had her first child, Connie, at 20, followed by two sons, Eddie (who is gay and lives in Montrose) and Tim. By the time she was 26, she was divorced, a single parent, and living in Corpus Christi. "I've also lived in Okla­homa, Kansas, Colorado, North Carolina-and Palm Springs, California, where I waited on the Sinatras, Liberace, Peter Fonda, lots of celebrities," she says . But her closest encounter witii a famous personality came, she says, when radio commentator Paul Harvey offered her a job doing public relations work for him. "He's great. I've been listening to him for years, and I used to send him cards every now and then," she says. "Once I sent a Valentine to him and his wife Angel, and when I got home from work a few days later, my daughter said I had gotten a telegram from Paul Harvey. "I said, 'Yeah, sure,' so she went and got it, and it just looked like a past due bill to me," she laughs. "But it was real." That communique, she said, led to Harvey inter­viewing her for a job as an advance person on his cross-country speaking tours . "It was an opportunity I passed up, because we would have had to move to Chicago, and it wasn't fair to uproot my kids while they were in school," she says. "But I can't say I regret my decision (because) I don't dwell in ifs. All in all, I've done pretty much what I've wanted to do, and generally I have a positive attitude. It's like the saying goes, 'Every minute I am angry, I lose 60 seconds of happi­ness."' Pauline also sayo "it's fun to be colorful"-that's why she stalks re-sale shops for the layers of clothing and jewelry that have become her trademark, even in eclectic Montro. e. "I've been com­pared to Cyndi Lauper, but I've been at this crazy lifestyle a few more years!" she laughs. HAnd she's a little bit more out­rageous than I am. I also like some of her music. Number 102 ("Time After Time," on Tim'sjukebox) is her song, and I play it all the time. "I also appreciate her relationship with her mother. I admire the compatibility between mother and daughter," she says. "I was real proud this week when my daughter came to visit from Austin. I moved to Montro~e in 1980 and she'd never been to visit, because she was not comfortable with the lifestyle. Kinety­nine percent of my friends are gay individ­uals, and now she realizes that my friend~ are going to be my friends regardless. She decided to come ~isit and bring my grand· kids, so I was real proud of that. ··one of the men I'm dating now paid the gay community here one of the nicest com­pliments I've ever heard. He said most of the time, people in Montrose are in a good mood, they're polite, cordial and very neat. He said the term 'gay' is good terminology because gay individuals in Montrose are usually very happy, with a real uplifting attitude. "I know that's true, because my life has really been enriched by living in Mont­rose!" To place an AD in the Mont ros.e Voice .. j us. t phone us 529 - 8490 l0am 5: ~ ~e days Ads can be charged over the phone to a maior credit card OR we can bill you later 'Ii~XAS STATE OPTICAL zm Dr. E. Burt Denton & Associates OPTOMETRISTS TSO-\'illa~e 2515 l'nher!.itv 528-1589 . TSO-South \ fain Hl4 \ fain 523-5109 Both Office\ l 'nde1 :'\ew Ownt•1 \hi'P and Management 18 MONTROSE VOICE I NOVEMBER 22. 