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Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987
File 017
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Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 017. 1987-02-27. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2296.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-02-27). Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 017. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2296

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 017, 1987-02-27, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2296.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 27, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 017
Transcript 16 MONTROSE VOICE/FEBRUARY 27, 1987 Catholics in a Dilemma: AIDS Prevention but no Condoms By Patricia McCormack NEW YORK (UPI)—Roman Catholic educators are gearing up their own pro grams to combat the spread of AIDS, but church doctrine has stripped them of what many scientists say is the most effective weapon short of sexual abstinence—condoms. "Clearly, we are not in favor of condoms." Sister Joy Clough, R.S.M., media coordinator for the archdiocese of Chicago, told United Press International. The archdiocese runs the largest Catholic school system in the world with 175,000 students. Sister Clough said that while the Chicago archdiocese does not yet have an AIDS education program in place, Cardinal Joseph Bernardin "is very concerned about AIDS, and he has mandated that AIDS instruction take place in our schools and in religious education programs." "At the same time," Sister Clough said, Bernardin "does not see condoms as the answer to the AIDS crisis." Bernardin, himself, recently criticized the use of condom advertisements on television. "I am opposed ... because I cannot support advertising whose immediate aim is good—the prevention of disease—but which implicitly and explicitly condones promiscuity, questions the normalness of heterosexual marriage as the proper context for sexual intimacy or artificially separates the love-making and life-making dimension of marital intimacy," he said. Therein lies the church's dilemma. U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop has publicly stated that next to abstinence, condoms offer the greatest protection against the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, the fatal disease that destroys the body's immune system. Koop advocates AIDS education programs—beginning in elementary school—that include the use of condoms. But longstanding Roman Catholic teaching has condemned the use of artificial birth control methods, including condoms. The church, with a school system in the United States that educates 2.8 million youngsters a year, teaches that any sexual activity outside of marriage is sinful. In general, church leaders across the nation agree with Bernardin. "Speaking as an individual. I would say that in a Catholic school context I don't see how one can advocate use of a birth control device—condoms—as a mean of preventing AIDS," said the Rev. Stephen O'Brien, executive director ofthe National Catholic Education Association's office of administrators of Catholic education. "In a Catholic school setting, you wouldn't have a health class on avoiding venereal disease, for example, nut- side a religious education context. The whole morality of sexuality is involved. The ideal is that sex is for marriage." "We believe that we can say with some assurance that students in Catholic schools throughout the country are taught the church's position on human sexuality," said Sister Catherine McNamee. president of the Washington, D.C.-based National Catholic Education Association. "Regarding the specific issue of AIDS, it seems important that students be taught that this is a very serious, usually fatal disease. The Catholic schools also should make a special effort to witness Gospel values in order to conquer the prejudice arising with the AIDs epidemic and encourage both students and parents to exercise Christian compassion toward victims of the disease and their families. A recent survey by the weekly publication. National Catholic Reporter, said that among "significant" Catholic school systems in the United States, only Oakland, Calif., plans to discuss condoms in AIDS education programs. Sister Rosemary Hennessey, schools superintendent for the Oakland system, said she felt condoms and other issues were necessary topics of discussion. "If we're afraid to talk about condoms and all the other issues AIDs raises, then we're really missing it," Sister Hennessey said. "In the meantime, people are dying." I Didn't Believe It at First Either! New From Europe A 90% success rate in the regrowth of hair by eleven laboratory studies. Approved by the Ministers of Health in France. Italy. Spain, England, Switzerland, Greece. Turkey and Portugal as a treatment which stops hair loss and stimulates new hair growth. Call for Appointment 847-5633 Not Minoxidil Made up ol vitamins and amino acids with a patented process to be absorbed into the scalp. Backed by a 40 year pharmaceutical company Approx. Annual Cost $400-$700 Pope to Face Gay Scorn in his U.S. Tour By Paula Butturini VATICAN CITY (UPI)-Pope John Paul II will face anger in San Francisco's gay community on his tour of the United States this September. Some church officials fear trouble when the pope stops in San Francisco, where the large and militant gay community is outraged over the Vatican view of homosexuality as a "moral evil." The city is widely viewed as the riskiest stop on the papal tour, with Vatican sources fearing anti-pope demonstrations similar to protests that marred his 1985 trip to the Netherlands. San Francisco's gay community remains angry over the Vatican's Oct. 30, 1986, document on homosexuality, which bluntly calls homosexual behavior "an intrinsic moral evil," "self-indulgent," and "disordered." The city originally was the final stop on the pope's trip, but church officials added Detroit to the schedule when fears arose about San Francisco. "They probably decided it might not be a good idea to risk ending the trip on a sour note," said one Vatican source. Another church source said Detroit's 800,000 Polish-Americans, who are predominantly Catholic, might be a welcome sight to the pontiff "after seeing San Francisco." A scheduled meeting with nuns and priests in San Francisco also could produce some fireworks like the pope's 1979 meeting with 5,000 nuns in Washington, D.C, when Sister Theresa Kane, one of the country's leading nuns, confronted the pontiff with a request that he consider women for the priesthood. The pope, a firm opponent ofthe idea, instead called on nuns to be selfless in their service to the church and to return to wearing traditional habits. Also in California, the pope faces dissent over Vatican pressure on Jesuit Terrance Sweeney to suppress results of a poll of U.S. bishops that expressed disagreement on priestly celibacy and female priests. Another source of controversy exists in Seattle, where Vatican officials forced Archbishop Raymond Hunthausen to relinquish part of his authority to a church-appointed auxiliary. The Vatican was concerned that Hunthausen was too liberal in granting marriage annulments and, among other things, allowed a group of gay and lesbian Catholics to celebrate mass in his cathedral. Trouble also has arisen over stripping the Rev. Charles Curran of his right to teach theology at Catholic University in Washington, D.C. Curran raised Vatican ire for some of his views on homosexuality, pre-marital sex, birth control and divorce. Dismissing two U.S. nuns for signing a 1984 ad in The New York Times saying the church's ban on abortion is "not the only Catholic position" also has strained relations between Rome and the American church. In each case, Vatican sources say, the pope has been especially disturbed by what he views as a lack of U.S. obedience to central church authority. U.S. critics argue that Vatican efforts t<> impose a stricter orthodoxy stifle theological creativity and amount to intimidation. In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Voiie
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