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Houston Voice, No. 895, December 19, 1997
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Houston Voice, No. 895, December 19, 1997 - File 001. 1997-12-19. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2355/show/2314.

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(1997-12-19). Houston Voice, No. 895, December 19, 1997 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2355/show/2314

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 895, December 19, 1997 - File 001, 1997-12-19, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2355/show/2314.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 895, December 19, 1997
Contributor
  • Michelak, J. C.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 19, 1997
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript D ~ p E M .B E R 1 s T H 1 s s 7 • VII VII VII • h o u s t o n v o i c e . c o m • I s ~-u •.. ~.:f:>:B !3-.5 ' Window Media Purchases Houston Voice Finn plans to expand Bayou City's Gay Newspaper; boost gay media business HOUSTON · Houston's largest gay and lesbian newspaper, Houston Voice, announced today the pending sale of the publication to Window Media, LLC, own­ers of the Southern Voice m Atlanta. According to principals of Window Media and Houston Voice Publisher Crad P. Duren, M lJ., the newspaper will ll'ansfer ownership effective January I, 1998. "The paper's affiliation with Window Media ensures the gay and lesbian commu­nity of Houston number one contact with the leading gay news group," said Duren, owner of Houston Voice, since 1993. "The pubhcat1on will continue to represent Houston and Hams County's interest and 10 expand fhc mfluencc of the Houston Votce outside of this nrra " Smee I Y74, the Houston Voice has been a staple in the gay ond lesbian community. The paper has grown t"emc"dously since its mccpuon and has seen phenomenal growth dunng Durcn's ownership, particularly m the last year. Duren, a respected medical doctor m the Houston area, purchased the paper in December of 1993 and co-pub­lished u with hts then-partner, the late Tad Nelson Window Media IS the creation of William Waybourn, President of Window Corporauon, a Washington, lJ.C. public relations firm Waybourn most recently served as Managing Director of the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD), a media watchdog group, and was founding Executive Director of the Gay & Lesbian Victory Fund, a successful gay pohucal action commincc. "Cap1talizmg on the successful acquisi­tion of Southern Voice earlier this year, we wanted to act on our second purchase," Waybourn said. "Houston Votcc fits our cnten~ perfectly and we were pleased that ncgot au~ns finalized qwck11." Wayboum also indicated other acqmsmons arc m ncgoua uons In creating Window Medta, Wayboum and his partners • Chns Cra :i, Rick Ellsasscr and Chad Johnson • share a com· men goal of fur. Ii g capital to prom1 mg gay and lesbian media businesses. The com· pany's first acqu1siuon, the Southern Voice, occurred earlier this year. Cram, an Atlanta attorney formerly with the firm Alston & Btrd. is the editor and publisher of Southern Voice. Ellsasser, a Vice President and pan· ner m Window Corp., duccts the public relations firm's West Coast dfons; Johnson 1s an attorney with the New York firm Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom, LLP, in its Washington, D.C. office. "Editorial management of Houston Voice will remam at the local level," Wayboum said. " We are fortunate to be coming to Houston at an cxcitmg tune. The recent election of Amuse Parker as the first openly gay or lesbian member of the Houston City Council 1s the next step 1n the matunty of the Houston lesbian and gay commumty. We want to be a partmpant m that process" Wayboum said the goal of Wmdow Media has always been to put nanonal financial resources into the local commuru· ty. He c-1ted his work at the Victory Fund and GLAAD as an example ·•we have a number of exetting 1deas to expand and See WINDOW page 20 Jurv awards mtern infected with HIV Virus S12.2 million by Bngrtte Gre Associated Press NEW HAVEN Conn · A "" rd cd $12 2 m!lhon \\ ednesday to a doctor infected with the AIDS Vll'U$, finding that Yale Untvcrstty was negligent when the woman pricked herself wtth an infected needle. as an mtem mne years ago The doctor and her family broke down m tears when the verdict was announced "M ney ts not c:cmpcnsauon for what I've lost, ' she said I've been w:nnng for this for rune years It's been a struggle every day" The woman, who sued under the pscu donym Jane Doe. blamed the school for not properly tram ng or supervismg hn when she was ordered to tnsert a b ood line mto the ann of an AIDS panent The woman pocked hersc f in August 1988. Just scvcn weeks mro her shtp at the hosp SIX weeks tested J>OSI' ve r the AIDS !'>.. Al'l OOE p ge 31 Francisco Sanchez considers entering race for State Representative Democratic Executive Committee Member contemplates run in District 145 by J.C. M1chelak Houston Voice Editor HOUSTON · State lJemocrat1c Exec-uuve Committee member and long·t1me Democratic pa rty operative Fra ncisco Sanchez, Jr. 1s considenng a race for S[ate Representative, D1stnct 145. A nJtive Texan. Franc isco Sanchez. was born in Brownsville on April 26. 1972 to Franctsco Sr and Mana Isabel. Presently, Sanchez 1s an account executive with Carreno Miranda, Inc. an mternattonal marketmg. pubhc rclauons and advertising agency If successful, Sanchez would take the scat currently held by State Representative Diana Davila, who deetded not to seek a fourth term m the state legislator earlier thlS week. (Sec Regional News) Sanchez was Rep. Davila's Lcgislauve Director for three years pnor to becorrung pubhc relations and advertts1ng executive, has launched an extensive effort to study the race and gauge support in the dtStrict " l gamed valuable insight into the legisla· ttve process during my service as a leg1sla­tivc d irector the past few years and through my involvement an Houston's East End.'" Fire Destrovs Heaven Popular nightclub beyond repair, must be re-built HOUSTON • Last weekend's fire at one of Houston's biggest nightclubs was an unprecedented loss to gay n1ghthfe and entcrta1nmcnt in Houston The .tftermath 1s still rever· be r .1 t 1 n g th<ough the communuy Heaven onr of told the Houston Voice 'l ucl:.tly, nco one was hurt. That s the tmponant thing • The fire broke out at approximately : I 20 p.m. Saturday, December 11 "We believe, at tlm t :nc, that the fire onginated m the storage/dressing room and furthermore, we behcve that the ongm of the fire was an elec­tncal malfunction • most proba­bly a wall outlet," reads an offi­cial statement from CA See Hf AVEN page 31 Sanchez told the HOUS!on Vo1tr. "I am ready put that experience a nd effective leadership to work for the people of this d1stnct I have to dcode whether I want to contnbutc to my community in that capact· ty or some other way.• If elected, Sanchez would be the second open· ly gay member of the Texas Legislature. Also, at the age of 25, he would be one of the youngest. Sanchez has applied ht> diverse background in market research. field orgam­zation, journalism, and government affairs to his extensive mvolvement in community events and pohll· cal orgaruzanons. He ts a board member of Amigos Volunteers and Education Services (AVES. 1996 to present), the U mvcrs,ty of Houston Alumm Orgamzauon Programs Comm1ncc (199610 present); Umvemty of Houston Student Foundauon, (1995-1997); Pumped Up on Art. (1996); and is a Sheltenng Arms volun-teer. "Anruse Parker's etecuon to ctty 1.."0uncil See SANCHEZ page 31 Songfest '97 raised more than $68,000 LETTERS TO THE EDITOR Dissenting viewpoint equated to communism by .illhn KeUet I would never suggest restncting Leslie Ramsay's nght of free speech, but I do sug­gest movmg her column to a publication with a more appropnatc "'adership. like the North Korea Monthly News. Thought Panic by Dale Carpenter I have a 8"'3l deal of resp«t for Grant Maron. cspcc1a!ly for the superb work he did m managing the successful city council cam­paign of Anrusc Parker. I voted for Parker, helped raise money for her, and am proud that the Log Cabin Republicans of Houston endorsed her. But Grant Mamn's unfarr per­sonal attack on Leslie Ramsay ('The Houston Voia, Issue 894, December 12, 1997, p. 2.), a woman who bas to~ed long and hard m the vineyards of gay equabty, gO<S too far For much of the hJStory of the gay evil rights movement, the gay left has rep=ted gay people to the rest of the world. Only m rttent years have a few dis5enters begun to speak up for the moderate and conservative majority of gay women and men. The message these gay conservatives are sending basically, that the,.,•s mo"' than one way to think "gay," indeed no way to think "gay" at all JS very unsettling to the gay left It means that wc !rave ended the gay left's monopoly on ideas and its control over the public image of gays.s. Unaccustomed to the cballcnge and unable to confront the substance of the new ideas offered by these heterodox thinkers, the gay left is oftctl left to sputter that these gay con­scrvattves must be "sclf·hating.. • If you disag1cc with us or simply address crit­ical questtons to us, says the old guard, you'"' not JUSI wrong but mentally ill. And so we _,,, treated to oocasional parox­ysms of indignation from the gay left such as those evident m Grant Manm's letter to the Voia. Even to raJSC the issue of whether we should vote for someone solely because she is gay is, by Grant Maro.n's lights, "self-haring, condescending. and homophobic." How dare Ramsay, he huffs, ask these uncomfortable quCSllOIJS about our" candidates? Doesn't Ramsay app"'°3tc her "ethical and moral obl1g;illOllS" as a gay person to "empower our own commuruty" by putting "qualified leaders from our own community" mto office? With JI. wave of the hand, Manm dispatclies Ramsay to a thcraplSt. To Annisc Parl<er's cmlit (and to Grant Manin's) her campaign never explicitly appealed for Wies simply on the basis of Parker's sexual orienranon. She consrantly emphasized her ~entials, which were con­Stderable. But Grant Martin knows very well that some people voted for or against Annisc Park!l' on the basis of her sexual orientation and precous lirtle more. We know what to say about the people who voted agalilS! Parl<er because she's gay: they're homophobes. But what do we say about the people 1n "our own community" who wied for her because she's gay? Ramsay's answer bolls down to this: Those who wic for a gay candidate simply because she's gay reduce her to a single characteristic - her sexual onenranon. That demeans her and the rest of us, not because there's any­thmg wrong with being gay, but because 1t IS Dot the sum of the candidate as a complex human being. We should care how she feels about taxes, mme, trash collccuon, and a hundred other thmgs if she JS to serve on city council So Ramsay is asking us to pause before we dutifully march off to the polls to fulfill our "ethical and moral obligations" and ask our­selves a srrnple question- Why are we doing this? If the answer is that we are voting for AnnJSC Parker because we beheve she is the most qualified candidate and best reflects our views then we need not fear the question. But if the answer IS that, deep down, we really don't know anything about her except that she's "one of our own" then Ramsay's question must seem very troubling indeed. It JS troubling because 11 suggests wc have reduced our entire lives to a sex act and the mearung that that sex act has m the world. If that's the case, tf wc have socially and intcl· lectually bankrupted ourselves so much, per­haps Ramsay will have some company on the therapist's couch. The gay left n<cds to orgaruze a new gaggle of actiVJSts to fight the demJSC of liberal ideo­logical hegemony JUS1 as a group of them ts now runrung around the country screaming for the "right" to fornicate in public. Let's call our new self-appointed guardians of ortho­doxy "Thought Panic'"" Perhaps if upstans hke Ramsay with therr pesky questtons are hit with enough nasty per­sonal attaclcs they will Just shut up. Then we can all go back to those halcyon days when meeting our 'ethical and moral obligations" to the gay commWllly meant voting the pany line and not asking why. vanitv and ignorance on parade by Dave Anderson After reading your letters to the editor from Grant Manin and Jaz:z Paz, I discovered that some of your "'aders lack comprehension skills Manin opens his d1atnbe by charactenzmg Leshc Ramsay's column as an attack on his candidate. Not only is this vain, but it illus· trates his ignorance. Ramsay opened a para­graph with ''the" quesuon (which Manin mis­quoted) that had been asked repeatedly by members of the commuruty. [Ramsey's] reference to the question was a moral and ethical gut<heck for the communi­ty What do we believe' The question was not "Whal do Parker and Manin want us to believe'" Is this community made up of rwo dimensional puppets that polincans can keep in their bacl< pockctS and treat as they wish, or is st a livmg and thinkmg group of people wor­thy of a candidates attention and courting? .. . As for Paz, she apparently has some pcr­f(> nal problem Wlth Ramsay being employed by the p:iper. Her letter is charicature of left- 151 ideology. She supports the erronrous liber­al contentloo that "what you are" 1s more Important than what you bebeve. That type of th1nlung is what truly segregates our society. As far as the poll concerrung sexual onen­tanon. that IS exactly what Ramsay was ask­mg • should we care? Apparently, only Paz and martm want us to concern ourselves with onentation Rather than recommend Manin or Paz attend some son of counseling. I would only refer them to Rr.Jding u Fundammtal." Maybe it would help them understand what they arc reading a little better before they Sit down at their keyboards. I would also r<0eommcnd See EDITOR page 3 In This Issue Regional News page 7, 10, 11 National News pages 12, 14, 15, 16 counwatch page 16, 17, 18 Global News pages 18, 23 Health pages 23, 26 Columnists Plain Speaking • page 8 Righteous Indignation . page 9 I Need A Nap· page 21 Arts & Entenainment pages 20 Church Calendar/ Religion page 24 Classifieds pages 30·31 Communttv Calendar/ Horoscope/SuchlslHe page 33 Out In Houston page 34 Communitv Directorv page 32 Crossword Puule page 32 Scene & Heard page 39 ~»..,,M•~u.qM..,,,.M 80lJOJM81 11oqqy png saw.., P8lfll1U• 0£AV~ .. Zl"d S3tiO.tV3J .:f'Vl~ lHl ~ uonn1os a1zznd DECEMBER DECEIVIBC.R 5. 1 997 Estabf!Shed 1974 as the Montrose Star, reestablished 1980 as the Houston Montrose Star, Change<! name to Th• Houston Vooc• 111 1991 ncorporatJng the New Orleans Crescent City Star, Reestabfished as the Houston Votce by Thomas Nelson " 1993 811 Westnemer. Suite 105 Houston, Texas 77006 (713) 529 8490 (800) 729 8490 Fa.: (713) 529.9531 Email: editorOhoustOll'iooce.com feedbackChoust011Y01Ce com Contents copyneht 1997 Office l>ours 9:00am 5:30pm ,. .. kdays Publlsber Crad Dinn Editor J.C.Mtllelal< lllSIJn auruu Sttve l.abtn$k1 -Heu-sto-n luIruIu Leslie Ramsay 11t1111i.1Ml- Ca1Clyn Roberts • hdotw Ult• Steve UndelWOOd Music -tw Writers Jon Anthony, Ricf1 Arensclllektt, I.any lrlgle. Stephani• McGno•. Curt Mamson. l•slie Ramsay. Cwlyn Roberts, Clvoslopll<r Rundquis~ VtCkie Shaw, Ela Tyter, Patnc1a Nel Warren PbelllllPbelS Steven [)av;d, Dalton OeHart l'rlllucuon com .. Marmoleio - - Robert Pottor --1111. Ftrm11 •11am111111es11 v'""" o..ien GrouP lllVlrtlsln1 Siles •••ll'llllent Lesl-e Rams-ay hit­s 11111• ~~~ ClassHlllls 1n• Persen11s Cc ·· Metn e,o ••Uonal lllvtrtlSllll lllPl'9SIRUllM Rrvttlddl Market1ne. ~O. Box 518. Westt,.td. NJ 908 232 2021 NaticetoMltftisen ~ rllt sdleG* lftNfl wn cffeotM St;(. 