1985 Films 'White Nights' Begins Holiday Film Season By Scott Cutsinger Montrose Voice Film Critic With the holiday madness nearly upon us, the film ~tudios are rushing out their prime product.; for big crowd consump­tion Fir8t out of the starting gate is the eagerly-awaited White Nights from the director of An Officer and a Gentleman, Taylor Hackford. The next few weeks will see the release of quite a few big movies like Santa Clau~-The Movie with Dudley Moore, Spies Like Us with Chevy Chase and Dan Akroyd, and Out of Africa with Meryl Streep and Robert Redford. Sylvester Stallone will step out of his Rambo fatigues and into boxing shorts for the fourth installment of the Rocky series. In Rocky 4, Stallone fights a huge Russian in what's billed as W.W. III-opening next Wednesday at theaters. Closer to Chriotmas, Steven Spielburg will present his dramatic effort The Color Purple_ A Chorus Line will finally make it from Broadway to the big screen, and the board game "Clue" will appear as an all-star, all-out comedy. Other coming attractions include the sequel to Romancing the Stone called Jeu•el of the Nile, and an adventure called Enemy Mme by the director of Das Boat. For the family , there i,; a re-release of JO I Dalmatwns, plus One Magic Chr1stma~ with Mary Steenburgen, and another Speilburg production called Young Sher· lock Holmes. Getting back to the present, there is a nice "small" film running at the Green­way Theater for one week that is of inter­est lo some. George Stevens-A Filmmakers Journey is an in-depth look at the director of films like Giant and Shane, lovingly presented by his son George Stev­ens. Jr. Lovers ofold movies will delight in such highlights as color footage from Gunga Din, on-the-set clips from many famous films, and interesting interviews with many big stars. An informative and eloquent tribute to one of the major con­tributors to Hollywood's heyday. o White Nights With the recent rash of defectors from CommumAt countries, it is timely that a film like White Nights should come along now. Directed by a man who has made popular, audience-pleasing films like AJ(ainst All Oddb and An Officer and a Gentleman, this movle simplifies a touchy subject and makes it eai;y for the general public to swallow. While White Nights is far from a "great" film , it is immeasurably entertaining to watch. What keeps our interest is the cur­ious combination of intriguing drama with dance equencei; of both ballet and tap. The drama is more personal than pol­itical, concentrating on the characters rather than the political situation that evolves. Topping if off are two superb per­formanC8 by Mikhail Baryshnikov and Gregory Hines as the clashing, dancing defectors. As with Taylor Hackford's other films, the plot here is basic and easy to follow. We are first startled by a hair-raising crash landing of an American plane in Siberia. A ballet star, Kalya Rodchenko (Baryshnikov), tragically finds himself back in the Ru~sian world that he defected from years ago. The KGB is thrilled and try to force him to be repentant and star in a ballet at Leningrad's Kirov. The twist in the story comes when Rod­chenko is forced to live with Raymond Greenwood (Hines), who defected to the USSR years earlier as a protest against involvement in Viet Nam. A tap dancer who was used for propaganda publicity only, Greenwood is now performing in small Siberian provinces and has fallen out of favor. Now the KGB wants him to redeem himself by getting Rodchenko to practice for the ballet performance. The two men are an odd pair, and their artistic and political beliefs differ wildly. The film chooses to skim over the prevail· ing political implications and concentrate on artistic integrity and talent. Each man is amazed at the other's talents, and each prfl'ent.; valid reasons why their craft is overlooked or underdeveloped. With Rod­chenko swirling through the air and Greenwood tapping madly around the room, we get a deep feeling of these artists and their love for their craft. We also get an amazing display of magical talent that is often quite unforgettable. Hines is an