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Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987
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Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 001. 1987-02-27. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2280.

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(1987-02-27). Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2280

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987 - File 001, 1987-02-27, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2313/show/2280.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 331, February 27, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date February 27, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript montrose VOICE Obscenity Standards Still Trouble High Court News, inside HOUSTON WEATHER: Friday night: 20% chance of ,f ,fJ ~ ~ ~i ~~I 1 J FEBRUARY 27 , 1987 ISSUE 331 I~ ;J ~ 3 more showers, low 50. Saturday: Sunny' High of 68. Sex Phone Services Still in Business Utility Commission Issues Temporary Ruling, inside Your GPW Logo- Pride Committee Makes it Official News, inside NEWS FROM THE HEALTH CRISIS o Hormone Shows Promise of Treating Cancer, AIDS o Catholic Dilemma: AIDS Prevention Without Condoms A DJ & His Oldies --· _____Fe ature, inside INSIDE: MORE NEWS THAN WE'VE EVER HAD! 2 MONTROSE VOICE FEBRUARY 27, 1987 Committee Rejects Night Gay Pride Parade By Sheri Cohen Darbonne .lfnntro1>e Voice Participants at the second planning meeting for what is now to be called Gey1 Lesbian Pride Week 1987 decided against considering the option of hold­ing a nighttime parade, over the enthus­iastic promotion of supporters of the concept and meeting chair Ray Hill, who urged delaying the vote. Larry Bagneris, who hes been push­ing the evening events idea as a way to avoid the summertime heat and revital­ize the parade, said the idea was intended as "something different to stir up some excitement." Channelling the parade route inw the site of another Montrose event would also keep post­parade spending in community busi­ne. s~es , he suggested. Lights on parade floats would give the celebration "a whole new look" and would attract more television coverage, Bagneris stated. He said the problem of obtaining a waiver or amendment to a city ordinance prohibiting the activity could probably be resolved "quietly" in City Hall. ••There was an ordinance six years ago that said we couldn't have a parade (on WestheimerJ at all. We managed to change the charter under a redneck, uncooperative, unbelievable city administration and police department we had at the time,'• Bagneris com­mented. Hill noted there is a "slip clause" in the ordinance that allows an exception or amendment if approved by a major· ity vote in City Council. Exceptions are regularly granted for activities such as the Greek Festival, which extend into the night hours, he pointed out. Responding to questions about secur­ity during the parade, Bagneris said, "We pay taxes we should demand (police) protection." But Debbie Holmes, a member of the Montrose Symphonic Band, com- Come out and mented that while the band was the parade unit most likely to suffer the worst effects of the heat, performers would have difficulty seeing their music at night. Mary Walters of the Lesbian Mothers group, said security after dark posed a special problem for people with children. §Ill VIER IPlATTIER §IERVIlCIE ... March Special Rrst Full Month Free on selected 2 bed/ 2 bath units. TWo weeks Free for First Month on All units! Remember, you don't just get a neighbor, you get a friend at ~ (jKEENWA'( PLACE J:.:xdusi~ Adult Apartments 3333 Cummins 623-2034 '6\ JOHNSTOWN PROPERTIES - ~~~ Scott Clark asked what kind of protec­tion would be available for people hav­ing to walk several blocks to their cars after the parade and street festival. Bag­neris quipped that the committee would provide the same type of service that Pride Week 't;7 was available in previous years follow­ing rallies at Spotts Park: "Namely nothing. We can't afford it!" Bagneris noted that Westheimer was well-lit and that there would be many people on the streets after the events. A proposal to allow those interested to investigate the possibility of a night parade was defeated by a show of hands at the well-attended meeting. "Thank you very much," Bagneris remarked after the vote. "You've saved me a Jot of work." Regarding a festival on Pacific Street, suggested as an alternative to the Spotts Park rally, Sue Lovell noted that not all gay businesses were located there and suggested the committee arrange some sort of shuttle transPorta hon to carry revelers to various busi· nesses in the area The festival discussion will be resumed at a subse­quent meeting. "Come Out and Celebrate Pride" was selected as the theme for this year's cele· bration after the committee viewed artist's interpretations of three different themes. The other themes incorporated in the five designs shown were "Cele· brate" and "Proud and Free." David Lozano submitted the winning logo design, incorporating two dancing figures against a lambda character and rainbow. The rainbow flag and lambda are symbols suggested by the National Conference of Gay Pride Planners to be used in pride week logos. A motion to include the word "lesbia­n" in all future official references to the celebration week also passed by a show of hands vote. The proposal, introduced by Deborah Bell, includes a provision to alternate positioning of the words "gay" and "lesbian" each year, with this year's event to be called "Houston Gay/ L<'shian Pride Week", while next year's will be denoted "Lesbian / Gay." Bell, who is vke president of the state chapter of the National Organization for Women and is active in the Texas Lesbian t Gay Leadership Conference and Womynspace, and Hill were elected co-chairs of this year's pride week plan· ning organization Jack Valinski was chosen as media coordinator and Lloyd Powell as out· reach coordinator, both by unanimous acclamation. Selection of a parade chair was tabled as there were no volunteers or suggestions. Bagneris declined nomi­nation for the position, saying he had to be out of town too often to coordinate the parade plans this year. The body voted to authorize Hill to spend reserve funds from last year to arrange printing logo t-shirts early, in hopes of having them available to dis­tribute during the Houston Festival and Westheimer Colony Art Festival. Montrose Homes Sought for Housing Program Sheltering Arms, an organization which provides support services for the elderly, is seeking Montrose-area partic­ipants for its shared housing program, according to Annette Allen, case man· ager for the program. The service, which operates in much the same way as a commercial room· mate matching service, attempts to place individuals in need of an afforda. ble living situation in private homes. The only requirement is that one of the parties in the arrangement be elderly or handicapped, Allen said. The program has existed about 18 months, with 15 matches having been made, Allen said. Currently, only five people are going through the placement process although about50 homes across the city are available. People offer space in their homes for a variety of reasons, Allen explained. Elderly persons living alone, for example, sometimes offer space free of charge for the benefit of companionship and asr;istance with household chores, tihe said. At the other end of the spectrum are those who are looking for a renter, who tend to ask average rates for a room or larger area in their home. Allen said she tries to talk these peo­ple into lowering in the prices. In Montrose, both living space and people to move in are needed, Allen said. Many people who have entered the program have expressed an interest in living here, she said. Participants in the program are required to provide three character ref· erences and a medical statement from a doctor ascertaining their ability to care for themselves, Allen said. A screening interview is also con­ducted to determine financial situation, why the person is interested and what type of person they would feel compati­ble with After the screening, arrangements are made for participants to contact each other, Allen said. lf two agree on a living arrangement, the case manager meets with the people and draws up a contract between them If problems later arise with compati· bility, participants are urged to contact Allen. Sheltering Arms charges a $25 matrhing fee for the tservice, which can be waived under Hperial circumstances, Allen said. Sheltering Arms 1s a non-profit organization working primarily with the elderly and adult children of aging parents. FEBRUARY 27. 1987 · MONTROSE VOICE 3 Hormone Shows Promise of Treating Cancer, AIDS Need a Car Today? Call Ralph Gilbert at Texas Brokers • 200 Cars to Choose From By Larry Doyle UPI Sci(•ncf' Writer CHICAGO-A major development in the fight against cancer and AIDS may be a genetically engineered protein that cannot cure either disease but can strengthen the immune system, a scientist said this month. "We're very excited," said Nicholas Plotnikoff, a neuropharmacologist with Oral Roberts University School of Medi­cine in Tulsa, Okla. "This drug appears to work and has no toxic side effects at all as far as we can determine, which is virtually unheard of." While the drug-methione enka­phalin- cannot cure either cancer or AIDS, it can enhance the body's ability to fight the diseases and prevent infec­tions that often accompany them, Plot­nikoff said Feb. 15. Plotnikoff discussed results of clinical trials of the hormone at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Other researchers at the protein drug sympo­sium touted genetic engineering as pro­viding doctors with new tools to treat tumors, heart attacks and wounds. "The development of techniques lo transfer ONA into bacteria has made it relatively easy to produce enzymes, reg· ulating factors and other proteins in large quantities," said Wolfgang Sadee, professor of pharmaceutical chemistry at the University of California at San Francisco. "These proteins open up an entirely new approach to therapy," he said, "and also provide novel insights into the physiological mechanisms of the major diseases of mankind." Plotnikoff and his colleagues have investigated a group ofproteins-callC'd prohormones because they act as pre· curBon; to the body's major biological regulators-which interact with white blood cells to either depress or increase immune response. Methione enkaphalin, one such pro­hormone, has been tested on about a dozen patients with cancer and a dozen montrose VOICE HOUSTON. TEXAS ISSUE 331 FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 27, 1987 Published weekly Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright 1987 Office hours 8am-6pm Henry McClurg pubhsh•t·«Mor Lmda Wyche m.n•gmg .cJ''°' David Roumlort product>On Elroy Forbes soc•lll d11.c1or Sheri Cohen Darbonne n-s SUBSCRIPTIONS (713) 529-8490 ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT (713) 529-8490 Jerry Mulholland .u.-.r11s•ng d11.cto1 ---Ken Boge_·~~~ •x...::ullV• POSTMASTER S9nd •ddreu corr.chons 10 408 Avond•le. Hout1on. TX 7700&-3028 SubK11pl1on ,.,. ,,, us (by V0tc• Utrlflf Of us M•1I} Sl 25 per week (upto211sunl. S65petye.r(52week1J.or S32 50 per SIX monuw f26 weeks) N•f•on1l lldv•tt1s1ng 1•1HH1H1r1ttv• A•vendell M1rkehng PO Box 1268. Pl11nheld. NJ 07061.1201) 7~-43'8 Fm•I •dv•111smg "-•di.rte Atl d•~l•y ads 5pm 2 dlyt p1101" 10 pubhc•tmn d•te All clus1hed ads2pm 1 d•y pnor 10 pubhc•t•on dlle Nolie• 10 lldverf•Hf'S Adverlts•ng r•t• s.chedul• Eighl A WH•llec11v1Apnl 11.1986 R•spons1b1Mr we do not usu me lin•nco•I respons•bd•ty for Cll•ml by ldver11Hrs but rffders are o~ked to ltdvtSe the roew1p•Pfll" ol •ny 1usptCion ol lradulenl OI' decepl/Vil ldvfl'rl,.ing •OCJ 11RpoclOn9 w•ll be onvest>glled Al•wl •-•c• U"•tt>d Pr.u lntern•hooel others with AIDS-related complex, a less severe form of acquired immune deficiency syndrome that often but not always develops into the deadly dis­ease. "We've been treating the ARC patients for a year and none of them have developed any opportunistic infec­tions and none have gone on to develop AIDS, both of which (are) rather sur­prising," Plotnikoff said. The results on cancer patients were less encouraging, he said, in that no sig· nificant reductions were seen in the advanced cases. Butthe drug did bolster the patients' immune systems and did prevent other infections that often afflict cancer patients, such as pneumo­nia. "I see this as a possible adjunct treat­ment for cancer patients coming off che­motherapy," Plotnikoff said. "It could be very helpful in preventing complica­tions." Plotnikoff said plans are under way to expand the testing of methione enka­phalin on ARC-patients. Ideally, he said, the drug would be tested in conjunction with an anti-viral agent such as the experimental AZT, which reduces spread of the disease but does not restore immune function. • Your Job is Your Credit •Instant Financing­Low Monthly Payments $100 off with this ad 1433 N. Shepherd ..... . 868-2365 Pardi Gras Nobody Does It Like 1022 Westheimer 528-8851 0 Morning· 7am··Noon Monday-Saturday ~ 'r;;:::::::J Afternoon: 6pm 8pm Monday··Friday Music by Larissa Thompson Evening : 11 30pm-1230am Every Night Can Beer Sl 25 Draft Beer 75C Well Dnnks S 1 75 Shots St 25 4 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 27 1987 IT TAKES COURAGE TO ADMIT TO YOUR DRUG OR ALCOHOL PROBLEM. AND PRIDE TO OVERCOME IT. 1-800-54-PRIDE 24 HOURS-A-DAY Dealing with a drug or alcohol problem is hard enough without also having to deal with homophobia Once you've decided to deal with a chemical dependency problem, the last thing you need is someone pass­ing judgment on your lifestyle. That's where we can help. We're Pride Institute, America's first in-patient drug and alcohol treat­ment facility run by and for lesbians and gay men. we offer a safe, confi­dential environment where you'll find the support, understanding and respect to effectively treat your chem­ical dependency. Our professional staff will do more than help you overcome your problem, they'll help you live your life with Pride. If you, or someone you care about has a problem with drugs or alcohol, give us a call. 1-80054-PRIDE. Help is available 24 hours-a-day. VPRIDE INffiITUTE Recover with pride. Gay Bars in El Paso Sought for Testing By Ken Flynn EL PASO, Texas (UPl)-An after-hours testing program for AIDS antibodies, to be conducted at gay bars, will begin "hopefully in the next few months,'' a public health official said Feb. I 9. Dr. Laurance Nickey, director of the City-County Health Unit, said health officials are negotiating with owners of gay hans to permit the voluntary tests to prevent ~preud of the disease. Hf> said the high-risk group, gay men, are reluctant to use public health facili Free Condoms Urged for Spring Break Students FORT LAUOERDALE, Fla. (UPl)-An AJDS counseling service wants hotels to hand out fr(•e condoms to vacationing colh.•ge student.