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Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999
File 015
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Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999 - File 015. 1999-12-17. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/223/show/204.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1999-12-17). Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999 - File 015. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/223/show/204

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999 - File 015, 1999-12-17, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/223/show/204.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 17, 1999
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 015
Transcript 14 NEWS DECEMBER 17, 1999 • HOUSTON VOICE neiu kids an the net Wired Strategies' John Aravosis has created a one-man, online activist effort through his web-site. > Continued from Page 1 Aravosis agreed, but indicated that a source's credibility, and value, should not necessarily depend on a long membership list or a large staff. "Any web-site can pretend to be anything they want, but ultimately they have to put up or shut up," agreed David Goldman, executive director of HateWatch, an Internet hate watchdog group. "You offer up data, and if it shows itself to be honest, true and insightful, it will grow and be helpful to people." Like Aravosis, Goldman's HateWatch, currently made up of six volunteers, has made a name for itself by talcing up the issue of on-line bigotry—including the enforcement of AOL's policy against hate speech—and has become a web source for information and discussion on the topic. Goldman expects HateWatch to attain nonprofit status in a few weeks, and plains to grow the organi-aZation to include a membership and full-time staff. Goldman takes a kind of Darwinian approach to on-line advocacy work. "Hatewatch has a very good n.ame right now," he said matter-of-factly "I think we have offered a good voice on on-line hate and bigotry, ... but no organization has the right to exist forever. If HateWatch loses credibility, or loses popularity, and it's time for us to go away, that's what will happen. We are part of public trust. If people like what we're doing, and they support us, we will be here." Few voices, loud noise One recent example of a small group !W.\\\\\\\\rl»W, MUSCLE MECHANICS PERSONAL TRAINING STUDIO rfet/i rC/rrryeti' rC'effe/ilV*?-? o>a***a*«*»v 4316 Yupon — By Appointment — 713-523-5330 CAPITAL BANK 3007 S. Shepherd @ W. Alabama 713/529-0001 FDIC insured. Rales subject to change. Substantial penalty for early withdrawal. •Minimum $100.000 CD deposit lo earn stated APY (Annual Percentage Yield) making a big statement, Aravosis pointed out, is the publicity generated by the group Queerwatch when it vocally opposed the death penalty during the trial of Aaron McKinney, one of two men charged with the murder of Matthew Shepard. "But in the end, they raised a legitimate issue in the community. It reflected a debate that's really going on," he noted. MichaeLPetrelis, one of the founders of Queerwatch, described the group as a loose network of about two dozen activists all over the country, with no formal structure or mission. He believes this flexible street- activist approach allows the group to work most effectively. "We don't represent a large constituency, which I think is good," he said. "A handful of people can change the world." Bill Dobbs, a member of Queerwatch and a leader of the Ad Hoc Committee for an Open Process, a similar network formed in opposition to the Millennium March on Washington, also claims an "ad hoc" issue-based approach eliminates wasteful bureaucratic process and gets results. The Ad Hoc Committee won't even exist after the march is over, Dobbs said. Shaping an image "Dealing with the Democratic Party is very similar to getting fucked in the ass; the first time is usually the most painful," began a press release circulated last month by National Gay Lobby.Org. "But, after several good screwings, almost everyone gets comfortable with the experience." The commentary, about the failure of the Hate Crimes Prevention Act, was penned by Michael Romanello, a founder of NGL. The group attracted attention recently when Romanello called for a boycott of AOL on the NGL web-site; the group also threatened to send street hustlers and transsexuals to protest outside the suburban Washington homes of AOL executives. With a core volunteer staff of about four, Romanello said they plan to grow NGL into a full-fledged gay rights organization with a non-profit arm and a registered political action committee. The group asks voluntary fees from members to cover operating expenses. Romanello acknowledges he is more outspoken than some other activists. "Because we are not politicians, and have no vested interest in keeping our jobs, we can say things the way we see them," he said. He defended the effectiveness of profanity and extreme language in NGL's public statements. "It was meant to get attention, and it did," he said. Another Internet group has taken a very different approach. the Stonewall Society was founded by Codi Penance in Baton Rouge to combat what he views as destructive infighting among gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgendered people. The Stonewall Society consists of a web-site where supporters can log on and sign a pledge that they will seek to end separatism and discrimination and seek to promote acceptance among gays. "The organization is more conceptual than bureaucratic," he said, saying that 69 people have taken the pledge. The Stonewall Society may develop local chapters, he said, but the web-site will remain the center of the organization. Employers told of park arrests >- Continued Irom Page 1 Smudy, the city's assistant parks director who was acting director of the parks department when the covert operation was started in August 1997. "This is not a moral issues. Everyone is welcome in our parks, but anyone that breaks the law will be punished," he said. But when park rangers arrest a man during the operation, details of the arrest will be shared with the media and his employer if he is an elected official or a city, county or school system employee, Smudy said. If the person works for a private company, officials don't rule out notification of the arrest to the employer, Sumdy said. And Smudy and, other park officials don't recall a woman ever being arrested during the string, which uses a team of five, male-only park rangers. The travel warning, patterned after U.S. State Department notices about dangerous conditions U.S. citizens could encounter in other countries, accuses park rangers of incitement to commit illegal acts, entrapment, false arrest and falsification of arrest reports. "Gay men living in and around San Antonio, Texas and those contemplating travel to that location are warned that thc City of San Antonio operates a covert operation that targets gay men," said the six- paragraph warning, issued primarily to media outlets outside San Antonio. McGowan said the community center has a contract to use workers who have been sentenced to community service by the courts. The center has potential workers fill out a questionnaire that, among other items, asks about treatment by law enforcement officers. Through that questionnaire, the center learned of a large number of people arrested for indecent exposure and related assault charges, McGowan said. That prompted a meeting with city officials in which they admitted the undercover operation. Parks director Malcolm MaMlfcvs as well as Smudy and others from the department attended the meeting, along with a city attorney and a representative for the mayor. "We were attempting to negotiate with them," he said. "But two things happened that made it appear they were not going to negotiate." McGowan sent a letter to Matthews with suggestions for other ways to clean up parks and decrease indecent exposure incidents. But McGowan said the response he received focused on the tone of his letter, rather than the attempts to end the undercover operation. Separately, McGowan submitted a Freedom of Information Act request to the city to acquire records related to the operation to help substantiate that could prove some of the center's allegations. City officials hedged at the request, but later said they would consider it. McGowan then issued the travel warning. 3- Continued on Page 15
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