1997 • Pna or comPttm ntCWOIMtaon of ¥'i ~ news 1rtt1rorft1C1n,CDPYet~frurrtfietb."UgnVaic1e _ _....,.,_ ......... • OpdonS tJ.OrtS'SeCI by cctt:':ists Of UtW0mts .-e nQt fllC ....., ..... ,.11ie-11><e,..,...n...i .. ..,.,.,. no..wtybt1eccrcec.eliP'fSHd0t~ofllidnon -orl.len tisd Ptr10Mlwicor*MI. rulorktioralmtl'lt ur • The >t:>uston \IQice wttomes Jetten to fie tdtor Mid rt$e'Vtl ... ~ .. ·--'""""""-­""""*""'"'"°"""""'~ .. • Nile.:ieJn of I'll ume °' Votocras:ti c1l'<~ P-Clfl10>l'l <er eO.f l• fUlllQrl11ncieSOl~llthetb,.~tQft\bl:tlsnolb bt construtd•S fl',y lleic:ll:ion of tllt SUul CritrUb:>f1 ol ilicl pel1.000f0f(~ • TM appe.vwice of idYtrtlsemer.ts or oonons eipn\.ld thf<81 dO ac:ic cOl\ltlhltt .i tndonement or cu-111tt by lht HoL1tOllllOCtDrrtsRlll Chaner Member Gmter H1ust1n i:1v a lesb11n Cb1mber •f C1mm1rc1 "'I e T H EDITOR!trom page 2 that Manin take a few of the mUTOrs down in his office; he apparently spends too much time adminng himself Open letter from a P-FlAG Mom by Sue Noll In the December 12 edition of the New York Timts, I recently read an OP ED piece by Larry Kramer regarding the Sex Paruc movement and redefining gay culrure. Sex Panic 1s a small but vocal group that espouses "sexual freedom" and accordmg to Mr. Kramer, wants gay men to have sex when and where and how they want to. Now, as a Mother, sex is narurally not a subject that I'm comfortable talking about. But, as a Mother of a gay son, I feel that it's imperative that I at least take a stand on what I feel 1s at best an ill-advised attempt to redefine what it means to be gay When I speak in public, one of the things that I often say is that being gay is so much more than what my son and his life parmer do in the pnvacy of their bedroom. Then, along comes Sex Panic and says, "Not only is that all it is, but we like it public and unsafe." Far be it for me to judge, but dar­ling boys, that's JUSt plain nuts. I have a theory that part of the reason that a movement like this exists is because so many of its members act d1sposably because they feel d1Sposable. In other words, they have been cast out by thCIT fam­ilies and very likely feel that they have noth­ing to lose and living on the edge makes them feel sometlung. But, I am here to say that there is anoth­er movement afoot called M.A.R.S. which stands for Mothers Against Reckless Sex. And, we care. We care about you and what you do Some of us have already buned our children because of AIDS and we don't --=··----·•§ LETTERS TO EDITOR want to do it with a new generanon. You matter to us. You matter to us ma very VIS­ceral way. We're mothers, we don't know any other. If you want to have sex, have tt. If you want to have sex in public restrOOms, have that. Not every one of you wants a life of commitment and the whtte picket fence. Not every one of you wants to be ass1m1- lated mto the mainstream and I understand that. But why make unsafe sex the focus of your hves? Although not gay myself, I know from having a gay son, that tt truly is more than sex. It's about who he is to his core. It's about hlS soul, it's about your souls, your very ethos; your fundamental values. You are not like tissues or garbage. You are, each and every one of you, dear and pre­cious to us as Mothers and as human beings. Please be safe. Please don't let this group, formed in a "fury" to defeat bemg asstrni­lated, speak for you. It sounds to me like a group that needs another group of Mothers to say, "You matter, I love you. Don't go. I want you in my life." And so, we're here, we're queer-loving Mothers, get used to us. Suprised bv Manin's logic by Dawn Clesson I was slightly surprised by Leslie Ramsay's Righteous Jnd1gnat1on (Issue 893) column ... , however, for other reasons than noted in the letters printed in the Letters to the Editor section m the 12/ 12/97 issue. I was surprised by how pos111ve Leslie Ramsay was about Annise Parker. Leslie Ramsay chooses to challenge our community to listen to and think about Annisc Pa.rker's stand on Jmportant issues not to vote for Annise Parker just because she is gay. Leslie Ramsay reminded us that whether or not a candidate IS gay is not as important as whether or not that candidate can fulfill h1S or her obliganons such as ftlhng potholes and fixing sewer lines. Personally, I do not vote for someone based on whether or not that md1vidual is gay or straight, male or female, or Democrat or Republican. I attended several community meeungs, along with Leslie Ramsay, where Anmse Parker addressed her stand on various issues, even the issue of usmg the Nation of Islam as secunty guards. many of the people attending these meetmgs were deciding to vote for Annise Parker because she 1s gay not because of the issues she had iust addressed. (By the way, I thought the "members only endorsement" voting process of the Log Cabm Republicans Houston membership was pnvate, as well as, the names of the members.) As far as I know, the only link between Anruse Parker's campaign headquarters and Lee P. Brown's campaign headquar· ters ts the one made m one of the letters to the paper. Since newspapers need pho­tographs, quotes, and statements to wme articles about candidates, perhaps Leslie Ramsay was calling the Lee P. Brown headquarters for other reasons than to "cause trouble" as CVJdenced by Lee P Brown's photograph appearing at least twice on the front cover of the paper It never ceases to amaze me how quick­ly people rum to name calling and malung assumpaons when attempnng to argue a pomt when they do not have any facts to support theu nrade. I suggest that some people may need to read more carefully Leslie Ramsay's opmion column for better comprehension instead of attempting to ignore or marupulate the statements made by Leshe Ramsay. ~Baba Vega *'* Rcsta«rattt Celebrate the Holidays!!! .Join th<' F'nu in our Pri\·atC' Bm1qu<'t Ro<mL .. WoudC'tfol ft'ood ... Hr:L<;(mallll> Pl'i<'l'S. .. l'niqu<' JlC'rb Clm1kn *A : \lontros<' Tradition ~ince 1975 '60~m"ISI. <> ;>22-~ * Ignorance p A G E Is Bliss, But It .Ain't Pretty! The Precinct Initiative. Let's kick ignorance out of government and out of our lives. If you want to fight the far right in the Republican Party, call NOW! To Volunteer call: 713.866.4878 Deadline for Precinct Chairs: Jan. 2, 1998 PAID FOR BY THE LOG CABIN REPUBLICANS-HOUSTON, INC. 3 OECEIVIBER 1 9 T H 1 9 9 7 r AUSTIN AREA UPDATE Public Domain Theaue hosts holiday benefit: new production New Years Eve Benefit for Austin SOS The Public Domam will host the "Save Our Spnngs New Year's Eve Benefit" on Wednesday, December JISI, b<ginrung at 8 p.m. The ennrc theatre complex will be transformed into a desti­nauon of "night life excitement.• The Public Domam Thcatn: IS centrally located at 807 Congrm Ave in downtown Austin Entertammenr indudcs live music in the upstaus/mam stage area by the bands Afiodite and lnkulcko. "A complimenrary buffet will fea­nue a tasty am.y of edibles for the party goon.• said Rob Faubion. the ~p's Communications Dirtctot Tickeis for the event are $35 per prnon or S60 per coup!<; and mdude the buffet and open beer and wine bar. For raerva!IOnS. call (512) 477- 2320, Ext 41 Tideis will be available at the door. Absurdist comedv The Bald Soprano takes to the boards Ausun's Public Domain Theatre Company will throw a pie 111 the face of reality this January when n sugcs a I 99()'s uuerpretallOn of Eugene Ionesco's classic I 950's absurdlS! play The Bald Soprano. Dcscnbed by the producen as "fun. neat, and a little weird," th• mteractive play runs January 9th through the 31st at the Pubic Domam Ionesco wra<e Thc Bald Soprano after hsten­mg to a set of English langua!l" tapes. Through the play, he explo= how the breakdown of Jan. guagc IS symptomatlC of the l>Kakdown of the family. Du<ctor Linda Miles has set this produc· tton m the 1950's. invoking the kitsch of Amrncan suburbia to portray the play's themes. The Public Dornam Theatre Company's stag· mg of The Bald Soprano will be an interacttve event. immersmg the audience m the aaion of the produroon Set designers Michad Arthur and Amanda Acklin will transform The Public Domain's main stage mto a museum of mass media and the nuclear family. Costume dcszgncr JCSSlca Hester will make the audience think they have stepped onto the set of Leave It To &aver, while choreographer Loshe Pasternack will create exhibits of the absurd to complement the play. The cast of The Bald Soprano mcludcs Kauo Bender, HoUy Brown, R Michael Clmkscalcs, Chris Cortez, Nicholas Keene, Claudia Langford, John Byron Mayo. Lenore Perry, Anita Rogcn, and Konrad Zappler. The Bald Soprano wtll play Thwsdays through Saturdays at 8 p. m. at The Public Domain. with a Sunday mattnce on January 18th at S p.m. Tickets are SS on Thursdays, $12 on Fndays and Saturdays ($10 students and scruor citizens), and "Pay What You Wish" adrtUSSIOn for the Thursday, January &th preview and the Sunday, January !&th matmce. A charn· pagne gala performance. with hor's dcouvrcs by Panache Catermg. will be hdd Saturday, January 10th: Tickets are S25. Call 474-6202 for reserva­tions and mfonnauon The Pubbc Dom3ltl Theatre as located at 807 Congms Ave m thc heart of downtown Austm Ample parlcmg is available on the street and in the State Cap1tol parlt111g IOIS. Briefs_ A Tuna Christmas returns to Austm for ftone week only to the Paramount Theatre, January 6-11. The shows will almost certainly sellout early. You can charge a ticket by callmg 512469-SHOW Call 512472-5411 for more mformatton ... Our Gay Apparel continues playing at H)de Park Theatre until Dec. 23rd Ynu can r~e tickets to the Chnstmas comedy by call mg 512454· T!XS .. Ballet Aushn stages its 35th production of The Nutcracker, Dec. 19-23 at the Bass Concert Hall. Call 512469-SHOW for information. HOUS TON V OICI:: P A G E 4 MONTROSE AREA UPDATE local anisfs holidav ornaments created to benefit Montrose Clinic Anne E. Hetmaniak, a local artist, has started a new tradttion this Holiday sea­son. To support both HIV I AIDS and breast cancer programs, Hetmaniak has created "Holiday Ornaments .. for a CURE." Each ornament is hand-made and dated . Twenty percent of the pro· ceeds from the sale of the ornaments, cur· rently available at Lobo Bookstore, will be donated to the Montrose Clinic. Hetmaniak, a native Houstonian, has worked professionally as an artist for sev­eral years in many different mediums. Her work has included portratt painting, murals, interior decorative, graphic destgn and ceramtc tile destgn and creation. "I recently dectded to use my talents to benefit others and to support causes I believe in," Hetmaniak said. "This is my first project of this type. hopefully of many' I think tt 1s a good start." Hetmaniak chose Montrose Clime as the benefictary of her project because the Clinic has programs targeted at both HIV I AIDS and breast cancer. The Clinic and Montrose Counseling Center are cur­rently providing breast cancer outreach services to the lesbian community. Montrose Clime 1s offering a Women's chnrc two evenings a week, Women can receive a complete well-women examina­tion, medication and referrals as needed for S45 every Wednesday and Thursday from 5 to 8 p.m. Montrose Counseling Center offers individual and group coun­seling in conjunction wtth this program. For more information, contact the Chnic at (713) 830-3000. PWA Coalition bestows Bill Napoli award to Dolph and Smoke The Btll Napoli Award for Outstanding Volunteer Service to the PWA Coalition was presented to Perrie Dolph and Alec Smoke at the groups annual chent Holiday party, December 9, 1997. Dolph and Smoke have been longtime support­ers of the PWA Coaht1on (PWAC). Bill Napoli served as president of the Coalition for four years, until his death in 1991 The Napoli Award, inscribed wtth a quote from Btll Napoli - "And you learn Alec Smoke and Perrie Dolph receive 811/ Napoli Award. you can endure" • ts the highest honor the Coalition can give and has been presented for the past six years. In addition to Dolph and Smoke, Gurrola Reprographics, Bering Methodist Church, and Daryl Hickman of Tiburon Systems, respectively, received Dignity Award's. And, special Angel Awards were presented to departing Board Member Jim Taylor and longtime Case Manager/Supervtsor Bob Hergenroeder. This years event, attended by more See UPDATE page 6 •700 N. Pearl, Su ite 1000, Dallas, TX 75201 * If you are choosing to sell your life Insurance policy. Lone Star Vtatlcal invite" you to meet wtth us 1n person or by phone. Our servt<·e assists you With the process of ncgouaung and selling your policy allowtng you lo acquire the llnanclal resources you are seeking. By utilizing our numerous fundralstng sources. Lone Star Vlalical will work to obtatn the highest ca•h payment Within the quickest posslbk time. Our services are free & confidential with no obligation. Please Call or Come By! 214*691 *8300 or 1 *888*691 *8030 With our convrutttd support to AIDS 5t'l'Vie% organiubons, 5% of our gross ttVn'IU~ will be donatrd t Communily Gospel 'PadM (ffezi4 ~ The Pentecostal Famitv ot Montrose l I· A . N t~ 4305 uman. Houston. 11 11001 113-880-9235 www.communltn:oapel.orc o ece tv1B E R "1 9 T H MM#M.MIW#MM.Mt.'