<; when they check in for spring hreak this year The Rev . Fred Tondalo, director of AlllS Centt'T One, said that if he cannot persuade the hotels to distribute the con tracPptivt• devices along with AIDS infonnation pamphlets, he is consider­ing having staff members walk along the beach to give them out. "People have to have access to unbi· ased information,"Tondalo said. "Then they can add or subtract bias as they see fit. Anyhody who is engaging in sex without barrier contraceptives . .. is dt•aling with a Russian roulette game." He said he already has met some res­istance from hotels about the condoms, but they may agree to distributing the pamphlets. He said he would apply for a permit to distribute the material on the street if necessary. Meanwhile, some hotel operators were complaining that advance regis· trations from college students planning to spend their vacations in Fort Lauder dale are way down this year. 04 Business is terrible," said Roger Handevidt, owner of the Ortgon Terrace Motel, a 16-unitlayoutthree blocks from the beach. "Our bookings are down by 50 pt>rcent. I'm going to have one heck of a setback this year. By May 1, I'm going to be down $30,000." Handevidt said the motel takes in half its yearly revenues during the spring break period from late February to early April. Some hoteliers said bookings are down because Easter comes later this year, April 19, and they expect business to pick up later. Others blame lower room rates at competing sites like Day­tona Beach and the raising of the drink· ing age to 21. They said that makes the Bahamas or Mexico, where the drinking age is 18, more attractive to those who can afford to pay more. Boston University travel agent David Teolis said in some cases, the expense is not a great deal higher. Week-long package trips to Nassau have been advertised on the Boston University campus for $379-$499, while Fort Lauderdale packages cost $369· $429. Spring break business peaked in I 985 with an estifnated 330,000 students vis· iting. The resulting bad publicity also may have an impact on bookings this year. The city reacted last year by putting up a safety barrier between the street and the beach and by tightly enforcing open-bottle laws. ties during regular hours for fear of being labeled as homosexual carriers of AIDS. He said off-site, after-hours testing is already being conducted to protect the anonymity of persons suspected of car· rying the disease. Tony Bengert, AIDS counselor for the health unit, said the tests are being held "in an informal atmosphere, where homosexuals f<•el more at home." Nickey said the tl·sting is part of "our tracking the disease and educating the public" lit• said health officials are "activt•ly pur:-;uing" agreements with gay bar owners "and arr getting their cooperation." "We will begin thr testing program at the bars just as soon as we both under· stand what our responsibilities are," Nickey said. "We are trying to get the word out to everyone so they under· stand the health significance of this dreaded di8easc." Bengert said the tests are voluntary, anonymous, and cost about $10 for those who can pay, adding that no one will be turm·d away if they can not afford the fct•. Dr. Earl W. Gorhy said there are 1:{ confirmPd casE·s of AIDR in the El Paso metropolitnn arN1, and an (•stimatE><l 8<Xl to 1000 carriers of the di seas(• l~·ngt·rt said th• Old Plantation. a gay disco har in its 10th year of opera· tion, has offered its performers' dress­ing rooms for the t<•sting. Bcngert said thP ll•sting in gay hars will he effective becaust> the high-risk group will f<·el more comfortahle in its own environ· ment. HN1lth officials in El Paso have con· ducted coun!-teling and testing nights nt a predominantly gay and lesbian non clrnominational church and at a city· <·ounty hrn1th t·enh.•r, Bcngert said Roh Bonaventure, owner of the Old Plantation, said th(• disco attracts 500 custom(•rs on a busy night. As of Feb. 2, a total of :I0,396 ca•°' of thE' fatal dist·ase have been diagnosE'<i, according to national statistics. More than half those victims-17,:l:ll>--have died. About 70 pc·rcent of the disease'i; victims have lx_.en homosexual and bisexual men. Health officials estimated 2 percent of the area's total population was infected with AIDS last April, and in IO months, that rate has doubled to 4 percent, Gorhy said. Trinidad Lists AIDS Cases PORT OF SPAJN, Trinidad (UPl)­Deaths from acquired immune defi­ciency syndrome rose from eight in 1983 to 149 at the end of January this year, medical officials said. Dr. Bisram Mahabir, director of the Caribbean Medical Center, said about 75 percent of the cases were gay men. He said 12 percent were women. Mahabir, in a speech to the Lions Club on Sunday, also warned that the incidence of venereal disease normally rises following carnival celebrations. The pre-Lenten festivities will take place in coming weeks. February 1s Gay and Lesbian Media Awareness Month-Sponsored by the Media Fund for Human Rights and !he Gay and ____Lesb_ian P_ress _Assoc_1a11..o n _,.. __ FEBRUARY 27. 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 Ram Dass: 60s Drug Guru Now AIDS Worker Dass describes the sequence that led him from psychology through chemical experiments in the company of Leary, Aldous Huxley and others to study of Indian spiritual practices and, eventu­ally, to his work with the Seva Founda-tion and other service projects as a quest for an "attachment of mind." By Sheri Cohen Darbonne Mo11lrose Volce Ram Dass, a former Harvard Univer­sity psychology professor who gained notoriety in the 1960'-s for experiment· ing with psychedelic chemicals includ­ing LSD and psylocibin, says now he has reached a true connection with con· sciousness in his current commitment to human service. One of the more recent outgrowths of this commitment is working with victims of AIDS, and the volunteers and "buddies" who pro­vide services to them, Dass reported Sunday, Feb. 22. Dass, who along with Timothy Leary was one of the first professors to be fired by Harvard in the 20th century, is sche­duled to lecture at the University of Houston, University Park student cen­ter at 7:30 p.m. Sunday, March I. The lecture, sponsored by and held for the benefit of the Seva Foundation, will focus on the topic "Cultivating the heart of compassion." Dass said his involvement with AIDS grew partly out of his previous work with people who are dying and partly out of more personal experiences, including the loss of friends. His approach to dealing with the disease's progression is different than the atti­tude encountered by AIDS victims in a hospital or hospice environment because of how the person is perceived, Dass claims. "It's really a contextual matter of the way one sees another person," Dass explained "In a hospital or medical f'nvironment, what is seen ifi thP body, whereaf.i in a hospice, the focus in on the personality. The attitude ther(' is 'It's too bad you're dying.' What I am more int(•rest('d in is the spiritual," he said. Throug-h involvement with the spirit, a person can reach an acceptance of dying and consciously approach the situation, Dass suggested. He said his program ('ncourages spiritual advance· ment through meditative practices. Meditation can be learned by anyone with a desire to do so, Dass asserted, noting that the practice takes many forms in application lo different life­styles. Hatha Yoga and even jogwng can be considered meditative experi('n­Cl'S, he said. Ram Dass, now muolued in AIDS work Dass' living·dying project developed from awareness of a philosophy found in many religions that one cannot be born without first dying, and the fact that man's deepest fear is that of physi­cal death. "I wanted to create a space for people who arl' dying, and for other people who want to be around", he said. Health Care Firm Buys City Block in Montrose Healthcare Associates Inc. , a firm which previously did marketing and public relations for local health care professionals, has purchased an entire city block in Montrose, where it plans to operate a residential rehabilitation cen­ter for adolescents and young adults. "Live Oaks Treatment Center," for young people with drug, alcohol or emo­tional problems, will be the company's first treatment facility, according to Stan Riley, the center's chief executive officer. The company entered into a limited partnership with 40 private investors, mostly health care professionals, to pur· chase the property. The block, bounded by Yoakum, Mt. Vernon, Bisson net and Berthea Streets, was purchased from Psychiatric Assa. ciates of Houston Inc. for $1,000,007, Riley said. Five buildings on the site ::>reviously housed professional offices, many of which will remain at the same location; an art gallery and a vacant apartment complex. Ri ley said $700,000 in renovations to the existing buildings is planned before the facility's scheduled opening in July. The Berthea Gardens Apartments will be converted into the patient resi ­dence, he said. No new construction is planned. Live Oaks will probably employ 20-30 full·time staff persons or the equivalent in full and part-time positions, Riley noted The project began with a telephone line. The "dying centers" were estab­lished in Santa Fe, N.M., and Marin County, Calif. Dass began working with AIDS patients and volunteers last year, and says he hopes to open a house for AIDS patients next year. Dass, who is bisexual, said his own experience heightened his interest in the disease. Awareness of AIDS has changed his sexual practices and has made him more sympathetic to the pain of others, he said. The loss of people involved in his pro­ject draws mixed feelings, Dass said. "My human heart hurts like hell," he admitted. But another, intuitive part of him understands the balance in the workings of the universe, he added. And, although Dass claims he has not used drugs intravenously and that his sexual practices were not those consi­dered to have the highest risk, he is "open to the possibility" he could be stricken with AIDS himself. "It's hard, hypothetically, to know how you would react," Dass responded when asked how he would accept the news. However, he said, "I feel pre­pared." Facing death would be "another chal­lenge," he added. Born Richard Alpert in 1931, Dass received an M.A. from Wesleyan Uni· versity and a Ph.D from Stanford, and served on the psychology faculties at Stanford and the University of Califor­nia. From 1958-1963 he taught and researched in the department of social relations and graduate school of educa­tion at Stanford. "I was teaching from the outside in," he said of his earlier work in the univer­sities. "I felt I wasn't being touched inside, and kept wondering, why can't I find happiness, and peace?" Dass said his first experience of being connected with his own mind was when he tried the drug psylocibin during his research at Harvard. "When you experience something like that, you have a tendency to keep try­ing," he explained. After trying to sta­bilize the experience for over five years, Dass said he realized the chemicals alone would not do that. Testimony in books of similar experi­ences led him to India, where he met his "guru" (spiritual teacher), Neem Karoli Baba, under whom he studied Ash· tang a Yoga, meditation and a variety of eastern spiritual practices. During this time he received his name, which means "servant of God." Dass said he interprets his "servant to master" devotion to deity through service to mankind. In 1974, Dass created the Hanuman Foundation, which developed the living-dying pro· ject and the "Prison-Ashram Project," designed to help prison inmates grow spiritua1ly and consciously during their incarceration Dass is presently chairman of the Seva Foundation, a non-profit organi­zation which provides health and eco­logical services in developing countries. Seva's primary current activity is sup­port of the Nepal Blindness Program and Avarind Eye Hospital in Madurai, India. Another Dvifj SJPgJ Enterprise ... K.J. 's ~~ NORTHSIDE Mon-Fri Happy Hour 12-7pm s1so Well & s1 Beer FRIDAY-Fantasy in Motion, 10pm SATURDAY-No Cover SUNDAY Free Beer Bust & Bar-B-Que 3-7pm $3 Cover Lip Synch Contest 10pm, Anyone Can Enter, Cash Prizes MONDAY Airline Night-s1 Bar Drinks and Beer for Airline Employees TUESDAY Men's Pool Tournament, 8pm, cash prizes THURSDAY Ladies' Pool Tournament, 8pm, cash prizes Come by and see our New Look' 11830 AIRLINE-445-5849 (2 blocks south of Aldine-Bender) 6 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 27, 1987 AIDS Conference Endorses Voluntary Tests By Charles S. Taylor ATLANTA IUPl>-A two-day national conference on acquired immune defi· ciency syndrome ended with a strong endorsement for the expansion of AIDS tests. but stressed they should be volun­tary, confidential and accompanied by counseling. The conference, convened by the fed­eral Centers for Disease Control, recom­mended nearly unanimously Wednesday that AIDS blood tests and counseling be made available at drug treatment centers, family planning offi ces and venereal disease clinics. The meeting also called for encourag. ing pregnant women and the spouses and sexual partners of intravenous drug users to undergo screening for the deadly virus. Further, the conference recommended the federal government provide more money for increased arc .. • to AIDS tests. But the conference strongly ruled out as legally and ethically wrong propos­als for mandatory testing, such as for newly admitted hospital patients, women seeking prenatal care and mar· riage license applicants. The CDC stirred sharp criticism from gay rights groups when it disclosed last month that it was considering recom­mending more widespread compulsory AIDS testing. The test works by detecting antibo­dies to the AIDS virus, indicating a per· son has been infected with the virus but has not necessarily developed the dis­ease or its symptoms. The conference, which opened Tues· day, was called to discuss prospects for more widespread AIDS tests as a way to combat the spread of the virus. The meeting drew state and local health experts and representatives of gay rights groups. hospitals and AIDS patients from around the country " It is my understanding of the recom­mendations that there is no support for mandatory testing, but much support for routine and voluntary testing," said Dr. Walter Dowdle of Che CDC. "We found a consensus there should be increasing support for voluntary antibody testing as an adjunct to coun­seling. We found a consensus that there •hould be increa8"d federal support." Germans Favor General Tests HAMBURG West Germany !UPl)­~ venty percent of West Germans favor regular tests for AIDS for everyone from prostitutei:o; to the federal chancellor it was reported. The daily Bild Zeitung newspaper said Wedne.sdav results of a national pubhc opinion. survev showed that seven out of every 10 p~ople questioned in a representative sample of 1.000 West German"' advocated widespread te:;t- 1ng The result~ of the survey by Ham· burg's Society for the Empirical Social Research were released by the news­paper the day after a West German doc­torti organization said it would refuse to participate in a mandatory reporting system proposed by the state of Hava­na. The federal government has decided against mandatory registration of peo­ple infected with acquired immune defi­ciency syndrome and instead plans to begin an anti-AIDS public education program. Bavarian officials said Wednesday they planned to go ahead with AIDS testing for all applicants for public jobs as we-11 1111 ;nmat~ in jails and prisons. said Dr William J Curran, professor of legal medicine at the Harvard School of Public Health. Dr. Robert J. Levine of the Yale School of Medicine said ''there is a need for protection of confidentiality" and laws should be passed to bar housing and job discrimination on the basis of AIDS test results. The CDC says 30,632 cases of AIDS were reported in the United States as of Feb. 9, of which 17,542 resulted in death. It projects 270,000 AIDS cases and 179,000 deaths by 1991 The final conference meeting was interrupted by a gay rights group called "The Lavender Hill Mob" shouting: "Where is the funding . Where is rib­ivarin (a drug that has shown promise in AIDS treatment)." Later, gay rights activists said they thought the conference responded to their pleas for federal funding and pro­tests against mandatory testing. "We came here fearing our voices would be ignored, but our voices were heard loud and clear," said Urashi Vaid of New York, a spokeswoman for the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force. We're Houston's largest Gay Audience. \\'e're the renders of the Montrol"-ie Voic('. We're the people you reach when you advt'rtist• in th(.