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Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987
File 019
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Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 019. 1987-02-27. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2298.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-02-27). Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 019. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2298

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 019, 1987-02-27, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2298.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 27, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 019
Transcript 18 MONTROSE VOICE / REBRUARY 27, 1987 Put Another Dime in the oP Jukebox Former Montrose Deejay Can't Get Enough Oldies By Sheri Cohen Darbonne Montrose Voice The roots of contemporary rock and Rhythm and Blues music trace all the way back to the 1920's, with the black jazz-blues sound of Bessie Smith paving the way for the evolution, a former Montrose disc jockey asserts. Dennis McGinnis, who many remember as the "oldies show" deejay at Dirty Sally's, will proudly display his research archives to those lucky enough to visit his Greenway Plaza area apartment. Around 40,000 78, 45 and 33 rpm discs fill a closet, a filing cabinet, and a room literally jammed with standup shelves in the phenomenal collection amassed by McGinnis and his lover. Russ Holland, over a period of at least 15 years. The two men, both of Harrisburg, Pa., met coincidentally in Houston, McGinnis said. They discovered, ironically, that they both had been collecting records for about the same time, and that they both frequented the same ghetto record store in the 1960's. They did not meet until 1979, after both had moved here. McGinnis said his own interest in records began at the age of 14. He recalled begging his father to take him to a little record store in Harrisburg's black district, called The Turntable, to look for copies of "Da Doo Ron Ron" by the Crystals and "The Locomotion" by Little Eva. He befriended the shop's owner, Martha, who fed his interest in oldies and the R&B sound, and helped him start his collection. The collection includes some very valuable oddities, including a record by Bessie Smith that McGinnis states is one of only 10 in existence. It follows, almost faultlessly, the development of the modern popular sound from the 20's to the current era. Tidbits of history, unknown to most record fans, abound. "This is the first Supremes album everyone knows about," McGinnis said, holding up the cover of the album. Meet the Supremes. Then he pulled out another cover with a different picture. "But this is the first press, the original," he explained. The first record came out in 1962; the second was released in 1964 when a new public interest in the group emerged, he added. McGinnis went on to point out the difference in the Motown label logos on the two records. "This is the original logo, the Motown car. It was only around a couple of years," he noted. McGinnis said his personal collection is focused mostly on the black R&B and early rock artists of the 50's and the "girl group" sound of the 60's. The addition of Russ' collection, containing more of the pop and rock music sounds of the later trends, rounded out the range. Together, they now have a priceless collection of a section of music industry history. "Most people see the beginning of rock as the 1960's turnaround, the Bill Haley period. Actually, it was the Rhythm and Blues era that began in the 40's that led up and fused into modern- day rock and roll,' McGinnis commented. The first true rock genre performer was probably Little Richard, who recorded "Tutti Frutti" in 1955, McGinnis said. Along the way, blues stars like Louie Jordan. Big Joe Turner, B.B. King and Howlin' Wolf were laying down distinctive sound patterns, picked up and drawn on later by white performers. The practice of "covering" emerged in the 50's also, with white performers re- releasing duplicate versions of records by black performers, McGinnis said. "Tutti Frutti" was covered by Pat Boone, and his version, believe it or not, sold almost as many copies as the original to the white market, he said. And Bill Haley's hit, "Shake, Rattle and Roll," was actually recorded first by Joe Turner in 1954. Turner's record enjoyed moderate success, but reached nowhere near the sales logged by Haley's 1956 version. Probably around 1960, the "sh'bops" began fading away, and the girl-group sound promoted by producer Phil Spec- tor rapidly gained popularity. McGinnis called this period, marked by artists like the Crystals and the Ronettes, a Just part of the McGinnis record collection Dennis McGinnis with two of nis Bessie Smith favorites way they were heard "back then," with the help of two recent acquisitions, a 1953 Wurlitzer "Magic Brain" two- speed jukebox, and a 1957 AMI juke that plays only 45's. McGinnis said he tries to keep the Wurlitzer stocked almost exclusively with 78's for memorabilia purposes. McGinnis purchased both machines in 1984. McGinnis, who says he now acquires records mainly through mail auctions, oldie magazines and private traders, said they are getting harder to find, since home jukeboxes have gained popularity in recent years. Records that once would have been available for one or two dollars are selling for $25 and up, he noted. "My usual motto is, if I can't steal it, I'll wait it out," he said, although he admits he once spent $250 for a single This 1957 Wurlitzer jukebox plays both 78 and 45 rpm records major area of his collecting. The sound peaked with the rise of Motown, and the appearance of groups like the Supremes and Martha and the Vandellas. Then, in the middle to late 60's, came the so-called British invasion, when the music industry did a 180-degree turn with groups like the Beatles and the Rol- ling Stones. Rock music actually changed little from then until now, although different stages or trends developed. "In '65 through '68, the Memphis sound was big; then came the psychedelic era, and that led into what's known as glam-rock," McGinnis said. Visitors can take their pick ofthe periods they wish to re-live. They also can listen to the sounds the disc. "It was one I had to have," he explained. And while he still attends record fairs and conventions, McGinnis laments that they aren't what they used to be. Out of town traders aren't frequenting the shows here the way they used to. he said. "You can still find some good buys, just not as many as before," he said, adding that whenever he is in another city, "I head straight for the record stores." His collection, McGinnis said, still needs some special additions from his favorite period. "I'm looking for the first album by the Chantels, with the original cover picture of the five girls," he said. That album, like Meet the Supremes, was re- released with another cover. Numb-Kneed Surfing BOSTON (UPI)—While waiting for that perfect wave, doctors say surfers should beware of a previously unknown hazard—"surfer's neuropathy." "It's not a serious problem," said Dr. Roderic H. Fabian, a neurologist at The University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston. "But it can be bothersome." Fabian said he discovered the affliction after two surfers complained of a numbing, tingling sensation on the inside of their knees. He questioned other surfers and found at least three more with similar complaints. When Fabian tested the two surfers. he found a nerve on the inside of their knees—the saphenous nerve—was functioning abnormally. Fabian determined the problem was caused by pressure surfers commonly put on the nerve when they squeeze their legs while sitting on their boards in the water waiting for a wave. He advised the two surfers to avoid such pressure, and the loss of sensation disappeared after a few weeks, Fabian said. Ga. HouseVotes to Prohibit Nude Dancers ATLANTA (UPI)—Georgia's House passed a bill to pull the beverage licenses of bars that feature nude dancers after the bill's sponsor threatened to dance naked so members could "see how disgusting it is." The bill submitted by Rep. Luther Colbert, R-Roswell, passed the House 145- 11 Wednesday despite pleas by Rep. Billy McKinney,D-Atlanta, to delay the measure until after the 1988 Democratic Convention. "We're about to have the Democratic National Convention," McKinney reminded lawmakers, "and you're talking about a conventioner's major means of entertainment." The House Rules Committee moved quickly to put the bill on the day's agenda after Colbert threatened to dance nude before them. "Then you'll see how disgusting it is," he said.
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