Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Montrose Voice, No. 88, July 2, 1982
File 001
File size: 13.55 MB
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Montrose Voice, No. 88, July 2, 1982 - File 001. 1982-07-02. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2169/show/2140.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1982-07-02). Montrose Voice, No. 88, July 2, 1982 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2169/show/2140

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 88, July 2, 1982 - File 001, 1982-07-02, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2169/show/2140.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 88, July 2, 1982
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date July 2, 1982
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript The Newspaper of Montrose Issue #88, Published Weekly Friday July 2 1982 Good Evening ~a~~:d~;e ni';ht~t~::;.ly t~l~~~~tan~ warm and a low of 76(. Saturday a. Sundafi: Partly cloudy !r;!~:,nw:~~n~e8..!~~~~~=d 0! high of96° Sunri1e Saturday 6:26AM. Sunset Saturday 8:27PM v ·o I The Parade c E and GP Rally Photo Souvenir Issue Monday-Leather Night! Tuesday-'Some Like it Hot' starring Marilyn Monroe Sunday, July 4-Beer Bust, 4pm, and The Montrose Symphonic Band in concert, Liberty Bank Parking Lot. Come see the balloon launch. Send the Band to San Francisco, Carneige Hall, New York City Montrose News/The Nation JULY 2, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Thousands marched or watched coast-to-coast Gay Pride Week celebrations across the nation attracted tens of thousands in many cities and over 100,000 in at least one other-San Francisco-according to AP and UPI estimates. As in previous years, estimates varied greatly depending on whether you were talking to the police, the press or the event organizers. In Chicago, gay people classed with about 20 members of the American Nazi Party at the Chicago parade, it's 13th annual parade. There were also anti-Nazi counter·demonstratione by Jewish and black groups. At least 13 people were arrested in the incident which involved rocks, eggs and smoke bombs being thrown at the Nazis. Reuben Samuele, one of the organizers of the anti-Nazi counter demonstration, said, "We consider it (the anti·Nazi coun· ter demonstration) a success. They (the Nazis) had to be kept behind a cyclone fence like caged animals. That's understandable." The San Fl'anciaco march drew an esti­mated group of 125,000 participants, !lccording to news rePorters, but resulted tn one tragedy when Darrell Anderson 18 of San Francisco was killed when run ~ve; by a noat. No other violent incidents were reported. nationwide. Th£> San Francisco parade was led by 150 lesbians on motorcycles known as ''Dykes on Bikes." Leaflets reading "Stop Nazi Provoca­tion in Chicago Against Gays" were passed out to San Francisco spectators. In N<-w York, reporters e,etimat.ed 100,000 people walked in or viewed the tra· ditional Fifth Avenue parade, but police estimated the number between 10,000 and 12,000. At the Loa Angeles parade, known as Christophf"r Street WeAt, reporters said 65,000 spectators watched as local politi· Q 0 , , ~~·,~·. The Drum's entrant in the Gay Pride Week Parade in Houston, dedicated to funds recently rai.sed for research into the cautt of Kaposi's sarcoma. Christopher Street m New York City 1e in that city's major gay ghetto. In Boston, the estimates varied from 2000 to 15,000 to the number of partici· pants in their annual Gay Pride Week march. In Atlanta, about 2000 demonstrators marched on the Georgia capitol demand· ing a stronger political voice in the state. The protesters shouted slogans against Atlanta Mayor Andrew Young, who had refused to sign a Gay Pride Week procla· mation. The document became official anyway without his signature by appro· val of the city council. In Memphis, about 100 people listened as former Playboy bunny and poet Lea Hopkins told them the purpose of Gay Pride W('('k wa11 to eduC'ate the non·KftY public. "It's mostly an educational process, the process ofletting people know gays are not going to go away," she wae quoted. "We'!e been here since the beginning and we will always be here." Marches, nnradPH or demonstrations wer~ also held m Ues Momet;, Hartford, TuNlon and Columbus. Man shot Norman B. Wilson, 42, of 812 Hawthorne. waa fatally shot in the chest Thursday, June 24, as he left for work at 10:~ p.m., following an argument, police said. The uaailant used a handgun. A suspect was arrested half an hour later at the scene and identified by police as Isadore Anthony Zinda, Jr., 29, of 4503 Montrose Blvd. Zinda had returned to the scene, police said, saying he was con· cemed about Wilson. He later charged