• Montro~e Voice. We're about 27,000 renders weekly. (1'h<'n•'tt !"till another ~fi .~-o of us not pictured abuvt· J You know what else? We, the rcadt·rs of tht· \'oH·t· spend somewhere around $6,000,(H.)() u·,·t·J..'(v on tlw things we buy-clothes, partying at night, aμartmt·nl:-i , t·arK und repair, hair care, serious things and silly things. (Y<'s, that's S6 million weekly.) Got qometh)nlf to f'Jl neoxt wttk? We've got th f." monry to buy it. Maybe all you hnvt• to do 1.s ask-by advertising to us through our nru·~pa1>er The Montrose Voice THE NEW',PAPER OF M4 >NTAOSE DIAL 529-8490 lor ADVERTISING or HOME DELIVERY He11 1 l'>O* we 1 1Q•lfod '"° r • t'I flaR °'''''" o ' ')00 Off f C1111 soon e e o'"' unC1111 lt'fftPOl • " 1 IUIPftl(ted) AISurnH P•H .)I'\ ,,,. '"CIO• 2 IS 1""4,,1 Hl•"'•·..:i ;~~::::~o;.,:,~=~~~~:t~~ ::~i.~;,~·.·~r:;-~;~;~oor:;~.~ .ii •Peno• FEBRUARY 27 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 7 The Coroner Who Took on Hollywood By Kathleen Neumeyer INDIO, Calif. (UPl)-When Liberace died ~'eb . 4 and the people who worked for him insisted he had succumbed to something other than AIDS, they didn't count on Raymond Carrillo. Among physicians a debate is under way over whether a patient is entitled to keep embarrassing health problems srcrrt or if the threat lo public safety outweighs individual rights. But no such question distracted Car­rillo when Liberace died and Carrillos's office was asked to certify by telephone a death certificate citing heart disease and a brain disorder as the cause of death. What did concern Carrillo, a portly moon-faced businessman elected in November after promising to rid the cor­oner'., office of corruption, was deter· mining the exact causf' of death. "They were t rying to pull a fast one on the Riverside County coroner's office," said the 56-year-old Carrillo. "I t hink they were trying to pull something they thought they could gel away with." Born in Arizona and raised since infancy in this once-sleepy and now booming desert town 40 miles from the more well-heeled resort community of Palm Springs, Carrillo spent 10 years as a sheriffs deputy and 14 as a deputy coroner before running for the top job last year His predecessor, William Dykes, was retiring, a nd Carrillo's major opponent was chief deputy coroner Carl B. Smith . But a grand jury, looking into charges that unlicensed embalmers had been working in the coroner's office, indicted Smith on perjury charges, and by the time of the June primary, Smith was a convicted fe lon. Campaigning on a promise to clean up corruption in the coroner's offi ce, Carrill o came in first in the election over Smith but did not get a majority. Carrillo asked the courts lo declare him the winner. He lost th at battl e but was more successful in the November runoff, when he ha ndi ly defeated the No. 3 vote-getter, Mickey Worthington, in the J une primary. Because so ma ny celebrities maintain vacation and retiremen t homes in the Palm Spri ngs a nd adjacent Rancho Mirage a nd Palm Desert areas of River­side County, the post made Carrillo a kind of new coroner to the stars-a ti t le once used lo describe ex-Los Angeles County Coroner Thomas T. Noguchi. Local residents have the feelin g that H M A A '\J ( l T r I t\ Ci officials kow-tow lo the monied Holly­wood crowd, and Carrillo says there have been times when bodies have been "spirited out" of Riverside County to Los Angeles for burial. Carrillo's first turn in the limelight came when Liberace died in his opulent Spanish hacienda Feb. 4. His physician, Dr. Ron Daniels, of Whittier, certified that the death was due to congestive heart failure and ence­phalopathy, a degenerative brain dis· ease often associated with acquired immune deficiency syndrome. But Daniels did not list AIDS as a cause of death. The Las Vegas Sun two weeks earlier reported that the flamboyant pianist was dying of AIDS. Liberace's attorney, Joel Strole, respanded with a telegram lo the Sun in which he demanded a retraction and denied that "Mr. Show­manship" was dying or that he had AIDS. Liberace, who denied being a homo­sexual and won a lawsuit in 1959 against the London Mail for making that insinuation, also denied through his spokesmen that he had AIDS. His long-time business manager, Sey­mour Heller, said Liberace had anemia brought on by a watermelon diet. As Liberace lay dying, his New York publicist, Denise Collier, maintained he was suffering from pernicious anemia, emphysema and heart disease. There were those who didn't believe it, a nd when the entertai ner died, Carril­lo's office came under a torrent of tele­phone calls from people asking what the coroner intended to do about it. His chance came when health offi­cials in Los Angeles asked Carrillo lo certify the death certificate so that they could issue a burial permit. Instead, Carrillo ordered Liberace's body returned to Riverside County from Forest Lawn Mortua ry in Los Angeles. He a lso ordered an autopsy, which proved conclusively what Liberace had desperately sough t to conceal. "He didn't die of heart disease a nd encephalopathy," Carrillo said. "In lay­man's terms, he had AIDS." To those who know the coroner, his conduct was perfectly in character "There's a general feeli ng here of a local boy making good," says Dave Michaels, city editor of the Indio Daily News. "There's a general feeli ng here tha t he look on the Hollywood establish­ment. ... It's like Ray lo be blunt and come out in the open." The first Hispa nic ever elected to such '" l\iT " 528-9600 BE FAMOUS. BE SEEN. ADVERTISE IN THE MONTROSE VOICE. office in Riverside County, which has a large Hispanic population, Carrillo operates a popular Mexican restaurant. He is not a physician, and at news conferences on Liberace's death he deferred to aides on medical questions. Carrillo, who bristles at suggestions he tried to turn the autopsy into a media circus. was testy when asked repeatedly why he had called for the investigation into Liberace's death. "I would be remiss in my duty if I didn't," he said, adding that he has an obligation to investigate deaths that are not attended by physicians and those ~uspected of involving communicable diseases. Daniels, who had paid a house call on Liberace the day before he died, arrived at the entertainer's residence shortly after 2:00 p.m. on Feb. 4 and pronounced him dead at 2:05 p.m. There has been speculation Liberace had been dead for some time before Daniels arrived because the hearse, sent from Forest Lawn Hollywood Hills, a good two-hour drive away, pulled up only a short time later. After the autopsy, Daniels' attorney said the physician suspected Libwace might have suffered from AIDS but had no proof and deferred to the wishes of the entertainer and his family in not listing AIDS as a cause of death. "Given the highly charged nature of the acronym of AIDS, one has to be care­ful with whatonedoeswith the living as well as with the dead in a society that treats that word as a pariah," said attor­ney William Ginsburg. "It is even more irresponsible to list someone's death as AIDS if you're not sure." Dr Arthur Caplan, a medical ethicist at the Hastings Center at Hastings-on­Hudson, N.Y. , a research center im.:olved in questions of medical ethics. said he found Daniels' self-def~nse "dis­ingenuous." He said that "all the physi­cian has to do to be sure is to do a blood lest." Caplan said a debate is under way in the medical rommunity over the vary­mg wei~hts to give to a patient's right to die in privacy and to keep his medical problems to himself, and the greater harm to ~OC'ietv from a communicable disease such a~ AIDS. He noted the 0 Iongstanding tradition that a doctor has a moral obligation to respect the patient's \\;shes about who knows about his disease, and that includes spouses, lovers, friends and the news media." Caplan said doctors fear that tf patients believe a doctor cannot be trusted to keep his medical secrets confi­dential, "this will discourage others, out of a fear of stigma, from getting medical help. They will choose lo die at home. "What it boils down lo is that a com­municable venereal disease, a sexually transmitted disease like AIDS. is a strong enough threat lo the public health lo compel disclosure." While Caplan believes the need to track an epidemic makes mandatory reporting of communicable diseases essential, he questions whether the media absolutely needs to report causes of death. "In cases like syphilis, cancer and sui­cide, we have always tolerated some obfuscation in obituaries," he said. "The public hasn't risen up and begged to be told the truth." Crystal's 911 W. Drew 522-7524 sat .. Feb. 2s- apm 'tll ? Mardi eras Mask and costume Party s100 First Place, sso second Place Judging 10pm-Happy HOur extended until 10pm New Specials Tuesday- Under 21 and NOwhere to Go Tuesday ls 19-21 Night for All You Ladles who haven't seen o-ystal's This ls Your Night! Dance to Your Favorite Music and have a cood l1me. ..>:_ T11ursday-oo Your own Thing Night! Show Your Special Talent and Win 575 1st Place. Dance, Sing or Whatever. M.C. veronica Lake ladles and Men welcome to Show Their Talent 1·~·);(,ll!C 8 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 27, 1987 What Discovery of AIDS-Like Virus in Cats Means for Felines By Russell Snyder DAVIS, Calif. iUPI>-A fehne form of AIDS may have been killing cats for thousands of years, Univer~ity of Cali· fornia researchers say. The scientists have discovered that an AIDS-like virus called feline T lymphotropic U>ntivirus. or ITLV. causes a disease similar to AIDS in cats. Symptoms include a weakened immune system, swollen lymph glands and a variety of infections that usually lead to death Although the FTLV virus is related to the human AIDS virus, scientists say it iH geneticaUy different and does not infect people. Nor is there any evidence that cats get the virus from humans. ''We believe this virus existed in cats for many years. perhap:-; thousands of years," said Dr Niels Pedersen. a pro· fessor of veterinary medicine who is sp<•arheading thf' univrrsity's rPsearch mto F1'LV "What Wl' have is theisolatton of a cat form of human AIDS.'' he said. There are an estimated 40 million to SO million cats living in the United States and officials at UC Davis are bracing for a flood of worried inquiries from petownerawhowant to know more about the malady. Peder:;en encouraged pet owners who think their cats are exhibiting ITLV symptoms to have the animals exam· ined by veterinarians. The Davis cam· pus is preparing brochures to help veterinarians diagnose the subject and is planning to publish articles on tht> subject in trade journals. Veterinarians are encouraged, in turn. to contact the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine for more informa ti on. "We did not want people to go out and destroy their catJ.;.'' Peder:;en said dur· ing a news briefing. The d1~ease was first noticed by Marlo Brown of the Petaluma Veten· nary Hospital in 19H2 among 4:J former stray cats that had been taken in by a Petaluma resident. A new kitten added to the group began having bouts of diarrhea, deve· loped a pen;isitent cold and an eyeinfec· tion and later aborted a litter of kittens. In the third year, the cat became anemic, thin and began behaving stran· gely, roaming compulsively an,9 mov· ing her mouth and tongue. Eventually, she died. Other cats who shared the same quar­ters began developing the same syn drome. Researchers concluded that cats liv­ing m close contact with many other cats are more likely to contract F'TLV than a house cat that rarely goes out· side. Random te:;t.i,; found, for example, that about[') percent of cats te:;ted in the San Frpncisco a rea had the ITLV virus. Only I pert'Pnt of farm cats may have the virus. Pedersen said. while the numh...·r falls ht1low 1 percent for cats thnt an· kept inside New York City apartmPnts. He said it is too early to determine how many cats nationwide have tht· F1'LV virus. So far, researchers have found no evi dence that FTLV is transmitted through feline intercourse. Sexual con tact is a primary route of AIDS trans· mission in humans. "We know the virus is present in the sahva in the cat," Pedersen said. "It could be transmitted through a bite or through mutual grooming. There is a j.?reat deal of saliva on the hair." It is hoped discovery of the virus will help in human AIDS research as well as t'Jiminating a cause of disease for the nation's most popular pet. "The virus, although it's in the same familv as the human AIDS virus and haH a Jot Of very close Similarities, iS distinrtly cat. We have no evidenre of tran.smission for anything but cat-to· cat," said Pederson. Although the AIDS-like disease is probably fatal to a cat, immunologist .Janet Yamamoto urged people not to kill off their peL• if they show signs of an immunodefi· cirncy She said once word gets around ahout the viru!-i , veterinarians will be able to diagnose the disease and may be able to treat some symptoms. "Please consult your vet before you do anything drastic to your cat," she said Pederson said the team was contact­ing laboratories elsewhere in the United States, in Europe and in Japan to find out how widespread the virus is. A problem in AIDS research has been that there is no way to cause the disease in laboratory animals for testing of treatments and vaccines. Two viruses can cause AIDS-like symptoms in chim­panzees. but these are somewhat differ· ent from human AIDS. Yamamto and colleagues said the cat syndrome might be an easier model to work with because cats are cheaper than chimps and because the disease appeari-; to mimic human AIDS more clo.selv. It ~ay ah;o be a major cause of di8- east• in cats. although this is too early to tell. she said . Some cats with feline IC'ukemia also had immunodeficiencies falsely blamed on the leukemia virus. The cat virus did not infect human rells when mixed in lab dishes, and did not react with AIDS virus antibodies from AIDS patients, Yamamoto said. BETTER LAWilS & 4ARDEilS Total lawn maintenance Commercial-Residential • Ldndscupc • T rd sh Removdl • Ch1mnc4 Sweep • Tree Service • Stumps Removed • Complete Sprink ler S4stems FREE ESTIMATES! BEST PRICES! 