electric, jumpy performer last seen in The Cotton Club. Married to a Russian interpretor, his character is obviously sorry now that he defected. While we do understand his original rea­sons for defecting (told as a soul-searching dance sequence), his motives for heading back to the US are not fully explored. How­ever, we can understand his longing for artistic freedom, and especially the love for his wife and unborn child. Rodchenko is a much more rounder and developed character. Baryshnikov, who him~elf defected in the seventies, gives an amazingly good. heartfelt portrayal of a man forced back into his past. He can sense that thing8 have not really changed since he left, but he is sad for what he left behind. A previous Oscar-nominee for The Turning Point, Baryshnikov givei; a strong performance here that could earn him another. The deficits of the film are few, but they are still obvious. The women in the movie are very weak, crying and weeping at every opportunity. It is a shameless attempt to manipulate the audience at the expense of poor characters. Also, much of SpPncer Tracy and Katherine Hepburn confer u:1th director George Stevens on the set of "Woman of the Year" ( 1942} '.: "' .... ~~;.,,,,_ ·"..,. .. ,,._:y y. ;!> .-.:: .:.. '. "( ~y ~/ ,~... ¥ ....,"• • .. ~+,.,,,...-~ .. >-~"'-•-= ........ ,..,.., ~ ~ ' ~ , .~ ..... »..·,,~,, .. ~~'~"y.,.;,;M"..:_""~~i.i:~' • ._:: ... _ __ _ Mikhail Barysh1kov (left) and Gregory Hines star in "White Nights," a story of international adventure, suspense and romance the music in the film seems inappropriate. While the hit songs like "Separate Lives" and "Say You, Say Me" do hit the approp­riate notes, other tunes by Robert Plant and Roberta Flack are all wrong and the dance music is not special enough to match the dancing. White Nights is light and breezy enter­tainment that builds nicely towards the end with an "edge of the seat" escape and startling but happy ending. There's nothing like seeing the Russian officers lose out in the end (especially in the Reago­nistic Era), and in the end the audience is cheering. A more downbeat ending would surely have the audience grumbling with mate­rial this heavy. Anyone looking for a prob­ingly serious look at defection will have to look elsewhere, but for the average film ­goer this film is a stimulating cinematic experience. o George Stevens- A Filmmakers Journey For tho e truly interested in the making of movies, there is a fascinating new docu­mentary on famed director George Stev­ens. While this may seem boring, you might remember that Stevens directed some of the greatest films ever, including Giant, A Place in the Sun, Woman of the Year and Swing Time. George Stevms-A Filmmakers Jour ney present.a a portrait of a man who worked with such greats as Katherine Hepburn, Cary Grant and Fred Astaire in the 2.5 features that he directed. From wri­ter and photographer of Laurel and Hardy pictures in the thirties to the epic grandeur of Thi' Greatest Story Ever Told, Stevens found that he really had to change with the times, After the 1940's comedies like Penny SPrenade and Vigil in the Night with Carole Lombard, Stevens found himself photographing the war that included the invasion of Normandy, Battle of the Bulge, and the opening of the Dachau Concentration Camp. We are privileged to view some of the only color footage of this war, shot in 16 MM and blown up to full size. The film was found in a storage build­ing by Stevens' son, and has never been shown to audiences since it was shot over 40 years ago. The son, George Stevens, Jr., direct.a this homage to his father with affection and praise. Stars like Warren Beatty, John Huston, and especially Katherine Hep­burn