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Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999
File 004
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Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999 - File 004. 1999-12-17. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/223/show/193.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1999-12-17). Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999 - File 004. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/223/show/193

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999 - File 004, 1999-12-17, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/223/show/193.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 17, 1999
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • DECEMBER 17, 1999 THEWS NEWS inside First Bradley, then Hillary, then Bill, then Gore Around the South 5 Judge sides with schools in hiv suit 5 The nation's Democrats Bush aide says gay GOP too critical 5 | jne Up against the Ky. legislature, courts to rule on military ban 3S a jury goy rights lows 5 . ' . Gay prosecutor to face well-funded challenger 5 COnVICtS an Army private Sheriff criticized for onli-gay views 5 of murdering a fellow Around the Nation... .7 so|d jer believed to be gay Judge allows death penalty in boy's murder . .7 Army recommends discharge for legislator .. .7 Wells Fargo Bank charged with discrimination .7 by t.AURA BROWN County negligent in Brandon Teeno's death . .7 FDA tries to holt alternative remedies 7 ,. Pr°mPted> *e "olent murder of a sol- „ . . . , . n _ . ,_ dier believed to be gay, Vice President Al Police looking for (ewelry in Big Easy murder 10 Gore announced Monday he would seek t0 Hawaii court rules against gay marriage ...13 overturn the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" ban on openly gay service members, meaning both Democratic presidential candidates now oppose the policy. Former Sen. Bill Bradley, Gore's opponent in the Democratic primary, said in September he would work to overturn the ban. In an interview that same month, Gore said only that he supported a more "compassionate" enforcement of DADT. Gore's announcement several days of mounting political criticism of the "Don't Ask Don't Tell" policy, including shots from President Bill Clinton and First Lady Hillary Clinton, who has announced her intent to run for the U.S. Senate seat from New York. But Congressional Republicans and military leaders quickly warned that all the talk doesn't mean the policy faces repeal in the near future. Sen. John Warner (R-Va.), chair of the Senate Armed Services Committee, told the Associated Press Tuesday that revisiting the policy should not take place "in the heated rhetoric of an election year." Warner, who backed DADT and whose committee would oversee efforts to change the policy, said he was concerned about the soldier's murder and discrimination against gays in the military. But, he added, "the wise and fair course for future congressional action, particularly in view of the profound impact of these issues on military readiness," would be for Congress to "await a complete review by the next administration, and then promptly consider any specific recommendations for legislative action." On Tuesday, the White House acknowledged Congress was unlikely to overturn DADT, and said the admistration's "time and energy" would be better spent working to improve implementation of the policy. DADT called a 'failure' "Don't Ask, Don't Tell, Don't Pursue" was passed in 1993 as a compromise when Congress refused to support President Clinton's campaign goal of overturning the ban on gay soldiers altogether. The DADT compromise, which allows gays to serve in the military so long as they do not disclose their sexual orientation or engage in homosexual acts, was designed in part to help prevent witch hunts aimed at rooting out gay soldiers. But critics have long contended the policy fails to protect gay soldiers from witch- V0ICES& ECHOES Editorial: 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' don't work . 8 Aiveor: LCR ploys the civil rights doormat 9 Letters: Gore, Bradley ond lesbians 9 OUT OH THE BAYOU Chatting wilh Simone 1 / Pop tuhure crash course Out in Print:'Stiffed' Bestsellers 18 On Stage: Reworking Sonny and Cher 19 Eating Out: Plucking a plate in a comfy place 23 COMMUNITY YH Pride in full swing Post Out: Astronomer turned activist Community Calendar Occasions .. My Stars! .. {"ARMART CLASSIFIEDS. . BUSINESS DIRECTORY Issue 999 liMIMH.I voice All material in Houslon Voice is protected bv vderal copyright law and may not be repro luced without thc written consent ot Houston Voice. The sexual orientation ot advertisers photographers, writers and cartoonists puh iished herein is neither Interred or implied. "ie appearance of names or pictorial reprf ■■>)! necessarily indicate the n ot lhat person or person---. ■ (ouston Voice accepts unsolicited editorial i'iateriai but cannot take responsibility for its "■turn. The editor reserves the right to