523-LAWN Haughton Sounds Alarm for Heterosexuals HOUSTON (UPl)-Two new AIDS cases transmitted from infected men to heterosexual women should alert Hous­ton's general population about the dangers of casual sex, the city health director says. The city's 10 heterosexually transmit­ted AIDS cases account for less than I percent of the total in the area. But Or. James Haughton said the cases "establish for the citizens of Ho us· ton that it can happen here too. It's not just a gay disease as the people of this city seem to think." He advocated an end to '"high-risk' behaviors" that increase the likelihood of exposure to the virus that causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome. "By high-risk behavior, I mean indis· criminate sexual activity, or at least sexual activity outside of marriage or with people you don't know well enough to feel secure about, doing drugs and especially doing drugs in circumstances where you are sharing needles with someone else, and for men, having ~ex ­ual relationships with prostitutes." The two new cases of heterosexually transmitted AIDS occurred in women aged 24 and 34. They are still living. The epidemiology department reported a total of 1,034 cases in the Houston area, up from the 995 reported the month before. Liberace Estate Going in Trust LAS VEGAS, Nev. (UPI)-Theestateof Liberace will be placed in a trust to benefit the performer's foundation, pro­viding scholarships to music students across the nation, according to a will filed in court. The five-page will, dated Jan. 22 and filed with the Clark County Clerk's office several days after Liberace's death on Feb. 4, places his entire estate m "The Liberace Revocable Trust." Joel R Strole, the performer's lawyer, was named to continue as trustee of the truRI and Liberace asked that hi• accountant, Frank Di Bella, oversee the funds. Liberace's estate is believed to be worth millions of dollars. The will did not provide a breakdown of L.iberace's assets, but the performer asked that all his business enterprises continue in operation. The businesses include the Tivoli Gardens Restaurant and the Liberace Museum, both in Las Vegas. Proceeds from the museum have been used to fund the 8-year-old Liberace Foundation, which provides scholar· ships to music students at 22 colleges and universities nationwide. Strole said funds generated from the trust will go to the foundation and its work. Seymour Heller, Liberace's personal manager for the past 36 years, said Sat­urday the Liberace Foundation has been providing scholarship money for the past four years, including $220,000 last year "We hope to do more and hope to con· tinue providing scholarships forever in Liberace's name," said Heller, a member of the foundation board that meets once a year After Liberace's death, his family requested donations to the foundation in lieu of Oowers, and Heller said, "The response has been heart-warming." FEBRUARY 27, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 Premiere Texas Tough Customer Edition of Drummer Magazine Feb. 28-10pm A Representative of Drummer Magazine will be here to meet Houston's Tough Customers. Door Prize: Trip for 2 to Lyle's Guest House on Padre Island-Courtesy Lyle's Deck Male stric Every Friday Nig~t 11pm <starts a New series> Congratulations to Dan Guzman. winner of 1st Strip Finals 10 MONTROSE VOICE FEBRUARY 27, 1987 "Have you noticed that? ... You get stuck SWJnging behind some guy who's just lollygagging along, and sure enough he'll be wearin' a hal on the back of his head." Voice Comics I ' m y ~ ~ 1 9870owWS)'l'dca ... lnc. Z ·.Z..8 Raymond plays another dirty trick on Max. ~I)~~ I>. ~w to\~, SCCU\"'11.\1' w,to.I\... ~t> ~ ~ ~ $ul4tic:M~ . - ~ l<fS-1' lli.l ~E OJi: I'<>'<'. 1'\E '000\<. Wl'Oll.£. ~ ~w.E.'<!.0-r.; ~ C:.El\I~' ~\.I~ ~Sn.ES"- ... . ..r- FEBRUARY 27 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 11 Dionne Warwick Still at Peak of Her Form By John Swenson L'PI Pop Writrr LOS ANGELES (UPl)-"That's What Friends Are For," a benefit song for AIDS research featuring Dionne War­wick. Stevie Wonder, Elton John and Gladys Knight, won two Grammys Tuesday night. The tune, which has raised $7fi0,000 for AIDS research, was named song of the year and it also won a Grammy for best pop performance by a duo or group with vocals. It also marked the reunion of War­wick and Burt Bacharach, who co-wrote the song with Carole Bayer Sager and who helped launch Warwick'.i:; career 25 years ago. Warwick, 45, grew up in a family of gospel singers singing at local New Jer· sey venues in a family group called the Drinkard Singers. After studying at Hartl College of Music in Hartford, Conn., Warwick was signed to a produc­tion deal by Scepter Records in 1962 to sing songs written by the team of Burt Racharach and Hal David. Their first collaboration, "Don't Make Me Over," hit No. 21 on the pop charts. In 1963 the team had their first major hit with "Anyone Who Had a Heart," a Top IO single. "Walk On By" reached No. 6 in 1964. Other hits followed: "You'll Never Get to Heaven," (]964); "I Just Don't Know Whal to Do with Myself' and "Message to Michael" (]966); "! Say a Little Prayer" and "Alfie" (]967). Warwick climaxed her )ate '60s tri­umphs singing Bacharach· David com­positions with "Do You Know the Way to San Jose," "Valley of the Dolls," "This Girl's in Love with You" and "I'll Never Fall in Love Again" before leav-ing for another record company and production team . In 1974 Warwick combined with the Spinners on the No. l hit "Then Came You," followed by the Top 5 "Once You Hit the Road" in 1975. Warwick scored another Top 5 hit in 1979 with "I'll Never Love This Way Again." In the early '80s Warwick worked with Barry Gibb of the Bee Gees on the "Heartbreaker" album. from which the title track and "Take the Short Wav Home" became hits. . The song "That's What Friends An· For" has raised $750,000 for AlllS research Sager said she hoped it would raise even more now that it has won two Grammys. The money is ehanneled through the American Foundation for AIDS rt-search , which is chaired by Eli­zabeth Tavlor "Every . time that song is played, ma~:he it calls mores attention to it <AIDRl and maybe someone will give some monev:• Racharach said. Raf,?t•r sa.id she wants everyone to know that AIDS ''attacks evervone, is not a homosexual disease. It's a· disease of our time. There's no cure and eve· r~·one die!-i. It's horrible." Romancing the Rock'n Rollers By John Swenson NEW YORK (UPIJ-The erotic and sometimes abusive experiences of young women "groupies" on the rock tour trail is described in an current MTV series designed to give the music video channel's audience a wider range of pro­grams. The documentary covers sexual exploits between male rock musicians and young women enamored with the idea of having sex with the stars. "I'd do anything," was the refrain of swarming youngsters outside stage doors and concerts across the country. "We're trying to broaden our audience," said Doug Herzog, MTV vice president of music news and special pro· jects. "It's an attempt to reach as many people as possible. I think this is a sub· ject that is of interest not just to the heavy MTV viewer but to the casual viewer because it sounds interesting and controversial." Shown in its entirety last weekend, the program is a dramatic switch away from the teen-oriented music videos that have been the cable television nNwork's staple during its five-year histor~· "The show tells you about what the backstage scene at rock concerts is about." Herzog said. Producers Harbara Kanowitz and Debbie Liebling tell the viewer a lot more than what goes on backstage, though. Interviews with ,-..·ell·known groupies over the years and rock stars who have known them build a steamv picture of love on the run . "I wanted to smell them." says grou· pie Miss Pamela. "I wanted to peel th« shirt off (Jimmy Page's) dripping wet body and hold it against my face." Veteran rocker Carmine Appict• admits that musicians on the rond get lonely and groupies help stave off the boredom of touring. Appice talks during the program about one of the most notorious groupie episodes, a bondage party at a Seattle waterside hotel where guests, including Led 7,eppelin and Vanilla Fudge, could fish from balconies. "The.· most disgusting thing I've ever s{>en m my life," Appice said of the affair '"Thev abused this woman with a mudshark.'; Frank Zappa later wrote a satirical rock operetta about the incident star· ring vocalisL" Mark Volman and How· ard Kavlan. Part of this music is used as the doCumentary's theme song. Zappa. who describes the groupie· rock star relationship as "corny," seems amused by the whole phenomenon. "The fantasies that guys in hands have-many of them are really incredi· bly stupid," Zappa said. "They're not going to realize htJw stupid they are until year" after they've gone through the experience. They're not out there looking for the girl they're going to marrY" they're lookinR" for a specimen." Vince Neil of Motley Crue illustrates Zappa's point by making a series of lurid sexist observations about groupies before admitting, "If I had a little girl I wou}dn 't want my girl at any rock con­cert. I wouldn't let her know I was in a band" MONTROSE KROGER PHARMACY 10% senior Citizen Discount You must be 59 years of age or older to receive a 10% discount on all your prescription needs. Stop by your Mon­trose store pharmacy and pick up your dis­count card today. we·re here to serve you .... Our pharmacy computer records make it easier and faster to serve our patients because your time is important. { . \ , Hours: 9·9 Mon-sat. 10·7 sun. Call 526·1239 12 MONTROSE VOICE FEBRUARY 27 1987 'Hoosiers' Scores Winning Points Review by Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice o Hoosiers Hoosiers tells a tale about the 1951-52 high school basketball season. The time period is significant. This is not one of your modern sports movies-all glitz and predictability. drums and feet. Jerry Goldsmith's music captures the old fighting, cheer­ing spirit in a very with-it way. (This ought to be a dynamite album.) Those seven boys are not just visions of young male virility. They are seven people we've come to care very much about individually, and they're some­thing more-a team. How many of our films today extol the virtues of the lone !left to right) Stet"e Hollar Kent Poole, Gene Hackman. Scott Summers, Brad Boyle and Wade Schenck from "Hoosiers" There's a very real possibility that this basketball team might loose the state championships. Their coach would still be very proud of them. So would we. We wouldn't feel cheated at all. This movie doesn't maneuver the plot so that everything hinges on that last game. No one's going to forfeit his livli­hood if they lose. A very good life will still continue for these boys. What matters in this movie, to this coach. is the development of the young wolr? Here. at last. is a group of fiercely proud American eccentrics working together towards a goal. There are so many stories here! The coach, played by Gene Hackman, is a man with a past. He's been banned from coaching in New York. This is his last chance. Kent Poole plays a team member whose alcoholic father (Dennis Hopper) embarrasses him. Can he learn to give him another chance? How many times? Steve Hollar is the lippy boy. Scott Hardy !Craig Sheffer) has follou-ed Amanda (Lea Thompson into the girl's locker room in order to talk with her. When a stunned gym teacher rushes up to get him out, he becomes verbally abusive in "Some Kind of Wonderful'' men's characters. Would we really believe that if the film were set in the present day? Even in the high school situation? I'm not sure. If not, our world is poorer because of it. And our movies, a mirror of that world, are too. This movie, hearkening back as it does to the days when the president was still an actor, can dance rings around most of the new sports films. There is plenty of footage with the actual game lovingly photographed in both regular and slow motion against a score filled with the •ound of pounding Summers is an early Jesus freak. Wade Schenck has to prove to himself that he's more than just an equipment man­ager in a team uniform. Can Barbara Hershey let go of all her bitterness and love the coach? The old pros revel in their parts. The young ones prove themselves more than equal to the task. This is such a chal· lenging yet comfortable film. Even surrounded by the glorious beauty of the Indiana countryside, this film is going to move a little slowly for the impatient. Screenwriter Angelo Pizzo and director David Anspaugh are faithful to a quieter town and a less hec­tic time. But those of you who have the kind of character to stick it out are going to be richly rewarded. o Notes Scriptwriters Houston read and cri· tique new plays and screenplays at Uni· versity of St. Thomas' Jones Theater on the fir•! and third Thursdays of each month lnfo-497-6727. o Openings Hoosiers Morgan Steu·art's Coming Home­Rich parents who do not really know their son bring him home from yearis in boarding school to help them run for office. Nightmare on Elm Street Ill Red Headed Stranger- Willie Nelson Some Kind of Wonderful- all of the complications of young love The Fnn11e Dwellers (Greenway III)- Australian film about aborigines Malcolm (Greenway ll)-a hip Aus­tralian comedy Salvadore (Belair)-Doings in El Sal­vador that won James Woods an Oscar nomination. Kind Hearts and Coronets: Monsieur Verdoux (Rice Media Center, 27) ONO! La Spaggia (MFA, 27)-The Beach. ONO! Murder in Harlem (Rice Media Center)-Tyler Black Film Collection. ONO! Poveri Ma Belli (MFA, 28)-Poor But Beautiful. ONO' Boogi<' Woogie B/ues;JukeJoint (Rice Media Center, !)-Tyler Black Film Col lection. Set in Dallas. ONO! La Fortuna di Essere Donna (MFA. !)-Just My Luck, I'm a Woman! Something Wild (River Oaks, I) Phillip Glass <River Oaks, 4)-behind the scenes look at Akhnatan. Focus on Video (Lawndale, 5)-every first Thursday Incumbent senator Tom Stewart (Nicholas Pryor) and wife Nancy (Lynn Redgrave) pose alongside a cardboard cut-out while au·aiting the arrival of son 11-forgan to complete their desired 'family' imagl' in "Morjfan Stewart's Homecoming" The Montrose Voice Ifs The Place to Advertise FEBRUARY 27, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 Exclusively in Houston and Dallas TEXAS HOT TALK FOR TEXAS MEN! ..~ ,., ·. (,>· Texas Hot Talk is LIVE and UNINHIBITED • Make New Friends • Develop Relationships • • Exchange Phone Numbers • • Or Just Rap With No Restrictions • DALLAS (214] 976 2211 HOUSTON (713] • Only $2°0 per 3 min. Call + Toll (if any]. No Credit Cards Necessary. Recommended for 18 years and older. 14 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 27, 1987 Looking for the Last Honest Man The Innocent Bystander By Arthur Hoppe I wa~ staring moodily at the typewnter when the door opened and an elderly bearded gentleman m a white robe shuffled in. "You don't happen to be a muse. do you?'' I asked hopefully. "No, my name's Diogenes," he said, holding up a lantern as he peered around. "and I'm looking for an honest man " "And I'm lookmg for a column idea," I said. "What I need is a pithy chunk of eternal wi~dom that captures the essenl.