give us loving eulogies about Stevens and their encounters with him. However, it seems that his movie is at it.a best when Stevens' own films are allowed to speak for themselves. The peak of this director's career comes after the war when he won his two Academy Awards for A Place int he Sun and Giant. Films like these and The Diary of Anni' Frank tend to lean more towards realism and frankness than his earlier romantic features. Apparently the tragedy of war had it.a effect on him, and he could not bring himself to make optim­istic and lively movies like Gunga Din and Alice Adams that had been his earlier trademark. Later years were tougher for Stevens, and after The Greatest Story Ever Told (I 965) and The Only Game in Town with Elizabeth Taylor and Warren Beatty (1970) he stopped his efforts. He was quoted as saying, "I think that one of the real misfortunes with our American motion pictures has to do with the fact that it's almost entirely dollars and cents conjecture .. . I think ideas are of untold wealth." With the movie situation the way it is today, we can truly value these words. George StPl'ens-A Filmmakers Jour­ney is much more than a typical documen· tary. As the interview and movie clips roll by, we can't help but be amazed at the accomplishment.a of this artist. Through the efforts of his son, we are entertained as well as informed about the history of films . It's a fabulous journey that shouldn't be miRSed. The Spartan A brisk-moving nm cl of gay mJe !twe, \ alnr, anJ Olymp1L hopes - set .n c.'a s1Cal Greece, m an era when lo\'e bernccn men wa~ an accepted and \ alul.>tl part of life. l'lea'l' senJ me ___ <.Opie' of Tiu: .'i/>c1rtm1 nt $7.00 cal h postpaid. Em los,·J is $ __ _ narnc __ l The ~--SPARTAN CllY stat<' zip Dl'.m Harmon ALYSON Publications, Dcμt. P 'i, PO Box 2783, Boston, ~1A 0220'i On the Town ACCOMMODATIONS (for Visi tors to Houston) Houston Guest Ho 106 Avondale-523· 2218 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE GAY BARS Bacchus 523 LOvett $2'.l-3396 leablan Bar,,. 710 PaetllC 523-9427 country Uayt..U lar'tding ..S:W Wntheuner 526--7519 8razo1 River Bottom '.(()() Brnos 62&-9192 coun1'y SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Br .. r Patch 2294 W HOie. -,mt>e- 665--9618 Chtcten Coop- ~ Westhetmer 526--2240 Club Laredon 1 .. 7le Norlh Fwy 87&-3~ Copa 2831 Richmond ~28·2259 dJ1co. 1mperaonators Cousins-817 Fairview 528·9204 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Dirty 61!1·{1 220 Avondate 529--7525 E J1 1 ..?13 Rlehmond 527 907' Eddington 1 6121 H1llcroti 981 6111 EJ:1te 1011 Bell 659-0453 counlry Oalteon £JC.J Fhchmono 11;.z;/·7616 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE HeavE'f't Pacific et Grant 521-9123 dlSCO SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Hole- 109 Tuom -62&-9121! 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DOLORES ST BED & BREAKFAST 41f>.861·5887 OR WRITE MARC 381 DOLORES ST, SF FOR INFO Far Houston travel agenls. see "Travel Agents" 1n tho Greater Montrose Bus•· ness Directory next page - NEW ORLEANS GUEST HOUSE 1118 Ursullnes, (504) 56&-1177 See our display ad monthly In l~o Mon1rose Voice SAN FRANCISCO: LELAND HOTEL 1315 Polk, 1-800-253-5263 or (415) 441· 5141 See our display ad monthly In lhe Montrose Voice DINING OIJT IN MONTROSE RESTAURANTS ALL RESTAURANTS LISTED HERE SERVE AS DISTRIBUTION POINTS FOR THE MONTROSE VOICE Baba Yagi 1 2607 Grant 522..00.C2 EiOOi'evard Cate---806 Loven 521·1:015 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Chal1no~Sn0ver-164·1.t66 Chapullapec8 13R1chmond-~­Chi ChiS-2103 FM 1960W-~9J93 Cuttured Co;- ·2366 R1ce:522Ts86--~ Edd1ngton~21 H1llcroft 981-6121 F9Yio71 C81ILA =2'3W.s~$2£M>099 ~ BB0-138 W Gray-527·~ GvrOGYrOs S~hStiop-15~ hetmer 528-4655 HOOMOf Pin 31-12~K-,~rb-y_5_2-8--38-1_6 __ _ la Jaic.;n!e-=-;-308 Montroe.e­M~ rt Street C.fe - 1 m Miaouu.