! ....... P A G C! DECEIVIBER 1 9 T H 1 9 9 7 r MONTROSE AREA UPDATE H UPDATE/1rom page 4 than 300 PWAC clients, was held at Tnmty Episcopal Church. For more mfor­manon about the PWA Coalition, call (713) 522-5428. MCC receiVes grants for indigem care Montrose Counseling Center (MCC) has received gifts from Episcopal Health Charities and the Methodist Hospital to provide services to indigent Houstonians in need of mental health services. The funds wiU cover the cost of psychological assessments and sign language translauon for the heanng 1mpa1red, services MCC has previously not been able to afford "These grants will enable MCC to use the experuse of a Ph.D-level, licensed psy­chologist to make assessments and provide clinical consultauon,h stated Ann J. Robison, MPA, Executive Director of MCC. "We will be able to see a wider range of c!ientS than ever before, and pro­vide them with more comprehensive ser­VlCCS." Sign language translation 1s also a great need that IS being met by the funds. "Sign language interpretation can be very expen­sive and the cost cannot be passed onto the client." Robison said Ep!SCopal Health Charities, which pro­Vlded one of the grants, 1s a public charity affiliated wtth the St Luke's Episcopal Health System Its goal 1s to assess and enhance the health status of the under­served. supponing LI-care and programs that promote lifelong health and well­being. The funds from The MethodtSt Hospital were granted through Its Community Benefits program, which seeks to make a cnucal difference m the Hams County community by addressing unmet needs. "There are too many women and men who fall through the cracks because they have no money," Robison says. "A great deal of them include members of the Gay Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgendered and HIV-affected communities. We are extremely grateful to The Methodist Hospital and Episcopal Health Charities for helping us reach out to more people." According to MCC, the new funds will allow the organization to link indigent individuals with its counseling programs, which cover: HIV I AIDS, hate crimes, intimate partner v1olence, sexual assault, and general life issues; case management for persons livmg with HIV I AIDS; and outpauent chemical dependency treat­ment services. For more infonnatton, call (713) 529-0037. Briefs_ The Houston Lesbian and Gay Community Center (GLGCC) announced today that 11 has begun compil­ing a timeline of important events in the h1Story of Houston's lesbian and gay com­munity. The organization is encouraging individuals and other organizations to sub· m1t suggesuons of events to be included in the timehne. The group plans to develop the timeline prOJCCI into a mult1med1a exh1- b1non of gay and lesbian history to be high­lighted in COnJunct1on with next year's Pnde fesuv1ucs. For more details, contact 1he Cmt<r at (713) 867-7904 M CC (Montrose Counseling Cen1<r) presented their annual awards at its Optn House on December 7, 1997 The Kenneth Vance Employee Awan:l went to Robert Taylor, a Case Manager, who was also voted most outstanding employee of the year. Student intern Knstina Fnman rrcr1ved the Margaret DiJacklin Student Awan:l and Miles Glaspy, a long·llme sup­porter of MCC, earned the organizations S1ella Scon Community Service Award .7(Jr¥y1y .7f-rt:-r.4-ry.J / DECEMBER 24, 1997 CCk,;;u/1aJ g;_,e ,~r,r£-e.J 7:30 PM & 11 PM CHILDREN 'S NURSERY CARE AVAILABLE FOR BOTH SERVICES Experience God's Unconditional Love 713.861.9149 • 1919 Decatur, Houston, Texas 77077 Wasl1ington@ White (betll'een Strulemont mu/ llo11sto11 Ai•e.) --=··----·•§ ·----- P A G E 6 Glaspy was also voted the year's most out­standing volunteer. MCC also honored co­founders and original board members William A. Scon, Stuart R. Phelps, Ted R. Hewes, Judith A Newsome, John H. O'Donnell, Marion Coleman, James Kuhn, Bert Hollister, and Steve Norvell .... Members of the boan:l of Outrage, Inc. presented a check to members of the board of Body Positive for the new Houston Wellness Center. The Center was one of three benefic1anes of the 1997 Outrage Halloween Party and other evmts. Steven's House and The Kolbe Project were the other beneficianes. The organization ward­ed a total of $15,000 in 1997. For more information or an application to be a 1998 beneficiary, call Outrage at (713) 706- 2508 . The Bayou City Boys Club (BCBC) held the1r annual holiday party benefiting AFH's Red Ribbon Toy Dnve last Sunday. Underwrinen by Jackson Hicks, Joan Pleason, and Gregory Spencer & Dan Logan, the event benefited local pediatric AIDS organizations BCBC matched dona­tions and/ or toys up to $1,000 .... Finally, Holly Dau, the Charles Armstrong Investments, Inc. (CAII) Employee Turnabout Show raised nearly SI ,500 through ptrformer's tips from cus­tomers and bartender donations of ups The event which took place December 8 at J.R.'s Bar and Grill brought together employees from CAH - Heaven, J.R.'s, and The Montrose Mining Company - to ptr­form holiday songs and variety numbers to raise money for The Gay and Lesbian Switchboard and the 800 Pacific Employee Emergency Fund. A check for $735 was presented to The Gay and Lesbian Switchboard. Crad Duren, M.D. 1213 Hermann Or., Suite 430 (713) 520-0653 Internal medical practice offering discreet confidental care to the community, including HIV/ AIDS diagnostics & therapeutics Healthcare from the Heart Anonymous Testing and Counseling Major Credit Cards & rsonal c hecks Accepted Insurance ,.Ith Qua lification Medicare DECEIVIBER "1 9 T H ., 9 9 7 REGIONAL NEWS ' Perrv 10 Sharp: whom are vou supporting for governor? by Juan B. Elizondo, Jr. AUSTIN Texas Agriculture Commissioner Rick Perry is posing a simple quesllon to Comptroller John Sharp: whom arc you supporting for governor? Perry, a Repubhcan, and Sharp, a Democrat, are the likely nominees for lieutenant governor next year. In a recent issue of Taas Wttkly, a politi­cal newsletter, Sharp said he doesn't make pnmary endorsements His campaign man­ager repeated that Monday. "John Sharp is running as a proven conservative Democrat," Tim Reeves said. "He has not endorsed any candidates in other statewide races, nor docs he have any plans to." The problem with that response, accord­ing to Perry's campaign, is that Land Commissioner Garry Mauro 1s the only Democrat who's announced for governor and will likely be the Democratic candidate against incumbent Gov. George W Bush. "As the Mauro-Sharp campaign gels under way, it is rntcresung to note the depth of support Garry Mauro has from his run­ning mate, John Sharp," Perry campaign manager Jim Arnold said "John, in case you haven't noticed, Garry will be the Democrat's nominee for governor. So, ... who do you support for governor?" On the Republican side, Gov George W. Bush has drawn one primary opponent, RC. Crawford, of Round Rock. Arnold said Perry wlll support Bush: "of course .... We're pretty clear," he said "It doesn't seem like on their side John ts quite sure where his loyalucs att." Mauro campaign manager Billy Rogers said the two Democratic campaigns have been working closely togc1her, bu1 1hat does­n't mean Mauro expects an endorsement from Sharp. "We've been working together and will continue to work together for a Democratic victory," Rogers said. Reeves said Perry appears more focused on partisan politics than on the interests of Texans. 11 Perry is determined to turn our strong bipartisan heritage into the partisan political gridlock we have all seen in Washington. Texans need results, not parti­san b1ckenng," he said In other polillcal developments this week: -Democratic Texas Supreme Coun Jusucc Rose Spector filed for re-election. Ms. Spector. one of two Democrats on the nine-member court. ts one of three JUS­tices up for re-election next year. -14th Court of Appeals Judge Harriet O'Neill, of Houston, filed for a spot on the Republican pnmary ballot to chal­lenge Ms. Spector. -Bell County prosecutor Murff Bledsoe, a Republican, announced for the Court of Cnmmal Appeals scat bemg vacated by Morris Overstreet, who is running for the Democratic nomination for anomcy gen­eral Environmenlalisls oner $50,000 reward for financier's conviction by Terri Langford HOUSTON - As Cahfomia and federal • forces work out a pact that saves a portion of corporate-owned redwoods !here, an1i-logging pro1es1crs Thursday stepped up their 11-ycar­fight against the trees' owner - Houston financier Charles Hurwitz. Using Houston's federal courthouse as a backdrop, Darryl Cherney of the group "Earth First'" offered $50,000 to any mdiVldual who can provide mfonnatlon that wiU lead to a criminal utdtctmcnt agamst Hurwitz. "I thmlc that Charles Hurwnz represents everything that's bad with corporate Amcnca," said Cherney, whose group has fough1 Hurwitz for years over logging rights in northern California, •·we art seeking to indict Mr. Hurtwltz by using the system, lhc judicial sys­tem," Environmentalists long have groused that Hurwitz, through his Houston-based Maxxam Corp. and subsidiary Pacific Lumber Co., cut a sweetheart deal wilh lhc federal and California government that gives Huzwu.z $380 million in exchange for JUSt 7,500 acres of forest - includ­ing the 3,000 Headwa1ers fores!, home of some of 1hc world's oldest redwoods Dale Head, who handles environmental and litigatton for Maxxam and Pacific Lumber, called Cherney's offer .. highly irresponsible . ... I lhmk what Mr. Cherney has chosen to do 1s bow out of lhc court system ... and instead go outside that and throw rocks at lhc system and throw rocks at Mr. Hurwitz," Head said Last month, President Clinton approved the federal government's share of the plan California and Pacific Lumber arc still ironing out details before the trade can lake place. The Headwaters 1s about 300 miles north of San Francisco. Earth First' and others would like 10 sec 60,000 acres of land pr=rvcd Animosity between environmentalists and Hurwitz has deepened in recent months. In August, one protester, angry at Pacific Lumber's loggmg program, threw a pie at Hurwuz Maxxam I :m tt fi t1] 11: '''I @'Ml I1 1111 ,J ii\1 I, !till The Houston HIV Prevention Community Planning Group (HHPCPG) is a volunteer board that provides guidance to the Houston Department of Health and Human Services' Bureau of HIV/STD Prevention by devel­oping a plan to prevent the spread of HIV in the greater Houston area. The HHPCPG currently has a vacancy and is accepting nominations for a person to represent the gay/lesbian/ bisexual community. Anyone over 18 years of age having personal or professional expenence working with this community may apply or be nominated ~r 1dd1t111a1 lnf1rmauon, Please call ma1194-921& Become a part of lhe solution. Join lhe HHPCPG. ---- took over Pactfic Lumber in 1985. As Hwwtt.z's representatives countered envi­ronmentalists' accusauons outside Houston's federal courthouse, his lawyers were busy ms1dc. Smee Sepl. 22, the Office of Thnft Supervision has been case, trying 10 prove Hurwitz and others mishandled the finances of Unucd Savings Association of Texas, con­tributing to lhc thnft's failure m 1988. The col­lapse cost taxpayers SI .6 billion 10 bail out As of Thursday, the government still was presenting its side of the case. The hearing, which is being heard by an administrative law judge from Washington, was scheduled 10 recess on Dec. 19. Maxxam and other defen­dants arc likely to present thelt side of the case early next year. Hamp Hodges announces bid for Agriculture commissioner by Peggy Fikac AUSTIN - Ci1mg h1S business cxpcnencc and tics to agriculture - while acknowledging he has never made a livmg as a fanner - Hamp Hodges launched hlS bid for lhc Republican nomination for Texas agriculture comrruss1on­cr Tuesday. "I am a businessman . I am the only candi­date that has successfully put together a busi­ness and managed ii 1hat IS as big or larger lhan lhc Texas Department of Agnculturc," said Hodges, 59, from Paris, Texas. Hodges founded a natural resources and LOBO light manufactunng company, Fort Worth­bascd Buffion Corp. which he said grew mto a $100 million business. He now as on the board of dittctors of BFX Hosp1tahty Group Inc., which has properties mcludmg lhc Fort Worth Stockyards Hotel and Houston's Cabo restau­rants. The Texas Department of Agnculturc has a $22.6 million annual budget, he said While Hodges said he hasn't earned a living as farmer or rancher, his grandfather, falher and wife were raised on farm and ranch opera­tions near Paris, Texas. He said he worked on cattle and hay operations as a youth until enter­ing West Point. He said he served eight years in the Army, including combat duty in Vietnam, rcsigrung as a maJOr Hodges is a landowner and a former ranch owner in Lamar County, according 10 his cam­paign literature, and has owned ranch land m Midland smcc 1978. He has run unsuccessful­ly for Congress HIS campaign treasurer IS his longtime friend, retired Alabama football coach Gene Stallings, who before Alabama coached at Texas A&M and w11h lhc SI LoulS Cardinals and Dallas Cowboys in lhc NFL. Among the candidate's attnbutcs, Stallings said, "The thing about Hamp is he's a good man. And I like that " Also seeking the GOP nomination for agriculture commissioner ts former state representative Susan Combs. a fourth-generation rancher who 1s a fonner Dallas assistant district attorney. "Susan Combs combines business expcn· encc with vitally needed background m agri­culture. Susan has run a small business for 17 years, a cow-calf operation in West Texas Addiuonally, she has experience work.mg for See REGION page 10 has what you need for the entire "FAMILY"! HOLIDAY HOURS Dec. 24 Dec. 25 9am - 6pm CLOSED LOBO BOOK SHOP 3939-5 Montrose 713-522-5156 CROWN EJI DODGE @ 11890 Old Katy Rood Houston, TX. 77079 281 -556-1111 Jon B. Hernandez New & Used Car Sales "Serving ff19 Gay & Lesbian Community.• HOUSTON vo•CE 7 Of:CEIVIBER 1 9 T H 1 s a 7 . PLAIN SPEAKING The Jov 01 Shared Historv by Larry Lingle It's barely been twenty years since Tennes<tt Williams scandalized the New York literary scene by wntmg his frank and gay "Memotrs ff That was still a time and a place where everyone knew who was gay but the non-gays did not talk about tt and the gays did not flaunt it. Now with the revolution well underway, a gay wnter, Charles Kaiser, tn his The Gay Mcuopolis 1940-1996, discusses the high and lowly of gaydom m New Yori< smce the seeds of the revolutions were planted in global war through the fruition of vast change m the era of AIDS KatSer's research is impressive, but equal­ly 1mprcss1ve IS the willingness of gays, young and old, to express tn words the real· 1ty of these six decades Promment figures in enrertainment, many of whom were only publicly outed after their deaths, are shown openly pursuing their true lifestyle, or more accurately, their lives. Even I found a name or two not previously encounte-red. In both previous careers, history and JOur· nahsm, l was very aware of the insights and JOumahsuc prowess of Joseph Alsop, the dean of Amencan columnlSts. Yet I was not only unaware that he was gay but that a SoV1et attempt at blackmail tnggered an East-West confrontation. In any case, Kaiser's book IS both well· written and enlightenmg, some might even say gossipy · I say mformauve While I looked forward to p1ckmg up Kaiser's book with anuc1pauon, l was dubious, to say the least. about George Plimpton's Truman Capote, both because Plimpton is straight but h1S book IS really a senes of long quotes from vanous persons in Capote's life And many of those speakers are or were straight. The very attttude I mentioned earlier pre· vailed among these people, resulting in such quotes as Lee Radz1w11l, when informed by Liz Smith (whose lesbiamsm remains unspoken by Plimpton in true '70s fashion) that Gore Vidal was suing Capote, replied: "Oh, Liz, what docs tt matter? They're JUSt a couple of fags." Actually Plimpton's book IS often delight· fuJ read.mg, suited for perusing around the swimmtng pools of which Capote was so partial. His approach creates rather vivid In actuality, Plimpton's book is more a source of primary material for others to interpret. He provides firsthand observa· tions of the range of Capote's life and leaves the conclusions to the reader While these conclusions do not differ matenally from what is already known, they do flesh out the " I also flashed on. another suppressed nu~et, I smrted a journal in high school and wrote openly in it that I Wa5 in love with my best friend. I appanmtly always carried the journal tn school for fear my older brother, who Wa5 wont tn SCOW' my possessions, might come across it. Somehow I misplaced it in school one day and lived in fear for m>ek5 that someone might have found it and figured out my secret. I never again kept a journal." ponratts of not only Capote but the high and low with whom he cavorted While Capote's fnend, Gerald Clarice, wrote the oflic1al biography, Plimpton bnngs out a clearer picture of Capote's early romance with Newton Arvin as well as his lifelong relationship with Jack Dunphy. And, stnce Plimpton relies on the words of others these relationships become more finely drawn when his gay fnends speak His swans, those h1gh-bom ladies to whom he was so close until he mocked them ID Answered Prayers, are barely able to bnng themselves to refer to his ••fncnds". broad strokes of that life . the confused childhood, the lifelong propensity to fabri· cate for the sake of a better story. And, indirectly through his interviews he only adds fuel to the few controversies of Capote's Life: Did he actually write To Kill a Mockingbird for his old childhood fnend, Harper Lee, and docs an actual manuscnpt of completed Answered Prayers cx1.St m some long-lost safety deposit box? What is not in dispute is that Capote, after his great success with In Cold Blood, began a slow but steady decline of booze and drugs which led to his death m the arms of Joanne Carson. The death and the funeral were as surreal as any other incident ID Capote's life. One service Plimpton docs perform quite well is comb1Ding the views of several par· ticipants about a single incident and illus­trating the value of eye witnesses, or their lack of same. From it all a portrait of Capote does emerge. He was unquestion­ably a great wnter, but not a great student. He was writing poetry and keeping a journal even as he entered his teens. This IS a feature I have encountered with other wntcrs. Probably explains why I am in retail. Although I must confess that only this book provoked a long buried memory of my own attempt to wnte a play in the sixth grade· and the end of my playwrihng. I also flashed on another suppressed nugget, I started a journal in high school and wrote openly in it that I was in love with my best friend . I apparently always carried the JOUr· nal to school for fear my older brother, who was wont to scour my possessions, might come across it. Somehow I misplaced it in school one day and lived in fear for weeks that someone might have found it and fig. ured out my secret. I never again kept a journal. For those of you looking for either a gift or holiday reading I can still strongly rccom· mend both of these books. Whatever else, tt is refreshing to read of a gay world which existed at least partially openly for some time. For me, it is revealing that at a time when I was convanccd of my uniqueness and aloneness, Leonard Bernstein was cavorting more or less openly in the streets of newly independent Israel. Had I only known. Well, better late than never. For all the trials and tribulations recently I have never for one moment regretted finally opening that closet door. And I thank the literary stars who shine light on our shared history .