·e of humanity and the meaning of hfe. But it isn't easy day after day •• 'You should try finding an hon{"sl man," he said with a weary sigh as he took a seat and rubbed his bare feet. "It's getting harder with every passing millenium." "What brings you here?" I asked ''I'm on my way to Pago Pago," he said ... An honest man was reported seen there as recently as last Shrove Tues­day I shouldn't have wasted so much Place a 'Personal Ad' in Next Week's Montrose Voice Seek o dote. on adventure. on encounlet" Send o message tor all lo see to someone you love Advertise your secret lontosy TOl'lA..:lA1'£ltSONAl.' 1NlHE NEWSPAl"Eli Of MONT10SE. JJSTCAll 529-8490 time in Washington," "You went to Washington?" "It'• the centor of the free world, the capital of history's greatest democracy and the heart of a nation that believes in truth, ju~tice and honor," he said. "That's absolutely true," I said. "When I arrived at the White House, there was a handsome, clean·cut Marine Corps colonel just coming out. I couldn't help but ask him if he was an honest man. Do you know what he said?" I took a guess:" 'I refuse to answer on the grounds that anything I say may tend to incriminate or degrade me'?" Diogenes looked surprised. "How did you know?" he said. "So I told the guard at the gate that I wanted to take my search for an honest man from the littl· est child in the land all the way up to the president of the United States. He tried to have me arrested as some kind of nut. That's when I went to New York." "New York?" I said. "You didn't visit Wall Street?" "Where else could I find the p1ilars of the financial community and the lead· er~ of the free l'nterprise system that made this country great?" he said. "Did you know that if Glutco merges with Consolidated Hams. Bismol Southern will be selling for 46 times earnings?" "Hush," I said nervously. "you could get arrested." "You don't want any insider informs· tion?" he asked. "I don't have any stocks or any money," I said. "What about a top job in the White House running guns to terrorists or covertly funding revolutionaries?" "I've got enough troubles already," I said He eyed me speculatively. "I may not have to go to Pago Pago after all," he said, shaking my hand. "I've always believed that honesty pays-as long as cheating won't get you anywhere. And you, sir, have the makings of an honest man." "Hey!" I said. "That's a great epi· gram: 'Honesty Pays-as long as cheat· ing won't get you anywhere.' I can make a whole column out of that." Diogenes looked pleased. "And you'll give me full credit?" he asked. "Not," I said turning to my typewri· ter, "unless you can beat me into print." He gave forth another sigh even wear· ier than the first. "Well," he said, "on to Pago Pago." c 1987 1S F) Chronicle Pubhshmg Co Al's Insurance Service 4108 Fannin Houston, Texas 77004 (713) 529-0140 AUTO LIABILITY SR-22 FILINGS YOUNG DRIVERS LOW DOWN PAYMENTS LIFE COMMERCIAL AUTO BONDS PROPERTY HOMEOWNERS NOTARY SERVICE Fortunes By Mark Orlon Your Horoscope from the Voice For Fflday evening. Feb. 27, through Fflday morning. March 5. 1987 ARIES That lovelight shining in your eyes could be reflected right back by someone younger. Stay open to possib1l- 1ties. but don't make any promises. This 1s a time of strong, but transient feelings TAURUS ·First you want one thing, then another First a friend, then a lover You can't quite make up your mind. Per­haps you're too analytical in an area where analysis has little value. You know what we mean: matters of the heart? GEMINI Give serious thought to any sudden moves. The urge to change homes. lovers or jobs is strong. Have a party instead. An unusual assortment of friends or a strange combination of peo­ple may help find some answers CANCER Those new beginnings that were getting under way recently are causing some unexpected changes 1n the way others see you. A feeling of confi­dence. surety, and down-right sexiness could make some of your dreams come true. LEO ·You are amb1t1ous, aren't you? Join that amb1t1on to a powerful creative urge. and the sky's the limit. Travel could be a part of this high-powered picture Be sure to take you lover along1 VIRGO Do it at home' Whether 11"s homework, housework, or home-style cooking, what you do there will turn out right. In the outside world, things are a bit strange. It's a jungle out there' Be a homebody. LIBRA Friendship brings love and love bnngs friendship, and this time the line between the two 1s blurred It's bound to bring about some serious thinking concerning who do you know, and how well, and what for? SCORPIO Take 1t to the limit' There's a strong desire to touch the heights and depths. to experience the limits of what's going on. With an understanding partner who knows your needs for extremes, this could be a time to remember. SAGITTARIUS Confused? You're feeling so close to the love of your life, and at the same time you're tempted to flirt with strangers Talking to a friend could help resolve some of your conflict CAPRICORN Savings, investments. long-term plans This is your chief area of concern this time. The future starts now You can take some interesting chances without going for broke. Money isn't everything, but you know how much 1t helps AQUARIUS ·A sudden change in career goals or a giant boost in your pres· ent one 1s what goes on this time. Some­one who loves you for all the right reasons helps Being in the nght place at the right times couldn't hurt. either PISCES Confusion hasn't totally van­ished. but in dealing with 1t, you've been learning who your friends are That's both new ones and old ones. As the air clears. that stranger isn't nearly as strange •f987 "'')111TAt....SEV1 ICE 16 MONTROSE VOICE FEBRUARY 27, 1987 Catholics in a Dilemma: AIDS Prevention but no Condoms By Patricia McCormack NEW YORK (UPl)-Roman Catholic educators are gearing up their own pro­grams to combat the spread of AIDS, but church doctrine has stripped them of what many scientists say is the moi;t effective weapon short of sexual abstinence-condoms. "Clearly, we are not in favor of con doms." Sister Joy Clough. R.S.M., media coordinator for the archdiocese of Chicago, told United Press lntema· tional. The archdioce~e runs the largei;t Catholic school system in the world with 17~.ooo students. Sister Clough said that while the Chi· cago an-hdiocese does not yet have an AIDS education program in place, Car· dinal Joseph Bernardin "is very con· cerned about AIDS. and he has mandated that AIDS instruction take place in our schools and in religious edu· cation programs." 0 At the same time," Sister Clough said, Bernardin "does not see condoms as the answer to the AIDS crisis." Bernardin, himself. recently criti· cized the use of condom advertisements on tRlevision. "I am opposed . because I cannot support advertising whose immediate aim is good-the prevention of disease-but which implicitly and explicitly condones promiscuity. ques­tions the normalness of heterosexual marriage as the proper cont{'xt for sex· ual intimacy or artificially separates the love-making and life-makingdimen sion of marital intimacy," he said Therein lies the church's dilemma U.S. Surgeon General C. Everett Koop has publicly stated that next to absti· nence. condoms offer the greatest pro­tection against the spread of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, the fatal disease that destroys the body's immune Ry.stem. Koop advocates AIDS education programs-beginning in el('· mentary school-that include the use of condoms. But longstanding Roman Catholic teaching has condemned the use of arti· ficial birth control methods, including condoms. The church, with a school sys· tern in the United States that educates 2.8 million youngsters a year, teaches that any sexual activity outside of mar­riage is sinful. In general. church leaders across the nation agree with Bernardin "Speaking as an individual, I would say that in a Catholic school context l don't see how one can advocate use of a birth control device-condoms-as a mean of preventing AIDS," said the Rev. Stephen O'Brien, executive direc· tor of the National Catholic Education Association·~ offic-e of administrators of Catholic education. .. In a Catholic sC'hool setting, you wouldn't have a health class on avoid ing venerea1 disease, for example. out side a religious education context. Tht• whole morality of sexuality is invo)v(•d The- ideal is that sex is for marriage." "We believe that we can say with some assurance that students m Catholic schools throughout the coun try are taught the church's position on human sexuality.'' said Sister Cathe· rme McNamee. president of the Washington. D.C -based National Catholic Education Association. "Regarding the specific issue of AIDS. it seems important that students be taught that this is a very serious. usually fatal di•ease. The Catholic schools also should make a special effort to witness Gospel values m order to conquer the prejudice arising with the AIDs epidemic and encourage both stu· dents and parents to exercise Christian compassion toward victims of the dis· ease and their families. A recent survey by the weekly publi· cation, National Catholic Reporter, said that among "significant" Catholic school systems in the United StateA, only Oakland, Calif., plans to discuss condoms in AIDS education programs. Sister Rosemary Hennessey, schools superintendent for the Oakland system, said she felt condoms and other issues were necessary topics of discussion. "If we're afraid to talk about condoms and all the other issues A!Ds raises, then we're really missing it," Sister Hennessey said. "In the meantime, peo· pie are dying." I Didn't Believe It at First Either! New From Europe Fred B./before A 90% success rate in the regrowth of hair by eleven laboratory studies. Approved by the Mlnist8fs of Health In Fronce, Italy, Spain. England, SWitz8fland, Greece, Turkey and Portugal os o treatment which stops hair loss and stimulates new hair growth 13Weeks Call for Appointment 847-5633 Not Minoxidil Mode up of vitamins and amino acids with a patented process to be absorbed into the scalp. Bocked by a 40 year pharmaceutical company Approx. Annual Cost $400-$700 Pope to Face Gay Scorn in his U.S. Tour By Paula Butturini VATICAN CITY (UPl)-Pope ,John Paul II will face anger in San Francis­co's gay community on his tour of the United States this September. Some church officials fear trouble when the pope stops in San Francisco, where the large and militant gay com­munity is outraged over the Vatican view of homosexuality as a "moral evil." The city is widely viewed as the riski· est stop on the papal tour, with Vatican sources fearing anti-pope demonstra­tions similar to protests that marred his 198.5 trip to the Netherlands. San Fran· cisco's gay community remains angry over the Vatican's Oct. 30, 1986, docu· mcnt on homosexuality, which bluntly calls homosexual behavior "an intrin­sic moral evil," "self-indulgent," and "disordered." The city originally was the final stop on the pope's trip, but church officials added Detroit to the schedule when fears arose about San Francisco. "They probably decided it might not be a good idea to risk ending the trip on a sour note," said one Vatican source. Another church source said Detroit's 800,000 Polish-Americans, who are pre­dominantly Catholic, might be a wel· come sight to the pontiff "after seeing San Francisco." A scheduled meeting with nuns and priests in San Francisco also could pro­duce some fireworks like the pope's 1979 meeting with 5,000 nuns in Washing· ton, D.C., when Sister Theresa Kane, one of the country's leading nuns, con· fronted the pontiff with a request that he consider women for the priesthood. The pope, a firm opponent of the idoa, instead called on nuns to be selfless in their service to the church and to return to wearing traditional habits. Also in California, the pope faces dis· t;ent over Vatican pressure on Jesuit Terrance Sweeney to suppress results of a poll of U.S. bishops that expressed disagreemE.'nt on priestly celibacy and female priests. Another source of controversy exists in Seattle, where Vatican officials forced Archbi8hop Raymond Hun· thausen to relinquish part of his author· ity to a church-appointed auxiliary. The Vatican was concerned that Hun­thausen was too liberal in granting marriage annulments and, among other things, allowed a group of gay and lesbian Catholics to celebrate mass in his cathedral Trouble also has arisen over stripping the Rev. Charles Curran of his right to tearh theology at Catholic University in Washington, D.C. Curran raised Vat· ican ire for some of his views on homo­sexuality, pre-marital sex, birth control and divorce. Dismissing two U.S. nuns for signing a 1984 ad in The New York Times say· ing tht• churC'h 's ban on abortion is "not thP only Catholic position" also ha.!-i struin(>d n·lations hetwt•rn Rome and the Ameri<'an rhurch. In Nl<'h rust>, Vatican sources say, the pop(• hus he(·n t·specially disturbed hy what he view• UH a lack of U.S. obe· clirn<·e to central church authority. U.8. critics argue that Vatican efforts to impose a stricter orthodoxy stiflt' theo· logical c·rC'ativity and amount to intimi· dation. In Montrose, Nearly Everyone Reads the Voice Activity Center Seeking Proposals for Building By S he r i Cohen Darbonne Montrose Voil'e Members of the board of Montrose Acti~it~ Center are considering leasing a building for use as a community cen· ter, and have submitted a req uest for proposals to several leasing agents and building owners in the area, board member Dwayne Wells announced at a public meeting Monday, Feb. 23. Arson Suspects May Be Linked to Other Blazes Two su~pects are presently being held m Harris County Jail in recent arson cases involving vacant buildings in the 200 block of Westheimer. Both are being questioned about other Montrose fires, irivestigators reported. Jn the most recent fire, William James Johnson, described by arson investiga­tors as a neighborhood vagrant, was arrested Monday, Feb. 23 shortly after he allegedly started the blaze at 127 Westheimer. Johnson is believed to be involved in other arsons, Investigator David Fuller said. Fuller said Johnson, 26, had been picked up for questioning in connection with past arson cases and has been seen at the scene of several Montrose fires. Houst-On Fire Department is investi­gating six arsons "right in a row" involving abandoned buildings on lower Westheimer, he said. The majority of these fires are believed to have been set by transients Fuller said. ' Neighbors and witnesses indicated Monday's fire was the result of a "terri­torial dispute" among vagrants in the area, he added. • Meanwhile, arson investigators are still trying to determine if a man sus­pected of starting a recent fire that des­troyed a house 20:3 Westheimer is also responsible for any other fires. Butch Lewis of the HFD central arson division said 28-year- old Robert Eubanks, who used the alias Roger Nance, confessed to setting other lower Westheimer fires, but investigators aren't sure how reliable his information is or wh{~h fires, if any, he may be con nected with. "We're trying to backtrack on every­thing he's told us," Lewis said. Eubanks allegedly told investigators C:A. Russo and Buddy Cox, who inter· viewed him Sunday, Feb. 15, after Eubanks called HFD to confess to the Feb. 9 arson, that he had set several other fires in the area. The Montrose Voice Ifs The Place to Advertise Call 529-8490 and You will be in Next Week's Newspaper of Montrose Wells said the board decided to pursue the option of leasing after concluding it might not be possible to raise the money needed for a down payment on the out­right purchase of a building under cur­rent economic conditions. MAC had previously announced a preferred plan to buy a facility. Wells noted that conditions are pres­ently favorable for renters, and that the board will be especially seeking lease proposals carrying an option to pur­chase in the future. "Purchasing is still our long-term goal," he said. The request specifies lease space of 10,600 square feet net usable area, with a desired expansion option of3000addi­tiona1 square feet. It also asks that the lessor bear the cost of building the space out to fit the needs of non-profit organizations sub­letting space, as wen as providing utili­ties and janitorial service. Because two key Montrose non-profit groups, the Montrose Clinic and Mont­rose Counseling Center, have agreed to move into the center, providing their conditions are met, specific modifica­tions tailored. to their needs are included in the proposal, Wells said. A ~lause is included in the request allowing for evah;.ation of individual provisions that cannot be met by a potential landlord. "This is our ideal, but we're not limit­ing ourselves to anything," Wells explained. Proposals will be received until March 20. Wells said the board expects 6·10 "bona fide" proposals. . A_n earlier projection of the center pro­viding rental space to local organiza­tions for as little as 50 cents per square foot may now be "unrealistic," Wel1!