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Montrose Voice, No. 86, June 18, 1982
File 025
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Montrose Voice, No. 86, June 18, 1982 - File 025. 1982-06-18. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 22, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2203/show/2194.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-06-18). Montrose Voice, No. 86, June 18, 1982 - File 025. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2203/show/2194

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 86, June 18, 1982 - File 025, 1982-06-18, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 22, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2203/show/2194.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 86, June 18, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date June 18, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 025
Transcript 24 MONTROSE VOICE / JUNE 18, 1982 Movies Film director Fassbinder found dead By John W. Rowberry International Gay News Agency Ranier Wemer Fassbinder, the openly- gay German film director responsible for the resurgence of the contemporary German cinema, died on Thursday, June 10 in his Munich home. At the time of his death he had been working on a new film, his 42nd feature project in the space of 13 years. Fassbinder was discovered nude on his bed by housemate and film editor Juliane Lorenz. The official announcement ofthe cause of death was being withheld until an autopsy could be performed, although authorities in Munich ruled out foul play. Another German film director, Wolf Gremm, for whom Fassbinder had appeared as an actor in his unreleased film Kamikaze, was also in Fassbinder's house at the time of his death. Gremm told reporters and police that Fassbinder had been intently working on his newest film project all night. A notebook and a video recorder which was still running were found next to the bed. Fassbinder came to American attention in 1971 when his film The Merchant of Four Seasons was shown here. But in his homeland he had already established a professional status as a filmmaker, actor and writer. Often involved in leftist theater and sentiments, Fassbinder was too untrusting of political organizations, regardless of their political/social philosophy, to embrace any specific doctrine. Openly homosexual. Fassbinder flourished in an artistic environment that judged him on the quality of his work and not his sexual proclivities. Fassbinder's first feature-length film was released in 1969, when he was 23 years old. The film, Love is Colder Than Death, began a cycle of 10 films, all completed in one year, that represented what Fassbinder termed his "pure passion for movies." A devotee of American gangster films, the elements of illegal countercultural activities often filled his early works—in which the director and his mother, under the name Lilo Pempeit, often appeared in the cast. His 1970 film about a group of filmmakers in a hotel during the making of a film, Beware of a Holy Whore, began the explosion of interest and acclaim for the rebel director. For the next decade, Fassbinder worked at a neck-break pace. He completed 31 additional feature films, including some which became international successes like The Marriage of Maria Braun, The Bitter Tears of Petra von Kant. Effie Briest, Fox and His Friends and Lili Marleen. His just-released Veronika Voss won the Best Picture award at the 1982 Berlin Film Festival and his last film, Querelle, based on the novel by Jean Genet, was shown out of competition at the 1982 Cannes Film Festival. Indifference to the films of Ranier Werner Fassbinder has never been an attitude of his critics or fans. Even films like Lili Marleen, which received universal bad reviews, were heavily attended. In Germany Lili Marleen was second only to The Empire Strikes Back in gross revenue. Fassbinder explored themes of individuals caught in the social dictates of their personal environments. Often using the protagonist to decry his own anti-social feelings, Fassbinder mastered an ability to translate his distrust of rigid social restriction into an universal axiom. His distaste for following convention manifest itaelf in his personal life. At a time and in a country that honored conformity as a national virtue, Fassbinder appeared the "mad genius" to the chastisement of the press and the secret delight of the public. His public notoriety was that of an indispensible, if unbe- haved, national treasure. His treatment of homosexuality as a theme in his films surfaced most obviously in Fox and His Friends, The Bit- Rainer Werner Fassbinder in drawing by Acel Clark ter Tears of Petra von Kant, In a Year with 13 Moons, and his final work, Querelle. But in many of Fassbinder's films there are obvious homosexual sensibilities. Fassbinder also produced a good deal of television work that remains almost completely unknown outside his native land. A major 13-hour historical drama, Berlin Alexanderplatz, was the topic of heated debate in