-$29-1264 Mr 8~••-T9tef- 2405 S Stllpr;;-d 52~51 z~~llJ Indian RMlaurant ~ 7 Marshah-626- SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE Second Vlri"e-3619 Wa.ah1ngton 862-8773 Spanish Fl0wef3921 Main 86S...1706-­SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ~like ~e1mer 520-0554-­Siar P1UI- 2111 Nor10ik° s2J-oioo Stuk ·n· Egg 4231 Montro1e 52-8·-8-13!;-­~~ esas Mti.:•cart Calf! "'628 w A•at.ma-$26- ~~~· eoffMsh;p-1525 wHi~mor-529- SEE OUR DISPLAY AD IN THE MONTROSE VOICE ~·~·· eBO:W.1hetmer •t Mornroae !2&- NOVEMBER 22. 1985 / MONTROSE VOICE 19 Stein & Toklas DETECTIVES Join Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas as they sleuth through the French countryside, investigating the disappearance of the father of their handsome gardener. A new and unusual novel by Samuel M. Steward, author of the Phil Andros stories, and a real­life friend of Stein and Toklas. MURDER IS MURDER IS MURDER $6.95 111 bookstores, or use this coupon to oruer by rr1ail. - - - - - - - - - - - - Here is $7 50 for Murder 1s Murder is Murder, by Samuel Steward city ___ -----state ip Alyson Publications, Dept. P-5, 40 Plympton St • Boston, MA 02118 e0RTHO FALL CLEAR-UP SPICIALS All Or tho GARDEN AND INSECT CONTROL PRODUCTS ARE On Sale· *10% OFF OUR EVERYDAY LOW PRICE James Bute Paint Company 4920 San Felipe at Post Oak Blvd. Houston, Texas Since 1867 Monday-Friday 7am-5pm - Saturday 9am-3pm 627-1120 Light Hardware & Home Improvements 20 MONTROSE VOICE I NOVEMBER 22. 1985 Montrose Voice Classified Advertising These rateJ •/)Ply only tOMhe ,. regul•t C1 y r" ng rates ull our D1&play Advfllt runt.. 29- '' THE HEADLINES: Headline words m bold type, centered. are $1 each word (m1n1mum $3 per line) (Centered bold head Imes can also appear w1th1n the text or al the end oflhe ad. and are also $1 per word. with a m1n1mum of $3 per line) THE TEXT: Each word 1n regular type 1s 40C (Add1t1onal regular words 1n "ALL CAPS" or Bold Words not m all caps are 55C each Additional BOLD WORDS •n all caps are 70C each.) EXAMPLES: THIS HEADLINE $3.00 -rhen each additional word hke this 40C THESE TWO LINES HERE TOTAL $6.00 Then each additional word like this 40¢ THESE THREE LINES ALL CAPITAL LETTERS CENTERED. BOLD. $9.00 Then eact\ add1t1onal >Nord hke this s 40C ADDITIONAL CAPITAL WORDS LIKE THIS IN TEXT ARE SSC EACH Addlt1on1l bold words hke this 1n text .,e SSC each. ADDITIONAL BOLO. ALL CAPS. WORDS LIKE THIS IN THE TEXT ARE 70C EACH. LONG TERM ADVERTISING: Run the same ad 4 weeks or longer make no copy changes dunng the run, pay for the full run 1n advance, and deduct 15%. Run the same ad 13 weeks or longer under the same cond1t1ons and deduct 25% BLIND AD NUMBERS Want secrecy? Ask for a 8 .nd Ad Number We'll conf1dent1ally forward all responses to your ad to you by mail or you can pick them up at our office Rate is $3 for each week the ad runs (Responses will be forwarded indefinitely however, for as long as they come m ) ORDERING YOUR AD: You may mail your ad In or phone 11 m You can pay by check. money order. Mastercard. Visa, AIT'encan Express. Diner's Club or Carte Blanche Or we'll bill you DEADLINE: Class '·ed ads received by 3pm Wednesday wdl be placed m that week s oiewspaper Ads received later will be placed m the following week's newspaper ANSWERING A BLIND AD: Address your envelope to the Bhnd Ad number, Clo Montrose Voice, 408 Avondale. Houston, TX 77006-3028 II will be for· warded. unopened, to the advertiser Enclose no money ADDITIONAL NOTES: A "word" 1s considered anything