• (Larry Lingle, author of this Plain Speaking, will be taking a bnef hiatus until the end of the year. His column will resume ID January 1998. Lingle is the owner of Lobo Bookstore at 3939 Montrose.) ... ... ... ... ... ... ... ... Briar Patch Christmas Partu sunaau 7:30Pm Trad1tlona1 Holidau Buff et BAH HUMBUG Come and celebrate the 1st Annual Christmas in Paradise Party! December 19, 1997 sundav a:3oom A Christmas song Tradition uue and In uu1ng Color PIUS CHRISTMAS CAROLS & HOLIDAY CHEER A soec1a1 tnanll uou to an our Briar Patch 1r1ends. -¢-llue music n1unt111-¢- -¢-neuer a couer-¢- -¢-Alwavs uue-¢- -¢-Alwavs FUD-¢- 2294 w. Holcombe at Greenbriar 713-885-9878 ...,.. -~ --=·--·~--·-•tt ------ P A 0 E ·SGnta's Hottest Helpers. ·Jolly Hour drink specials all night! The party continures becember 20-21 wcsthcimcr weekend with special Holiday drink prices. 713-522-7366 a DECEIVIBEA 1 9 T H 1 9 9 7 RIGHTEOUS INDIGNATION Thinking or a Resttul Holidav by Leslie Ramsay The holiday season is in full swing. Everyone is so rushed with parties and events. The invitations arc too numerous to keep track. The service organizations are handing out awards. The social clubs are runrung their fundralScrs. Doesn't anyone plan affairs for the summer months any­more? need to start doing away with things. How many pairs of socks do you really need any­way? How many pairs of shoes did Imelda Marcos have? My sister in law is coming to Houston this weekend for a visit. Little does she know that she lS taking back a few things that we just don't need anymore. I wonder is she could use a slightly used washing machine? We are loolong forward to her v1s1t. My beloved has not had the opporrumty to viS1t with her younger sibling for nearly two years. Many things have happened in all of our lives in the last two years. I am already gearing myself up for the giggling to begm. ''How do you all do this every year? I have spoken to so many people that are just plain exhausted from trying to keep up. Most are looking forward to Christmas Day so they can get some much-needed sleep. The thought of one day of absolute peace and quiet is enough to encourage even the most exhausted grand diva of drag to carry on her busy, busy charity ball schedule. Twenty-four hours of absolute silence is less than a week away." How do you all do this every year? I have spoken to so many people .that are just plain exhausted from trying to keep up. Most arc loolong forward to Christmas Day so they can get some much-needed sleep. The thought of one day of absolute peace and quiet is enough to encourage even the most exhausted grand diva of drag 10 carry on her busy, busy charity ball schedule. Twenty­four hours of absolute silence is less than a week away. The mall crowds are smaller than usual according to the talking fifty-dollar haircuts on the evening news. But who has time to watch the news? [ haven't seen the news in weeks I had planned on going Christmas shopping last weekend. I had too many "things" to attend. I have yet to see the inside of a Houston mall this season. I did get the opportunity to parade through the IJallas Galleria a few months ago. r had every intention of spending way too much money but I didn't find one single thing worth buying I have ~ccntly come to the conclusion that I haw everything I need. I have finally reached that particular place in my hfe that I They giggle non-stop when they are togeth­er Laughter is so contagious around those two. The holidays are very special to me. I look forward to visiting with my extended family. I look forward to visiting with my nephews most of all. I see them almost everyday but on Christmas morning. with their eyes bnght with glee, is the best time. They arc so adorable in their suits and ttny linle tlC'S when they arc all dressed for church They love singing in church. We always spend 100 much money on toys. The boys fell asleep trying to open and play with all of their new toys at the same time last Christmas morning. They looked so contented with the shiny new train or alphabet blocks tucked under chins while they slept on top on a mountain of shredded wrapping paper. They have nothing to worry about. They are truly loved by so many people. I wish all of you a safe and restful holiday. EnJOY your families-extended as well as 1mmed1ate From our family to yours-Happy llolzdaysf T T T T T T T T Premier PAGING & WIRELESS PAGERS 51995 HOUSTON vo•ce 9 Whv Is Mv Panner Alwavs Yelling At Me? by Dr. Charles C. Perroncel There are Expressive people who believe in talking about everything ... and sometimes shouting about them. AND there are reserved people who tend to be very quiet and to "show" what they feel rather than talk about it. On the principle that opposites attract, 1t should be no surprise that these two often find a powerful attraction to each other. The quiet one enjoys the excitement the other brings to the relationship, the expressive one cherishes the stillness and solidity of the quiet partner •...... THEN ALL HELL BREAKS LOOSE. The Expressive one becomes volcanic and nagging and the steady one becomes withholding and boring. What's to be done'! Can they ever learn to get along and restore the happiness of their "In-Love" time? Of course they can •.• IF they BOTH are willing to work at 1t. Last column we gave some hints for the Noisy Partner. This time there's help for the Quiet One. First off, there are people who are quiet by temperament. It can actually be measured and predicted at birth whether you' II be better at sales or at library science. Delivery Room Personnel use the "drop test" - holding the newborn in one hand and suddenly lowering It - and noting how much It squirms, screams or JUSt hes there and enjoys the ride. The last group usually grow up to be Quite Partners. However, some of the screaming bunch can be badgered into becoming quiet too. They arc simply scared quiet by years of repressive upbringing at home, school and/or church. In either case, a quiet partner can contribute as much trouble to a relationship as a noisy one. It's JUSt less apparent. So here are some tips for min1m1Zing the problems and increasing the plea­sure of living with that boisterous. bad­gering, bombastic partner of yours. I. Buy time to think about what you want to say by suggesting: "I need a little time to think about that". Then be sure to come back to the subject as soon as possible. 2. Write your ideas down for your conversation so that you won't become muddled while talking. 3. Ask for understanding. Make it clear that you are trying to answer, but are hampered if your partner won't be quite so that you get a thought clear and clearly stated. 4. Write a note about the issue if you find it just too threatening to talk about it. Ask your partner to write back. 5. Get into an Assertiveness Training Class or see a qualified relationship therapist 10 coach you in the art of fearless conve"atlon. (Dr. Charles Perroncel ,.,11 an.m·er questions in this column sent to Ent" Nous, The Houston Voice, 811 Westheimer. Ste. 105. Houston. TX 77006 or add"sud to <dr.c.perroncel@ theru­pist. net >- Check.for past column.) ut www/nstincts.com) Your Out And Proud Clothing Store HAPPY HOUDAYS FROM ALL OF US To ALL OF YOU! 1232 Westeimer • 713-522-1626 Mon - Sat 1 O am - 9 pm • Sunday 12 - 6 pm 8ROIHERS o e c e IVI e e R 1 9 T H 1 g g 7 LIVIE ~lISIC O,_. ~lIL TIJ>LIE STA(ilES Fl?~ the wallflowers matchbox20 village p eople otis day & the knig0-ts war the romantics flock of seagulls jackopierce kokotaylor & many more ! l>LllS;,;,. Fii? "~l<.S ~lll ... l(illT .STAR RI.SE Houston Chronicle .......... d ........... .. ,j ,·,\' ClARIC 11".CMKM.OGl'i:S CYIH CAFE ~ 713-629-3700 BLOCKBUSTER MUSIC• FOLEY'S • FIESTA• RANDALL'S Online: http://www.tidcetmaster.com v.1.P. P.4C1<.4C.E.s AL.So .4V.4•L.4ELE! "'1 llO<["S $.UC' 'C )tMN(NCI' v1ARGE llo\IE 'ltlU ~ ll.fP()!I AC'ISI :;:,ucr 10 Clwa Wl!l()U' NCTlCE ~' ~~~ '1ini:.donc . 1 11.ufon"• 1 luti.tn l!Jr £<(,rill llJ\OU Btul"3 -11.?.?.l.CJ088 :'1 l.1:30.011 1 I '11..c· IA1uni:i· I 'lid. \\ illir's 71 1.ZU.':H J l>o"nln"n 7 14.l1S. U ;'7 w:+.+as.-ww.+cy !MaMM+M-- p A G c:: 1 0 r • R E GION/1rom page 7 the regional adm1n1 .trator of the General Services Admimstrahon, and of course that organ1zat1on ha.s a big budget and lots of employees," said campaign spokesman Regg;e Bashur. On the Democratic side, stale Rep. L.P "Pete" Panerson of Brooks1on has enle"'d the race. He grew up on a family farm and contm­ues fannmg and ranching on it. He also owned and operated a tarpaulin manufactunng and "'Pair business He has headed the House Agnculrurc and Livestock Committee. His campaign spokesman, Dwayne Holman, had no comment on Hodges' remarks State Rep. Diana Davila declines to seek tounh term HOUSTON - S1a1e Rep. Diana Davila has announced she will not bco seek.mg elecllon to a fourth lerm m 1he Texas Legislature. The Housion Democrat's surprise decision Monday opens up a seal m the heavily Hispanic and Democratic southeast Houston district. "I JUSt made the decision to pursue other opportunities," said Ms. Davila, 31 "I feel comfortable with the support I've had. I've served my constituency well and will contin­ue lo focus on the kjnds of issues on which I've focused in 1he Legislature." Michael Bunch, whom she defealed m 1996, is seekjng 1he Republican nommallon m that disma. Ms. Davila has concentra1ed on education and other child"'n's issues m the Legislatu"'. She said Monday thai she would continue working in those areas and said she was considering returning to school "Thert:'s no need 10 search for anything deeper than me making a personal deci­sion," she sa1d_ Ms. Davi.la was first elected in 1992, defeaiing Republican Mark Sandoval (Sec "'lated front page story). HPD oflicianv opens new police headquarters HOUSTON - Amid much fanfa"' the Houston Police Departmenl's (HPD) new police headquarters al 1200 Travis officially opened las! Thursday, Decembcor 11 . Joining HPD Chief C.O Bradford at the grand opening ceremonies were Mayor Bob Lanier; Bob Eury, President of Central Downiown and Executive Dirt:e1or of the Downtown Houston Management D1Stria; .and Joan Buschor, chairperson of the city­wide Positive Jntcraaion Program Several former chiefs of police also attended the H event including Sam Nuch1a, Harry CaldweU, Joe Clark, B.K. Johnson, John Bales, Jack Heard and Mayor-elect Lee Brown. "Our training, technology and profession· ahsm are nationally recognized, but, most important, we enioy a bconer "'lauonsh1p with the people of this city," Bradford said. The Chief also said the departmen1 had long oulgrown the Riesner location bu1l1 in 1950 He said the former headquarters localed ai 61 Riesner "represents the department's past, not its future." Bradford also praised the achievements of Mayor.elect Brown, HPD Chief Bradley, Elyse and Mayor Bob Lamer looking on at opening ceremony of HPD HQ. P"'decessors. he c"'di1ed Nuchia for mak· mg Housion's streets safer and Brown for bringing the community and police depart­men1 together in partnership as never bcofo"'. The grand opening signaled a new and exciting future for the 7 ,500 officers and sup­port personnel who serve nearly two miU1on people in the nation's fourth larges< ci1y The 26-story office tower in the heart of 1hc city with 444,142 square feet of office space, 1400 modular work stallons and more than 1,000 compulers will allow the building's 2100 employees 10 proVlde bcoucr service 10 the community. The move comes at a time of great dynamic changes in the city and police department. A new admi01strauon siands posed to lead the city mto the 2lsl century and HPD's Police officers arc well prepared to meet whatever challengC'S lie ahf'ad Former citV councilman claims ethnic bias in FBI sting HOUSTON - A former Houston cny councilman charged with bnbery in an FBI public corruption sung has asked 1ha1 the charges bco dismissed bcocause only minority politicians were targeted Ben Reyes See REGION page 11 ,i.I d.9it&.\ I it \'\ ___ __;:i~ ·" t River Oaks 1911 West Gray Medical Center 2276 West Holcombe at Dunlavy at Greenbriar 713-521-0550 713-66 1-0668 Former/ at 3939 Montrose Happy Holidays from the staff and management of Fantastic Sams Quality Stylists Needed • 713.266 3758 oecEIVIBER 1 B T H 1 ") 9 7 REGION!trompage 10 motion Monday with US. DtStnct Judge David Hittner, alleges that he was singled out because he 1s Hispanic. The Justice Department went after nine minority poliucians, never approaching Mayor Bob Lanier and five white City Council members, Reyes said. Reyes' attor­ney, Michael Ramsey, also raised questions about why former US. Attorney Gaynelle Griffin Jones, also a minority, recused her­self from the case. All six people who were indicted, except for Reyes' longtime aide, were mmonties, Ramsey said. "This is an instance of the FBI creating a Spanish-speaking "front' for the express pur­pose of targeting political factions of the Latino community, with the hope and expec­tation that other minonties would become involved," according to the motion. It was near the term-limned end of Reyes' 15-year stint as the City Council's first Hispanic that two Hispanic FBI agents approached him and pretended to be investors, Reyes said The men said they represented a group of minority investors in an enterpnse called the Cayman Group and were interested in participating in the planned convenuon cenier holel, Reyes said. They 1old Reyes and other minority coun­cil members 1ha1 they wanled to make up the minonly inveslmenl componenl of the hotel plan submitted by developer Wayne Duddlesren, the plan favored by City Council A Hispanic lobbyist and public relations expert was ultimately hired to help the "investors" gain the suppon of council for the Duddlestcn plan, and the part1cipa­t1on of the men now known to have been undercover agents Bribery mdictments were returned against Reyes, councilmen John Castillo and Michael Yarbrough, former councilman John Peavy Jr., former Houston Port Commissioner Betti Maldonado and Reyes' aide Ross Allyn. According to th• indict­ment, the s1x participated in a scheme to innucnce the awarding of contracts in the REGIONAL NEWS convention center hotel project. Reyes, Castillo, Yarbrough and Peavy arc accused of enriching themselves by "cor­ruptly soliciting and accepting cash pay­ments with the intent of being mnuenced and rewarded for supporting the interests" of the FBI front company - the Cayman Group - in connection with the hotel pro­jCCI Reyes, Allyn and Maldonado arc accused of giving or offenng cash paymcn1s to coun­cil members with the inicnt of winning sup­port for the Cayman Group's part1c1pation m the project. The men have pleaded inno­cent and Ramsey said it 1s the FBI that tS guilty of wrongdoing. 