Germany—where some of the nationalized television stations refused to air it—when it was seen in 1980. Financed by the German State Television system, the television drama centered around a particular section of pre-war Berlin that is now underneath the Berlin Wall. Only a handful of Fassbinder's prolific outpouring has been seen in America. Querelle is next set to play the 1982 Montreal Film Festival. Trekkies take note: 'The Wrath of Khan' nearly flawless By John John W. Rowberry International Gay News Agency Almost flawless, and a damn sight closer to perfection than you might have expected after Star Trek: The Movie, Star Trek: The Wrath of Khan is just what the doctor ordered—a powerful and action- filled two-hour version of what made the television series a cult event. While the original crew is back for this second Star Trek adventure, they have managed to get over their delight at seeing each other again and get on to the business of exploring the universe. William Shattner turns in his best James Kirk performance—bar none—and the delightful surprise is the introduction of another Vulcan (yes, Spock is still there), this time a woman, a starship captain in training. Ricardo Mantalban, as the outlaw Khan, is the sexiest 200-year- old you've ever seen, and also gives a highly-charged, right-on-target performance. Except for a cliche or two at the end (remember, I said "almost" flawless), this adventure should guarantee at least a couple more Trek films and give the Star Wars crowd something to scratch their heads about, since The Wrath of Khan has a screenplay that doesn't embarrass the actors. A surprise at the end (I wouldn't dream of giving it away) makes the whole thing much, much more believable. If you like science fiction at all, then you deserve to treat yourself to The Wrath of Khan. The ghost of a 'Haunting': Steve Spielberg's 'Poltergeist' By John John W. Rowberry International Gay News Agency There is a very good reason why Steven Spielberg's name is stamped all over the Tobe Hooper film, Poltergeist; Spielberg co-produced, authored the story and co- authored the screenplay. Beyond that, it is a Spielberg film from beginning to end; it has the stamp ofthe famous director on every frame. Now that's fine if you like Steven Spielberg's particular brand of filmmaking; some parts magic and some parts high religious metaphor. But I have to wonder why Hooper was there at all. And beyond that, since Poltergeist is actually two and a half films, who really directed whom? In case you have never delved into the dark mysteries, a poltergeist is a playful spirit, usually connected to a personality in the concrete world, that upsets the order of ordinary lives by moving things around: chairs, tables, watches, televisions, sometimes even people. But poltergeists, unlike ghosts, are universially non-evil spirits. Part of the Hooper/Speilberg film is about an average middle class family living in a housing tract in middle America. A father, a mother, a teenage daughter who lives on the phone, a younger son, and a five-year-old daugahter. It is the latter who attracts the playful (usually) spirit. She communicates with it (or them) through a imageless channel on the television. That's all very well laid out, the family are inherently interesting people as a unit, and Hooper/Spielberg create a senseof tension within the first few minutes of the film—a tension that is the one constant and dependable element for the next two hours. In fact, the suspense is everything in Poltergeist; the special effects, while interesting, do not go beyond the realm of what state-of-the-art moviemaking is all about. The big problem comes when Spielberg/ Hooper try to mesh their clever poltergeists with a real evil and destructive haunting. Too many contradictions. It sounds more like Paul Schrader, who openly claims to do no research for his films (Hardcore, American Giggolo, etc.), than the very ingenious man who gave us Jaws and Close Encounters. But then again, maybe that's not as weird as it sounds, since both of those films, for all their brillance, had slight structural problems. Poltergeist has more than slight problems; it suffers from too much of Spielberg's influence. In a film that just won't wash, given what little we know about the supernatural, we are treated to a religious experience straight out of Chee Encounters, along with those beautiful, but already-done violent cloud formations. There is a medium (a spiritual house cleaner) who brings a jarring note into a cast otherwise acted out in a low key. There are some physical malfunctions: the spirits came out of a television, hut their source of power is a closet in a child's bedroom, and the point of exit from their bright-lit domain is a spot on the ceiling in the living room. How you get from point A to point B to point C is just not very clear, but perhaps you should forget about the title of this film and just go be scared half to death because no one does it better than Spielberg and Hooper.
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