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Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999
File 021
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Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999 - File 021. 1999-12-17. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/223/show/210.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1999-12-17). Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999 - File 021. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/223/show/210

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999 - File 021, 1999-12-17, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/223/show/210.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 17, 1999
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 021
Transcript 20 OUT ON THE BAYOU DECEMBER 17,1999 • HOUSTON VOICE Chatting W I THIS I MONE >■ Continued from page 17 She sits erect in a straight back chair and her face is serious during a recent interview in a Houston coffee shop, but she often flashes a big smile and sometimes even appears embarrassed by her own boldness. But she must be bold to write the way she does—without shame, without fear, fully confident of her power with words. "I am lost in the wetness of your body/the sweetness of your mouth and tongue/dancing against mine/the sweat on your neck and breasts/as it dampens my fingertips," she writes in "Suite 69." It's easy to see Cunningham's passion for poetry and prose. And she doesn't write only erotica. In the works is a book about the trial and tribulations of two Texas girls. Within the passion and boldness of Cunningham's writing can be a softness when she discusses love and life. "I am loving her like I once loved you/kissing her lips gently caressing her breasts/just as you caressed mine that very first time resting her head on my shoulder/hiding behind closet doors and between satin sheets/1 am loving her and she is loving me," she writes in "Suite 69." But to find her voice in writing, Cunningham has had to overcome trou bles at home, which started at age 9 with the effects of domestic violence among her parents. "I was there when my mother killed my father," she says, adding quickly it was in self-defense. "I loved my father and he was good to me, but he abused my mother. I never blamed my mother for what happened." Despite that tragedy, Cunningham remains close to her mother, even if she doesn't like her daughter's writings of erotica. "My mother's pissed. She wants to be able to show my work, but she says, 'How can I show this,'" the younger Cunningham says. Passion also strikes Cunningham when talk turns to feminism and her African-American heritage. "Women should be seen and I don't think we're seen," she says. Cunningham wants to help put women in the forefront where she believes they should be and hopes one day to become a filmmaker to help. She wants to make films "that need to be seen so that people feel more comfortable with their sexuality." Although she's been in relationships with a few men, Cunningham says she has never been confused about her sexuality. She shared her first kiss with a girlfriend when she was four; her first sex with a woman when she was 14. She exudes a boyish charm and says her young father "raised me like a tomboy. He treated me like his brother." Some poems in "Suite 69" are short a result, Cunningham says, from the little thoughts that constantly pop into her head. For instance, about a one-night stand, she pens: "When I said good-bye and kissed you on your cheek with your body on my breath, did you cry?" Another poem, "U So Fine," is the product of pulling alongside an attractive woman at a traffic light. She looked over, shamelessly flirted, daring the woman to look her way. Immediately, her poet's mind went to work: "U so fine and I can tell by the way you smile you know it. I see it in your eyes as they hide behind your ray-ban tinted shades/I wish you'd pull over so I can get your name and perhaps a number or two cause I'm really digging you/Shittt, I want to get to know you and possibly gain a touch or two." Yes, she wanted to get to know that woman. "I'm a big flirt, but it's pretty harmless nowadays," says Cunningham, a reference to her year-old relationship. Like her mother, Cunningham's girlfriend isn't too pleased with her erotic writings. But she'll have to get used to it, Cunningham says. Admittedly preoccupied with sex, Cunningham easily admits that her work is laced with the undercurrent of sexual prowess. But multi-faceted in life and conversation, Cunningham shifts gears to her enjoyment of dressing in drag and hitting gay bars for blacks. "When I really want to step out of Simone's shoes, I dress up like a boy and lip sync," she says. Simone Cunningham is passionate when talk turns to feminism, her heritage and sexuality. Cunningham enjoys the tips, but most of all, the attention. "I like being seen," she says. For more information about Simone Cunningham's work, call 713-601-0455, or write Urban Publishers, P.O. Box 300635, Houston, Texas 77230-0635. Conquer Aging... a fresh approach for restoring the skin you were born into. Introducing the most innovative [skin technology for men and women 'available today: r MICRO-DERMABRASION. rThis procedure produces spectacular results in the gentle refinement of skin imper- ffections on any type of skin. 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