-i said. Geb Branda suggested that allowing lessees to absorb the cost of building out their own spaces would help to keep the rent.al costs down. But Wells said he felt leaving that responsibility with the individual organizations was not in keeping with the original concept of providing a cen· ter for community use. In addition to the clinic and counsel­ing center, 28 organizations have expressed an interest in the center, a lthough none of them has made a com­mi tment to move in, Wens pointed out. The req uest for lease proposals pro­vides for a 90-day period for the board to determine its response. Wells said the time will be used to seek community approval and obtain a firm commitment from groups planning to move their offices. A discussion of potential names for the facility drew some debate after Well~ noted one of the potential tenants had mduded a clause in its list of condi­tions that the center's name not indude wording that would deter non·gays from using iLo;; services. The condition was requested by the Montrose Clinic because of it.8 high volume of non-gay clients, Wells said. The clinic and Montrose Counseling Center, described by Wells as the cen ter's "core," will be the facility's largest initial renters. But Jack Valinski expressed frustra­tion at what h<' called a "trend" toward avoiding the words ··gay" and "les­bian" in group names and community publicity. "We don't need a center to expand dosets," Valinski said. HSK CONTRACTING A Full Service Contractor • Roofing (All Types) • Tile/ Masonry • Remodeling • Sheetrock/ Painting • Plumbing/ Electrical • Foundations Repaired • Tree & Trash Removal • CarpeVFlooring • Cabinets • Decks/ Hot Tubs • Room Additions • Concrete • Insulation • Chimney Sweeping & • Water Proofing • Pest & Rodent Control Repairs • Fully Insured • Heating/AC • References Available No Job Too Big or Too Small 520-9064 OR Emergency Digital Pager 891-4053 Rendezvous Club (The Old Boobie Rock) Tel. 527-8619 1100 Westheimer 6rfro.1 • 18 MONTROSE VOICE 1'.EBRUARY 27. 1987 Put Another Dime in the ol' Jukebox Former Montrose Deejay Can't Get Enough Oldies By Sheri Cohen Darbonne Montruse Voiu The roots of contemporary rock and Rhythm end Blues music trace ell the way back to the 1920's, with the black jazz-blues sound of Bessie Smith paving the way for the evolution, a former Montrose disc jockey asserts Dennis McGinnis, who many remember as the "oldies show" deejay at Dirty Sally's, will proudly display his research archives to those lucky enough to visit his Greenway Plaza area apart­ment. Around 40.0m 78, 45 and :~1 rpm discs fill a closet, a fi1ing cabinet, and a room literally jammed with standup shelves in the phenomenal c-ollection amassed by McGinnis and his lovt.•r, Russ Holland. over a period of at least 15 years. The two men, both of Harrisburg, Pa., met C"oincidentally in Houston, McGin· nis said. They discovered , ironically, that they hoth had been collecting records for about the same time, and that they both frequented the same ghetto record store in the I960's. They did not meet until 1979. after both had moved here. McGinnis said his own interest in records began at the age of 14. He recalled begging his father to take him to a little record store in Harrisburg's blark district. called The Turntable, to look for copies of "Oa Ooo Ron Ron" by the Crystals and .. The Locomotion" by Little Eva. He befriended the shop's owner, Martha. who fed his inter{>st in oldies and the R&B sound, and helped him start his collection. The collection includes some very val­uable oddities, including a record by Bessie Smitli that McGinnis stat<·s is one of only 10 in existence. It follows. almost faultlessly, the development of the mn<frrn popular sound from the 20's to the current era. TidbiL'i of history unknown to mPst record fans. abound. ·This is the first Supr(•mes album evf>ryone knows about,"' ~kGinnis said, holding up the cover of the al hum, Meet the Supremt•s. Then he pulled out another cover with a different picture "But this i~ the first press. thP origi· nal , • he explained. The first record came out in 1962~ the second was released in 1964 when a new publit• interest in the group emerged, he added. McGinnis went on to point out thedif ferencein the Motown label logos on the two re(_'ords "This is the original logo. the Motown car. It was only around a couple of years.'~ he noted. ~kGinnis said his pen.onal colle<.'lion 1s focu•ed mostlv on the black R&B and early rock arti~ts of the ."i()'s and the "girl group" sound of the 60's. The addi· tion of Ru~s· collection, containing more of the pop and rock music sounds of the later trends, rounded out the range. Together. they now have a priceless col· lection of a !it'Ction of music industry history "Most people see the beginning of rock as the 1960's turnaround, the Bill Haley period. Actually. it was the Rhythm and Blues era that began in the 40's that led up and fused into modern· day rock and roll.' McGinnis com mented. The firi;t true rock genre perform('r was probably Little Richard. who recorded "Tutti Frutti" in t95fi. McGin· nis said. Along the way, blues stars like Louie Jordan. Big Joe Turner, B.B. King and Howlin' Wolf were laying down dis­tinctive sound patterns, picked up and drawn on later b.v white performers. The practice of"covering" emerged in the 50's also, with white performers re· releasing duplicate versions of records by black performers, McGinnis said. "Tutti Frutti" was covered by Pat Boone, and his version, believe it or not, sold almost as many copies as the origi­nal to the white market, he said And Bill Haley's hit. "Shake, Rattle and Roll," was actually recorded first by Joe Turner in 1954. Turner's record enjoyed moderate success, but reached nowhere near the sales logged by Hakv's 19f>6 version. Probably around 1960, the "sh'bops" began fading away, and the girl-group sound promoted by producer Phil Spec­tor rapidly gained popularity. McGin­nis called this period, marked by artists like the Crystals and the Ronettes, a Dennis McGinnis with two o/ hzs Bessie Smith favorites way they were heard "back then," with the help of two recent acquisitions, a 1953 Wurlitzer "Magic Brain" two· speed jukebox. end a 1957 AMI juke that plays only 45's. McGinnis said he tries to keep the Wurlitzer stocked almost exclusively with 78's for memorabilia purpos('s. McGinnis purchased both ma('hines m 1984. McGinnis, who says he now acquires records mainly through mail auctiomi, oldie magazines and private traders, ~mid thry are getting harder to find , since home jukeboxes have gained pop­ularity in recent years. Records that one(• would have been available for one or two dollars are selling for $2!) and up, he noted "My usual motto is. ifl can't steal it, I'll wait it out," he said, although he admits he once spent $250 for a single This /9.57 Wur/1tur jukebox plays both 78 and 4.5 rpm records major area of his collecting. The sound peaked with the rise of Motown, and the appearancE" of groups like the Supremes and Martha and the Vandellas. Then. m the middle to late 60's, came the so<alled British invasion. when thE" music industry did a 180-degree turn with groups like the Beatles and the Roi ling Stones. Rock music actually changed little from then until now, although different stages or trends developed. "In '6.'; through '68, the Memphis sound was big; then came the psyche· delic era. and that led into what's known as glam-rock," McGinnis said. Visitors can take their pick of the peri· ods they wish to re-live. They also can listen to the sounds the disc. "It was one I had to have," he explained And while he still attends record fairs and t·onventions, McGinnis laments that they aren't what they used to Ii<>. Out of town traders aren't frequenting the shows here the way they used to, he said. "You can still find some good buys, just not as many as before," he said, adding that whenever he is in another city, " I head straight for the record stores." His collection, McGinnis said, still needs some special additions from his favorite period. "I'm looking for the first album by the Chantels, with the original cover pic­ture of the five girls," he said. That album, like Meet the Supremes, was re· released with another cover Numb-Kneed Surfing BOSTON (UPJ)-While waiting for that perfoct wave, doctors say surfers should bl'ware of a previously unknown hazard-"surfer's neuropathy _" "It's not a serious problem," said Dr. Rodl•ric H. Fabian. a neurologist at The University of Texas Medical Branch in GalveHton. "But it can be bothersome.'' Fabian said he discovered the afflic­tion after two surfers complained of a numbing, tingling sensation on the inside of their knees. He questioned other surfers and found at least thre<' more with similar complaints. When Fabian tested the two surfers, he found a nervl' on the inside of their knees-the saphenous nerve-was functioning abnormally. Fabian determined the problem was causl'Cl by pn•ssure surfers commonly put on the nerve when they squeeze their legs while sitting on their boards in the water waiting for a wave. He advised the two surfers to avoid such pressure, and the loss of sensation disappeared after a few weeks, Fabian said Ga. House Votes to Prohibit Nude Dancers ATLANTA (UPl)-Georgia's House passed a bill to pull the beverage licenses of bars that feature nude dancers after the bill's sponsor threat· ened to dance naked so members could "see how disgusting it is." The bill submitted by Rep. Luther Col­bert, R-Roswell, passed the House 145· l I Wednesday despite pleas by Rep. Billy McKinney, D·Atlanta, to delay the measure until after the 1988 Democratic Convention. "We're about to hove the Democratic National Convention," McKinney reminded lawmakers, "and you're talk ing about a conventioner's major means of entertainment." The House Rules Committee moved quickly to put the bill on the day's agenda after Colbert threatened to dance nude before them. "Then you'll see how disgusting it is," he said. 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Matching is random and you may not hear another caller and yet still be charged. call at peak night times to avoid unwanted charges. Addi· tional toll charges may apply in some areas. "' t L 20 MONTROSE VOICE I FEBRUARY 27 19B7 'Full Tilt' Leans Toward Theater's Best (left to right) Phillip Hafer as Pete Keating, Melba O'Banwn as Roe and Eoghan Ryan as Ken in Chocolate Bayou's production of P.J. Barry's "Full Tilt" Houston Live by Bill O'Rourke .ttontrose Voice o Full Tilt Full Tilt playing at Chocolate Bayou Theater Company, was developed in CBTC's Preston Jones New Play Sym· posium lai;;t summer. This is its world premiere. I have little doubt that news of its performance~ elsewhere will get back to us. It's that good. When a group of people become a mob. a form of mass hysteria. They may feel closer to each other for the •hort time that they lose their reason, but what happens later? What do they feel towards each other when they can see clearly again. if they ever can? peripheral people. They were affected by the violence but they had no hand in perpetrating it. They're all orbiting each other in a small town. Two of them fall in love for a short while, but for the most part, they react to each other with a kind of mag· netic repulsion When the reporter gets personally involved with the bartender !Timothy Han. on). she Rets up a meeting which evolves into another mob scene with everyone but the bartender personally involved. \\'hat will happen now? Will violence beget violence? (There is some believable wife beating between Phillip Hafer and Cathryn Pisarski.) Or will love be possible again? P.J. Barry's script, for all its power The Ballet Eddy Toussaint de Montreal debuts at Jones Hall on March 3 Years before this play opens, a small group of policemen-friends and com rads-have gone out of control, into "full tilt.·• Between them, they killed a man in a fight over a girl (played by Melba O'Banion). Now a women's magazine reporter ~Ginny Lang) has come to town. She's spending money left and right to bribe people into reopening the story. She interviews them to see if she can find out what really happened. With one exception. these are all the and pity, is somehow not as emotionally affecting as it is intellectually probing. Maybe that's because we spend much more time watching people grow apart rather th"n together. Still, it is impell· ing. We try to see the whole diorama at once. try to chart all these lives and how they went wrong, try to identify that mysterious force that seems to make it all inevitable. How can we reverse its effects if we can't identify them? Barry offers no pat, simplistic answers, only a chance to analyze it for ourselves. Director William Burford sweeps the action acro!:'s Tom King's set almost rinrmntically, they way we deduce Shakt·speare must have used the Globe. Kurt W. Garabenstein 's sound design adds to the versimi1itude, but it is Eoghan Ryan's lights that really grab the eye. (Ryan also doubles effectively as an actor in the piece.) A vt·rv good show o The Anshutz Collection The masterpieces from the Anschutz Collection of western art now exhibited at the Mui;eum of Fine Arts provide edu cation as well as entertainment. The style of Remington and Russell is very recognizable. It leads one major school in its high drama and dynamic When their works do include people or animals, they have to be hunted for- as thev would be in the wild. Their staiuary-hy Shrady, Deming, Putnam and Huntington-focuses on the strange m•w animals the explorers were finding. In tht• mid-1920s, around the time of Russell '!