accej: reject or edit any submission. AH rights revert to authors upon publication. Guidelines tor freelance contributors are available upon request. Houston Voice 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200 Houston, TX 77006 713-529-8490 Bill Bradley, Hillary Clinton, Bill Clinton and Al Gore in recent days have all criticized the military's ban on openly gay members. hunts, discrimination and harassment, and discharges of gay service members have risen every year since DADT was implemented—increasing from 617 in 1994 to 1,149 last year. On the campaign trail in New York, Hillary Clinton told a group of gay contributors Dec. 7 that she would advocate overturning the ban on gays in the military. The First Lady, a candidate for U.S. Senate in New York, declared the policy a "failure," those attending the private fund-raiser said. On Saturday, President Clinton told CBS News he was "quite sympathetic" with his wife's views. "What I'd like to do is focus on trying to make the policy we announced back in '93 work the way it was intended to, 'cause it's way out of whack now, and I don't think any serious person can say it's not," Clinton said. On Thursday, Clinton told leading gay and lesbian Democrats during a Democratic National Committee luncheon that the best way to bring about change in the controversial policy on gays in the U.S. military was through the ballot box. "The president said we had made a lot of progress in changing attitudes in the country but there was a still a long way to go," an administration official said after the closed-door question and answer session. "He urged them to get involved in winning the hearts and minds of candidates for Congress in the upcoming election cycle." A 'sobering' murder After deliberating for less than two hours Dec. 8, a military jury found Army Pvt. Calvin N. Glover, 18, guilty of premeditated murder in the July 5 death of Pfc. Barry Winchell. Winchell died after being beaten with a baseball bat as he slept in his barracks at Fort Campbell. Rumors that Winchell was gay had circulated on the base, military officials testified during Glover's trial, and he was viciously harassed in the weeks leading up to his killing. But his superiors testified that the DADT policy had interfered with their ability to investigate harassment against him. In a statement released Monday, Gore cited the case as the impetus for the change in his public opinion on DADT. In the wake of the murder, the Pentagon said Monday it would order an investigation at major military bases over the next 90 days to determine if gay soldiers were being harassed. But two days later, Defense Secretary William Cohen said he did not expect the Pentagon to change its controversial policy toward gays in the U.S. military, and especially not during President Clinton's remaining year in office. "I do not expect the policy to be changed—certainly not during this administration," Cohen said at a press conference during a visit to Dover Air Force Base in Delaware. But the secretary said he was determined to see that the "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy on lesbians and gays in the military be implemented fairly and that was why he ordered the Pentagon's inspector general to conduct a spot investigation at major military bases on the issue. Advocates for gay service members said they question whether the survey will produce valid results, since a soldier would violate the DADT policy and be subject to discharge just by acknowledging their .sexual orientation to investigators or discussing harassment because of it. "The big question is can gay people participate in this survey without getting fired from their jobs," C. Dixon Osbum, co-executive director of the Servicemembers Legal Defense Network in Washington, told the New York Times. "How do you trust anyone, especially at a base where an anti-gay murder took place?" Pentagon officials said those conducting will be charged with investigating those who commit the harassment, not those who report it. Yet anything short of removing the ban won't end the discrimination, Osburn said. GOP opposition George W. Bush, the Republican front- runner, has said he supports the ban on openly gay service members. Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), Bush's closest competitor for the GOP nomination, also supports DADT, and has criticized Clinton and Gore for attacking the policy without discussing the issues with military leaders. Another GOP presidential hopeful, Gary Bauer, also criticized Clinton and Gore for their views on gays in the military Tuesday during a campaign stop in New Hampshire. Bauer said the military shouldn't be used to "try out some liberal idea"—whether it was women in combat, co-ed training or allowing openly gay soldiers. "The purpose of the military is to win wars and defend the United States of America," he said. "It's not to be a sociological playground for either Bill Clinton's theories or anybody else's theories."
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