0 Reyes would show that this indictment 1s the result of an 1mpermissibly selective prosecu11on which unlawfully targeted Reyes because of his race, while 01hcr non­mmorit: J.es who were similarly situated were not made the focus of the governmenl's investigation," according to the motion. New computer svstem searches tor and finds Medicaid fraud HOUSTON - Our of the 1echnology Iha! perfCCled the so-called "smart bombs" used in the Persian Gulf War comes a sys1em now being used to find fraud in the Medicaid system Texas Comptroller John Sharp said Monday that a preliminary examination of Medicaid claims from Houston and Austm alone turned up $34 million in improper billings. The system found a psychiatrist who billed for 40 one-hour therapy sessions m a single day, h discovered a physician who claimed 10 be on the JOb more than 18 hours a day for every workday in a year. Intelligent Technologies, which devel­oped the "neural net" technology, has been awarded a 21-monlh conlract to contmue its Medicaid work for the Texas Health and Human Services Commission, which administers the Medicaid program in Texas. Sharp said he contracted with the company after reading about how credit card compa­rues used the technology to root out fraud . "They taught the Visa (credit card) system how to think hke a credit card crook," Sharp said at a news conference at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Cen1er on Monday. "They spenl two years teaching our system how to 1hink like a Medicaid crook." Stale and federal governments spend about $7.5 bilhon per year on Medicaid, which provides health care for low-income children, pregnant women, disabled and elderly in Texas. It is estimated that 14 per­cen1 of the Medicaid budget is lost to fraud, Sharp said A computer searched through millions of Medicaid claim forms, Sharp said, revealing a pattern of questionable billing practices a1 a Houston-area physi­cians clinic. S1a1e officials discovered thal Houston Pro Medical continued to use Dr. Francis C. Archer's name to submit bills for more than two months after the physician died in January, the comptroller said Texas Pro Medical has agreed to repay the state S2 mil­lion for improper billing of services provid­ed to Medicaid beneficiancs, Sharp said Issac Molho, president of Houston Pro Medical Management, could no! be reached for comment, Tht Houston Chronicle report­ed. Seulement 1alks arc also under way with several orher providers, and some cases may be referred for cnminal prosecution, Sharp said. Joe Brown, company president, said the anti-fraud systems were derived from tech­nology used in the "smart bombs . ... Now, It has made its way into the commercial sec­tor," he said. The computer can analyze Medicaid bills using 120 factors 10 size up the practices and can "learn" from the system and dctCCI new schemes used by providers. Sharp said the next goal is to be able to use the system ear­lier in the claims processing system so it can analyze clauns before the state pays the bill. Sunday, December The Imperial Court Presents Briefs.. Boxes of toys were airlifted 10 young AIDS pancnts in Romarua recently - the result of a grassroots effort by school youths, AIDS experts, and private firms. The pro­JCCI spearheaded by physicians and nurses at Baylor College of Med1c1ne and Texas Children's Hospital, sent toys collected by school children in the Hous1on Independenl School District and other individuals. Continen1al Arrlines dona1ed the cargo space for the airlift which took place over the Thanksgiving weekend .... Dallas' Turtle Creek Chorale announced 1hey will present Comedienne Margaret Cho for a celebra1ion of comedy and music on New Year's E\"C at the Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Cenicr begmmng at 8:30 p.m. Jommg Cho will be Liberace protegc Daryl Wagner and comedienne Valery Pappas, rccip1Cnt of the prestigious Carol Bumcn Award for Excellence in musi­cal comedy. For more information, call (800) 494-TlXS... Finally, Milr.e Laster filed his Declaration of Candidacy for the Texas House of Reprcscntauves, District 134 in the Democratic Party Pnmary. Extending from Krrby Dnve 10 Dairy Ashford, District 134 includes the Wes! Uo1vcrs1ty , Bellaire, parls of Mcycrland, Maplewood, Sharpstown, Fondren Southwest and Alicf areas of Houston. Laster says he recogruzes an urgent need for new leadership in the dtS­tnct (Compiled by staff from local sources, Associated Press and wrre reports) "' "' "' "' "' "' "' "' Photos With Santa from 7pm-9pm "It Came Upon A Midnight Queer" A Totally Gay Christmas Revue at 9pm Followed at 11 pm by Houston's Hottest ll#ale Strip Contest ---- Christmas Eve ~ , f, • Feel the Spmt at your Home \.\~'i {\ !1 )17( .d i away from Home :J~~"-~\.vVf ' ~ ' Christmas Day Open at 6pm Santa's Elf Dances for your viewing pleasure at 9pm ···-- 1 1 OECEIVtBER 1 9 T H 1 9 9 7 Student columnists fiver criticiling uavs sparks debate by Patnck Graham Associa1td Pms PHOENIX - When the editor of Northern Arizona University's student newspaper l'Cjected Harmony lerley's col­umn cnticiz1ng the campus' gay and lesbian group, the conservative wnter went over her editor's head. Outraged, lerley and her 1dcological allies with T1v Unt!nground Pms turned her dis­posed column rnto 900 one-page !hers. The leaflets ended up on car windshields across the Flagstaff campus in late October and eventually cost her the unpaid wntmg posi­tion she held for three semesters. The rncident also shook up the normally quiet university of 17,000 students and has prompled a debate over the extent of free speech and political correctness. The 200-member Lesbian Gay Bisexual Alhance is demanding an apology from an unapologeltc lcrley, the newspaper is defending Itself for ftnng lcrley and against her censorsh1p charges, and NAU officials are trying to figure out if Icrley should be purushed for spcalang her mind "Talk about shutting down intellectual thought and intellectual speech," the 22- year-old speech commumcauons major said Wednesday. "I wasn't anadung homosexu­als. I don't agree with homosexuals. If you say anytlung against homosexuals, you are automallcally called a bigot." The fliers, cl.aiming that gays are promlS­cuous and want legalized sex with children. naturally angered the LGBA, which saw II as noting more than rehashed homophobic rantings. "(It) was narrow-minded and confronta­tional, and its message was one of hate," said Rich Machold, a graduate student in psychology and an alliance member N "When she apparently put thlS on 1,000 cars. not orily did she violate the student code of conduct, she also forced her extremely discrimmatory viewpoint onto people who would normally not choose to read thlS." University officials are invesllgatmg the incident to determme if lerley violated two campus policies, said An Farmer, NAU's director of Student Life. Farmer sa1d lerley appears to have violated the school's policy barring advertisements from being distrib­uted via fliers on car windshields. Farmer said the problem with such !hers is that they tum into liner. The other policy is the student Code of Conduct, which includes the school's Safe Workmg and Learrung Envuonment policy. The policy includes a section on d1scnmina­tion, which can include "behavior that cre­ates an environment which lS intim1datmg, hostile, or offensive for individuals of one group, and thus interferes with a person's ability to work or learn." Farmer would not say whether !crley vio­lated the Code of Conduct because the case IS under reV1ew "We are supporters of free speech and will protect those nghts from time to time," Farmer said "But in this case, we have to be very cautious." lerley said she has htred an attorney and is ready to ftle suit against the university if she is punished by NAU The homosexuali­ty debate began in The Lumbt']ac/c on Oct. 15 when lcrley wrote a column on the subject. Namely, she alleged that homosexuals are promiscuous rather than monogamous, and that homosexuals "demand that sex with children be legal1zed." She also said that orily 3 percent of Amcncans are gay, as opposed to a I 0 per­cent figure used by many gay act1V1sts She cued several sources, including Planned Parenthood and the Centers for Disease Control and Prcvenrion .. All sources avail­able at T1v Lumbtr;aclr," she concluded. After two weeks, lerley submitted a sec­ond column she said was needed to rebut an LGBA letttr that questioned the sources .. _-...::::; cited in her first column. LGBA charged that lerley got her data from "an ultracon­servative lobbying organizauon" lerlcy said she was so inccraed, "I had to defend my sources." "The bottom line is that LBGA knowing­ly and purposely tried to dismiss the evi­dence I presented to create a 'truth' more to their hking," she wrote m the second col­umn. Tracie Williams, editor of The Lumberjaclc, defended her decision to kill the second column and to later fire lerley for distributing the leaflets. "It's not right to bait someone with a col­umn, to draw someone in to write a letter to the editor and then attack them," William said. "I didn't run the column because I did­n't think 11 was fair and ethical I JUSt didn't want to get into a tit-for-tat." Lumberjack faculty adv1Ser Warren Weber said he consulted with Williams over the column and lerley's subsequent fmng on Nov. 6. He said he agreed with both deci­sions. "She was terminated because of the flier bit," Weber said. 11We considered it to be unprofessional." Settlement allows New Jersev uav couples to adopt by Jeffrey Gold NEWARK, N.J (AP) _ A settlement announced today in a cl.ass-action Lawsuit gives gay and unmamed couples the right to adopt children on equal footing with mamed cou­ples New Jersey IS the first state 10 permit such adoptions. according 10 the Amcncan Clvil Liberties Umon, wluch announced the settle­ment. A consent decree app~ by a state judge nullifies a stale pohcy to wluch there had been a1 least two exceptions made recently. The order takes effect immediately. In one of the recent exceptions, a gay couple tn Bergen Counry were granted joint adoption of their •- ~~ 8_~l~l'{ Saturday December 27 9pm TERRI'S ANNUAL CAPRICORN BIRTHDAY BASH! -- Come help this group of Capricorns and fnends end ·97 and get a jump start on 98 ~ ad. t4e s~ o! t4e 1tw. g'a'Ut & ~~~atta~~· Come celebrate New Year's Eve at CHANCES and THE NEW BARN. $10.00 per person NOW ... $15.00 per person at the door. LIVE ENTERTAINMENT ' BOTH BARS a>~,,. Long Shots Band - Shiela Lennon '1~! Reserved Seating of your choicel ~ Oanct:o/ Friday December 26 • 9 pm BARBARA WALKER'S FINAL '97 BENEFIT 523-7217 "A Birthday Tribute to a Bag Lady!" Come see & enioy a hilarious bunch of Queens and Wanna-Bees celebrate Lisa's Birthday! 1100 Westhelmer • Houston • 523-7217 foster child, a 2-year-old boy named Adam, by a family court judge. The men, Jon Holden and Michael Galluccio, of Maywood, were also the leading plaintiffs in the cl.ass-action Lawsu11 seeking to overturn the stare regulation that barred unmarried couples from joint adoption. Similar niles eXISI in many states Since the state allows unmamed individuals to adopt, many other New Jer.;ey gay men and women are adoptive parents, gay rights activists said. Many are in couples where one partner IS the biological parent, or where each partner adopted the child separately. The class-acnon suit, filed in June, was brought on behalf of Holden and Galluccio and Lambda Families, a lesbian and gay farm­ties organization. Official: list ot Georgians with HIV could be in place in two vears ATLANTA -A state official says a system that would collect the names of every HN­positive Georgian could be in place within two years. But the plan concerns AIDS and HN patients and advocates who fear that public disclosure could lead to discnmina-uon "You can't repair the loss of confidenual­ity," said Marj Plumb of the Gay and Lesbian Medical Association But Dr. Kathleen Toomey, the state's director of public health, said, confidentiality "is some­thing we all think has to be paramount " Officials say haVlng names of those with HIV - which can lead to AIDS - will lead to better tracking and treatment of those with the virus. Currently, the state reports names of people diagnosed with AIDS Over the years, AIDS and HIV pauents have been afforded a specific right to privacy under state and federal laws. The special protection was in recogrution of widespread discrimination against those patients In a highly unusual move, New York health officials recently named a man with HIV who they said knowingly infected scores of women. Now, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prcvenuon is calling for mandatory reporting of HIV infections. Although the CDC hasn't decided the best way to do that, agency officials say the cur­rent method of reporting AIDS cases by name has worked well Patients routinely must waive their nght to privacy to get their medical bills paid and to be tested for HIV "II ts somewhere between the hil.arious and the addled to say that we have privacy," said Arthur L. Caplan, a medical ethicist at the Un1vcnuy of Pennsylvania. The government goes to great lengths to protect the identities of those with l!IV or AIDS, including sex offender.; who could pass on the illness. Still, AIDS advocates wonder if confidentiality 1s a promise the government or anyone can keep. ln Florida last year, a drunken health offi­cial released a computer disk containing the names of 4,000 AIDS patients "And now you are going to have people who are going to be on a computer list 10, 15, 20 years," Plumb said. "It wouldn't be so hard 10 imagine who might have a stake in finding out who those people are." Local authorities let San Jose mariiuana club stavopen SAN JOSE, Calif. - The Santa Clara County Medical Cannabis Center can keep its doors open despite a court ruling bamng such clubs from selling pot, local law enforcement officials said The Santa Clara County dis1nct attorney, San Jose city attorney and c11y pohce thief said Monday that the state appeals court rul­ing was aimed orily at a San Francisco club State agents said that they saw maniuana sold to people without prcstnpuons at San Francisco's