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Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999
File 020
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Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999 - File 020. 1999-12-17. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/223/show/209.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1999-12-17). Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999 - File 020. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/223/show/209

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999 - File 020, 1999-12-17, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/223/show/209.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 17, 1999
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 020
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE ♦ DECEMBER 17, 1999 OUT ON THE BAYOU 19 On Stage THEATER NEWS & REVIEWS Reworking Carol, Sonny and Cher by D.L. GROOVER Stages' premiere of the off-Broadway hit musical I LOVE YOU, YOU'RE PERFECT, NOW CHANGE, still running in New York City, possesses grace and charm. The cast showcases its considerable musical comedy talents with delight; the staging is clever and polished; the score hummable. So, why did I begin to tune out? Because this show is something I've seen one time too many, for years. Comprised of sketches highlighting the trials and tribulations of the dating/mating game (Act I) followed by the joys and pitfalls of marriage (Act II), this musical has been resurrected and recycled from vari- ment in her now-empty life, revealing much more than she intends. Bonasso delivers this monologue with quiet, unassuming power. Casey Burden is all cute and huggable in his various roles, and any mother in the audience would be pleased to have him as a son-in-law. He comes into his own with the haunting ballad, "Shouldn't I Be Less in :■** IWk ft f Joanne Bonasso, Pippa Winslow, Casey Burden and Jeffrey Gimbfe in the TV variety-show-like 'I Love You, You're Perfect, Now Change.' etyshow favorites like Carol Burnett, Andy Williams, Sonny and Cher and even "The Bell Telephone Hour." The play attempts to be up-to-date with a smattering of "shits" and the plaintive cry of "she won't go down on me," but you could take your aunt to see this show and rest assured she wouldn't need a blindfold or ear plugs. It's too sweet and pld-fash- ioned to shock. Toothless as a teddy bear and just as cuddly, "I Love You" is so harmless and willing to please it's almost quaint. In this day and age when most musicals are rated PG-13, a breezy, entirely weightless romp should be eminently embrace- able. All we ask is that it entertain without reminding us of chamber musicals like "You're a Good Man, Charlie Brown" or "The Fantastics." But the exceedingly pleasant actors hold the show together by their sheer exuberance. They sing up a storm, mug like vaudeville troopers and even manage a few smooth dance steps. They make this show easier to sit through, even when two full acts of this run-of-the-mill variety show shtick is one act too many. As written, the quartet plays a kaleidoscope of characters. Each vignette finds them in a different guise, and they all play some variation on the stereotypical guy and gal, husband and wife, widow and widower. Joanne Bonasso is the show's Imogene Coca. Whether she's the much put-upon single girl caught in the "Single Man Drought," or the quintessential Jewish mother hen-pecking her husband and whining kids, she's wonderfully versatile. Her shining moment is the "Very First Dating Video of Rose Ritz," a poignant and well-written cameo, in which this 40-some- thing divorcee attempts to find a replace- Love With You?" Sung to his wife over a breakfast routine they've accepted over the years, the temptation to stray just doesn't seem all that important, or interesting, anymore. It's a subtle moment that Burden sings from the heart. Jeffrey Gimble possesses a polished, effortless voice. With his rich baritone, he can belt or, croon with the best of them. He certainly makes the pseudo-pop numbers written by Jimmy Roberts and Joe DiPietro sound better than they are. Leggy and lithe, Pippa Winslow sings the show-stopping number "Always a Bridesmaid" to perfection. Winslow makes the most of this country-western anthem to staying single. With a primary-colored storybook set consisting of house fronts and a garage door, part of the steps might flip down to reveal a restaurant table already set for dinner, or a bed might materialize out of the porch stoop. Most of the time these scenic changes, accomplished by the actors, are more intriguing than the scenes themselves. The performance I attended was sold out, and the audience heartily enjoyed itself, so it obviously appeals to a great many. Perhaps it's because there aren't any variety shows on TV anymore that something so tame and uninspired as "I Love You, You're Perfect, Now Change" can strike a nerve. I Love You, You're Perfect, Now Change Stages Repertory Theatre Through Jan. 2 3201 Allen Parkway 713-52-STAGES www.stagestheatre.com
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