with murder and held m lfarria County Jail under$20,000bond Zinda, identified as a laborer, and Wil­son were acquainted prior to the incident, police said. Neighbors said they heard shots, saw Wilson collapse, and saw Zinda pounding on a neighbor's door. But then Zinda left the scene. Montrose Mouth Those new faces in town are the softball players Yep. The lone Star Claulc is in town this weekend Gay softball teams are here from Los Angeles, San Francisco, Dallas, New York. Tulsa (two teams) and Kansas City (also two teams). Ya'll come out and watch the games Saturday and Sunday. Consolation games will be at the regular MSA field, Levy, Saturday, but the main games Saturday will be at Westwood Field ~one short block south of Loop 610. west of Stella Link) and at Heights-Lyons Field (on West 13th. one block east of N Shepherd), running 9:30am to about 3:30pm Then Sunday, starting 9:30am and running probably until early evening, the championship playoffs will be at Westwood Field (no games Sunday at Levy Field or Heights-Lyons Field). The eight out~f-town teams will be competing against eight Hpuston teams (Briar Patch. Brazos River Bottom. Mining Company. Galleon, Dirty Sally's. A&K Jewelry. Jim's Gym and, yours truly, the Montrose Voice. {Our first game is against San Francisco's Cafe Tara Bond at 11 :30am Saturday at Heights-Lyons Field.) Be real fr1endly to these fellows at the clubs over the weekend The complete schedule is m the sports pages of this issue of the VOICE. -·- Country music recording artist Ro1e M1ddox and Hollywood comedienne Joan Rivers are to serve as grand marshallsat the National Gay Rodeo in Reno opening July 30. This is the seventh year for the annual event and organizers say they looking for 25,000 visitors this year -·- And, lo and behold, it wasA.nlta Bryant on the boogie floor at at an Atlanta straight disco a week back AP snapped her pix. both the Post and Chronicle in Houston carried 1t. and Miss Bryant says she a1n t pleased She was caught jumping with the Rev. Ru11 Mccraw. a strange fellow who claims he was once homosexual, was ··cured." and now has a ministry .. curing·· other gay people Remember what Dear Abby said about Anita and her ··save Our Children'' organization? She said, "'It's a fact that ·our childen' do not need to be ·saved' from homosexuals. To use 'God.' the 'American Flag' and the emotionally charged cry to ·save Our Children' in an effort to deny employment , housing and public accommodations to a whole segment of our population because of their personal sexual preference is outrageous•• Go get ·em Abigail! -·- So, you've been wondering when's a good time to go to the Rlngllng Brothers and Barnum a Bally Circus at the Summit? Try about two weeks from now. 8pm Wednesday night. July 14 That's when several Montrose groups will be going. So get a group of your V'Yn together and come own down Tickets are available at the Tower Theater box of1ce and many other locations around the city. ·•- Steve Wallace of Gultgate lane1 says he"s got a new Sunday rrud-day gay bowling league going, 11am-2pm. lt"s an ideal way to fill up Sunday morning for non-church goers. says Steve 4 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 2, 1982 THE GALLEON Welcome, the EAGLES, softball team from New York Happy Hour Daily 2-Bpm Thursday Buffet 8pm 2303 Richmond 522-7616 JULY 2, 1982 /MONTROSE VOICE 5 1 Year A 0 Whitmire speaks at gay political rally g By Johannes Stahl . . at the rally Instead ofa tap beer bust, a thedavaf rtherallyandsatdthatSpotts July J, 1981 The traditional Gay Poht1cal ~aucus station wagon filled with cases of beer Park was left cleaner than on any pre- Woma ' b • d (GPC) Rally at Spotts Park followmg the arrived and its supply disappeared vious year n S r UISe GayPrideParadewasthebestattendedin quickly. A large fireworks display ended Hous· body found the five year history of the event, with Ontheplussidethough,Bagnerissaida ton's fifth major Gay Pride Week The partially-clothed body of Delores Kalis· estimates of the crowd said to be at least Parks Department official contacted him celebration. zewski, 51, was found in her Montrose apart· 12,000. ment at 420 W. Alabama. GPC president Larry Bagneris said he Police began an investigation. personally thought the crowd was as high July/, 1981: as 18,000 and "double" the attendance of Fi the previous year when heavy rains re gutted pawnshop drenched the park. A Montrose pawn shop, Shaw's, at 1014 W. Bagneris had previously announced Gray was destroyed by fire. Fire investiga· that this year's rally would be less politi· tors were checking on the possibility of cal with emphasis on entertainment. arson, as the location had been the scene of Taped music by Larry Fought and Cherry several