separated by "spa­ces; except hyphenated words are considered 2 words when each segment 1s a recognized word 11 11 stood on its own A complete phone number, including area code. is 1 word City. state and zip 1s 3 words bold llne bold line text words bold hne Use add1t1onal paper If necessary CATEGORIES D Announcements 0 Accomodat1ons (lodging for Houston v1s1tors) 0 Cars & Bikes O Commercial Space O Dwellings & Roommates D Employment & Jobs Wanted 0 Items For Sale O Models, Escorts. Masseurs O Personals 0 Pets 0 Rides 0 Travel 0 Yard & Garage Sales PLACE MY SERVICE-ORIENTED AD UNDER - _ - --IN THE "GREATER MONTROSE SERVICE & SHOPPING DIRECTORY," OPPOSITE PAGE bold headline words at $1 each (minimum $3 per line) regular words in text at 40¢ each ALL CAPS regular words m text at 55C each Bold words In text at 55¢ each BOLD All CAPS 1n text at 70¢ each Blmd ad number assigned for $3? Complete issue of newspaper with my ad m 1t mailed to me, $1 25? TOTAL FOR 1 WEEK: Times weeks: Less 15'111 discount for 4 to 12 weeks or 25% discount for 13 weeks or more equals COST OF AD(S) O Also. I wish to receive The Voice home delivered each week I have enclosed (or will be billed or charged, as indicated below) an additional O $29 for 6 months or O $49 for 1 year TOTAL ENCLOSED or to be billed or charged METHOD OF PAYMENT. 0 Check enclosed 0 Money order enclosed 0 Cash 0 VISA charge 0 MasterCard charge 0 D1riers Club charge O Carte Blanche charge O Amerc1an Express charge O Bill me If charging. card expiration date _ Credit card number Signature __ Name -----­Address Phone(s) for venf1calton of ad, 11 necessary MAIL OR BRING TO· Montrose Voice. 408 Avondale. Houston, TX 77006-3028 OR PHONE (713) 5~8490 weekdays 108m·5 30pm MONTROSE RESOl ROES SELECTED ,.ATE NAT OAGANIZAT ONS S.r 0.,..~ Assn o' T• f80AT) 120 Brazos~ Austin- (512! 412-3333 AIDS Action Councilfhdera'°" ol AIDS RetatlKI Org•n1ut10ns t1t!> lnekpend.nc• Av SE WW'ltnglon DC 20003 1212) ~7 3101 Gay & lnt>oan Press Assn-POB A OICIChetse• Sta New YOfk NV >0011 (212) 989-'622 Gay Aoql\ts Nal Lobby -fl08 1192 Washington DC 20013 !202) 546-1801 Human Rtghb campaign fund POB 1396 WIYt- 111gton DC 20013-(202) ~6-2025 lat'l'\bda Legal o.fPlnse 132 w •Jrd New York NY 10039- (212) 94•·9488 lesb1arvG1y R1gf'lls Ad'wOCllH POB 822 Aushn 78767 Mec:ha Fund lor Human Rigl'lts ·POB A Oki Chelsea Sta New York NY 10011 1212) 989-6622 Niii Assrt or Bt.1S1M'H Councill BoJi 1514') Sain Francisco CA 9411S-. i41Sl ~ Na! Assnot Gay 6 l .. btanOemoClubt 1742 ~ass Av SE Washngt.on DC 20CMD (202) !>41·3104 Nat Gay HeaHh EcSuc foundallon POB 784 ........ Yt><k NY 10036- (212) 563-6313 01 Or Greenberg (7131 523--5204 !"Qt Gay RtQhts Actvoc•tn $olO C.Stro S.n fr•n· CtSCO CA 9'114 (415) &6J-362-C Nat Gay Task Force {NGTF) «> 5lft Av New York NY 10011 1212) 74 \-$800 NGTF t Cr11 Sbt1e (8()0) n1-7()4.4 (outJlde New Yor11 State) Aural eo.1 hon cJo Waller Z•ngN Bo• 6' Stum TX 76627 T• Gay/lftbcaft Tnlt Fore• POB AK Oen1on 76201 t817) 387..a216 US Transvestite. Transa.uaJ Contact Swc 1017-8 E P1ke Seattle 991n Q!:l6 &24-L"'!i6 ATTENTION ORGANIZATIONS Check your listing We hst here each week 11ame of organization address. phone. regular meeting dates and times. and ~~~~r~~t s~:~a':':!