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Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987
File 026
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Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 026. 1987-02-27. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2305.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-02-27). Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 026. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2305

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 026, 1987-02-27, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2305.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 27, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 026
Transcript FEBRUARY 27. 1987 / MONTROSE VOICE 25 Sex Phone Services Still in Business FORT WORTH, Texas (UPI)—A controversial telephone sex service that Southwestern Bell is trying to put out of business won the first round of its battle with the phone company. A Texas Public Utility Commission hearing judge last Monday rejected First Condom Announcements Being Aired on ABC By Mark Schwed UPI TV Editor NEW YORK—The nation's three major television networks have eased their prohibition on messages touting condoms as a means of guarding against AIDS and one network—ABC—will is already airing such warnings. ABC a week ago became the first network to promise that public service messages concerning condoms would be aired. And NBC and CBS both said they were reversing their previous positions and would now allow their affiliated stations to decide for themselves whether to run advertisements for condoms. Reaction to the word that NBC and CBS were easing their prohibition had an immediate effect—before the day was out both of the networks' New York City stations, WCBS and WNBC, said they would soon accept such advertising. Despite the change in policy by the networks, however, none plan to allow ads for specific condom manufacturers on a national basis. The refusal to air the ads comes despite pleas by the surgeon general and some lawmakers. "We are allowing our CBS owned and operated stations to make their own decisions," CBS spokesman George Schweitzer said. "The network continues not to accept condom commercials." ABC's 30-second public service spot was scheduled to run in all time periods this past week. The clip features Surgeon General Everett Koop advising that the best protection against acquired immune deficiency syndrome, barring abstinence, is the use of a condom. In New York, WCBS and WNBC said they would accept condom commercials immediately. "Five thousand New Yorkers already have died of AIDS and 30,000 are likely to die of the disease by 1991," said Roger Colloff, vice president and general manager of WCBS. "We recognize that condom advertising affects a sensitive area of human behavior as well as strongly held moral and religious beliefs. However, we also recognize that New York has almost one-third of all AIDS cases in the United States," Colloff said. Bud Carey, vice president and general manager of WNBC, said that because of the growing health emergency in New York, "We feel it is encumbent upon us to expand our efforts on this subject. We realize that members of our audience may not readily accept this action. ..." WCBS said it would air "only those commercials whose principal message relates use of condoms to prevention of disease," while WNBC said the ads "must be solely directed to the use of condoms for the purpose of reducing the risk of AIDS and not for either contraceptive purposes or for the purpose of encouraging sexual activity." Southwestern Bell's request to immediately cut off the sex phone service, operated in Fort Worth since November by Spectrum Advertising Inc., of Seattle, Wash. The company also operates a similar service in Houston under Southwestern Bell's new 976 service. Several others also operate but Spectrum was picked by Southwestern Bell for the test case. The PUC decision by Mary Ross McDonald issued in Austin said she did not want to damage the company's case before central issues in the case can be decided at a hearing in May. Callers on Spectrum's 976 lines are charged between $2 and $19.95 for a var iety of services ranging from a brief chat with a woman to a "party" conversation among several callers and X- rated descriptions of sexual acts. The charges for the calls are billed through the telephone company. Southwestern Bell contends Spectrum is violating its regulations for 976 services by offering live conversations. Paul Hermann, an attorney for Spectrum, pointed out that other 976 companies offer live conversations. He said the phone company has singled out the sex service in a discriminatory effort to violate the company's right of free speech. McDonald's 18-page decision said Spectrum's arguments for staying in business between now and the May hearing were "detailed, cogently argued and compelling," "Obviously, the decision is very disappointing," said Southwestern Bell Vice President Bill Free. Free said the phone company probably will appeal Monday's ruling to the commissioners and continue to seek permission to immediately disconnect Spectrum's service. McDonald issued an interim order preventing Southwestern Bell from disconnecting the lines on Tuesday. The full PUC will hear the case on May 12. FEIFFER this sam^mr f83g]SrJ we me _.££& PVPLICIW. Mm* h'XMU- \f_ffi MPRA6UA. was mm ufc, veceix mm! psrcuMJM; tf&.*mm
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