-> death, the luminous land was still the subject matter, but the style embraced impressionism. This is the West of Hunter, Sloan and O'Keefe. I heartily recommend this excellent exhibition o Notes The Outlaw Comics have been "out­lawed" again . The room in Baton Rouge which had booked them for this Mon day rhickem·d out. That's Jimmy Swag· Pat Ne . .,hit i.e.; RmNma and Geof[re)' Nau{fts i.-. Eul(ene Morris Jerome. aspir1n/i( u:riter, in Neil Simon's c-omedy Biloxi Rlw·.'i , opening March .1 at the Mu.,ic Hall action. lt'H a group of rich tradition with paintings hy Couse, Maurer, SchrE'Y· vogel, and Frank Tenney Johnson; and statues by Berke and Barye (a French· man whm•e only brush with the living West was Buffalo Bill's Wi:d West Show). But there is also another school that we often forget. I overheard one lady compare it to the various renditions of Tolkien's world. Indeed, it was the new, unspoiled land that intrigued these artist8 with its fanta!-!tic wonders. Their canva!->es. many of monumental size to match the subject, are obsessed with the play of light on these new landscapes. Some are so luminous they look almost as if lit from behind. This is the school of Bierstadt, Tavernier, Innes, Herzog and Hill. gert's hometown. isn 't it? Well, their loss tH our gain! The O.C. are bringing this performanc·r hack to the Comedy Workshop. This is the last weekend forTUT's My Fatr Lady at the Music Hall. Auditions: Deathtrap. two women. three men, all over 3.5. March 1·2, 7:00 p.m. 667-0:l04. o Celebrate! March :!-Fat Tuesday March 4-Ash W1odnesday, th1• beginning of Lent. B'days: 27-Barbara Love, Elizabeth Taylor, Longfellow. 2ll-Zero Mostel, Bernadette Peters, Tommy Tune. 1- Harry Belafonte, David Niven, Lytton Strnchey. 2-Karen Carpenter, Dr. S..us.. Kurt Weil. .'l-Cyrano de Ber· Lea R~chards as Sop~ie Tuckerm'!'n, Mike Grobleu•ski as Nicholas Denery and Jim Walser a~ Nma Denery m a scene from The Autumn Garden gerac, Jean Harlow, John Moray Stuart-Young. 4-Miriam Makeba, Knute Rockne, Mary Wilson. 5- Michael Ru maker, Andy Gibb, Rex Har nson. "My people don't lisp ... they just are ... I'm one of them right there .... If you take me, you've go to take the whole thing."-Lou Reed in Rolling Stone (born March 2) o Openings Autumn Garden (First Unitarian, 27)­Channing Players present a tale of New Orleans misfits. Brighton Beach Memoirs (Actors Workshop, 27)-the first play in Neil Simon's autobiographical trilogy The Enchanted Cottage (Theater Southwest, 27)-romantic comedy­fantasy Let's Murder Marsha (Theater Subur­bia, 27)-broad comedy McDowell, Shannon, Sweeney (Comix Annex, 27) F.d Wilson and Mary An Papenek Miller (Art League of Houston, 27)-his st€.'€.'l and wood sculptures, her mixed media exploration of the relationships between men and animals. ""- Grand Night Parade-Momus Sails the Caribbean! (Seawall to the Strand, Galveston, 28, 6::30)-Freebies. ONO! The Glass Menagerie (Stages, 28)-A man remembers the two powerful women-his mother and his sister­whom he eventually had to nee. Art of Augustin Bossio (University of St. Thomas' Crooker Gallery, 28) Ceci lle Ouoset, pianist (Jones, !)­Garcia Navarro conducts the HSO. Outlaw Comics Get Religion, Again! (Comedy Workshop, 2)-0NO! Ballet Eddy Toussaint de Montreal (Jones, 3 and 4)-Houston debut spon­sored by Society for the Performing Arts Biloxi Blues (Music Hall, 3-8)­Second in Simon's autobiography. Sybill Estess, poet (UST Bookstore, 4)-reads from her works, "Seeing the Desert Green." ONO' Mark C. Martino (Stages, 4)-Stages' composer in residence presents inciden­tal pieces from past plays and two world premier€.'s, including a requiem mass. ONO. The Immigrant-A Hamilton County A/hum (Alley, 5)-about a Russian immigrant who came to Texas via Gal­veston THE VIET NAM RESTAURANT 3215 Main St. at Elgin 526-0917 Lunch Buffet M-F 11:30-2:30 $3.75 All You Can Eat Your Host and Bartender Andy Mills Open 11:30-Midnight Sun.-Thurs. 11:30-2:00 a.m. Fri. & Sat. I 10% Discount with this Coupon on All Menu I Items ____________ __, FEBRUARY 27, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 Obscenity Standards Still Troubling the High Court By Andrea Neal WASHINGTON (UPl)-The Supreme Court is still grappling with the mean· ing of obscenity 2:1 years after Justice Potter Stewart'!:> proclamation that he could not define pornography, "but I know it wh<'n I !-iee it." The latest controversy involves an Illinois law thnt allows juries to apply community standards in determining if an allegedly ob!-icene work has redeem· ing literary, artistic or social value. The court was to hear argument!:\ in the case last Tu<.'i-;day from Illinois offi. rials. who consider the law a useful tool for fighting pornography, and First Amendment advocates, who fear the law could lead to the banning of such pre-eminent works as James Jovce's masterpiece "Ulysses." ~ "It's probably the most significant ohi.;cenity case the court has heard since 2 Newspapers Have Pulled Doonesbury WACO, Texas <UPl>-The Waco Tribune-Herald has joined a Salt Lake City newspaper in pulling this week's Doonesbury comic strip concerning a television ad campaign dealing with AIDS and "safe sex," The editor Monday said this week's series about condoms inappropriately comments on the acquired immune defi­ciency syndrome epidemic "I just didn't think it was an approp­riate kind of humor," said Bob Lott, edi­tor of the Waco Tribune-Herald. "Just the idea of humor based on a subject as tragic as AIDS is out of kilter." The comic strip by Garry Trudeau this week does not mention the word condom. In one panel, an advertising executive recommends substituting the word "condo" for "the unmentionable product." Lott called the series. "good satire," but decided to pull the strip this week because "the underlying element here is the AIDS tragedy " Lee Salem, editorial director of Uni­versal Press Syndicate in Kansas City, Mo., which distributes Doonesburv to 900 newspapC'rs, said the DesC'ret N.ews in Salt Lake City also decided against running the strip, and a Wisconsin new~paper moved the strip from its comic page to the editorial page. Wm. James Mortimer. editor and pub· lisher of the Salt Lake City newspaper, said he found the strip objectionable. "The sexual and contraceptive mate­rial presented does not meet the stand­ards of a family newspaper. These are sensitive and important issues in today's society but inappropriate for the comic pages. where readers of all ages are attracted," Mortimer said The Mormon Church tells its mem hers to abstain from sex outside of marriage, and opposes sex for pleasura· ble rather than procreative purposes. The church ali.;o excommunicates homo­sexuals, one of the prime risk groups for AIDS. The Waco paper ran a story Monday explaining its decision not to use the strip. Lott said about a dozen calls had been received protesting the move. "We're not that uptight about run­ning things that may be objectionable." Lott said "Certainly condom usage is such that it should be covered in a news­paper Miller vs. California," said Irwin Karp, who represents Volunteer Lawyers for the Arts, a non-profit group that advises artists on First Amendment matters. In the landmark 197:3 Miller ruling, a majority of justices for the first time agreed on a standard for determining what is obi.;cene material subject to state regulation. This year's case, Karp said, will deter­mine "what degree of protection is going to be provided literary and artis­tic works of significant value. We think that were the prevailing community standard to apply, the protection for important works of ~ocial commentary would ix- completely diluted in some parts of the country" Obscenity has proven to be one of the mm~t troubling constitutional questions for th€.• court. The justices repeatedly have said obscenity is not worthy of First Am€.·ndm€.·nt protection but have failed to come up with a simple defini­tion for ohscenitv. In 19M, the co~rt ruled that a French film, "The Lovers," did not violate an Ohio oht-;cenity statute, but the justices were unabh· to agree upon an opinion supporting the decision. The cas<'" promptM Stewart's oft­quoted observation that he knew porno­graphy when he saw it. "and the motion picture involved in thi1:t case is not that." In Miller vs. California. the court said a book. magazine. movie or work of art may be de<>med obscene if it appeals to the prurient interest, de8cribes sexual conduct in a "patently offensive" way and-as a whole-lacks literary, artis­tic, political or scientific value. Until now, most lower courts have ruled that the first two prongs of the test should be based on community stand­ards, but the redet-ming value of a work must be judged according to objective criteria David Goldstein of the American Civil Liberties Union said applying community standards to the third part of the test would limit free expression. "I can imagine juries condemning Ulysses' today just like they did 60 years ago and that's one of the great books of the 20th century," Goldstem said. "Ulysses." based on Homer's "Odvs­sey ,"~as banned in the United Staies from 1921 until rn:n after chargeR of obscenity were leveled against it. The book is now considered among the great works of world literature. Illinois Assistant Attorney General Mark Rotf'rt says th(•re is no such thing al-i an objective standard for detennin· ing if a work has !;ocial value. It is unrealistic "to read the First Amendment as requiring that the peo­ple of Maine or Mississippi accept pub· lie depiction of conduct found tolerable in Las Vegas or New York City," Rotert said. The case before the court arose in 1983 when two adult bookstore clerks were arrested under Illinois' obscenity sta­tute for selling adult magazines to undercover policemen. The case is part of a growing national debate over censorship of sexually explicit material, spurred in part by a report issued last summer by the Attor­ney General's Commission on Porno­graphy. The report urged concerned citizens to band together into watch groups to file complaints, put pressure on local pro­secutors, monitor judges and, if neces­sary, boycott mE-rchants selling pornographic materials. 22 MONTROSE VOICE FEBRUARY 27, 1987 Grab Your Partner and Get Ready for Mardi Gras Around Town by Elroy Forbes .\11 tr• Voice Social Director o Good News The Brazos River Bottom was packed Tuesday night. Country and Western dance fans from The Ranch, BRB, and some I recognized from old Bears filled the dance noor and reviewing areas around the bar Six couples made the finals, Prizes were awarded from Tom's Back Pocket, TNT Sh irts, The Pot Pie, l.W. Marks, Puppies Boot Parlor, TGRA, Baba Vega, The Fitness Exchange, Blue Iris Florist, Euro­tan, J Rs, The Mining Co., Heaven, The Galleon , and The Ba rn. First place country and western dance contest u·inners, June Archibald and Dai ·id Kiber A combined cash prize from the BRB and The Ranch reminded everyone that there are two C& W dance bars in Hous· ton. Winners were: first place. David Kiser and .June Archibald from BRB; second, Carol Martinez and Evie Dne Ranieri from The Ranch; third, Andrew Bester· man and Brent Leefgreen from the BRB. These three couples will represent Houston in the Texas finals starting March 22 in Ft. Worth"s 651 Club. The state contest continuei-; in Austin on April 5 at Snuffy's; April 19 at the Silver Dollar in San Antonio and ends here in Houston at the BRB May 3. While l was in Ft. Worth last week­end. I visited the 651 Club. The new facility is very impressive and spacious Announcements proclaimed their upcoming C&W contest. I tell you, they really had some serious dancers. A11 of our people need our support in this com­petition. Congratulations and best wishes to all! o Christmas in Montrose The next organizational meeting is on Fat TuPsday, March 3, 7:00 p.m. at Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh Dr. Call The Tire Place, 529-1414 for details. o Mardi Gras Time Th1" Saturday there will be three parades in Galveston. At noon, the Truckers Parade will go down the Sea­wall with floats and decorated trucks as they celebrate the big island event. At :!:00 p.m., the campy Hou-Dah Parade, a take off on the famous California New Year's Day Do Dah Parade, will feature briefcase drill teams from many Hous­ton corporations as we11 as campy entries competing for cash donationn of 1000, .• 500 and $200 to their favorite charities. At night, by torchlight, is the big blow out and the long parade that will wander through the historic Strand Oistrict. This is the parade evervone talks about. · If you are like me and just a little shy about driving to Galveston, The Kreu·e of Hydra has buses leaving T he Rip­cord at noon on Saturday, returning to Houston by 10:00 p.m The estimated time of return is in time for Chutes Cu!-i· tomer Contest and the big doings with Drummer ma~mzine. The cost of the Mardi Gras trip is $20 before Saturday and $25 the day of the big party. Call The Ripcord or Time less Taffeta for details. o Out and About I have to admit that Go Country Day at Ma ry's was not only a pleasant, but was a relaxing experiene. I know that is not characteristic of Mary's but that's how it all worked. It was fun to pay a visit the other night to find my favorite doorman, Fannie, was working and having a good time. Mary's is doing a Pardi Gras (pro­nounced Party Gras) weekend with cos­tume awards after II :00 p.m. Saturday night. All of these activities are being pumped into their new April Fool event-The Miss Vacant Lot title. Booths are available to organizations and bu.sine.s~es such as Maria'.';: She can read neither English nor Spanish but she can read beads. No telling what they have in mind for Pickles. At Neartown Associatio n's mert· ing, Channel 2 newsmen showed up to check mto president Ron Rodrick's fight with City Hall over the recent lower Westheimer fires. Petitions are being circulated to demand municipal action on the many promises made to clean up the vacant buildings. Four area leaders on the Needy Persons Help programs also spoke at the meeting held at Bering Memorial Methodis Church. Popular Tom Horan has invited many of our community groups and individuals to come to the first ever "indoor" Mardi Gras parade inside the lobby of the Wyndham Hotel Greens· point. 12400 Greenspoint Drive on March ~ at 7:00p.m. The festivities will include bands, floats, clows and mor<'. Call Tom at 875-2222. ThC' Annual Bering Memorial Mardi Gras Pancake Festival begins Saturday at 7:00 a.m. All you can eat for$4 . ltwill be in the basement of the Main Build· ing. 1987 treasurer of the Grea ter Montrose Business Guild is Jim Spence Guest bartenders at A-fary's G(J('!i Country party included; 1bottom. left to right) Dick Sanderson of Mary's, Alan Pierce of BRR, Debbie Pou:el/ of &cchus; (standing, left to right) Mana of Mary 's, Robm of Mary 's, Betsy of The Ranch, Becky of The Ranch, and Buzz of The Barn Richard Barbeau is visting Houston from Boston l\rw memhers of the Greater Mont­rose Busine!