Cannabis Buyers' Club, that us See NAT'L page 14 -=····---:-•-•§ ••••• P A G E ., 2 OEC:Cl:SV1BC:R 1 9 T H 1 e e 7 STARTS THURSDAY, DECEMBER 25th Greenway3 EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT 5GreerwayPlaza•(713)626--0402 LANDMARK'S MM#@.MIK~@.MA" iM•+++w p A 0 E 1 3 T D E C C! IVI B E R 1 9 T H 1 9 9 7 NAT' L/trompage 12 pot was lat<r r<SOld on the street and that children w<re on the premises. But City Attorney Joan Gallo said clients don't smoke or bnng children to the Medical Cannabis Cent<r in San Jose, which resem­bles a doctor's office more than a club. "We have a very dtff<rent model here," she said "We don't thtnk this ruling really impacts us_" State Attorney General spokesman Matt Ross said the decision by the State Court of Appeal on Fnday applied to all such organi­zallons "Cannabis buyers clubs are not allowrd Plam and Simple," he said The ruling takes effect in 30 days from the llme II was ISSUed ManJuana clubs opened in more than a dozen Caltforrua cities after vot<rS passed Proposition 215 1n November 1996. The ini­tiative allows possession and cult1vation of maniuana for AIDS, cancer and other dis­eases upon a doetor's recommendation. The appeals court said Fnday that the only way patients can use maniuana legally was to grow 11 themselves or. 1f too sick to do so, get 11 from a primary caregiver who grew 1t According to the court, Prop. 215 defines a pnmary careg1v<r as someone designated NATIONAL NEWS by the pauent who has assumed consistent respons1b1lity for the pauent's housing, health or safety. The court said that does not include mar­iJuana clubs. But local officials maintain that the Medical CaMabis Cent<r meets the definitton of a primary caregiver. Peter Baez, co-founder and executive director of the center, said clients are required to declare the center as their 11alternativc medical provider" working with their primary doc­tors. The center, which has worked closely with local authontles, also 1s away from schools and churches and bans juveniles, Baez said. Teacher cleared after complaint over 'Ellen' episode discussion ALAMEDA, Calif - A state panel has cleared a teacher accused of wrongdoing after she discussed the .. coming-out" episode of the televts1on show Elim with her fifth-grade class Parents Mike and Judy Trelow complained that Victoria Forrester violated the1r parental nghts by discussing the April episode in their daughter's class at Amelia Earhart Elementary School But the Alameda Unified School Distnct cleared Forrester in October. And Monday, a lawy<r for the state Comm1SS1on on Teach<r Credentialing said the panel has decided there is insufficient evidence to investigate wheth<r she should lose her teaching license. Forrester's attorney, Ballinger Kemp, was told by phone Fnday of the panel's decision, although the state has not yet notified the parties officially by letter. "I'm excited. I'm happy. I'm relieved," Forrester told the San Francist:o Chronick. "But there's a little piece that constantly nags at me _ a sadness that this happened in this community." The state's decision closes the books on a parent's complaint that a seven-minute class­room discussion of the TV episode violated his right to control what his daughter hears in school about homosexuality. Mike Trelow asked the school board to fire Forrester and the state to revoke her teach­ing license Trelow said Monday he had not gotten word of the commission's decision and would not comment. He has said he might sue Forrester 1f school authonties didn't punish her. Trelow has maintained that although Forrester is a good teacher, she vio­lated his wishes to be nottfied of any class-ll'O/,../~"--="---....: S''Your NeighOOrh~ Country Bar' Coming Attractions! December 19th Customer Appreciation Featuring Hors d'oeuvres Special Guest D.J. "Jimmy Dale" @ 7pm Our Way of Saying Thanks! 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The Trelows say there is a document on file with the school stating that they don't want their daught<r, Heather, to participate in such discussions. Additionally, Trelow claimed that, when it became clear that Heather did not agree with Forrester's asser­tions the Ellen character was 11brave" and "proud," the teacher pulled the girl aside and suggested she be open to different points of view. Forrester denied she had said anything like that to the g;rl, and the school distnct's investigation, which included interviews with students, found no evidence that Forrester had done or said anything inap­propnate. Gav loan applicants get semement from credit union BOSTON - A New Bedford credit union has paid $5,000 to settle a lawsuit brought by two gay men who applied jointly for a loan, but were denied. Paulo Lopes and David Nichist1 said they w<r< told by a loan officer at the First Citizens Federal Credu Union that their rela­tionship was not like a marriage and the1r application could not be considered in the same way as a joint application from a het­erosexual couple. The two had applied for a loan to consolidate thetr debts "Of course, 1f this couple had the oppor­tunity to marry, they would not have been turned away," said Mary Bonauto, an attor­ney with Gay and Lesbian Advocate• and Defenders, who represented the men. Along with its S5,000 settlement, the cred11 union issued a Jetter of apology. The couple had filed a complaint wnh the Massachusetts Commission Against DiSC'nmmauon. "This may seem like a small maucr to some people," said Nichistl "But 11 is terri­ble to have other people decide not to do business with you solely because you 're part of a gay m.alc couple. Controversy brews over Times Square recruiting station NEW YORK - Mayor Rudolph Giuliani says Times Square is a fitting locatton for a .. landmark" military ~cru1ting sta11on and will fight efforts by gay activists and business leaders to have u moved. "At th1> point, they can forget about any plans of removing it because I wouldn't approve 11." G1uliaru told the New York Post. Tom Duane, D-Manhattan, an openly gay member of the City Council. says the station has no right to Its rent-free location on c11y­owned land because the military discnmi· nates against gays and lesbians Duane's proposal to move the Slatton, e•tablished in 1946, has the backing of the Times Square Business Improvement District, which said it wants to tum the locauon into open space for pedestnans. Duane. chamnan of a Cny Counol sub­comm111ee on land use, IS to hold a heanng on 1he recruiting station on Tuesday. The mayor said he would consult with veterans and the Defense Department about the sta­uon . Gav dean sues school, files complaint with Human Rights Commission A gay dean is suing Albertus Magnus Collge, claiming he was dismissed because of hts sexual orientation. In his lawsuit, Michael Hartwig, 43, charges the Catholic colkge with breach of contract, slander and libel Hartwig IUed the lawsu11 agamst 1he school and the school president Fnday. He has also med a complaint with the state Commission on Human Rights and Opportunmes. In his complaint, Hartwig See NAT'L pago 15 -=·-···--··§ ·-------- P A G E ., oecervial!Fl ., 9 T H ., ~ Q .,, NAT'Utrom page 14 claims he was discriminated against because of his sexual orientation and religious beliefs "No facul!y member should have to fear discrimination because of their personal beliefs or relational commitments. I want to assure that what happened to me, won't happen to my colleagues," Hartwig said in a prepared statement. Hartwig was placed on paid leave in October, shonly after he wrote an OJ>-ed piece for a newspaper identifying himself as a priest 11on leave. ti Under Roman Catholic Church law, priests can never be absolved of their vows, but they can leave the active min­istry m good standing if they undergo "lai­cization." Hartwig was never laicized. The college has said Hartwig's disrrussal was the result of conflicting accounts he had given about his status as a pncst and not because of his sexual onentation. School officials maintain Hartwig told them he was no longer active m the mjnistry when he applied for the job six years ago. But according to coun documents, his resume said he took ua permanent leave of absence from active ministry" for personal reasons at the end of 1987 Albenus offi­cials could not be immediately reached Hartw1g1s lawsuit seeks unspecified mone· tary damages, a rctracuon of all alleged defamatory statements about Hartwig made by school offictals and his reappointment to the faculty. Filmmaker Ken Burns urges end to racism at Michigan commencement ANN ARBOR, Mich - Filmmaker and h1stonan Ken Burns urged University of Michigan students during a commencement NATIONAL NEWS address Sunday to fight bigotry and div1S1ve­ness. "So I ask those graduating today - male or female, black or white or yellow, young or old, straight or gay - to become soldiers in a new 'union' anny, an anny dedicated to the preservation of this country's ideals, a van­guard against ~aratism and disunion," Burns said. Bums also warned students not to forget their history, both personally and collective­ly. "If you don't know where you have been, how can you possibly know where you're going?" he said. Bums, best known for the award-winning PBS series The Civil War, grew up in Ann Arbor. He spoke to about 2,000 graduates at the school's winter commencement cere­monies. Burns, Nobel Prize-winning chem1Sl Richard Smalley and social activist Gwendolyn Calvcn Baker received hon­orary degrees at the ceremony. Group won't rent school theater for concen bv lesbian duo CORVALLIS, Ore • The Corvallis Folklore Society won't rent Ashbrook Independent School's theater for a concen by a nationally known lesbian folksmgmg duo after all. The society wants the school to develop a formal non-discriminatory rental policy before it will book the 402-seat theater for its cvrnts, said Anna Ellendman, concert coor­dinator. As of now Cru Williamson aod Tret Fure will hold their Feb. 28 concen m the downtown Ma;csuc Theatre, Ashbrook had denied use of its theater to the duo, saymg It didn't want to appear to promote or attack sexual lifestyles. The folklore society complained to the city, which said the refusal violated its anu-dis­cnminahon ordinance. Dave Gore, headmaster of the private, non-dcnominauonal school responded by promising the school would work with the city to rewntc the rental policy. The school also offered the theater to the society at a reduced rate. "We hope that Mr. Gore will eventually rewrite the rental policy to comply with" city law so that the Ashbrook School the­ater can become a resource for arts organi­zations and their audiences in our commu­nity/' Ellendman said. Briefs_ A musical starring Vicki Lawrence will replace a country music concert next year as a fund-raiser for AIDS education and suppon services The play Sister Amntsia 's Country Wtsttrn Nunscnst Jamboree will be presented Jan. 20-22 at the Grand Ole Opry House. Organizers said llckct sales waned 1n the past two years for the country concerts They featured Singers such as Billy Ray Cyrus, Pam Tillis, Mary Chapin Carpenter and K.T Oshn. The fund-raisers have been held for four years. New privacy laws and a state rccom­mendauon arc pushing Che Cassia County School Board rn Burley, Idaho to change its policy for students who contract the AIDS virus No casts of AIDS or the human immunodeficiency virus have been rcponed m the district yet. But if they are, trustees will have to weigh a •tudent's right to an cducauon wuh the need to protect others . Two statewide groups arc JOmmg together 1n an cffon to slow the rapid­ly mcrcasmg surge of AIDS and HIV infection in Kentucky's black communi­ties. Representatives from the NAACP and the Kentucky Depanment of Pubhc Health said at a news conference Friday that they're planning a series of work­shops, health fairs and other events around the state next year to provide informauon Heated Patio Saturdays Chili Dogs 50¢ Draft 2pm til... Sundays Guest Bartenders R.S.l.C.S.S 50¢ Draft A 2pm til... V Happy Birthday Jerry Jones -=··-----·•§ •••••• P A G E 1 !5 DECE!IVIBER about AIDS and alen blacks to the grow­ing threat ... A Topeka, Kansas muruc1pal planning ~xpen who is openly gay won·1 take a top governmental JOb because of what be calls an opprcsS1ve atmosphett created by the city~s most notable anti-homo~xuaJ cru .. sader. Darrell Lewis, planning director m Duluth, Minn., said last week he would refuse the city-county planning director's job m Topeka because of persistent anti­homoscxual demonstrations by the Rev. Fred Phelps and his followers from the Westboro Baptist Church The State College Area school board in Pennsylvania has voted to include homosexual ISSUCS at a d1vemty workshop for district employees, rcvcmng an adm1rus­trative dec1S1on The d1vcrs1ty workshop, mandatory for the d1Strict's estimated 600 employees. IS scheduled for Jan 21 at the Penn Staler Hotel and Conference Center .... The group behmd Colorado's anti-gay rights Amendment 2, which evcorually was declared unconstttut1ooal by the US Supreme Coun, has a new leader Colorado for Family Values last week announced Paul Jessen, pastor of the Colorado Restoration Fellowship Foursquare Church, will take the rems of the group. He says he wants to put the organization back in the public eye CFV has not had an exccuu,·e director smcc Kevin Tebedo resigned m 1996. Jessen says he w~nts the group to ren("W its aCUV15m an opposing what he secs as "the forced affir­mauve action of homosexual behavior 1n our commuruucs. '' He said the group also will fight to protect the "traditional legal defimtion of marriage" and help those .. trapped 1n homosexual behavior" Two men were assaulted m Fon Collins, Colorado, one t11Jurcd seriously, m what police said appeared to l>e a hate cnme The 25-ycar-old men. whose names wt~ nor released, were leaving Lmdcn's Bar around I :30 a m. Saturday. Two men sraned See NAT'L page 16 1 9 T H 1 9 g '7 Your Community lmase lt!her! House of Coleman Fine.Printing & Graphics 901 WEST ALABAMA HOUSTON, TX 77006·4693 713 . 523 . 2521 · FAX 713.524.2643 ••••• P A G E 1 B NATIONAL NEWS NAT'Utrompage 14 ydhng derogatory "'marks at them and then kicked and punched them, police said "We're classifying this as a hate crime because the suspects yelled. 'Hey you fag. gots,' at the victims," said Susan Vance, an officer with the Fort Collins Police Services. "And it turns out the two victims aren't gay_" D ogcn Umvenity appa"'ntly has become .ll..thc tint Oklahoma state entity to include 0 scxual orientation" in its policy on anti-dlSCrimmation. The Rogcn Board of Regents made the change quietly at a "'cent mccung ...