other fires. Wolf and live entertainment by Houston July 1, 1981 Off Broadway and John Day& Company Political group kicked w~ p;;~~-::~al of Houston's political Off '81 election effort power was present. Amidst cries of "We The regular meetingofthe Gay Political Cau- want Kathy," Bagneris presented Mayor cus, held at the downtown Holiday lnn, Kathy Whitmire. This marked the first attracted the largest crowd ever for the group time that a. mayor of Houston had because of fired up interest following Gay a ttended the rally, although Whitmire had Pride Week, they said. done so in 1980 when she was City U.S. Congressman Mickey Leland, whose Controller. district includPd Montrose, made the keynote "Thanks for a wonderful welcome," she speech to the standing-room-only crowd. said. "It's good to see so ma ny people who July 7, 1981· have been friends of mine for a Jong time. Dozens arrested rm pleased to be on the stage with elected C officials who are friends of mine and in hicago friends of yours." Police claimed it was not a case of a crack· down on the gay community but30men were arrested in a one week period ending July 7. The arrests occurred outside three gay bars and one theater showing gay erotic films. July 7, 1981 Police told not to enforce "failure to identify" ordinance Houston police were instructed not to make an a rrest simply becauee a person refused to identify himself. The in•truct.:ion to the orticen wa• made pending the outcome of an appeal ofa recent fede ral judge's ruling on the subject. In the paet, officers had arrested people simply for "failure to identify" themselves. Montrose Voice the newspaper ol Montrose 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston. TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copynght 1982 Office hours: 10am-6pm Henry McClurg publ11Mt «llrOt Johannes Stahl B1tl1e Duncan en1e1l11flmen1 aporta eoi1or Ed Martmez Nick Fede Acel Clark gral)tllCI Wilham Marberry .Overl111rrg 11r«:IOT Randy Brown ao.,..r/41n9 David Petluck M1vert1smg .L,.y,l. .,H,,a,,m,,gs Aonme Stephens .Overt1Jrl'lf1 Foundmg M11mbM Gay Preu .4.UOC••l>On Nt>wS SenllCH 1n1ern1t1on1I Gly Nrw~ Agency. P1c1l•t N• w :-~:e.,,d F-Hlure Services & W"/ers 1San Francisco) Ch10- ni.:MI fe11urM. Un•le<I Feature Syndicate Jellrey W•tton Randy Allred. Slont'wlll FeaturesSyndit:ate. Bdan ~.-kNiw9hl POSlM..,!ilER Send address orr«t•onl to 1317 ~or>tro •306 Ho~lon l )( 77006 Subs1.1ipt1ofl r.are 11 .15 $49 pe1year152 llSI.*). S7.9 per••• tn0n•tts 121 ie.sutl). or St 2S per week 1le$S then ?f> ISSllH :=~~::~~=-::~;~c-f;~,~~1~) :=::· A~•l•ntl' dNdl•n6 Each Tuea.dfty 6 )()pm 101 NUC! '91e11Md MCI'! Frtdlly ..,_l'llng Whitmire added, "We have a hard job before us and you, and together, we can get the job done." City Council members George Greaniae, Dale Groczynski and Jim Greenwood &ha red the stage with Mayor Whitmire. Additionally, Lance Lalor, the present City Contro11er; Mike Driscoll, Harris County Attorney; and Debra Danburg, State Representative District 79; were present. Lucia Valeska, Director of the National Gay Task Force based in New York, spoke to the crowd. She said, "NGTF wants to learn how to turn locaJ muscle into national clout and you in TexBB know how to do it." Bagneris announced plane for a mas­sive GPC membership drive which was started at the rally. But according to volunteers working at the voter registra· tion and GPC mailing list booths, regisb'a· tion that night was light. A problem arose with the beer delivery Police chief speaks at 'Day of Remembrance' "Fl"ar not that your life shall come to an end, but rather that it shall never have a beginning." This quotation of John Henry Newman was read at the invocation at Gay Pride Week's National Day of Rememberance held Tuesday, June 22, at the First Unitarian Church, 5210 Fannin. The annual event was sponsored by the religious organizations and churches of the gay community with the Universalist <Unitarian) Gay Caucus hosting the ser­vices. ThE' printed program of the services was dedicated to the Rev. Fater Mark Maurice Barron 0.P., a Jong time friend of Houston 's gay religious community. Houston Poh <·e Chief Lee Brown addressf.'d the services as a last minute surprise. "The Montrose Church of Christ invited Chief Brown to attend June lst. but he didn't confirm until an hour before the schNiulOO start of the st>rvices," reported church member Clay Garrison. "I have a firm belief about law enforce· mcnt,'' Brown said. •·Jt can't be successful in carrying out its mission of law enfor~ ment without cooperation of the people it fierves Stressing public involvement and feed· back he said, "It is better to get involved today as an active witness than to be a victim tomorrow ." Chief Brown is optimistic that he will -Mt.'e I Joust.on aa "u greal C'ity become& a safe city." He would a lso like to see the Houston Police Department become a "showcase for the nation." Interact/ Houston, a non-profit educa­tional institution, gave a slide presenta­tion called "Houston's Gay & Lesbian Movemen t, Past to Pre!