-is Guild include Carpenter Bob, Bl/I Marberry, and Bobby Gund lack of Union Auto P arts, W. Ala· bama at Almeda Road. Jim Spence of Immuno the rapy Clinic was elected 1987 treasurer of the guild. The Great Montrose Garage Sale is coming to your neighborhood on May 2. A $6 entry fee will entitle businesses or individuals to a special sign to mark your location. a map indicating where you are and multi-media promotion. George Benedict chairs this event. More info is available by calling 528-0443 or 528·1111. We just have time to Mardi Gras , Rodeo then it's Let Us Entertain You Weekend. That's enough fornow. I hop• to see you Around Town Lawrence Welk, the Acid Rocker? LOS ANGELES (UPl)- Fans expect· ing the bubbly sounds of Lawronce Welk's polkas were instead confronted by a raucous punk-rock soundtrack after a mix-up at a compact disc plant. The label for Welk's "World's Great· est Polkas" was accidentally placed on about 10,000 compact discs of the sound track of the film "Sid and Nancy," trig· gering a minor uproar among the bandleader's fans. Polka fans were unexpectedly treated to such songs as "Love Kills'" and Sid Vicious of the Sex Pistols singing a vio­lent parody of Frank Sinatra's "My Way," said Bernice McGeehan, spokes· woman for Welk Enterprises, the band­Jeader's record company. "It was a big shock to the Welk people who bought that particular CD and we are now in the process of recalling all of them," McGeehan said. Welk's office began receiving com­plaints almost immediately after the CD hit the stores a few days ago. "The first thing that happened was a very nice lady from West Covina called , and she was more astounded than any­thing else," McGeehan said. "She took it to her polka club party, and they were going to play it for a dance party. She called and said the music was loud and screaming and she couldn't repeat the language she heard on the CD." ~Pl~y ~safe! FEBRUARY 27, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 AIDS Doctor Expected in Court By Susan Kuczka CHICAGO (UPl)-The decision to bar a Cook County Hospital physician infected with AIDS from physical con­tact with patients is expected to have nationwide implications, officials say. Members of the medical and legal pro­fession say they are confident the courts will eventually rule in favor of the afflicted physician, who is fighting the Cook County Board's unprecedented hands-off decision. But they are fearful the board's ruling this month will undo AIDS education efforts aimed at increasing public awareness about how the deadly dis­ease is transmitted. "A serious harm has been done to the public's understanding of the spread of this disease," said Dr. Rens low Sherer, head of the AIOS program at Cook County Hospital. "It is not transmitted by a wide variety of interactions that include a physician touching a patient during a phy.sical f."xamination . "I think that message has been clearly confused in the mind of the pub­lic ns a result of this action. It's impor­tant to undt•rtitand that this action appli<·s not only to this individual but to otht>r physicians and health -car<' worker.!; nnti<mwide." The Cook County Board, which gov· ems activities at the 1,400-bed hospital that employs 700 full-time physicians, rejected the accepted guideline.!; set forth by the federal Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta by voting to keep tht' phyHidan away from patients. Th<• Cll(' guidelines require that hE.•alth·cnre workers afflicted with acquirPd immune deficiency syndrome takP certain precautions to avoid spreading thP disease. Almost Half Harris County Jail Inmates Exposed to AIDS Virus HOUSTON (UPl)-Nearly 40 percent of the Harris County Jail inmates who volun tarily submitted to AIDS testing last year had been exposed to the virus, the jai l's medical director said recently. Dr. Ronald Haley said 172 of the 436 inmates tested last year, or about39 per­cent, had bC>en exposed to the vi rus that causes acquired immune deficiency syn­dromr. The jail testing program began in January I 986 to provide a medical ser­vi< ·e to tht' inmates. Of those tested, :196 werP male and 40 were female, with 161 mPn and 11 women testing Positive, he said Haley emphasized that no scientific eoncluHions can be drawn from the rrHultN hPenust> most of tho5ie tested werP mE.•mbt·rs of high-risk groups for the disPasl•. Thos<' prisoners showing positive teHtR are offl•red counseling while they are in custody and medical attention if they show symptoms of the disease. Inmates who have AIDS are not t;t•parated from the rest of the jail popu· lation, he said, adding there was no m<'dical rl'ason to segregate them. "W£> can't force anyone to take this teHt," Ha ley said. "Jn a lot of ways, I wiHh W(' could, b('('ause then we would havt• some data we could rely upon . Th£>r£> is no sri£>ntific basis for this at all lwraust• it's not random.'" EvPn wi thin tht' high·risk groups, tht' h•st111g is ,;tri<·tlv voluntnry. hf' said The guidelines have been endorsed by the American Medical Association and the American Hospital Association. Hospitals in New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles, where AIDS also has claimed physicians as victims, are fol­lowing the guidelines, officials say. But the precautions set forth in the guidelines were not enough to persuade the Cook County Board that the physi­cian, a 10-year veteran of the hospital who ·has requested anonymity, should be allowed to continue his work with patients. "There's just too many unknowns with respect to the disease," said board Commissioner Richard A. Siebel. "The medical profession is working with limited knowledge and research." "Let's be real," said Commissioner Rose Marie Love. "There's a lot of fear and hysteria about AIDS. We must always, as public officials, make sure Cook County Hospital has no kind of stigma attached to it. The majority of County's patients don't have a choice about going anyplace else." Yn addition to the board's concern about the spread of the disease, board Presidt•nt George W. Dunne said the possibl<• legal ramifiratiom; ofthe~itua ­tion were taken into account. "Then•'s a certain knowledge about the creativity and capability of the legal profession to initiate and trigger all kinds of lawsuitH, and the payment (of damag£'s) would be made not individu ~ ally by the medical profession but by the fi million citizens of Cook Countv," Dunne said . ~ At least one lawsuit already is being prepared-at the request of the stricken physician. Harvey Grossman, legal director of the Illinois branch of the American Civil Liberties Union, said he plans to sue in federal court, claiming the board's action violates the rights of handicapped workers. "It's (the board's decision) particu­larly tragic because not only are they making a victim of this physician twice-first because of his illness and then because of his dismissal-but they're potentially making a victim of the entire community by dispensing information that lacks logic," Gross­man said. "It will have a significant impact on the health-care system by taking people who are competent, and can safely deliver quaJity care, out of the system. Yn essence, it confuses the public and undermines the trust that health-care people have worked hard to establish." Medical professionals agree the only known transmission of the disease AIDS is through intimate sexual con· tart, use of contaminated needles and through the mother's placenta to her unborn child. Dr. Burton Anderson. chairman of the infectiouR disease~ department at the rniver.sity of Il1inois Medical School, said he was confident the courts would overturn the board's deci~ion. But h~ expressed concern about it~ effect on the rest of the medical com­munity "Docton., nurses, prople in almost all professions and activities. will have AIDS," he said. "This is a major national epidemic. I am concerned it (the board't; decision) may influence other counties and cities to take similar action . And the more we feed fean::; bv going along with them, the worse it'~s going to get." :tl7~ THE LARGEST Pla:a~~USTON! GRAND OPENING! ------F--R--E---E-- --------------------------- BUY 1 GET 1 FREE 550 2-14 INCH PIZZAS TOPPINGS 1.00 EA GOOD THRU 3/2-3/9187 FREE BUY 1 GET 1 FREE 850 2-20 INCH PIZZAS TOPPING 1.50 EA GOOD THRU 3/2·319/87 ------------------------------------------ 522-2929 2137 W. 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"AASA encourages schools to develop programs that will help stu­dents understand AIDS and, to the extent possible, help them avoid con­tracting the disease," the study said, noting that local officials decide about admitting students or workers with AIDS and how to deal with sensitive and controversial facets of the growing acquired immune deficiency syndrome problem. The educators said they are opposed generally to mandatory drug testing, "except in instances when a reasonable suspicion exists that the person has been abusing drugs or when the per­son's position is extremely sensitive in nature and could endanger the lives of others." Guidelines on drug testing said stu­dents should not be subject to blanket drug testing without probable cause, testing of any student or worker should protect their safety and privacy and schools should follow through with information about treatment services to help drug users. The position statements are meant to be u~ed as catalysts for discussion and guidelines in the nation's nearly 16.000 S<"hool district.-;. said Richard Miller, AASA executive director Condoms, Condoms, Everywhere By Jeffrey K. Parker NEW YORK (UPl>-This city will dis· tribute at least 1 million condoms a year in an aggressive public anti-AIDS cam­paign designed to make every New Yorker a "condom expert," the city health commi!'l.sioner said recently 'The latex condom is currently our most effective front-line weapon against increases in sexually transmit­ted diseases and especially the relent­less epidemic of AIDS-which is surely our city's mottt urgent health problem." Commissioner Stephen Joseph said. "Everyone needs to be a condom expert, or condom comfortable," he told several hundred health care profession­als who gathered at New York Univer­sity to discuss ways to promote use of condoms to battle acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Assistant Health Commissioner Ste· phen Sehultz, who also spoke at the con· ferenC'e. e<'"hoed Koop's concern that ''if abstinf"nce i!'l. not possible, then use a condom. ••Asking people to ab~tain from sex is tantamount to asking people to stop eat­ing," Schultz said. .Joseph i;;aid he expected opposition to the condom campaign. One teenager in ten has a secret. One Teenager in Ten: Writings by Gay and Lesbian Youth Edited by Ann Heron For every generation that comes out, these essays will be invaluclble." Gay Commw1;ty Nf!Ws 'There is a rare sensibility displayed in many of these essays that is nothing short of a'>tonishing International Gay News Agency {IGNAl an important and necessary book powerful and very poignant ' Womanews '"One teenager in ten". according lo Kinsey, that's the proportion of gays to straights in this country. Onl' Tel'r1agn in Tl'n : twenty-eight young men and women from all over the United States and Canada. from fifteen to twenty-four years of age, speak out about their coming-out experiences - about what it is to be young and gay in our society today. $3. 95 in bookstores, or use this coupon to order by mail . ............... ......... .. .... ... TO ORDER ........... ..... ... .............. . Please send me_ copies of Onl' Tl'l'nager m Tl'11 at $4.50 each. postpaid Enclosed is $ _ name addr~ city state zip ALYSON Publications, PO Box 2783, Boston, MA 02208 P-5 §AMEJDAY TYPE~ . §ETTEJR§ , \ N I•:\\' 111 \ ISION 01" 'l'l IJ•; MON'l'R08 1~ V OICE We'll typeset your Flyers, Menus, Business Cards, Letterheads, Resumes, Brochures, Forms, Ads-­and hundreds of other items­the Same Day (Sometimes You Just Want It Right Now!) Get 1t to us by Noon (or call for a pickup by 11am) and we'll have 11 ready by Spm (Sile of the job permitting) NO MINIMUM TIME LIMIT' If your typesetting really only takes 10 minutes, you'll only be charged for 10 minutes) ~1 'l'YPES'l'YJ.ES TO CHOOSE Fil.OM Pick Up and Delivery Available ($5 ch~rge) 408 AVONDALE - 529-8490 'A Bunch of Marijuana­Smoking Homosex uals' Lehder Capture Spurs 'Fed- Up' Citizens By Tom Quinn BOGOTA, Colombia (UP!}-The cap­ture of international narcotics kingpin Carlos Lehder at a ranch house hidea­way was triggered by disgruntled neighbors who thought he and his holed·up bodyguards might be rebel guerril1as, cocaine cookers or even "a bunch of marijuana-smoking homosex­uals." As surprising as the capture, how­ever, was that police were tipped off at all in this nation where drug dealers are looked on as Robin Hoods and cocaine is considered a Yankee problem. Police Maj. Willian Lemus, who led30 officers and soldiers in the raid on Lehder's hideout, said it is apparent the public is getting fed up with the drug mafia. "We received a complaint from a neighbor of the ranch where Lehder and his 14 bodyguards were hole up. He said he thought the group might be guerril· las," Lemus said in an interview. "Another person called us to say there were a bunch of marijuana-smoking homosexuals there. Someone suggested the ranch might be a smal1 cocaine laboratory. And another person went to the U.S. Embassy and insinuated the ranch hid somebody important, without specifying who it was." Officials say Lehder's capture and extradition Feb. 4 has encouraged even more people to turn in drug dealers. "This is the biggest result of the Lehder bust. In 10 years of intense work in Colombia. we've never seen anything like the amount of information we're sudd<·nly getting," a veteran Drug EnforcemE'nt Adminh;tration agent said "Tht• phrnomrnon is uncanny. Even though wt• off('r rewards for informa· tion. we are getting people who don't want the money. They are just fed up . They feel the mafia has gone too far. They say these hoods have begun to tread on them and they don't like it." By most counts, Lehder's arrest actu ­ally will do little to stem the now of cocaine out of Colombia. Officials believe smaller opera tors quickly stepped in to take over his business. "The big three of the so-called Medel· lin Cartel-Lehder, Pablo Escobar and Jorge Luis Ochoa-have been on the run so much in the last three years they've been practically forced out of busine~i;. We now suspect that they've been replaced by scores of new opera tors, many of whom are absolutely unknown to us," the DEA agent said. "Let me put it this way: In 1983 you had three billionaires dominating the business and now you've got 100 millionaires doing most of it." Authorities cite two factors in the upswing of resistance to the nation's $8 billion drug industry: Colombia's grow· mg internal drug abuse problem and the raRh of killingR of prominent and ordi· nary citizens in tht• last few years. In IH!-\6, Rix judges, induding a Rupr(•mp court mngistrate, wrre killed by gunmen suppoRt•dly hirrd by the drug mafia. In thE• la"'t four years. 17 ('olombian journalists have been killed after d1•nouncin11 druii trafficking. FEBRUARY 27, 1987 MONTROSE VOICE 25 Sex Phone Services Still in Business FORT WORTH, Texas (UPI)-A contro­versial telephone sex service that Southwestern Bell is trying to putout of business won the first round of its battle with the phone company. A Texas Public Utility Commission hearing judge last Monday rejected Fi
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