• School district officials in Las Vegas backed away some from a widc-rangmg harassment policy proposal that would ban ccrtam tcasmg and fl1r11ng among both Stu· dents and faculty. A school distnct commit· tee postp0ncd until January a discussion of the policy amid tough questioning and harsh citirum. Much of the public comment at Tuesday's Policy Committee meeting came from advocates for gays and lesbians who questioned why the policy includes protcc· tion from harassment on the baSIS of nmc charactcnstics but not for sexual oncnta· uon Despite a brush with student demonstra­tors wearing gags, State Umvers1ty of New York trustees refused Tuesday to reveal details of a closed-door d1scuss1on about a sex confe"'ncc held on SUNY's New Paltz campus. Trusttts did talk in executive scs· s1on about last month's conference which included graphic demonstrations on lesbian· ism, safe sadomasochistic sex and sex toys. But Chairman Thomas Egan said it would not be discussed publicly at Tucsday"s board meeting because 11 involved a personnel mat· rcr. Egan called the controversy an "unfor· tunate distraction" at a time when the um· vcrsity is preparing for its 50rh anniversary .. Cincinatti officials reported the state IS spending $210,000 a month on AIDS· "'lated drugs for pnsoncrs · four times what it spent per month last year, a newspaper reported Monday. AIDS ranks thud as the cause of death in Ohio prisons. behind can­cer and heart disease. Most inmates with AIDS contracted the d1Scasc before they were locked up. prison officials told Tht Cincmnali Enquirrr in a story Monday .. Finally, Salt Lake City"s C11y Council voted 5-2 10 approve an ordinance pro· tccting gay city employees from d1scnmma· tion. One opponent. Councilman Bryce Jolley, said the law will be "'pealed m January by the new council. Two hours of vitnolic public dcbarc preceded the council's vote. Mo"' than 30 "'5idenrs argued for and agamsl the new law Gay city residents pleaded with council members to approve the ordinance that proteCIS c11y employees from job discnmination based on their race. color, national ongm, sex, religion, age, sex­ual oricnration or disability. They say it's a matter of fairness and cqu11y "' "' "' COURT WATCH Coon savs domestic protective orders applv to same-sex couples by Mark R. CheUgren FRANKFORT. Ky • A Court of Appeals ruling that says domestic violence orders may be obtained by one member of a same· sex couple who faces abuse from the other could mflamc lcgislauvc debate on the topic. One state senator has al"'ady proposed a change m the law to prohibit the issuance of domestic violence orders to memb<-rs of a same-sex couple The appeUarc dcciSJon Fnday reversed a Fayette Circuil Court ruling. which had rakcn the position that the law applies only 10 a married couple or a heterosexual cou· pie. Judge David Buckingham of Murray, who wrorc rhc majonty decision. said the statute applies 10 couples engaged in an mti· mare "'lat1onsh1p and would not apply to roommates "The language of the statute is unam· b1guous. even though II is gender-neutral and docs not specifically mcludc or specifi· cally exclude same-sex couples from its scope." Buckingham wrote. "The General Assembly has not given prcfc"'ntial treat· ment to same-sex couples or homosexuals; rather 11 has provided for equal t"'atmcnt under the law for same-sex or homosexual v1ctims of domestic violence ... Judge Joseph Huddlesron of Bowhng Green joined Buckingham's opinion. Judge Rick Johnson of Mayfield dlSScnted. He said the legislature intended to allow domes.. tic violence orders for couples that arc com· posed of members of rhe oppos11c sex. The statute now allows .. any family mem­ber or member of an unmarried couple" to petttion a court for a domestic violence order 10 refrain from any con1ac1 wllh the partner. II has generally been applied to unmarried couples who live togc:tht-r, for· mcrly ltvcd 1ogc1her or have a child in com· mon. It also covers spouses and some other relatives. According to the court case, John W l"'land and Blake Allen Davis w°"' homo· sexual males living togcthe-r an an intimate relationship. Ireland sought a protccuve order, alleging he had been abused by Davis. Sen Tim Philpor. R-Lcxmgton, has pro­posed a revision that would add to !he dcfi· nition of an unmamed couple, limiting that category 10 people "of oppos11c sex:· Philpot said prior 10 a hearing on the pro· posal in August the legislature intended 10 protect women and children from abuse and protect a traduional family unll. Philpot said he is open to the possibility of prov1d· See COURT page 17 For eke H'V-+­Co~~"-, e,~ey Accepting Most Major Medical Insurance o e c Exercise Programs w/ Personal Trainers Nutritional Intervention BIA Testing Massage Therapy Neuropathy Therapy Steroid Education CAU. (113) 349·9150 COURT WATCH COURT/trom page 16 mg protection to homosexual victuns of domesuc violence if gays prove there is a problem. lawver sanctioned tor Improper conduct in Montel Williams case by Richard Pyle Associated Press NEW YORK -A lawyer who improperly added a gay male plaintiff to a sexual harassment suit against television talk show host Montcl Williams was sanctioned $15,000 U.S. District Judge John S. Manin said Wednesday that W. Randolph Kraft "behaved egregiously" and demonstrated bad faith in trying to keep his role in the high-profile case alive and subjecting his original clients - four women - 10 "needless expense." Manin also said Kraft acted m defiance of a court's warning that he could not tack on the new defendant and "the court might well impose sanctions" if he did so. "There is a clear line between zealous advocacy and abuse of the legal system that an attorney may not cross," the judge wrote. "Kraft ... clearly crossed that line." Calls to Kraft's office in Jersey City, N.J., were not returned. The action grew out of a 1996 suit m which Stacy Galonsky, a former associate producer of The Monte! Williams Show, and Mahn Feldman, a former executive assistant, claimed 1hcy were sexually harassed by Williams and fired after they complained Among their allegations were that he groped them and made lascivious remarks. Later, two more women who had worked on the syndicated TV show and two former domestic employees of Williams' family were added to the suit - originally filed m a New Jersey state court and later moved to federal court at the defendant's requesL By last March, four plaintiffs had dropped out or fired Kraft as their lawyer, leaving him orily former nanny Carmen Rodnguez and ex-housekeeper Maria Gonzalez as clients. At this point, Manin said m his 18- pagc opinion, Kraft added Ernesto Medina, a gay man who claimed he had been sub­jected to "sexually offensive conduct" dur­ing seven months as Williams' executive asSlstant in 1994-95. Mcdma alleged that Williams ridiculed his sexual orientation, gave him embarrass· ing "sex toys" and grabbed his buttocks. A spokesman said Williams "vehemently denied" the charges, as he had the earlier ones. Manin said Kraft was warned by a judge that the case no longer belonged m federal coun and he could face sanctions by persist­ing ma "frivolous" effort to harass, delay or dnve up his adversary's legal costs. He said Kraft knew Medina's allcgauons were "totally distinct" from those of his original clients - as were those of the former nanny and housekeeper. The latter two complained not about Wilhams, but about his wife and mothcr-in­law walling around their home topless and displaying sex toys. Manin said that as going topless on New York streets was legal, it was "hard to sec how walking around bare-breasted in one's own home... could create a 1hostile work environment."' Manm said the pair had been added to the suit m such haste that one of their "cen­tral allegauons" was hand·wnttcn on court papers Because Krafl knew the federal court had no jUrisd1ct1on in their case, he said, Gonzalez and Rodriguez apparently were included for "public rctauons ... and tactical" purposes. AT&T wireless employee awarded $405,000 in AIDS discrimination case WEST PALM BEACH (AP) - A JUry awarded $405,000 Thursday to a man who said he was repumandcd for taking too much sick lime after telling his bosses he has the virus that causes AIDS. Roger Kw1atck, who worked in the support services office at the West Palm Beach branch of AT&T Wrrclcss, said he was first repnmandcd m 1993, the day after he told his bosses he was HIV-positive. In the months following his announce­ment, Kwiatck's bosses told him his work needed improvement and he needed a doc­tor's note to justify his absences. Kwiatek's attorney, Scott Warfman, said the AT&T Wireless and it's subsidiary, McCaw Cellular, were trying to lay a foundation to fire Kwiatek. In 1994, the company told Kwiatck he'd be fired if he didn't improve and gave him the option of taking long-term disability. Kwiatek, who was then on a reduced work week, said he could do the work and contin­ued in the $23,500-a-ycar JOb. He eventual­ly accepted the long-term disability m 1995, when he became to weak to work. The jury awarded Kwiatek $180,000 for past and future psychological counschng and lost wages. He also received $125,000 for pain and suffcnng. The jury also said AT&T should pay $1 million in pumuve damages, but by law that amount would be reduced to $100,000, Warfman said. AT&T spokesman Shawn Camp criticized the jury's award. "It's a Christmas verdict," he told the Palm Beach Post Thursday. "We never dis­cnminatcd against Mr. Kwiatck m any way .. There was never any type of punitive action here." Camp said the company is sull paying 60-percent of Kwiatck's salary and accommodated his request to reduce his work week. Jurvto hear male vs. male sexual harassment suit BIRMINGHAM, Ala. - A sexual harass­ment and assault claim from a male state Department of Human Resources employee against his maJc former supervisor goes to trial Monday in federal court. Calvin Burton Ill of Bmningham sued the state of Alabama and former supervisor Philip Calloway m DHR's food stamps claims office. The case comes a week after justices on the US. Supreme Court heard arguments m a sarne·sex sexual harassment case stem· ming from incidents among offshore oil rig workers in the Gulf of Mexico The Supreme Court decision on whether sexual harassment laws apply to members of the same sex is expected in July. In his suit, Burton claims that Calloway told him in March 1993 that he was "gay and proud of 11" Calloway asked Burton out, but Burton told him he liked women and was engaged to be married, Burton claims. But then, Burton claims, Calloway began subjecting him to ·•countless incidents" of intcnuonally rubbing his body agamst Burton's in a small room that contained a copy machine, making sexual commenlS toward him and inVlting him to a gay nghts march m Washington. Dunng jury selection Thursday, DHR's attorney Margaret Fleming acknowledged that Calloway was homosexual, but she denied that he had ever harassed Burton. Burton, who filed suit in October 1996 seeks compensatory damages, back pay: court costs and other awards, as well as injunctive rchcf to ensure that any sexual harassment in the workplace stops Former patient sues psychiatrist ALBUQUERQUE - An Albuquerque psychiatrist has been sued by a former female patient who alleges he illegally had sex with her and that she later teamed h1S W>fe's ex-husband died of AIDS. Rose Wynell Quackenbush, 47, alleges m her lawsuit that she began seeing Dr. John N Bennett in November 1995 when <he sought treatment for depression. ............. ., •••Qu•ack•en•bu sh, a secretary and school P A G E 1 7 teacher, continued seeing him until this sum· mer, says the lawsuit, filed in state district coun. During that time, Bennett "negligently failed to refer Wynell to another therapist and ncghgently treated Wynell by uunatmg and maintaining rc~ated sexual contact with her," the lawsuit alleges. "Additionally, Benncn did not disclose to Wynell that Mrs. (Judith) Bennett's former husband was HIV positive until after Bennett began to engage Wynell in a sexual relationship," the lawsuit says. The ex-husband died of AIDS m September, the lawsuit says. Bruce Pasternack, Quackenbush'• attorney, said the case bas been turned over to the distnct attorney's office. Bennett and his attorney, Charlonc Mary Toulouse, declined com­ment Tuesday on the lawsuit, which also names Mrs. Bennett as a defendant. Mrs. Bennett worked in her husband's office as a bookkccpcr, says the lawsuit, "The problem is most people wait too long.' -Danna K. Archer which accuses the Bennetts of professional negligence and seeks an unspecified amount of damages. Pasternack said Quackenbush has filed a complaint against Bennett Wlth the state Board of Medical Exarnmcrs. Man indicted on charges ol selling useless HIV home testing kits FRESNO, Calif (AP) - A Los Banos man has been indicted by federal authorities for selling bogus HIV and Hepatitis A home test kits. Court records show Lawrence Clare Greene, 50, marketed his home test kits over the Internet and through several San Joaquin Valley pharmacies under the label LEI-Home Access Care and Jin-Greene Biotechnology Prosecutors See COURT page 18 Allstate \ ou'n· m e,-.J hand"-. Your house. Your car. Your business. You. For your insuratKe need~ ki"llV. good hands is the only place to be!" Ed""·-ard Garcia ,'.'~E.rdwsJ<• Aim< AMio. Prof><rt:t. uf•. &smtss All~;u~ I nsurMV:e Comf"'m· 3467 l:orf.1· Orov< HtlU)tlll\, TX 17Ns Bui (?tl) 5Zl>-5553 Fn C7ll} 5Zl>-5t55 oen;......,_~...,_........,.._u...~.,.._ ..... ~IA-'-~,...._-...., .. ~ .............. , .... ..._._ ................ --·Aailllr~ - ~ ... S'fiitKiNG <>~ sYUFFEilSI u f.;f pi/l ~~~~~~:·;~:::::.tfl/1 6:;;AN~ Please Drink Responsibly. Every Night! Come see our Erotic Dancers Tease & Please tn our Cages of Decadance! COMMUNITY STAFF PARTY! Wednesday: 9 pm CHlii~'i'illS tVE 'Twas the night before Xmas and all through the house, Everyone was Party-ing,all in a rouse! All were in good Cheer, With Cheap Drinks and Beer! With Visions of young studs dancing galore, admir-ing eyes in cages adore LOW COVER cried the Door­man for all to hear, Don't you just love this time of the year? tiliiiS'i'ililS Di Yf Family Escape Time starts at 9 pm! Fast, Fresh, & Up-to-Date! www. acificstreet.com Houston's Lowest Regular Drink Prices! $1.25 Well/ $1-75 Beer $3.00 Call / $3_50 Premium & $1-25 Schnapps! 710 Pacific Street Houston, Tx. 713/523-0213 D E C Ei • NI Et 6 A 1 9 T H .._ .., -S 9 7 COURT WATCH COURT/1rompage 17 said the kits were not approved by the Food and Drug Administration. Greene allegedly sold the test kllS to about 30 people nationwide, mostly m New York and Florida, and distributed them to about 35 to 40 pharmacies 1n Modesto, Fresno and Merced, U.S. Attorney Paul L. Seave said in a written statement Fnday. "Those who seek to profit from the tragedies associated with the spread of the HIV virus by illegal means will be vigorously prosecuted for their despica­ble acts," Seave said Class-action suit seeks to force Utah Medicaid to pav tor deVices SALT LAKE CITY - Utah Medicaid is d1scrimmaung against rcapients who can­not speak by refusing to pay for devices that allow them to communicate, a class-action lawsuit contends Such devices may range from a few hundred dollars to several thou­sand. The su11, filed m federal court Tuesday by the Disability Law Center, 1s based on denials of payment for such devices to Scott Fike, 32, who has cerebral palsy, and Jana Real, 30, who was left speechless from a brain in1ury. United Cerebral Palsy of Utah also IS named as a plainuff Un11ed Hralthcare of Utah IS named as a defendant because it provides health-care coveragr for sorue Utah Medicaid enrollees, mduding Fike. Utah Medicaid 1s required by federal mandate to cover the devices, when deemed medically necessary, for rec1p1entS age 21 and under. But the Utah program excludes members when they turn 22. State Health Department offi­cials say those denied coverage can appeal. The suit alleges Utah Medicaid discrimi­nates against people with severe disabilities m favor of people with less severe disabili­ties, said Ron Gardner, legal director of the nonprofit center. Medicaid covers speech and language therapy, equipment and sup­plies to adults and children who have diffi­culty speaking. But it does not provide the same level of service to adultS unable to speak The sun alleges that policy is m v1olat1on of the Med1ca1d Act, the Amencan wuh D1sab11it1es Act and the Rehabihtahon Act. "If you have some natural speech abil11y, they'll provide services to improve that speech, but 1f you have no speech ability, Medicaid says, •No,'" Gardner said. Rod Betit, executive director of the Utah Department of Health, said the state Medicaid budget is not large enough to cover everything and that the agency must determine the need for such devices to ensure rec1p1ents are able to communicate well enough to receive good medical care. "If you are disabled, but sull have the use of your hands or can speak somewhat or can write notes to communicate, then say­ing this (commumcation device) is the only way you can communicate, for medical rea­sons, 1s not the case," he said. "If you arc a quadnpleg1c and clearly have no other way to convey your frelings and concerns other than through an ass1St1ve devicr. then that's a much more clear case " www. houstonvoice.com •=•·•••¥*•·•;" ...... P A G E 1 e GLOBAL NEWS To decriminalize or not? British conference discusses mariiuana by Sue Leeman Associated Press LONDON - Mariiuana should be legal­ized because it is a largely safe drug that can alleviate some symptoms of multiple sclerosis. AIDS and cancer, the sponsors of Britain's first public conference on the issue declared Thursday. Body Shop founder Anita Roddick. one of the sponsors, told an often-rancorous audience of 500 that Bntain's current poli· cy regulaung mar1iuana 1s "random. foolish and harmful" and "turns the sick mto cnm­inals.