>l"nt,'' depicting the movl'ment from the early gay pride days of Cherryhurst Park in 1975 to Gay Pride Week "81 The National DayofRememberanceis a day dedicated to the anniversary of the Stonewall Riots in New York in 1969 as a tribute to all lesbians and gay men who have given their lives in the cause of gay civil rights. the organizers said. Gay Hispanic Caucus holds fiesta By Johannes Stahl The Gay Hispanic Caucus staged a Fiesta at 2504 Mason last Friday evening, June 25, 88 a Gay Pride Week event. The lawn party featured live Spanish music, chaJupas and beer and marked the fi fth a nniversary of the group. Lucia Valeska, director of the National Gay Task Force (NGTF}. announced that literature from NGTF was being trans· Gay Hispance Caucus TMmbers Denis Medin.a (lef t) and Jose Luis Fonsttci lated into Spanish. She brought the first of the translations to be distributed at the fiesta. An NGTF booklet, "About Coming Out," is now available as "Sohre El Asunto De Darse A Conocer Como Homosexual" for the gay Hispanic community. "We must go forward as one in a multi­faceted form," she said. 6 MONTROSE VOICE / JULY 2, 1982 Move afoot to end government regulation of advertising Heb.1th warnings in cigarette ads could soon disappear if Congress approves a measure barring the governement from regulating fairness in advertising, reports the Washington Post. Although the bill, introduced by Wiscon· sin Senator Robert Kasten, doesn'tspecifi. cally eliminate the required health warning, it does limit the Federal Trade Commission's authority. which one FTC commissioner says .. will make it extremely difficult" to continue cigarette ad reguaJtioni;. In addition to cigarettes, the bilJ would Me#ico $219 per person Alf & land, double occ., Cancun, Puerto Villarta, Acapulco, Cozamel Call Bob, 821-2577 24 hours major cred it cards travel tickets issued 24 hours a day Houston Travel Consultants ~ ~ Patricia Anne O'Kane Attorney at Law • Criminal matters • Estate planning • Corporations • General civil practice • Seven years experience 3323 Yoakum 526-7911 permanently end government attempts to ban ads aimed strictly at children, and would prohibit the government from cracking down on ads that encourage the unsafe use of produeu;. The bill , currently before the Senate Commerce Committee, has the strong sup-; port of both the advertising and tobacco industries. Fairness in advertising, says Tobacco Institute spokesman Jack Mills, "is so broad a term that anybody can think an ad is unfair." A lousy way to lose weight Researchers at Yale University say they've discovered that, contrary to popu­lar belief, smokers do not eat less than non-smokers. In fact, they tend to eat more, reports the Executive Fitness GAY PRIDE WEEK SPECIAL Custom frame your Gay Pride Week Poster H111,IH·d nw1oil li,1m« w11ho111 m;11 , _~• .~ h-,, !!0~-• 111 cl'"'~~ ,, "'"' ..... """'1' 9~~ ~.~ "'uh I 1hu l11ll'I ~ •itiro In., ~O'l, -lh I ~ Frame of Reference 1.7.'l.1 Wt\lheimer '>20-07!0 •011 d1~p1 .• , II I Ill \ ( JJf11t· "hop DD BASIC BROTHERS MENSWEAR 1220 Westhelmer 522-1626 Open 12-6 daily except Sun. Call for consignment information Neu:sletter However, due to some kind of myste­rious body chemistry that's not yet under­stood, smokers don't absorb as much of the food . The ret;earchers think it may have som• thing to do with nicotine lowering the body's efficiency. But at any rate, they don't recommend smoking as a way oflois ­ing weight, not if you want to live long enough to enjoy your trim figure. Cocaine crackdown in Bolivia Pacifi!" New• Service International pressure may finally be forcing Bolivia to crack down on itB $1 billion cocaine trade. Newsweek magazine says the govern· We Understand ~a Your Type 3~ • Letterhead/ Envelopes ~~ • Business Cards • Party lnvttations ~~ • Ac&Flyers .,~ • Broch.:res :I. • Layout Service ~>I ~~' C•ll Bill 522-4251 ~~ Investment Opportunities Real Estate Syndications Base Financial Group 330 Fairview 524-1871 Barbara Hanson Income producing properties in the Montrose, Bmz and middle city areas. owner/broker/syndicetor ------- - ment, bankrupt and unable to obtain for· eign loans, has launched an offensive against coca crops and processing plants. Authorities claim to have put 80 jungle labs out of business. but U.S. officials say the real proof will be a crackdown on smuggling rings. Are we not flacks? Ford has Telly Savalas but Volkswagen could have Devo, reports Wheels magazine. Besides singing the praises of de. evolution, the band is trying to whip up enthusiasm for their matching fleet ofVW Sciroccos, Devo member Jerry Casale says he likes his car so much he's willing to do a com­mercial, but no one's asked. BIG SALE! Garden Party Finery Get your shoes, hats, dresses, jewelry, etc., etc., etc. Consignments taken Hours 11am-6pm Monday-Saturday 1405 California 523-5552 ~ Bonded Insured * ATCO !