~t~nf~r~a~~d;::~n~~= \/01ce, 408 Avondale. Houston. TX 77006 THE MONTROSE VOICE-INVOLVEO IN THE COMMUNITY Aid for A1DS P0666952·c57 77C06 ";;.?6-6G71 An A Capella Chorus Church of Chnsl POB 66734 77266 A Place n the Sun 522· 1695 ACLl.. 1236 W Gray 524-$925 AIDS Holl1ne 529-3211 (Gay A LHb••n Sw1tr:h­boatdJ Amenci.n (iay AlheiStl POB W711 77c66 527 9255 As1ro Rainbow A hance ~734 1TTY) Astro Rainbow Soctety lor the De.at -924·5074 (TTY Of 1tOtCe) 64!r0074 r'JTYI Avc;;:;,..1e Aun POB 6605-4 77266 meets 7 30pm 2nd Thurs, Women 1 Ctmsiian Ctr 310 Pao fie AiuiaO Womyn I M.tgaZ•nft- 6130 SW fwy •335-266-5237 tr~~,:~~rs · Rot>ert Moon, d1r 200 e;;;r.Q MemOr1'iiUn;t'ed- Me'tttodtSi~ 1440H•rold-526·1017 hC 10'.SOam Sun ChO~es- Un11m1led -POB 70996 77270- 529~ 3211 (Gay & Lesbtan Sw11ctiboard• meets 1pm 3'd Sun. Muterson YWCA 3615 W•lh• ·soc1•I Mixer· 7 JOpm alternate Fndtys Sunday bfunch 12 30pm 3rd Sun C°h~Church'OfiheGOOd s°hephe;d-1107 Montrose ave 1pm Sun, B1t>te tludy 7 30pm Thurs Ch'UrChOlchr7st;nF;:ih':"1940 w. .~ 529-8005 svcs 10 4S.m Sun Bible study 7 30pm Wed Rev Chns A R~e. pastor ~s rOr'" Htftnan E~ahtYiCHE, ~ POB 3045, 77253-680-3346. 937"3516 meet 2nd Tun Hou Hou!@. 1617 Fannin 9th floor activity room £.ti'i"efl110fun.led HOO(c'UHJ 3317 MontrOM •B32-659'-6148 C6eis. lnb1.11n Mothers Group- Sarra 473--3708 meets 2nd & 4th Thurs. O.gntty Ctr Ci1"We's-342-6&l2 - COit 45'1- mee1S at Brazos Rr._.er 8onom 2400 Brazos 528-8192 Committee IOt Pubbe Health Aw.ueness-POB 3045 77253- 52&-6333 522-5084 'Shar"'g Group 10< the WOfoed Weir meet Fra. 7..a,,m Montrose Counsehng Ctr Communily ·P01i11Cit Achon Committee (C· PAC) P06 2005. 77252-236·8666 con;muMy Gospel Ctr 3207 Montrose 521· 0511 Svea I tam Sun. 7 30pm Thurs Congregation Aytz Ch•yim 1840 Westhe•mer 688-8997. 728-5181 1vc & soc1a1 8pm 2nd & 4th F11 c;;;~.- 2i&-1S05 O.mo Comm1ttN ot GPC-52£1..iii.c Oh.rmBStuctyGroup 406Avono•le 524·~ D;a Foundation-2700 Mason- 524·$781 Ot;nity Hou-32ITTen~-!2e-o111 s2~1&« mass 7 30pm Sat EsoPS Pr1va1e Proless10nal Soci.11 Ch.I~ 9876 r;;;;ahon or Chmflt1es Ul"lfted IOI Soc1aiSer1•· ~=~~~~~;=~'u':'~t;Ql ·~~:~ Monrrose Cluuc Montroae CounHliftO Ctr ~tan•n ChvTCl'l-5210 Fanntn-$26-1571 $VC t11S.m $un f7ontrunne'1i Randy 68t-!679 or Joe ~8019 runs Sun. Tues & Thurs Memorial P•rk Tenros Ctr runs Mon GoH Ctr Hermann Park G.y & AN"'• Shenng [l1Def1enc• (GASE)- 528 1311. 528-0891 Gar & L.St>emn Ar"Ch1vft ot r. att.b'".1.-0t iiHinC GiY &-lest)°;an Mormons 1713 W•lhe1tner •6040. 77098 566- t413 Gay Asi•ns & Fmtndl • 2615 WaughDTi289 523-6769. 785'"3633 mfftl 3pm 2nd ' IHI Son Gar F1ih;;a""32i7 F;.;n.n 528-0111 Gay H1span-;'C C•ua;--168-5252 Gay N~rHi"'AiiianC'e ~t.ci6 Gay Politi<•I C•ucu"'t"""iGPCl- P08 e6i64 772ti6- S21 1000- mfftt 3217 Farinm tat & 31d Wed (Hou) ~y Pride we;;-c;omm1ttH-POBiii2T 772e6-Stan Ford 523-7644 Of C.ttiv Lenahan 868-6256 Gmy & l•bian St~ at UofH-Bo;"it4 4800 C•lhoun-S29--321t ~G•y & letb4an Swirchboard} G;y & ~Sw1tcbb0af'd-=PQB-e6Sir' 77266-529-3211 "'tormm11on. coun ... •ng rel· err•IS TTY AIDS H.oct_•n_o.~=~ Greater Montrose e-us1nessGu1kt· Mike N 6J0..0309 or Bruce Woolley 529--8464 meels 7pm 4th Wed Brennans Rest 3300 Smith The Group !heater vr.OrkShoP-Joe Watts S22· 2204 meets 7pm Thur1 Dionity Cir 3217 Fannin Hmz~vw11ChPre;i';choni='2615 Waugh Or •266 77006 tesbt1n concerts hee marhng Its! HOmoPh1ie Interfaith Alliance 729 MaFM)r 523-6969 ~~nt:::~~:Y ~~.esf~~ ET?,~6:~' t t()pm meets 7pm 4th Tues Hou -BafOwrlers Assn 1HOB01 e10 veri1u°7• N 2923 Main ·522..()00() Hou Community Clow""';;"s-862-83 ;;I H~ Council o~~ 526-eos.c Hou· Dat8- PrOressionais-523-6922 664-6459 meets 1 30pm 2nd Tues Hou Gay Hea•th Advocates-:7'~~48 Meets 7 J()pm 1st Sat Hou G1y'S1Uci'eniSA5'n-747. .' 