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Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987
File 021
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Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 021. 1987-02-27. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2300.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-02-27). Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 021. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2300

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 021, 1987-02-27, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2300.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 27, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 021
Transcript 20 MONTROSE VOICE/FEBRUARY 27. 1987 'Full Tilt' Leans Toward Theater's Best (left to right) Phillip Hafer as Pete Keating, Melba O'Banion as Roe and Eoghan Ryan as Ken in Chocolate Bayou's production of P.J. Barry's "Full Tilt" Houston Live by Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice a Full Tilt Full Tilt playing at Chocolate Bayou Theater Company, was developed in CBTC's Preston Jones New Play Symposium last summer. This is its world premiere. I have little doubt that news of its performances elsewhere will get back to us. It's that good. When a group of people become a mob- it is a form of mass hysteria. They may feel closer to each other for the short time that they lose their reason, but what happens later? What do they feel towards each other when they can see clearly again, if they ever can? The Ballet Eddy Toussaint de Montreal debuts at Jones Hall on March 3 Years before this play opens, a small group of policemen—friends and comrads—have gone out of control, into "full tilt." Between them, they killed a man in a fight over a girl (played by Melba O'Banion). Now a women's magazine reporter (Ginny Lang) has come to town. She's spending money left and right to bribe people into reopening the story. She interviews them to see if she can find out what really happened. With one exception, these are all the and pity, is somehow not as emotionally affecting as it is intellectually probing. Maybe that's because we spend much more time watching people grow apart rather than together. Still, it is impelling. We try to see the whole diorama at once, try to chart all these lives and how they went wrong, try to identify that mysterious force that seems to make it all inevitable. How can we reverse its effects if we can't identify them? Barry offers no pat, simplistic answers, only a chance to analyze it for ourselves. Director William Burford sweeps the action across Tom King's set almost cinematically, they way we deduce Shakespeare must have used the Globe. Kurt W. Garabenstein's sound design adds to the versimilitude, but it is Eoghan Ryan's lights that really grab the eye. (Ryan also doubles effectively as an actor in the piece.) A very good show. d The Anshutz Collection The masterpieces from the Anschutz Collection of western art now exhibited at the Museum of Fine Arts provide education as well as entertainment. The style of Remington and Russell is very recognizable. It leads one major school in its high drama and dynamic peripheral people. They were affected by the violence but they had no hand in perpetrating it. They're all orbiting each other in a small town. Two of them fall in love for a short while, but for the most part, they react to each other with a kind of magnetic repulsion. When the reporter gets personally involved with the bartender (Timothy Hanson), she sets up a meeting which evolves into another mob scene with everyone but the bartender personally involved. What will happen now? Will violence beget violence? (There is some believable wife beating between Phillip Hafer and Cathryn Pisarski.) Or will love be possible again? P.J. Barry's script, for all its power When their works do include people or animals, they have to be hunted for— as they would be in the wild. Their statuary—by Shrady, Deming, Putnam and Huntington—focuses on the strange new animals the explorers were finding. In the mid-1920s, around the time of Russell's death, the luminous land was still the subject matter, but the style embraced impressionism. This is the West of Hunter, Sloan and O'Keefe. I heartily recommend this excellent exhibition. □ Notes The Outlaw Comics have been "outlawed" again. The room in Baton Rouge which had booked them for this Mon day chickened out. That's Jimmy Swag- Pat Nesbit is Rowena and Geoffrey Nauffts is Eugene Morris Jerome, aspiring writer, in Neil Simon's comedy Biloxi Blues, opening March 3 at the Music Hall action. It's a group of rich tradition with paintings by Couse, Maurer, Schrey- vogel, and Frank Tenney Johnson; and statues by Berke and Barye (a Frenchman whose only brush with the living West was Buffalo Bill's Wild West Show). But there is also another school that we often forget. I overheard one lady compare it to the various renditions of Tolkien's world. Indeed, it was the new, unspoiled land that intrigued these artists with its fantastic wonders. Their canvases, many of monumental size to match the subject, are obsessed with the play of light on these new landscapes. Some are so luminous they look almost as if lit from behind. This is the school of Bierstadt.Tavernier. Innes, Herzog and Hill. gert's hometown, isn't it? Well, their loss is our gain! The O.C. are bringing this performance back to the Comedy Workshop. This is the last weekend forTUT's My Fair Lady at the Music Hall. Auditions: Deathtrap, two women, three men, all over 35. March 1-2, 7:00 p.m. 667-0304. □ Celebrate! March 3—Fat Tuesday. March 4—Ash Wednesday, the beginning of Lent. B'days: 27—Barbara Love, Elizabeth Taylor, Longfellow. 28—Zero Mostel. Bernadette Peters, Tommy Tune. 1— Harry Belafonte, David Niven, Lytton Strachey. 2—Karen Carpenter, Dr. Seuss. Kurt Weil. 3—Cyrano de Ber-
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