~~c!eP.0~!~0F~as • Ticks • Rats • Mice Home or Business FAST SERVICE STRONG GUARANTEE LOWEST PRICES 988-1331 lntroductorv Special 13aao Call Now for ~ Information lJt FOLLOWING A LIFESTYLE ••• YOURS ••• IN THE VOICE MONTROSE V 0 I C E ·------------------------ : ~ONE\l\"STH I . CUSSIC'82 : GYRO GYROS 1 SANDWICH SHOPPE I I I I I I I I I 1536 Westheimer 528-4655 JULY SPECIAL, WITH THIS AD with this ad Gyro Sandwich, Fries and Coke, $2.85 Open llam-lOpm everyday (till midnight Friday & Saturday) Imported Beer and Wines ~------------------------ Personaliud Custom Jewelry & Rings Designed to Refkct Your Lifestyk! Serving Montrose Since 1974 Immediate Cash We Buy • Gold • Silver • Jewelry •Gems • Coins • Watches -·- The ROUGH CUT I 520 Westht!imer Suitt! K 520-7050 11 :30 AM to 2 00 AM 1408 WESTHEIMER 528·3878 Wine Bar and Restaurant Three Blocks west of the Tower Perfect for after the theatre ... JULY 2, 1982 / MONTROSE VOICE 7 Every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, 7- lOpm, the nostalgic music of the Manning Music Company Every Thursday, Friday, Saturday, 9:30- 1:30, the all new Happy Trails Riders Every Sunday, 8-midnight The Dixie Kings This coming July 7, noon-7pm, join Tom (Torchy) Lane for a moonchild birthday party 715 Fairview 521-2792 Open noon-2am 7 days a week THE H~'~LE ~'~ 109 TUAM HOUSTON This 4th of July weekend and every Wednesday thru Sunday The Kampy Kapers of KeokiKona at the Top of the Hole, 5pm-lam This Sunday, July 4, free hot dogs with all the trimmings and ice cold watermelon and all the goodies that momma used to have for your 4th of July picnic, 2-6pm 109 Tuam 528-9066 8 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 2, 1982 Judge 'comes out,' pleads guilty in sex case A promint'nt judge in Minneapolis pleadect guilty June:Ll tu charges of St:xual misconduct involving young men, repcrWd As:>1)("iated Press. The judge then read a statement in court telling how he hegan "battling homosex ualitv" when he was 10 and suffered " yea~s of loneliness and a sense of isolation." Henm•pin County District Judge Crane Winton ~aid that he had tried without sue· cess to change his sexual orientation. In exchange for his guilty plea to two misdE"meanor charges. special prosecutor~ dropped two felony charges of having sex with a minor and two misdemeanor cha.rgn of paying forst-x. Winton wa~ sus pt>ndt"d with pa)· from his $4X,000-a-year pot;l after a grand jury returned indict· m··nb involving two youths May ~ Eat your h eart out, Brandon Tartikoff Pacinc New• Service We may nothaveseen theJastofPac-Man . ABC haa bought the rights to the little yellow critt.eT for a prime-time television special this Christmas. The voracious star of the nation's moat populaT video game will also reportedly get h18 own Saturday morning kiddie show. Meanwhile, doctors at the University of Nebraska Medical Center are using Pac­Man to diagnose stress-related problems. Dr. Robert Eliot says the game offers valu­able duee about how individuals deal with stress. He eaye the games can send some peo­ple' a blood pressure soaring from 130 to 220 within a few minutes. The doctor says most people "have no idea they are paying that kind of physiological price." 'Sisters' hold dog show By Daniel Curzon International Gay New• Agency The 'Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence" held their second annual dog show in the heart of San Francisco's gay Castro dis· trict June 13, complete with 50 entrants, Sister Boom-Boom as master of ceremo­nies, and actTess Shirley Maclaine as a aurprise guest. The street had been blocked off for the occasion, and the several thousand observers watched as a man in leather pants with his Great Dane, a man in spot­ted clothes with his Dalmatian, a bulldog weanng the British flag, and even a child or two, paraded up and down the ramps. 'A comedian walks in a courtroom . . . ' Paclnc New• Service Talte my lawauit. Please. K-Tel Recorda isn't laughing about Henny Youngman's latest ventUTe, a recording featuring a steady stream of jokea, accompanied by dance music. K-Tel objecta to the title, Hooked On Henny, which it says waa ripped off from K-Tela'a Hooked On Cla.,ic• and other eimilar titlee. But Henny'e company, Rhino Record•, 1ay1 that argument i.a dumber than some of Youngman'• jokes. Rhino 1ay1 "Hooked On the Bluea," "Hooked On Rock And Roll," and "Hooked On A Feeline," were popular titlea long before K-Tel created ita "Hooked On" aeri ... Playgirl Follies This Saturday, July 3, 10:30pm, $1.00 cover Special guests JILL JORDAN Miss Lone Star Country JERRY HARPER Queen of Hearts Also join us for our Special 4th of July Show Happy Hour Saturday midnight-2am Sunday noon-midnight Mon-Fri 4-8pm Open 10am Mon-Sat, Noon Sun A MONTROSE ALTERNATIVE Pink Elephant . "Oldest & :Sff.