3o9s Hou Inter-Fa.th Alharice contact u·uough lnte­gnly Hou Hou M?torcycle Club< Clo Mary 1 1022 West he1mer 528-8851 ttoU North ProlenK>nats POB 3840 Humble n341 -8111 at 821·7126 meet 1 ')()pm 2nd s.1 Hou Out<Soor Group Jim ~3144 =., 19:nn: 7C~9p:~~~:s 5~~~~}f,;~:;::-, Center particrpant annuat T11: OU CJasic Callas Oct Hou-Tx V Nov 9-11 IH1nc-P0Bt604177222 694-1732529-7014 art hated groups are 1nterac1 B znmo 1 A Place an the Sun M~trose A'1 Alliance Gay & L.esbtan Arcmves of T11: Gay & L.esbaan Sw<tchbOaro Montrose Sympnon1c Band board meet 7 30pm 1st Thurs (varied 1ocat1ons) educational lorum 7 J()pm 3re3 Tl'\urs ngersoll Speakers Bureau POB 391 Bettaue 7740.., 669-4064 ntegr ty Hou {Ep1scopa11art) POB 66008 1726& 524· 1489 meets 7 30pm 2nd & •lh Mon Autry House 6265 Mam nteract POB 16041 77222 529-7014 KPFT Radio FM·90- •t9 Lovet1 Blvd 5~ ~ Breakthrough lesb1an--tem1mst pgm Fn 815-ttam Walde nStetn gaypgmlhurs7»- 900pm KS. AIDS Found.alion 3317 MontrOH Box 1 t55 77006 -52'-2437 AIDS Rrsk Reduction (Sale Sell) Work snaps 8pm 2nd & 4th Mon ••cept O.C 1n coniund1on with Montrose Counseling Cen to• In Montios£, N£ady Ev£iyon£ R£ads th£ Voi(£ Jerry K1ulfman Cancer F'Und77i'4106 Kre-we ot Hydr1 -811 Gr•ceiand 8111 Mercier 726-1032 Lambda Ctr Gay AICohOhCI 'Alanon-1214 Jo Annie-521·9772 lesbiaN-Gay Reaource s..,c-U~el'Slty o~. 4800Cmlh0un. box.309 77004 74.1253 mee, 2 30pm alternate Tues. Sp1ndletop Room 2nd floor Un1vers1ry Cir Let Us En1ert11n You Weekend 'PtOJect ol Hou Council ol Clubo-52&-8Q5.4 The Lime C~Ch212 Fargo- S22·7~ tvCI 230pm Sun lone Star Nudist Group .f>OB 740572 77274 luther•n1 Concemed:-meets at Grace Lulhe­ran Church 251$ Waugh-521-0863 4'SJ..1141 meet 2nd & 4th Tues evwungs Mc...AOOty Hous.e--=etc>Ks,ArOs Foundation. 3317 Montrose Box 1155-524·24:)7 M.,,-:;;g;;-,..., Oecep110nCourteay Club P08 541871. 77254-529·3211 (Gay & lesbian Switchboard) meets b ... weekly Mettopo"'hiinCOmmunity C~he Flesur~ rect•Of'I !MCCR)-1919 Oec11ur-861·9149 Pol luck dmner 7.30pm 111 Sal monthly svcs 10 45am & 7 1Spm Sun & 7 15pm Wed member~ stup 1nQu1rers ctus 7 30pm Mon. educ•tion d.asses Tues & Wed 1t11es ~lropolttan Wind Ensembtlill' 5~96t0 MfflS SI Stephens Episcopal Church 7 30 Wed MOOtOOArtAlllance-694·1732 ~314 869- S332 afl1ll•te l1H Jnc meets 2nd Mon Montrose (h;.n;ss Guttd tee Gr .. l•r Montrose Bu1Gutld Mon1tose cftW"Ch ol Chnlt 1700 MonttOH 777..g286 svc Item Sun Montrose Clvie Club see Ne•rto ..... n .Assn MonrroH c.;:;;c=.803 HawthorM 528-55,31 open Mon Tue. Thurs 6-9pm ~~,~~~'t;~~:;,9"=r' meel 7· MOl'ltrose Counseling Clr-900 Lovett •203- 529-0037 Al~S victim support group 8 30pm Mon Womens $upport Group 7pm Tue. AIDS Rtsk RedVCllOn (Sate Sell) Workshopt 8pm 2nd & 4th Mon except Dec 1n cOt11unc11on w1lh K$JAIDS Found•lion Montrose $.ngerS'. gay men·s ChOluS Mike S26· 3810 Montroae Soltbmll l .. gue POB 22212 77227- S24·3144 Mo;;i,ose-spo..t;-Assn jMSAI ... spec1f1C IUb gr®p:_ __ _ Montrose Symph-on_•_c_B_on_d_P_O_B_ 6iii'i 77266-527-9-CS.C meet 7 30pm Tun O.gn1ty Ctr 3217 Fanllm. •ffd1ate L1H Inc MORLJ~MORE. ~Q037 prOJK~ Counaehng Cent..- MSA MOO N;Qht Bo:c-.,--,,-ng--pf-.y-Sl-od-.-.,, .-L-._-. 8200 8tMSm••n-Ste¥e 592·4S97 ~hull Night j lr.t1xed LNgue-~1-Bo-.,-,,.,-g-­M• ke w .. kert •t 973-1358 ptay Ppm Slad1um Lmnn 8200 8tHSma1n MSA Pool !81llardsl League· Debbi 5' 111 973- 1358 or OenntS Lord 660-6752 1umrner season eompeM1on vanous 1oca1ions 8pm Wed MSA VoHeyball- Mark 522-1469 ga~-7pm Tues. Gregory Lincolnschaot. 1101 Taft Montrose W11teh ~t>group Neartown Assn M°<JS1angs.:-meets a11he -Barn 710 Pac1t1c 528-- 9427 Club nigh! Thurs National Gay Health Educ81-;Qn~nda11on 523-52().1 Nahonal Org1n1za11on 10r w;men (NOWI Les· b1an Rights Task Force POB 440422. 77244 Neartown A$1n ~Montrose-C1v1c -Club) 14t) Westhe1mer meet 7pm 41h Tues Neartown Business Alliance -529-7010 meets 7pm 2nd Wed. liberty Bank. 1001 Westhe1mer New Freedom Chusliaf'I Church-829 Yale 8fi.3.8377 SVCS tClam Sun Overeater• Anonymous ctO M"onirose Coun =~~r ~1~~,!1&,:~rn~~~-:~~r :e~' Bering Church. 1440 t.farold Parents & Friends
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