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Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987
File 012
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Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 012. 1987-02-27. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2291.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-02-27). Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 012. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2291

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 012, 1987-02-27, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2291.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 27, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript FEBRUARY 27. 1987/MONTROSE VOICE 11 Dionne Warwick Still at Peak of Her Form By John Swenson UPI Pop Writer LOS ANGELES (UPI)—"That's What Friends Are For," a benefit song for AIDS research featuring Dionne War wick, Stevie Wonder, Elton John and Gladys Knight, won two Grammys Tuesday night. The tune, which has raised $750,000 for AIDS research, was named song of the year and it also won a Grammy for best pop performance by a duo or group with vocals. It also marked the reunion of Warwick and Burt Bacharach, who co-wrote the song with Carole Bayer Sager and who helped launch Warwick's career 25 years ago. Warwick, 45, grew up in a family of gospel singers singing at local New Jersey venues in a family group called the Drinkard Singers. After studying at Hartt College of Music in Hartford, Conn., Warwick was signed to a production deal by Scepter Records in 1962 to sing songs written by the team of Burt Bacharach and Hal David. Their first collaboration, "Don't Make Me Over," hit No. 21 on the pop charts. In 1963 the team had their first major hit with "Anyone Who Had a Heart," a Top 10 single. "Walk On By" reached No. 6 in 1964. Other hits followed: "You'll Never Get to Heaven," (1964); "I Just Don't Know What to Do with Myself and "Message to Michael" (1966); "I Say a Little Prayer" and "Alfie" (1967). Warwick climaxed her late '60s triumphs singing Bacharach- David compositions with "Do You Know the Way to San Jose," "Valley of the Dolls," "This Girl's in Love with You" and "I'll Never Fall in Love Again" before leav ing for another record company and production team. In 1974 Warwick combined with the Spinners on the No. 1 hit "Then Came You," followed by the Top 5 "Once You Hit the Road" in 1975. Warwick scored another Top 5 hit in 1979 with "I'll Never Love This Way Again." In the early '80s Warwick worked with Barry Gibb of the Bee Gees on the "Heartbreaker" album, from which the title track and "Take the Short Way Home" became hits. The song "That's What Friends Are For" has raised $750,000 for AIDS research. Sager said she hoped it would raise even more now that it has won two Grammys. The money is channeled through the American Foundation for AIDS research, which is chaired by Elizabeth Taylor. "Every time that song is played, maybe it calls mores attention to it (AIDS, and maybe someone will give some money." Bacharach said. Sager said she wants everyone to know that AIDS "attacks everyone, is not a homosexual disease. It's a disease of our time. There's no cure and everyone dies. It's horrible." Romancing the Rock'n Rollers By John Swenson NEW YORK (UPI)—The erotic and sometimes abusive experiences of young women "groupies" on the rock lour trail is described in an current MTV series designed to give the music video channel's audience a wider range of programs. The documentary covers sexual exploits between male rock musicians and young women enamored with the idea of having sex with the stars. "I'd do anything," was the refrain of swarming youngsters outside stage doors and concerts across the country. "We're trying to broaden our audience," said Doug Herzog, MTV vice president of music news and special projects. "It's an attempt to reach as many people as possible. I think this is a subject that is of interest not just to the heavy MTV viewer but to the casual viewer because it sounds interesting and controversial." Shown in its entirety last weekend, the program is a dramatic switch away from the teen-oriented music videos that have been the cable television network's staple during its five-year history. "The show tells you about what the backstage scene at rock concerts is about," Herzog said. Producers Barbara Kanowitz and Debbie Liebling tell the viewer a lot more than what goes on backstage, though. Interviews with well-known groupies over the years and rock stars who have known them build a steamy picture of love on the run. "I wanted to smell them," says groupie Miss Pamela. "I wanted to peel the shirt off (Jimmy Page's) dripping wet body and hold it against my face." Veteran rocker Carmine Appice admits that musicians on the road get lonely and groupies help stave off the boredom of touring. Appice talks during the program about one of the most notorious groupie episodes, a bondage party at a Seattle waterside hotel where guests, including I.ed Zeppelin and Vanilla Fudge, could fish from balconies. "The most disgusting thing I've ever seen in my life." Appice said of the affair. "They abused this woman with a mudshark." Frank Zappa later wrote a satirical rock operetta about the incident starring vocalists Mark Volman and Howard Kaylan. Part of this musicis used as the documentary's theme song. Zappa, who describes the groupie- rock star relationship as "corny," seems amused by the whole phenomenon. "The fantasies that guys in bands have—many of them are really incredibly stupid," Zappa said. "They're not going to realize how stupid they are until years after they've gone through the experience. They're not out there looking for the girl they're going to marry; they're looking for a specimen." Vince Neil of Motley Crue illustrates Zappa's point by making a series of lurid sexist observations about groupies before admitting, "If I had a little girl I wouldn't want my girl at any rock concert. I wouldn't let her know I was in a band." MONTROSE KROGER PHARMACY 10% Senior Citizen Discount You must be 59 years of age or older to receive a 10% discount on all your prescription needs. Stop by your Montrose store pharmacy and pick up your discount card today. we're here to serve you.. Our pharmacy computer records make it easier and faster to serve our patients because your time is important. \ > Hours: 9-9 Mon-Sat. 10-7 Sun. can 526-1239 ^ mmm
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