• Said Roddick· "It is ume to change the law.'' The conference, also sponsored by Virgin boss Richard Branson, was brought together by The Independent on Sunday newspaper, which has mounted a campaign to enable Bntons to buy and grow maniua­na legally. Some at the conference expressed concern that marijuana use was a "gateway" to harder drugs, but they were in the minority. Nigel Evans, a lawmaker from the main opposition Conservative Party, was heckled when he said manJuana could cause mad­ness. "Keeping II controlled is the only way we can keep the number of young users down," he insisted. Bnush property owners face jail terms of up to 14 years for allowing someone to smoke cannabis on their premises Govemmrnt figures show that thrre are at least I 5 milhon manJuana users, wuh more than 656,000 arrests made for cannabis-related offenses between 196 7 and 1995. Pnme Mm1ster Tony Blair's Labor gov­ernment, which came to power on May 1 says it has no plans lo dccnm1naltze man- OCCEIVIBER juana, despite a recent British Medical Association repon that marijuana has ther­apeutic value in treating the symptoms of some diseases. The medical journal Lancet concluded in I 995 that "the smoking of cannabis, even long-term, is not harmful to health." Labor lawmaker Austin Mitchell, who earlier this month led a delegation to the Department of Health asking for mati1uana to be made available on prescnpuon, said he had been told there was not enough research on the subiect. "Pure balderdash," Mitchell thundered Thursday, waving a copy of the BMA report from the floor "Thousands and thousands of multiple sclerosis sufferers are being forced into the back streetS " Balancing on a pair of crutches. MS suf­ferer Barry Clarke complained that he has to be a cnmmal to obtain marijuana to relieve muscle spasms "Why can't I grow 11 in the privacy of my own home and smoke it'" Clarke said. "That's all I ask." Rosie Boycott, ed11or of The Independent on Sunday, urged other coun­tries to follow the Netherlands, which allows itS citizens to use maniuana for ther­apeutic and recreational purposes. Other speakers went further, urging full legaliza­tion. Sociology professor Lynn Zimmer, co­author of a report on manjuana research published by US. philanthropist George Soros' Lindesmith Center, said the drug "has some potential for harm, but not too much." Soros, a billionaire currency trader, was among the financial backers of a California law, approved by voters in 1996, that allows marijuana to be grown and used for med· 1cal purposes if recommended by a phys1· c1an. Decriminalizing marijuana Zimmer said, would enable police officers to focus on other cnmes - in effect "expanding cur­rent police forces by 5 or I 0 percent. Last See GLOBAL page 23 1 9 T H 1 u a 7 M#Me@i4-:+@eM§ @•MM+M P A G C! 1 9 ... ENTERTAINMENT Tomorrow Never Dies Twilight of the Golds Best Bond Yet by Leslie Ramsay Uruted Anists releases the long over due Tomorrow Never Dies to a theater near you tlus weekend Get ready to be entenained. Tlus lllStallment of Ian Fleming's Agent 007 finds Bond spoiling the world domina­tion plans of the maniacal Elliot Carver, 24- hour news media mogul. If the news day is a bit off- why not create your own news' A few people will get blown to shreds 10 the process but 11 docs make a really super head­line m the morrung newspapers. Pierce Brosnan (Mrs. Doubtfire, GoldenEye) returns as the super suave Bond. James Bond. Michelle Yeoh (Supcrcop) plays Wai Lin, a gun totmg Kung Fu Cluncsc agent. Wai Lin is not the usual femme fatale that Bond has draped about him 10 previous outings. Wai Lin fights side by side with Bond. Jonathan Pryce (Evita) stars as Eliot Carver. The role is a cross between the evil twins of Ted Turner, Bill Gates and Rupcn Murdoch. Teri Hatcher (TV's Lois & Clark) plays the wife of Carver and former lover of Bond, Paris. Desmond Llewelyn (16 Bond Films . . ) returns as Q. Q continues turning out the most fabulous toys that make Bond the man with the best toys in the business. This time he has supplied James with a remote con­trolled BMW 750. The car IS fantastic. Dame Judi Dench (Henry V, Hamlet) and Samantha Bond (GoldenEye) play M and Miss Moneypenny respectively. GOtz Otto (Schmdler's LISI, Gndlock) plays the sadisuc psychopathic German boy toy of Carver. His career in Amencan films IS sure to take off after his exposure in Tomorrow Never Dies. Vincent Schiavelli (Amadeus. Ghost) provides the bizarre evil guy character that every James Bond film must have. Is it wonh seven bucks and a trip out to the multi-plex to sec 11? Absolutely. Gold at the AMC 30 by Leslie Ramsay Avalance Releasing 1s delivering The Twilight of the Golds to the AMC 30 at Dunvale screens this weekend. The film stars Jennifer Beals (D.vil in a Blue Drrss, F7asJuiance) as a newly expect­ing mother, Suzanne. Her genetics research industry employed husband, Rob, is played by Jon Tenney (Fools Rush Jn, Tombstone). The husband convinces her to run a "few tests" on their unborn child. The genetics tests results are not at all what they expect. The child has the genetic makeup linked with homosexual­ity. The couple is torn over what to do. Suzanne receives mixed messages from everyone she turns to for advice. Rosie O'Donnell (A I.Lague of Their Own, Exit to Eden) and Patrick Bristow (TV's Ellen) have cameo roles as a co-workers who offer advice. 'T"lie Staff and Management of The BRB .l would like to wish everyone a Happy and Safe Holiday Season Sunday December 21 • 8pm The Rainbow Rangler's Holiday Show and Auction Thursday December 25 • 2pm til. .. Christmas Buffet The Brazos River Bottom Club I 2400 Brazos • Houston. TX 77006 713-528-9192 ....... P A G F.: 2 0 DECE IVI BER Suzanne's brother, David as played by Brendan Fraser (George of the Jungle, Mrs. Winterbourne), is gay. The family still has not dealt with his sexual orientation. Faye Dunaway (The Chamber, Network) plays the mother, Phyliss, and Garry Marshall (&aches, Exit to Eden) plays the father, Walter. They struggle with their own feelings about David's ori­entation. Should Suzanne abon their first born grandson and try again? Maybe the next one won't be gay ... The film is very thought provolting. The abonion issue is not the main focus as much as genetic research, Do we really need to know everything? WINDOW/trompage 1 improve the newspaper," Waybourn said . "We believe Houston Voice has a strong role to play in the community." Wayboum is a native Texan. He was born in Houston in I 94 7. Waybourn worked for 10 years as an eduor for two Texas dally newspapers. A former Dallas activist, he was president of the Dallas Gay and Lesbian Alliance. He was an instru­mental force in the growth of the lesbian and gay community there throughout the 1980's. While m Dallas, Waybourn was funda­mental to the creation of gay and lesbian institutions including the community center, AIDS clinic, food bank, credit union, credit card, and a young adult's d1Scussion and support group. Jn tbe early I 980's Wayboum, Bill Nelson, Terry fcbedo and Craig Spaulding founded Dallas' Crossroads market, a multi·purpose store serving Dallas' gay and lesbian community. Subsequent to selling Crossroads Market in 1991, Waybourn moved to Washington, D.C., where he founded the Gay and wbian Victory Fund, a highly successful political action committee devoted to raising money for openly gay and lesbian political candidates and served as its executive direc­tor for four years. "Houston was an integral partner in the growth of the Victory Fund," Waybourn said. "Thanks to early interest on behalf of many Houstonians, including former board member Annise Parker, we were able to help elect numerous openly lesbian and gay can· d1dates to public office." Three years ago, Waybourn formed a public affairs and marketing firm, Window Corporauon, to assist wlth positive interac­tion between mainstream corporations and the lesbian and gay community. The Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD) subsequently hired Window Corporation for two yean to restructure GLAAD from a loose confederauon of chapten into a single cohesive national organization. Today, GLAAD maintains fully staffed offices in New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Washington, Atlanta and Kansas City. Last year. Wmdow Media LLC was formed with partners Ellsasser and Johnson - who have worked with Waybourn since the early days of the Victory Fund - and Cram, who began working with the team dunng Waybournrn's tenure at GLAAD Ellsasser manages tbe business aspects of Window Media, and preV1ously managed the day·to-day operauons of both the Victory Fund and GLAAD. A graduate of Drake. Ellsasser is a degreed accountant and also serves as a partner in Window See WINDOW page 23 1 B T H 1 e e 7 -=···--·•;'! wish to offer Seasons Greetings to those organizations, businesses and individuals who have helped us continue "lifting hearts during the holidays" for those in our community afflicted with or affected by HIV I AIDS. We are proud to acknowledge the following businesses and organizations who have supported our endeavors or have allowed us to support them in their community service efforts. The Brazos River Bottom Garden Party PWA Coalition The Colt 45's Krewe of Olympus-Texas Soiree Aubergine Mary's ... naturally! Venture-In The Texas Gay Rodeo Association-Houston Chapter The Royal, Sovereign and Imperial Court of the Single Star n 1997, through the efforts, contributions and support rom many within our community, we have been able o provide holiday cheer in the amount of $15,99 • PWA HOLIDAY 'iARITIES (a tax exempt charitable organization) Underwritten by the membership of PWA Holiday Charities tw.+w+ P A G E 2 1 DECEMBE.R 1 9 T H 1 9 9 7 ea ears Eve ~ i ~ T ~ U ~ ~ N, T . ~ ~ : "Baker Pierre Lumbroso makes Moroccan style bread the old fashioned way ... all are divine. Pierre practices his craft at Riva's." Ann C..riswell Houston Chronicle 11119/97 !".@@+@§1111 P A G 6 2 2 our 's! GLOBAL NEWS HEALTH GLQBAL/rrom page 18 year in the United States, the police arrest· ed 500,000 people for possessing cannabis," she said. "By my calculat1on, these arrests cost American taxpayers about $500 mil· lion." AIDS warning tor soldiers at Britain's largest militarv base LONDON (AP) · Commanders at Bntain's biggest military base have advised troops to take an AIDS test after at least two HTV·posit1ve women had a senes of sexual affairs with soldiers, the Ministry of Defense said Tuesday. Deputy commanding officer Col. Neil Donaldson said in a special order signed Wednesday that the two women had been having sex with soldiers based at Catterick WINDOW/trompage20 Corporation. Johnson, a graduate of Harvard Law School, serves as strategic and legal counsel for Window Media, and for both the Victory Fund and GLAAD. He is national co·chair of the Servicemembers Legal Defense Network, general counsel of the Victory Fund and partner in Window Corporation. Crain, also a graduate of Harvard Law School, manages the editorial and opera· lions aspect of Window Media and serves as editor and publisher of Southern Voice. Crain's background in ioumalism, newspa· gamson m Yorkshire, 210 miles (340 km) north of London "It has been reported by a confidential source that at least two females hving in the geographical area of Cattenck Garrison have contracted the AIDS virus and are HIV positive," Donaldson's statement said The women, he said, "are believed to be hberal with their affections, particularly to soldiers, and are not adverse to indulging in casual sex, often unprotected." The Sun tabloid newspaper said that more than I 00 men had asked for AIDS tests after the announcement and speculated that the women may have been dehberately trying to infect soldiers. The Ministry of Defense did not say whether any of the soldiers tested had the HTV virus. Catterick garrison is the headquarters of the 19th mechanized brigade which includes battalions of the Royal Irish Regiment, the Highlanders and the Queen's Royal Hussars. T T T T T T T T per management and law serves him well as publisher and editor of Southern Voice. Crain edited three award·w1rmmg university publications, the Harvard Law Record, the Vanderbilt Hustler, and Versus Magazine. He was also a reporter with The Tennessean, Nashville's morning daily paper. In addition, Crain has played sigruficant roles in several maior gay civil rights cases, including the first legal attack on the m1li· tary's "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy to reach the Supreme Court, and the child cus· tody case of Sharon Bottoms, the Virginia lesbian whose mother sued for custody after learning of Sharon's sexual orientation T T T T T T T Studv: cenain svmptoms can identttv earlv-stage HIV infection by JoAnn Loviglio BALTIMORE · Fever, joint pain and night sweats can indicate infCClion with the AIDS virus before it shows up 1n the stan· dard blood test, researchers say. The symptoms can appear within three to four weeks after a person is infCCled with HTV, according to the study pubhshed Wednesday in Tht Journal of tM Ammcan Mtd1eal ksociation. It takes three to six months before HIV antibodies are found in the bloodstream Knowing the symptoms could be helpful in developing countries where high·tech methods of early diagnosis are unavailable or unaffordable. People in the very early stages of HIV are highly infCC11ous and unaware they have the virus, so they are more likely to have unprotCCled sex. said Robert Bolhnger, associate professor of medicine at Johns Hoplons University, one of the researchers. The study looked at 3,874 people in India who were being treated for other sexually transmitted diseases and at first tested nega· tlve for HIV antibodies Researchers screened the patients for an HIV protein called p24 antigen, which appears within a couple of weeks of mfCClioo. Having p24 antigen IS proof of HTV infection b
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