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Montrose Voice, No. 86, June 18, 1982
File 023
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Montrose Voice, No. 86, June 18, 1982 - File 023. 1982-06-18. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2203/show/2192.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-06-18). Montrose Voice, No. 86, June 18, 1982 - File 023. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2203/show/2192

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 86, June 18, 1982 - File 023, 1982-06-18, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2203/show/2192.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 86, June 18, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date June 18, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 023
Transcript 22 Montrose Voice/June 18,1982 Montrose Live Automatic: rock and roll in Montrose By Billie Duncan If you have been wondering where to find good hard-driving, dancable rock & roll in Montrose, look no further than every other Sunday at Grant Street Station, where the three-man rock group, Automatic, blasts forth their particular brand of rock madness. The group is headed by drummer Larry Sotoodeh, who perches with his drums on top of a large industiai spool in the corner of the back patio, while brother Kenny plays bass and Mick Rose carries the vocals and guitar work. These three people put out a great deal of romp and stomp music to the delight of a very mixed bunch of Montrosians. The gay population of the bar, both male and female, is joined by a compatible mixture of non-gay rockers and a sprinkling of intermediate trash. Within the broad catagory of rock & roll, Automatic has a great deal of variety, being as adept with Stevie Wonder as with the Cars. Besides the copy tunes they do, they add a good sampling of their own compositions, one of which is called "Hollywood Eyes" and will be released shortly as a single. Because they play on the patio, they cannot use their full equipment or they would probably be shut down. As it is, they are playing with what they call rehearsal equipment, but the show they put on is no rehearsal. While drummer Larry looks on from his spool perch, which creaks and jerks with the beat, lead singer and git player Mick rips through the vocals with true rock gusto and tears into his guitar like a man posses^d. One wonders how he keeps from getting shin splints from jumping on the concrete. He twists, he stretches, he leaps, he lands on key. His guitar chords crash across the audience, then his lead work intricately weaves its heavy spell. Changing up the pace, he becomes tender. Well, tender with a touch always of gravel and concrete. This is not music for the laid-back. This is music to sweat by. This is music to take home in your veins. This is music to remember late at night when you are not alone. There are no dance classes to teach you to move to this music. This music moves Automatic at Grant Street Station you any way you let it. The heat of the sun and the beat ofthe drum combine to practically personify Hot. And Hot stalks the patio of Grant Street Station, stoned and drinking tequila, looking for someone to share the beat. Hot fills up with beer and conversation and takes on the dance floor. Hot soaks up the vibrations of the multi-muscled afternoon and takes off his shirt. Hot speaks softly in your ear. And through it all, the fingers and fists of the music of Automatic work through the crowd. Even when they play a song that was written and recorded by someone else, they do it in their own way. Do not go to hear cloned music. You will be disappointed. PHOTOSBYROGER GENTRY ■ Duncan's Quick Notes Good-bye, Good Luck, Come Back: Last weekend saw the farewell performances of two very popular Montrose entertainers, Mr. Tiffany Jones and Champagne. Champagne bid farewell to Houston on Saturday at the Pink Elephant to a packed and very enthusiastic crowd. In the crowd was Tiffany, whose fault it is that Champagne is leaving. He got them both booked for the summer at some wonderful place in the far northeast. Sigh. Mr. Tiff then waved bye-bye from the Copa stage on Sunday. Gary Smith says that the Copa will miss him. Mr. Tiffany has been emceeing the shows there. So now the Copa will be having guest emcees every two weeks. The first guest emcee will be Jahonau Reis. Oh, and here is some big Copa news: Divine will do a show there on July 16. Meanwhile, back at the P.E., regulars Eydie Mae and Jeresa are reported to have had a very sucessful show in Victoria at the Pitts. Taste-ticklers: There are a couple of things happening downtown (we claim downtown Houston as partof the "Greater Montrose Area") that should appeal to the varied tastes of various Montrosians. Magician Doug Henning will be performing his incredible show of illusions at the Music Hall tonight and tomorrow (Friday and Saturday). He is the guy that turns himself into a six-foot shark and can conjure up a 450 pound tiger. On TV you can say, great, but the camera can trick you. But live on stage.... Also this week, starting June 23, is the Joffrey Ballet at Jones Hall, sponsered by the Society for the Performing Arts. They will be celebrating their 25th anniversary. Happy anniversary! More from Max: Max Pearson, who gave us Cleopatra (in drag no less) has a new and slightly more serious work up for inspection. It is titled That Sad Jar of A toms and concerns the effect of Lord Byr- on's death on Mary Shelley. The ShelleyB had a somewhat unconventional household that included Jane and Edward Williams. Edward and Mary's husband Percy Bysshe Shelly were killed in a boating accident in 1822. A funeral pyre was erected on the beach for them and they were burned as Lord Byron looked on. In Max's play, the funeral procession of Byron is moving through London in 1840 as Mary Shelley and Jane Williams look on and remember their lives. The play will be presented at the Houston Guest House June 23 as a staged reading with Renee Pernoud as Mary Shelley and Natalie Roberts as Jane Williams. Fred Hinton appears in a small role as Ted. It is part of a program for Men and Women Together, which is being put together by Roz Vecchio. New Musical to Open: The Girl from Golden Gate will open on Sunday night at Chocolate Bayou Theater, 1823 Lamar. The musical was written by Gerald Bradley and Rebecca Finn and directed by Jeff Galligan. It features several Montrosians in the cast, including Roger Gentry who makes his country singing debut in Kenny Sotoodeh of Automatic Mick Rose of Automatic Larry Sotoodeh of Automatic
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