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Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999
File 014
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Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999 - File 014. 1999-12-17. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/223/show/203.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1999-12-17). Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999 - File 014. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/223/show/203

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999 - File 014, 1999-12-17, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/223/show/203.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 17, 1999
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 014
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 17, 1999 NEWS 13 Hawaii court rules against gay marriage HONOLULU—Hawaii's Supreme Court upheld a 1998 constitutional amendment against gay marriage last Thursday, closing the door on three gay couples who had sued the state for the right to marry. But gay rights activists say the decision does not reverse the high court's 1993 ruling that failure to recognize same-sex marriage amounts to gender discrimination, and that gay couples are entitled to the same rights and benefits as heterosexual couples. The 1998 amendment gave state legislators the power to determine whether marriage licenses should only recognize unions between a man and a woman. The Hawaii court ruled that the amendment protected the ban from scrutiny under the equal protection clause of the state constitution, so the law, passed in 1994, must now be given full force. Still, gay rights advocates said the ruling applies only to the issuance of marriage licenses and not to other legal recognition for same-sex couples. "Unless the legislature passes a comprehensive domestic partnership law, there are going to be hundreds of lawsuits" demanding marriage-like benefits under the court's 1993 ruling, according to Dan Foley, the gay couples' attorney. Last week's decision did not bar future cases seeking the same benefits that come with civil marriage, agreed Evan Wolfson of Lambda Legal Defense & Education Fund. "Although raw power politics and the fierce, sustained campaign of our opponents may have prevented this case from getting us all the way to equality this century, the historic case has left us in a transformed position to fight on," Wolfson said. Hawaii became the hope of gay marriage advocates in 1990, when three gay couples were denied marriage licenses by the state health department and sued the state. Later that year, the case was thrown out by a lower court judge. But the Hawaii Supreme Court's historic 1993 decision reinstated the lawsuit, saying the ban violated the state's constitution unless the state could show compelling reason to justify it. The ruling set off preemptive legislating around the nation. At least 30 states banned gay marriage, and Congress passed the Defense of Marriage Act, which denied federal recognition of same-sex marriage and allowed states to ignore same-sex unions licensed elsewhere. In an effort to clarify the state's position, the Hawaii legislature passed a law in 1994 limiting marriage to opposite-sex couples. In 1996, Circuit Court Judge Kevin Chang said the state could not justify that limitation and ordered it to grant licenses to the couples. But he suspended his decision pending an appeal to the Hawaii Supreme Court. In the intervening two years, voters approved a 1998 constitutional amendment giving legislators the authority to limit state-recognized marriages to opposite-sex couples, which they had already done. The couples were "devastated" by the court's decision, Foley said. Of the three, Tammy Rodrigues and Antoinne Pregil, and Pat Lagin and Joseph Melillo remain in Hawaii and still want to marry, Foley said. Ninia Baehr and Genora Dancel have separated and are living on the mainland. Melillo said the Supreme Court decision was more upsetting than the public approval of the constitutional amendment because he expected the court to be a guardian of civil rights. "We have never lost a court case until this memo was issued by the Supreme Court today," he said. "Ifs very difficult to see how they arrived at this decision. It's really a cop-out." Sue Reardon, a teacher at Kalaheo High School, cried when she was told of the ruling. "Oh, God, this is awful," said Reardon, an activist who was hoping to marry her female partner. "It's just scary. If you can help create laws to segregate and discriminate, then no group is safe." Opponents of gay marriage cheered the Hawaii decision. "Thank you to the Hawaii Supreme Court for affirming what we've known all along— that marriage, by God's definition, is between opposite-sex couples," said Mike Gabbard, chairman of the Alliance for Evan Wolfson of Lambda Legal said that even with the Hawaii court defeat, gay couples are entitled to all marriage rights short of a license. Traditional Marriage. Vermont a possibility Vermont is the only state whose top court is currently considering gay marriage. Three gay couples sued there for the right to marry in 1997, but a Superior Court judge dismissed the case, ruling that there is no fundamental right to gay marriage. The couples appealed. The Vermont Supreme Court is expected to rule soon on the case. Chat | Personals | News | Travel | Entertainment | People &. WanetOut.com www.planeloutcom | AOL Keyword: PlanetOut engage •->• enjoy K7* Join us in our excitement as we anticipate the coming of our Lord and Saviour, tKe Baby Jesus at MARANATHA FELLOWSHIP MCC 3400 Montrose, Suite 600 (Corner of Montrose and Hawthorne) Holy Grounds Friday December 17 at 7pm An evening of live praise & worship, coffee-shop style. $5. Cover charge • $1. Flavored coffees and desserts. This event benefits the Maranatha's Building Fund. Emmanuel, God with Us! December 19 at 10:30am Special Worship Service in Story and Song to conclude the Advent season. Candle Light Service Sunday, December 24 at 7pm Reception to follow. NURSERY AVAILABLE FOR ALL SERVICES. For more information, call 713-528-6736 or email us at maranatha@lconn.c ^
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