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Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987
File 024
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Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 024. 1987-02-27. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2303.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-02-27). Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 024. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2303

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 024, 1987-02-27, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2303.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 27, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 024
Transcript FEBRUARY 27, 1987/MONTROSE VOICE 23 AIDS Doctor Expected in Court By Susan Kuczka CHICAGO (UPI)—The decision to bar a Cook County Hospital physician infected with AIDS from physical contact with patients is expected to have nationwide implications, officials say. Members of the medical and legal profession say they are confident the courts will eventually rule in favor of the afflicted physician, who is fighting the Cook County Board's unprecedented hands-off decision. But they are fearful the board's ruling this month will undo AIDS education efforts aimed at increasing public awareness about how the deadly disease is transmitted. "A serious harm has been done to the public's understanding of the spread of this disease," said Dr. Renslow Sherer, head of the AIDS program at Cook County Hospital. "It is not transmitted by a wide variety of interactions that include a physician touching a patient during a physical examination. "I think that message has been clearly confused in the mind ofthe public as a result of this action. It's important to understand that this action applies not only to this individual but to other physicians and health-care workers nationwide." The Cook County Board, which governs activities at the 1,400-bed hospital that employs 700 full-time physicians, rejected the accepted guidelines set forth by the federal Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta by voting to keep the physician away from patients. The CDC guidelines require that health-care workers afflicted with acquired immune deficiency syndrome take certain precautions to avoid spreading the disease. Almost Half Harris County Jail Inmates Exposed to AIDS Virus HOUSTON (UPI)—Nearly 40 percent of the Harris County Jail inmates who voluntarily submitted to AIDS testing last year had been exposed to the virus, the jail's medical director said recently. Dr. Ronald Haley said 172 of the 436 inmates tested last year, or about 39 percent, had been exposed to the virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome. The jail testing program began in January 1986 to provide a medical service to the inmates. Of those tested, 396 were male and 40 were female, with 161 men and 11 women testing positive, he said. Haley emphasized that no scientific conclusions can be drawn from the results because most of those tested were members of high-risk groups for the disease. Those prisoners showing positive tests are offered counseling while they are in custody and medical attention if they show symptoms of the disease. Inmates who have AIDS are not separated from the rest of the jail population, he said, adding there was no medical reason to segregate them. "We can't force anyone to take this test," Haley said. "In a lot of ways, I wish we could, because then we would have some data we could rely upon. There is no scientific basis for this atall because it's not random." Even within the high risk groups, the testing is stri.-lly voluntary, hr s;ml. The guidelines have been endorsed by the American Medical Association and the American Hospital Association. Hospitals in New York, San Francisco and I_os Angeles, where AIDS also has claimed physicians as victims, are following the guidelines, officials say. But the precautions set forth in the guidelines were not enough to persuade the Cook County Board that the physician, a 10-year veteran of the hospital who has requested anonymity, should be allowed to continue his work with patients. "There's just too many unknowns with respect to the disease," said board Commissioner Richard A. Siebel. "The medical profession is working with limited knowledge and research." "Let's be real," said Commissioner Rose Marie Love. "There's a lot of fear and hysteria about AIDS. We must always, as public officials, make sure Cook County Hospital has no kind of stigma attached to it. The majority of County's patients don't have a choice about going anyplace else." In addition to the board's concern about the spread of the disease, board President George W. Dunne said the possible legal ramifications of thesitua- tion were taken into account. "There's a certain knowledge about the creativity and capability ofthe legal profession to initiate and trigger all kinds of lawsuits, and the payment (of damages) would be made not individually by the medical profession but by the 5 million citizens of Cook County." Dunne said. At least one lawsuit already is being prepared—at the request ofthe stricken physician. Harvey Grossman, legal director of the Illinois branch of the American Civil Liberties Union, said he plans to sue in federal court, claiming the board's action violates the rights of handicapped workers. "It's (the board's decision) particularly tragic because not only are they making a victim of this physician twice—first because of his illness and then because of his dismissal—but they're potentially making a victim of the entire community by dispensing information that lacks logic," Grossman said. "It will have a significant impact on the health-care system by taking people who are competent, and can safely deliver quality care, out of the system. In essence, it confuses the public and undermines the trust that health-care people have worked hard to establish." Medical professionals agree the only known transmission of the disease AIDS is through intimate sexual contact, use of contaminated needles and through the mother's placenta to her unborn child. Dr. Burton Anderson, chairman of the infectious diseases department at the University of Illinois Medical School, said he was confident the courts would overturn the board's decision. But he expressed concern about its effect on the rest of the medical community. "Doctors, nurses, people in almost all professions and activities, will have AIDS," he said. "This is a major national epidemic. I am concerned it (the board's decision) may influence other counties and cities to take similar action. And the more we feed fears by going along with them, the worse it's going to get." THE LARGEST PIZZA' IN HOUSTON! GRAND OPENING! Tree BUY 1 GET 1 FREE 550 2-14 INCH PIZZAS TOPPINGS 1.00 EA GOOD THRU 3/2-3/«/87 BUY 1 GET 1 FREE 850 2-20 INCH PIZZAS TOPPING 1.50 EA GOOD THRU 3/2-3/9/87 522-2929 2137 W. ALABAMA SUN-THUR 11AM-1AM FRI-SAT 11AM-2AM GENERAL REPAIRS SPRING SPECIAL o Transmission Service 29.95 Oil & Lube 24.95 Cooling System Service 27.95 1411 Tail fca^3) 522-2190 TRANSMISSIONS i zManAQms PANCAKE DAY Wj/fcjj/ SATURDAY FEBRUARY 28. 1987 7 AM. - 2 PM. AU. IK PANCAKES WITH SAUSAGE AND &ACON VOU CAN EAT S400-ADUIT S2EC- 12 AND UN.*0 JU BERING MEMORIAL ^|* I "ited Methodist Church 526-1017 M*_ Horcw at MuCeiTY St • Houston _ IN INTERNATIONAL MILITARY FASHIONS FRENCH * GERMAN * ITALIAN * WWI VINTAGE * COME tDVa/UUtl THE FASHION ARMY AT CILROY'S* INTERNATIONAL MILITARY SURPLUS HDQRS. MON-SAT ™C.."™, 11-6 S.1-2118 Cl*vic®c.vgr,s of'Mansion FLOWERS & GIFTS European and Tropical Cut Flowers, Plants, Fruit & Gourmet Baskets, Imported Chocolates, and Stuffed Toys Available. 1811 Indiana at Dunlavy 523-3791 Major Credit Cards Accepted
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