\' Friendliest \'· ' in Texas" ~-(:- · QUICK COPYING WORK IN A RUSH? Try our Xerox 9400 for fast & versatile service-usually while you wait. RESUMES-hundreds in minutes on reg· utar paper of special stock REPORTS-printed, c~lated & bound m • j;tty LETTERS-printed on your stationery or letterhead PROGRAMS-Ready on time for your specall event PRICE LISTS-keep up to data BUSINESS FLYERS-hundreds while you welt. ALSO, WE ARE A FULL-SERVICE OFFSET PRINTER Our prices are low but quality work is what we are known tor Among our featured services are • Stationery, enve­lopes. busmess cards • general printing • typesettmg7 • carbonless business forms • color printing • announcements & invitations When you are getting price quotes, give us a call 667-7417 FREE DELIVERY & PICKUP Quality is the difference at SPEEDY PRINTING SER VICE Bellaire Store 5400 Bellaire Blvd. The Community'• Duality Pflnter & St1t10ner -- L.I 522-8227 AIRLINE TICKETS LOWEST PRICES IN TOWN Denver ........... . ...... 99 Kansas City ........... 65/85 Mlnneaplols/St Paul ..... 119 Milwaukee ....•.. , ...... 119 St. Louis ................ 89 Colorado Springs . . . ..... 109 Ft Lauderdale ........... 119 Cleveland ..... • .. • ..... 119 all fares one way Call Rick for Details Serving the Gay Community join us for the superb talents of RUTH HASTINGS thru July 17th Sunday and Monday thru July: Baj as f ea tu res the fantastic Jerry Quinones and Charlene Wright Our chef has done it again! Our new summer menu has lower prices and higher quality! A Jew new daily items include­Chof> Ped Sirloin Baja-6.95 Battered Fried Filet of Sole- 7. 95 Chicken Fried Steak (excellent!)-8.50 &ffe En-Brochette-8.95 Remember to join us for Happy Hour Monday thru Saturday, 4 to 8 PM for 75¢ well drinks! Moral Majority says it's has financial problems The executive vice president of Moral Majority says the conservative lobbying group has cash-flow problems that have put it in serious finanacial trouble, reports AP. Ronald Godwin said in a direct-mail appeal in June that "Moral Majority barely has enough money to print our next newspaper," the monthly Moral Majorzty Report. In the letter, Godwin asks for gifta from $15 to $50 before July 4 for "an old­fashioned rally day for Jerry Falwell," the televison evangelist who founded and directs Moral Majority." Security clearances only for some gay people in UK By Gavin Young Jnl('rnotional Gey N('wt1 Agency British Prime Minister Margaret Thakher Te<'ently announced new guide­Jinei.. for security clearances, including those for homOHexuals. The guidelines were largely as recom· mended hy the Security Commission and now state that "an unconcealed, acknowl· edgt•d and Mtable relationship in Great Bri· tain, with another c·onsenting adult in which no homofiexunl nets take place in public-, no longer involves a party to such a relationship in any vulnerability to black· mail." However, because other countries have laws against homosexuality, the commft.11o1ion fe lt t h u t th i8 wa8jus tifi c uti o n for barring gay people from security posi· tions in the Foreign Service. Likewise, on the Armed Forces issue, the Commission considerrd that male homosexual artR should still remain a criminal offense, "in order to muintain dii.C"iphne." Although thl' recommendations refer only to malee:;, it is understood that th<' government will apply the same rules to lt'Hbians. Since tht" sKond World War, the British SP<:urity <•stablishml'nt hai:; bel'n rocked by a number ofecandals having homosexual implication. However, it was a scandal with heterosexual implications involving Sir Roger Hollis that led to the setting up of tht' recent Security Commission. Sheriff Heard' s office may be declared 'vacant,' says county judge Harris County Judge Jon Lindsay &aid June 30 he expects Texas Attorney Gen­eral Mark White to delcare vacant the office of County Sheriff Jack Heard, according to a report in the Houston Post. Heard ran unsuceesfully against Kathy Whitmire in the last Houston mayoral election and allowed his supparters to "gay bait" Whitmire. Several other officials are expected to ht' ousted from their posts as well, said Lindsay. Lindsay cited sources in White's offic-e that their interpretation of last week's U.S. Supreme Court ruling d.ecl~ring Texas' "resign-to-run" law