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Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999
File 018
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Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999 - File 018. 1999-12-17. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/223/show/207.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1999-12-17). Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999 - File 018. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/223/show/207

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999 - File 018, 1999-12-17, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/223/show/207.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 17, 1999
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 018
Transcript HHHHHHHHHHHHaf' - OntoRtkeBft HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 17, 1999 A GUIDE FOR YOUR LEISURE TIME Chatting Simone Cunningham's charm and intensity are easy to see in 'Suite 69,' her new work of erotic lesbian poetry. W I THIS I MONE The intensity, passion and sexual tension of Simone Cunningham come through in the hip new work of this bold, lesbian poet by KAY DAYUS For starters, she's had over 25 lovers—not counting the men, she spent 10 years in accounting, and she's been a prolific writer of poetry and prose since the age of nine. SAnd she's only 26. Simone A. Cunningham, a charming but deep and intense author, says 2 she has only just begun. "Suite 69," her self-published book of black lesbian erotica, is mostly steamy, sometimes soft and sad, and often angry. It's easy to see why. In "I've fucked dicks," she writes, "I've fucked dicks in my time/lst at the tender age of 9/violated, mutilated by hands of black man some call uncle cousin and step dad." Cunningham was raped, she says in a matter-of-fact tone, several times by male members of her family, "I was introduced to men at an early age and I grew to like sex with them until I went with a woman," Cunningham says. "Suite 69" first saw the light of day on Cunningham's self-designed web-site "Urbanlova suites." It was there .she first shared her work with others and, she writes, was welcomed. "The sistas welcomed me with open arms. For the first time in my life, I began to take my gift seriously," she says. But Cunningham was only able to share her gift for about six months before her Internet provider pulled the site because of its content. She admits that many people view erotica as "tasteless porn," but Cunningham argues otherwise. "So many women, particularly African-American women, are oftentimes left unsatisfied after sexual encounters. Millions of women have yet to explore their full sexual curiosity. Women need to take time to find out what they want in a sexual relationship," she says. And Cunningham says that erotica can help. >* Continued on page 20 If-"**? nm S BOM TO POP CUlTIM •to ZEN' mmm The founders of New York's Paper and its dishiest columnist) are celebrating the style bible's 15th anniversary and its new guide to what's cool by DAVID GOLDMAN It was 1984. Ron and Nancy twirled merrily in the White House, ignoring the new disease slaughtering its way through the nation's gay male population. Computers were high-priced and clunky and still outnumbered by typewriters in most offices. The activation of the World Wide Web was five years away. Busy people kept in touch using call forwarding: If you'd fished a tiny phone from your bag and begun babbling into it on the street, you would have been clocked as a dangerous, delusion lunatic. And in New York, David Hershkovits and Kim Hastreiter founded Paper, yet another flake in a fluny of funky 'zines founded to chart the cultural cross-currents in ever-evolving downtown Manhattan. Today Paper is an extraordinary publishing success story. Not only is it still in print after a decade and a half, it also has an international following (70,000 readers monthly) and a hugely popular web-site (650,000 page views per month). It has been crowned "the hippest magazine on earth" by the Los Angeles Times and "the magazine of culture information among the sens'- Continued on page 21
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