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Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987
File 009
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Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 009. 1987-02-27. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2288.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987-02-27). Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 009. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2288

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 009, 1987-02-27, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2288.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 27, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 009
Transcript 8 MONTROSE VOICE/FEBRUARY 27, 1987 What Discovery of AIDS-Like Virus in Cats Means for Felines By Russell Snyder DAVIS, Calif. (UPI)-A feline form of AIDS may have been killing cats for thousands of years, University of California researchers say. The scientists have discovered that an AIDS-like virus called feline T- lymphotropic Lenti virus, or FTLV, causes a disease similar to AIDS in cats. Symptoms include a weakened immune system, swollen lymph glands and a variety of infections that usually lead to death. Although the FTLV virus is related to the human AIDS virus, scientists say it is genetically different and does not infect people. Nor is there any evidence that cats get the virus from humans. "We believe this virus existed in cats for many years, perhaps thousands of years," said Dr. Niels Pedersen, a professor of veterinary medicine who is spearheading the university's research into FTLV. "What we have is the isolation ofacat form of human AIDS," he said. There are an estimated 40 million to 50 million cats living in the United States and officials at UC Davis are bracing for a flood of worried inquiries from pet owners who want to know more about the malady. Pedersen encouraged pet owners who think their cats are exhibiting FTLV symptoms to have the animals examined by veterinarians. The Davis campus is preparing brochures to help veterinarians diagnose the subject and is planning to publish articles on the subject in trade journals. Veterinarians are encouraged, in turn, to contact the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine for more information. "We did not want people to go out and destroy their cats," Pedersen said during a news briefing. The disease was first noticed by Mario Brown of the Petaluma Veterinary Hospital in 1982 among 43 former stray cats that had been taken in by a Petaluma resident. A new kitten added to the group began having bouts of diarrhea, developed a persisitent cold and an eye infection and later aborted a litter of kittens. In the third year, the cat became anemic, thin and began behaving strangely, roaming compulsively and moving her mouth and tongue. Eventually. she died. Other cats who shared the same quarters began developing the same syndrome. Researchers concluded that cats living in close contact with many other cats are more likely to contract FTLV than a house cat that rarely goes outside. Random tests found, for example, that about 5 percent of cats tested in the San Francisco area had the FTLV virus. Only 1 percent of farm cats may have the virus, Pedersen said, while the number falls below 1 percent for cats that are kept inside New York City apartments. He said it is too early to determine how many cats nationwide have the FTLV virus. So far, researchers have found no evidence that FTLV is transmitted through feline intercourse. Sexual contact is a primary route of AIDS transmission in humans. "We know the virus is present in the saliva in the cat," Pedersen said. "It could be transmitted through a bite or through mutual grooming. There is a great deal of saliva on the hair." It is hoped discovery ofthe virus will help in human AIDS research as well as eliminating a cause of disease for the nation's most popular pet. "The virus, although it's in the same family as the human AIDS virus and has a lot of very close similarities, is distinctly cat. We have no evidence of transmission for anything but cat-to- cat," said Pederson. Although the AIDS-like disease is probably fatal to a cat, immunologist Janet Yamamoto urged people not to kill off their pets if they show signs of an immunodeficiency. She said once word gets around about the virus, veterinarians will be able to diagnose the disease and may be able to treat some symptoms. "Please consult your vet before you do anything drastic to your cat," she said. Pederson said the team was contacting laboratories elsewhere in the United States, in Europe and in Japan to find out how widespread the virus is. A problem in AIDS research has been that there is no way to cause the disease in laboratory animals for testing of treatments and vaccines. Two viruses can cause AIDS-like symptoms in chimpanzees, but these are somewhat different from human AIDS. Yamamto and colleagues said the cat syndrome might be an easier model to work with because cats are cheaper than chimps and because the disease appears to mimic human AIDS more closely. It may also be a major cause of disease in cats, although this is too early to tell, she said. Some cats with feline leukemia also had immunodeficiencies falsely blamed on the leukemia virus. The cat virus did not infect human cells when mixed in lab dishes, and did not react with AIDS virus antibodies from AIDS patients, Yamamoto said. BETTER LAlimS & QARDEUS Total lau;n maintenance Commercial—Residential • Landscape • Trash Remoual • Chimney Sweep • Tree Seruice • Stumps Remoued • Complete Sprinkler Suslems FREE ESTIMATES! BEST PRICES! 523-LAWN Haughton Sounds Alarm for Heterosexuals HOUSTON (UPI)—Two new AIDS cases transmitted from infected men to heterosexual women should alert Houston's general population about the dangers of casual sex, the city health director says. The city's 10 heterosexually transmitted AIDS cases account for less than 1 percent of the total in the area. But Dr. James Haughton said the cases "establish for the citizens of Houston that it can happen here too. It's not just a gay disease as the people of this city seem to think." He advocated an end to "'high-risk' behaviors" that increase the likelihood of exposure to the virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome. "By high-risk behavior, I mean indiscriminate sexual activity, or at least sexual activity outside of marriage or with people you don't know well enough to feel secure about, doing drugs and especially doing drugs in circumstances where you are sharing needles with someone else, and for men, having sexual relationships with prostitutes." The two new cases of heterosexually transmitted AIDS occurred in women aged 24 and 34. They are still living. The epidemiology department reported a total of 1,034 cases in the Houston area, up from the 995 reported the month before. Liberace Estate Going in Trust LAS VEGAS, Nev. (UPI)—The estate of Liberace will be placed in a trust to benefit the performer's foundation, providing scholarships to music students across the nation, according to a will filed in court. The five-page will, dated Jan. 22 and filed with the Clark County Clerk's office several days after Liberace's death on Feb. 4, places his entire estate in "The Liberace Revocable Trust." Joel R. Strote, the performer's lawyer, was named to continue as trustee of the trust and Liberace asked that his accountant, Frank DiBella, oversee the funds. Liberace's estate is believed to be worth millions of dollars. The will did not provide a breakdown of Liberace's assets, but the performer asked that all his business enterprises continue in operation. The businesses include the Tivoli Gardens Restaurant and the Liberace Museum, both in Las Vegas. Proceeds from the museum have been used to fund the 8-year-old Liberace Foundation, which provides scholarships to music students at 22 colleges and universities nationwide. Strote said funds generated from the trust will go to the foundation and its work. Seymour Heller, Liberace's personal manager for the past 36 years, said Saturday the Liberace Foundation has been providing scholarship money for the past four years, including $220,000 last year. "We hope to do more and hope to continue providing scholarships forever in Liberace's name," said Heller, a member of the foundation board that meets once a year. After Liberace's death, his family requested donations to the foundation in lieu of flowers, and Heller said, "The response has been heart-warming."
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