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Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987
File 025
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Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 025. 1987-02-27. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2304.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-02-27). Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 025. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2304

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 025, 1987-02-27, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2304.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 27, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 025
Transcript 24 MONTROSE VOICE / FEBRUARY ?7. 1987 Educators Tackle Social Issues at Confab NEW ORLEANS (UPI)—The American Association of School Administrators in its annual meeting Feb. 20 tackled volatile issues such AIDS education in all public schools and testing for drug use by students and staff, subjects ranging from AIDS to merit pay and the length of the school year. The group approved giving instruction about AIDS, reflecting the urging of Surgeon General Everett Koop, who in October recommended children start learning about the deadly illness "in early elementary" grades. At the end of January, fewer than half the nation's public schools reported offering AIDS education. "AASA encourages schools to develop programs that will help students understand AIDS and, to the extent possible, help them avoid contracting the disease," the study said, noting that local officials decide about admitting students or workers with AIDS and how to deal with sensitive and controversial facets of the growing acquired immune deficiency syndrome problem. The educators said they are opposed generally to mandatory drug testing, "except in instances when a reasonable suspicion exists that the person has been abusing drugs or when the person's position is extremely sensitive in nature and could endanger the lives of others." Guidelines on drug testing said students should not be subject to blanket drug testing without probable cause, testing of any student or worker should protect their safety and privacy and schools should follow through with information about treatment services to help drug users. The position statements are meant to be used as catalysts for discussion and guidelines in the nation's nearly 16,000 school districts, said Richard Miller, AASA executive director. Condoms, Condoms, Everywhere By Jeffrey K. Parker NEW YORK (UPI)—This city will dis- tribute at least 1 million condoms a year in an aggressive public anti-AIDS campaign designed to make every New Yorker a "condom expert," the city health commissioner said recently. "The latex condom is currently our most effective front-line weapon against increases in sexually transmitted diseases and especially the relentless epidemic of AIDS—which is surely our city's most urgent health problem," Commissioner Stephen Joseph said. "Everyone needs to be a condom expert, or condom comfortable," he told several hundred health care professionals who gathered at New York University to discuss ways to promote use of condoms to battle acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Assistant Health Commissioner Stephen Schultz, who also spoke at the conference, echoed Koop's concern that "if abstinence is not possible, then use a condom. "Asking people to abstain from sex is tantamount to asking people to stop eating," Schultz said. Joseph said he expected opposition to the condom campaign. One teenager in ten has a secret. One Teenager in Ten: Writings by Gay and Lesbian Youth Edited by Ann Heron "For every generation that comes out, these essays will be invaluable." — Gay Community News "There is a rare sensibility displayed in many of these essays that is nothing short of astonishing. ..." — International Cay News Agency (IGNA) "...an important and necessary book.... powerful and very poignant .." — Wotnaneuis "One teenager in ten": according to Kinsey. that's the proportion of gays to straights in this country. One Teenager in Ten: twenty-eight young men and women from all over the United States and Canada, from fifteen to twenty-four years of age, speak out about their coming-out experiences — about what it is to be young and gay in our society today. $3.95 in bookstores, or use this coupon to order by mail TO ORDER Please send me copies of One Teenager in Ten at $4.50 each, postpaid. Enclosed is $ name address city state zip ALYSON Publications, PO Box 2783, Boston, MA 02208 SAME DAY TYPE- -SETTERS A NKW DIVISION OK 'PIIK MONTROSE VOICE We'll typeset your Flyers, Menus, Business Cards, Letterheads, Resumes, Brochures, Forms, Ads— and hundreds of other items— the Same Day (Sometimes You Just Want It Right Now!) Get it to us by Noon (or call for a pickup by 11am) and we'll have it ready by 5pm (size of the job permitting) NO MINIMUM TIME LIMIT! If your typesetting really only takes 10 minutes, you'll only be charged for 10 minutes) SI TYPESTYLES TO CHOOSE FROM Pick Up and Delivery Available ($5 charge) 408 AVONDALE — 529-8490 'A Bunch of Marijuana- Smoking Homosexuals' Lehder Capture Spurs 'Fed- Up' Citizens By Tom Quinn BOGOTA, Colombia (UPI)—The capture of international narcotics kingpin Carlos Lehder at a ranch house hideaway was triggered by disgruntled neighbors who thought he and his holed-up bodyguards might be rebel guerrillas, cocaine cookers or even "a bunch of marijuana-smoking homosexuals." As surprising as the capture, however, was that police were tipped off at all in this nation where drug dealers are looked on as Robin Hoods and cocaine is considered a Yankee problem. Police Maj. Willian Lemus, who led 30 officers and soldiers in the raid on Lehder's hideout, said it is apparent the public is getting fed up with the drug mafia. "We received a complaint from a neighbor of the ranch where Lehder and his 14 bodyguards were hole up. He said he thought the group might be guerrillas," Lemus said in an interview. "Another person called us to say there were a bunch of marijuana-smoking homosexuals there. Someone suggested the ranch might be a small cocaine laboratory. And another person went to the U.S. Embassy and insinuated the ranch hid somebody important, without specifying who it was." Officials say Lehder's capture and extradition Feb. 4 has encouraged even more people to turn in drug dealers. "This is the biggest result of the lehder bust. In 10 years of intense work in Colombia, we've never seen anything like the amount of information we're suddenly getting," a veteran Drug Enforcement Administration agent said. "The phenomenon is uncanny. Even though we offer rewards for information, we are getting people who don't want the money. They are just fed up. They feel the mafia has gone too far. They say these hoods have begun to tread on them and they don't like it." By most counts, Lehder's arrest actually will do little to stem the flow of cocaine out of Colombia. Officials believe smaller operators quickly stepped in to take over his business. "The big three of the so-called Medel- lin Cartel—Lehder, Pablo Escobar and Jorge Luis Ochoa—have been on the run so much in the last three years they've been practically forced out of business. We now suspect that they've been replaced by scores of new operators, many of whom are absolutely unknown to us," the DEA agent said. "Let me put it this way: In 1983 you had three billionaires dominating the business and now you've got 100 millionaires doing most of it." Authorities cite two factors in the upswing of resistance to the nation's $8 billion drug industry: Colombia's growing internal drug abuse problem and the rash of killings of prominent and ordinary citizens in the last few years. In 1986, six judges, including a supreme court magistrate, were killed by gunmen supposedly hired by the drug mafia. In the last four years, 17 Colombian journalists have been killed after denouncing drug traffieking.
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