constitutional means these officials will be removed from th~:~~~i said Lindsay would not reveal his sources. Commissioners court would have to vote on the reappointments to "th ... P<>•lf. -- L.I 5719 Kirby ' Suite 20 Houston, Texas 77005 522-8227 SAN FRANCISCO s271 Round Trip Air Coll Rick for Details JULY 2, 1982 /MONTROSE VOICE 9 ~i:-iA1-R-CRAFT­couPoN SPECIAL Men's & Women's Summer Survival Cuts 515°0 with this coupon only 2110 Lexington 526-5472 MASTER CARD & VISA ACCEPTED ·-----------------------~ We support the Lone Star Classic softball tournament Join us July 6, FULL MOON PARTY with specials PHOTO BY TOM DA VIS 10 MONTROSE VOICE / JULY 2, 1982 JULY 2, 1982 /MONTROSE VOICE 11 The sun shines on our parade Montrose Voice team report by Johannes Stahl and Ed Martinez The cJouds at first threatened to spoil it but finaJly even the heavens did not dampen the day. Gay Pride Sunday boomed out on the streets of Houston and the crowds came out to see it. Gay pt'Ople and many more who neither knew nor cared about one's sexual prefer­ence came out and lined the sidewalks of Westheimer on Gay Pride Sunday, June 27, 1982. The size of the crowd? That depends on who's estimating. Local non-gay media, with helicopters in the sky, put it at b~tween 15,000 and 20,000. Houston police Sgt. E.P. Aldridge said it was 15,000. Gay Pride Week Committttchair Larry Bagne­ris said it was much more. And activist Ray Hill, the "father" of the Houston gay rights movement, termed the other esti­mates "ridiculous" and said the parade crowd was near 70,000. But definitely, Houston's fifth Gay Pride Parade was the largest one yet. The parade line-up of 52 organizations including 37 floats began early afternoon near Shepherd and Westheimer. Dark skies and strong gusty winds threatened last minute construction of entries and the parade itself, but good weather eventually prevailed. Entries were judged about 3:30 p.m. and winners were presented with trophies and a placard to display during the parade. The "Best Non-Professionally Built Float" went to the Diana Awards Founda· tion. The "Beet Professionally Built Float" was given to The Copa. The "Most Original Float" went to Club Houston of the Club Baths Chain. The "Grand Mar· shell's Prize" was awarded to the Loading Dock. And the "Grand Prize For Theme" was be•lowed on the Church of Christian Faith. The bands played, the marchers marched, the floats rolled by magnifi· cently, and everyone was proud. Proud to be gay, happy lo be alive and very human, deeply end intensely human on this day. Gone were the bigotry, the fear and loa· thing of people based on learned hatred or just simple ignoran.ce. Eve~~ne fel~ the spontaneity in the air as traditional r;vals and enemies joined hearts and mmds, and occasionally. hands on this day. The Montrose Symphonic Band fol· lowed the lead motorcycles and the flag. Dallas' Oak Lawn Symphonic Band fol· lowed later and then the Texas A&M Gay Student Services presented the Gay Marching Aggies Band which was replete with kazoo players. In accord with the fact that Sunday was also Gay Pride Week's "Salute lo Louisi· ana" day, Mary's pre!'ent.ed the Olympia Jazz Band, a famous Dixielana jazz band from New Orleans. The Bourbon Puhr Parade Disco from J'\pw Orleans also had a float de('onttcd in Mardi Gras colors. Th(> Different Drum's entry was a vin· tngt• "gangster" car covered w~th .$1000 dollars in $1 denominations which is ear­marked for Kaposi 'a sarcoma research. A group or "mobf'ten~" guarded the rar on the two mile parade route. One incident with the Houston Poli<'<' was reported in the 1000 block of West· heimer near Mary's. Witnesses say that a man crossed Westheimer befor~ the parade from the Liberty Bank parking lot to mid-block by Mary's. In crossing he was neT~~ ~;Jc~sai :~·the man to the side of a police car and searched and h~d~uffed him. When the crowd saw the mcide_nt, they began booing the officers, at which point they removed the handcuffs and placed him in the back of the patrol car. The police then left the scene WJth the man. Larry Bagneris Jr., Chairman of Gay Pride Week Committee '82, said that the roping off of a oection of the street allowed Montrose Voice photos by Ed Martinez, Johannes Stahl and Bill Marberry the parade units to move by the reviewing stand in a more timely fashion. He recommended that next year "the area from the reviewing stand to Numbers 2 be roped off and the direction of the parade reversed. Bagneris said there is not enough room at the line-up area at 2020 Kipling and by reversing direction of the parade it could be handled more ef~:e~t!