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Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987
File 022
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Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 022. 1987-02-27. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2301.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-02-27). Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 022. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2301

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 022, 1987-02-27, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2301.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 27, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 022
Transcript FEBRUARY 27. 1987/MONTROSE VOICE 21 Obscenity Standards Still Troubling the High Court Lea Richards as Sophie Tuckerman, Mike Groblewski as Nicholas Denery and Jim Walser as Nina Denery in a scene from The Autumn Garden gerac, Jean Harlow, John Moray Stuart-Young. 4 —Miriam Makeba, Knute Rockne, Mary Wilson. 5— Michael Rumaker, Andy Gibb, Rex Harrison. "My people don't lisp ... they just are ... I'm one of them right there. ... If you take me, you've go to take the whole thing."—Lou Reed in Rolling Stone (born March 2) □ Openings Autumn Garden (First Unitarian, 27)— Channing Players present a tale of New Orleans misfits. Brighton Beach Memoirs (Actors Workshop, 27)—the first play in Neil Simon's autobiographical trilogy The Enchanted Cottage (Theater Southwest, 27)—romantic comedy- fantasy Let's Murder Marsha (Theater Suburbia, 27)—broad comedy McDowell, Shannon, Sweeney (Comix Annex, 27) Ed Wilson and Mary An Papenek- Miller (Art league of Houston, 27)—his steel and wood sculptures, her mixed media exploration of the relationships between men and animals. Grand Night Parade—Momus Sails the Caribbean! (Seawall to the Strand. Galveston, 28, 6:30)—Freebies. ONO! The Glass Menagerie (Stages, 28)—A man remembers the two powerful women—his mother and his sister— whom he eventually had to flee. Art of Augustin Bossio (University of St. Thomas' Crooker Gallery, 28) Cecille Ousset, pianist (Jones, 1)— Garcia Navarro conducts the HSO. Outlaw Comics Get Religion, Again! (Comedy Workshop, 2)—ONO! Ballet Eddy Toussaint de Montreal (Jones, 3 and 4)—Houston debut sponsored by Society for the Performing Arts Biloxi Blues (Music Hall, 3-8)— Second in Simon's autobiography. Sybill Estess, poet (UST Bookstore, 4)—reads from her works, "Seeing the Desert Green." ONO! Mark C. Martino (Stages, 4)—Stages' composer in residence presents incidental pieces from past plays and two world premieres, including a requiem mass. ONO. The Immigrant—A Hamilton County Album (Alley, 5)—about a Russian immigrant who came to Texas via Galveston THE VIET NAM RESTAURANT 3215 Main St. at Elgin 526-0917 Lunch Buffet M-F 11:30-2:30 $3.75 All You Can Eat Your Host and Bartender Andy Mills Open ll:30-Midnight Sun.-Thurs. 11:30-2:00 a.m. Fri. & Sat. I 10% Discount with this Coupon on All Menu l Items By Andrea Neal WASHINGTON (UPI)—The Supreme Court is still grappling with the meaning of obscenity 23 years after Justice Potter Stewart's proclamation that he could not define pornography, "but I know it when I see it." The latest controversy involves an Illinois law that allows juries to apply community standards in determining if an allegedly obscene work has redeeming literary, artistic or social value. The court was to hear arguments in the case last Tuesday from Illinois officials, who consider the law a useful tool for fighting pornography, and First Amendment advocates, who fear the law could lead to the banning of such pre-eminent works as James Joyce's masterpiece "Ulysses." "It's probably the most significant obscenity case the court has heard since 2 Newspapers Have Pulled Doonesbury WACO, Texas (UPI)-The Waco Tribune-Herald has joined a Salt Lake City newspaper in pulling this week's Doonesbury comic strip concerning a television ad campaign dealing with AIDS and "safe sex." The editor Monday said this week's series about condoms inappropriately comments on the acquired immune deficiency syndrome epidemic. "I just didn't think it was an appropriate kind of humor," said Bob I_,ott, editor of the Waco Tribune-Herald. "Just the idea of humor based on a subject as tragic as AIDS is out of kilter." The comic strip by Garry Trudeau this week does not mention the word condom. In one panel, an advertising executive recommends substituting the word "condo" for "the unmentionable product." Lott called the series, "good satire," but decided to pull the strip this week because "the underlying element here is the AIDS tragedy." Lee Salem, editorial director of Universal Press Syndicate in Kansas City, Mo., which distributes Doonesbury to 900 newspapers, said the Deseret News in Salt I^ke City also decided against running the strip, and a Wisconsin newspaper moved the strip from its comic page to the editorial page. Wm. James Mortimer, editor and publisher of the Salt Lake City newspaper, said he found the strip objectionable. "The sexual and contraceptive material presented does not meet the standards of a family newspaper. These are sensitive and important issues in today's society but inappropriate for the comic pages, where readers of all ages are attracted," Mortimer said. The Mormon Church tells its members to abstain from sex outside of marriage, and opposes sex for pleasurable rather than procreative purposes. The church also excommunicates homosexuals, one of the prime risk groups for AIDS. The Waco paper ran a story Monday explaining its decision not to use the strip. Lott said about a dozen calls had been received protesting the move. "We're not that uptight about running things that may be objectionable," Lott said. "Certainly condom usage is such that it should be covered in a newspaper. Miller vs. California," said Irwin Karp, who represents Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts, a non-profit group that advises artists on First Amendment matters. In the landmark 1973 Miller ruling, a majority of justices for the first time agreed on a standard for determining what is obscene material subject to state regulation. This year's case. Karp said, will determine "what degree of protection is going to be provided literary and artistic works of significant value. We think that were the prevailing community standard to apply, the protection for important works of social commentary would be completely diluted in some parts of the country." Obscenity has proven to beoneof the most troubling constitutional questions for the court. The justices repeatedly have said obscenity is not worthy of First Amendment protection but have failed to come up with a simple definition for obscenity. In 1964, the court ruled that a French film, "The I_overs," did not violate an Ohio obscenity statute, but the justices were unable to agree upon an opinion supporting the decision. The case prompted Stewart's oft- quoted observation that he knew pornography when he saw it, "and the motion picture involved in this case is not that." In Miller vs. California, the court said a book, magazine, movie or work of art may be deemed obscene if it appeals to the prurient interest, describes sexual conduct in a "patently offensive" way and—as a whole—lacks literary, artistic, political or scientific value. Until now, most lower courts have ruled that the first two prongs of the test should be based on community standards, but the redeeming value of a work must be judged according to objective criteria. David Goldstein of the American Civil Liberties Union said applying community standards to the third part of the test would limit free expression. "I can imagine juries condemning Ulysses' today just like they did 60 years ago and that's one of the great books of the 20th century," Goldstein said. "Ulysses," based on Homer's "Odyssey," was banned in the United States from 1921 until 1933 after charges of obscenity were leveled against it. The book is now considered among the great works of world literature. Illinois Assistant Attorney General Mark Rotert says there is no such thing as an objective standard for determining if a work has social value. It is unrealistic "to read the First Amendment as requiring that the people of Maine or Mississippi accept public depiction of conduct found tolerable in Las Vegas or New York City." Rotert said. The case before the court arose in 1983 when two adult bookstore clerks were arrested under Illinois' obscenity statute for selling adult magazines to undercover policemen. The case is part of a growing national debate over censorship of sexually explicit material, spurred in part by a report issued last summer by the Attorney General's Commission on Pornography. The report urged concerned citizens to band together into watch groups to file complaints, put pressure on local prosecutors, monitor judges and, if necessary, boycott merchants selling pornographic materials.
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