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Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999
File 002
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Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999 - File 002. 1999-12-17. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/223/show/191.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1999-12-17). Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999 - File 002. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/223/show/191

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999 - File 002, 1999-12-17, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/223/show/191.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 999, December 17, 1999
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date December 17, 1999
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 002
Transcript I7« tTTETTTTTI voice Prompted by the violent murder of a soldier believed to be gay. Vice President Al Gore said he would seek to overturn the ban on openly gay service members, falling in line with a host of other Democrats. Page 3 The intensity, passion and sexual tension of Simone Cunningham come through in the hip new work of this bold, lesbian poet who recently self-published 'Suite 69,' a collection of erotica. Page 17 ISSUE 999 ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE. DECEMBER 17, 1999 new kids on the net A crop of 'virtual' gay rights groups are clamoring for attention, but should it take more than 'dot-com' to earn legitimacy? by PAIGE P.ARVIN No members, no budget, no full-time staff, not a single office or meeting. A flurry of on-line activist groups have come on the scene in the last year, and many are garnering attention inside and outside the gay community. But does is "dot-com" or "dot-org" by itself a substitute for a constituency, bylaws and the other traditional measures of an organization's legitimacy? In a recent controversy involving whether America Online was discriminating against gay users, the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation and National Gay Lobby.Org were referenced side-by-side in many mainstream and gay press news accounts, with both groups treated as equals. GLAAD, founded in 1985, has 15,000 members, an annual budget of $3.7 million, and offices in six U.S. cities. National Gay Lobby.Org was founded earlier this year, claims a thousand members, no annual budget and is solely Intemet-based. While gay orgiinl-zations of all sizes, shapes and causes have co-existed for decades, the Internet has spawned a slew of new group names, raising questions about organization accountability, credibility and what exactly it means to be a "gay rights group." Online activist Michael Romanello, who co- founded National Gay Lobby.Org and recently took on America Online and called for a boycott The fact that just about anyone with a mouse and a modem can think up a name, put up a web-site and create a gay rights "organization" presents ups and downs, according to some gay activists. The good, the bad and the Net "It's a good thing and a bad thing," observed Internet activist John Aravosis, himself a part of this growing "virtual" activism. "In a sense, I think the Internet will make you better .known by name. ... It makes you become an organization, It's very odd, people do perceive me as a gay organization," said Aravosis, the president and sole staff member of Wired Strategies, his on-line advocacy consulting business. Aravosis has earned this perception primarily by taking a stand on issues of interest to gays, including AOL's policies; posting information on his web-site; and, as he has emerged as an on-line source, speaking with the press when contacted. He doesn't hide the fact that for now, he's a one-man show. But reporters don't always ask, either. Not all aspiring gay rights activists and groups are totally Internet-based. But the Net can often level the playing field for those seeking publicity, creating a realm where one person sitting in front of a computer can maintain a web-site and churn out press releases as effectively as a large national organization like Human Rights Campaign. "1 think it's a good thing. Our movement is big enough to accommodate all who wish to participate," said HRC spokesman David Smith. "Everybody who wishes to be politically active should be, and can be, in whatever form they choose." Smith deflected the question of whether media references to such groups can be misleading to many, including gay men and lesbians. "This is a democratic country, and nobody should be denied access to the mainstream mcdi.i to get their viewpoints across," Smith said. "It's up to the journalist to determine a point of view and whether that point of view is represented by a constituency or not. Often, the gay press will quote a person who has a constituency of one just to put a contrary view out there." > Continued on Page 10 m lieerWatcl Founded:1997 Non- Profit: No Board of director*: No Budget: None cal meetings: No We bin e: None Tiindf-d: 1999 Non-Profit: No -d ol directory No Members: 69 signed pledge Budget: None Physical meelings: No Website: stonewallsotiety.org ju«r *■—— •*"•»*—« Founded: 1999 Non-profit: No Board of directors: Yes Members: About 1140 Budget: None Physical meetings: Mo ■: nationalgaylobby.org Founded: 198S Non-Profit: Yes Board of din Members: Aboul IS.000 Budget: S3 7 million Physical meetings: Yes Website: glaad.org Founded: 1996 Non-PrOfrt: Not yet d of directors: Not yet s: list-serve of 1200 Budget None Physical meetings: No Website: hatewatch.org Budget: t Physical meeting*: No Website: foranopenprocess.org Founded: 1996 Jon-Profit: No. for profit Board ol directors: No Budget: None Physical meetings: No Website: wrreditrategies.com A weapon of homophobia? Park rangers in San Antonio have arrested more than 500 men on sex charges in two years, sometimes releasing their arrest records to employers and the media, prompting an outcry from local gay activists by GIP PLASTER Once every 36 hours for the last two years, on average, park rangers arrest a man on misdemeanor sex charges in one of San Antonio's dozens of city parks. Authorities say the men are hunting for sex in public places, flashing their groins and groping what, most often, rums out to be an undercover park ranger in the midst of a covert sting to rid the parks of men seeking sex with other men. More than 500 men have been arrested during a two- year operation by a team of undercover park rangers, city officials and gay activists said. Some gay leaders are crying foul, accusing the city -and its park system of targeting only gay men and entrapping them in the newest demonstration of the region's longtime hostility toward gay men and women. "It's like a weapon of homophobia they're wielding here in San ./-Vntonio," said Michael McGowan, director of the city's Gay and Lesbian Community Center. "We're really pissed about this. We're angry." The high number of arrests prompted McGowan and the community center last week to take the unusual step of issuing a press release warning gay men planning to travel to San Antonio to rethink their trip, y The center also accuses the citv of entrapment and of arresting men simply for being gay. The community center issued the stronglv-worded travel warning after attempts to negotiate with the parks department failed, McGowan .said. 'Unwilling to negotiate' City of San aAntonio Parks and Recreation Department officials met with community center representatives in early November and admitted that they send park rangers wearing plain clothes to more than 20 of the city's parks specifically to make arrests based on indecent exposure and other related offenses. "I had the distinct feeling that [the community center] thought we were doing this as a moral issue," said Don >- Continued on Page 13
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