~· the evening in Spotts Park, 88 thousands of celebrants and s~ton sat around on gr888y hills to watch, listen and partake of the pleasures of the Gay Political Caucus Rally, there wu a feeling of ahared experience. Politicans spoke, leaden conjured up word images to give tongue to emotiorui that threatened lo burst from the bodies of those present. The mayor of Houston, Kathy Whit­mire, appeared to tumultuous applause and almost riotous acclaim from one of the moat enthusiastic segment.a of her consti· tuency, and the crowd showed Her Honor that ahe wu truly loved and appreciated. Then came the firew0<u, and it waa all over ... or is it? 12 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 2, 1982- I JULY 2, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 Lone Star Classic, national tournament, this weekend By Billie Duncan Althou11h two teams have dropped out of the Lone Star Cla88ic (San Francisco Stallions and Los Angeles Spike), the line-up for play is exciting and talent­laden. Besides eight MSA teams, there will be eight out of town teams, coming from coast to coast. Los Angeles is sending the Hotshots, while San Francisco is being represented by Cafe Tara Bond. The Eagles are flying in from New York and Fitness Exchange is arriving from Dallas. Tulsa is bringing in the Blue Boys and Tim's Outlaws; and Kansas City, Mos­souri, is Hning up Cabaret and Open Range. The Montrose Sports Association teams represent both divisions and span from the lead to the cellar. Playing for MSA are Dirty Sally's, the Galleon, Jim's Gym, Montrose Mining Company, Briar Patch, A&K Jewelry, Brazos River Bot­tom and the Montrose Voice. Something is known about the MSA teams, but not a lot of information about the out of town teams is common knowl­edge here in Montrose. So the VOICE called a couple of the team captains to get an idea of what kind of competition was going to take place. The teams contacted are like day and night. The New York Eagles are in the Big Apple Softball League and are tied for first place this year. They were the cham· pions last year and placed third in the Gay World Series. Manager Mike Carey used to live in Houston. It was at his urging that the team decided to come to play in the Lone Star Clauic. But &peaking for the entire team he said, "We're looking forward to it." The Eagles are sponsered by the Eagle's Nest in New York and have been together for seven years. When asked what they would do if they were elimi· natecl early on (which seems unlikely), Mike laughed, "Well, I guess we'll juat have a party the rest of the time." A team that seems like it was born to party is the Fitness Exchange from Dal­las. They face MSA'• Jim's Gym. Man­ager Ronnie Patton wishes that they were matched with an easier team for the MSA Softball LAST WEEK'S RESULTS S1turd1y. June 26 Brier Patch 15 A&K Jewelry Barn 7 Dirty Sally's Mery'• 7 Montrose Mining Jim'• Gym vs. A&K Jewelry, ppd., rain Briar Patch vs. Galleon, ppd .. rain Montrose Mining vs Brazos River Bottom, ppd., rain Sundey, Jun• 27 no gtmN scheduled STAND-INGS ..... Pct GB South Divis/Oii J1G1lleon 6 3 1167 xJ1m'1Gym 6 3 1167 A&K Jewelry 3 6 333 Brier Pitch 3 8 273 MontrOM Voice 2 7 222 NorlhDw1110fl yOlrty S.lly'1 11 1 .917 Montron Mining 5 • 555 ..• Mary'• 5 555 ••• Bern 5 ... 5'• Brazos River Bottom 2 250 7 KCllnched playoff apot ycllnched U,..t pl1ce In division THIS WEEK'S GAMES L .. gue pl1y re1ume1 July 10 MSA Women's Softball LAST WEEK'S RESULTS Sunday, Jun• 27 No g11M1 •ch«iul«J STANDINGS WM Pct GB Renegades 7 1000 Ducks • 1167 21; HeU Ra1Nr1 • 571 3 first round. "I heard they were tied for first, and we haven't even played anyone else. We're not even in a league." The team got together just for this tour­nament. Explained Ronnie, "We practice pretty good with ourselves." He expressed gratitude that there was a 15- run rule and claimed, "We'll be there for Saturday's games, anyway." One thing that bothers Ronnie is that the losers competition is at 3:00 p.m. ''That's the hottest part of the day." So look for the team with T-shirts for uniforms, out Utere having a good time. Said Ronnie, "It's gonna be fun. I think." Hot dogs, soft drinks, T-shirts and but­tons will be on sale and there will be free beer at the fields. Lone Star Classic '82 Softball Schedule Saturday, July 3 At Westwood Field (4045 Lemak. One short block south of Loop 610. West of Stella Link.) Houston Briar Patch vs. Houston Brazos River Bottom, 9:30am New York Eagles vs. Tulsa Tim's Outlaws, 10:30am Kansas City Open Range vs. Houston Montrose Mining Co., 11:30am Houston Galleon vs. Los Angeles Hot Shots, 12:30pm Winners of 9:30 and 10:30 games meet, 1:30pm Winners of 11:30 and 12:30 games meet, 2:30pm At Heights-Lyons Field (On West 13th, one block east of North Shepherd) Houston Dirty Sally's vs. Houston A&K Jewelry, 9:30am Dallas Fitness Exchange vs. Houston Jim's Gym, 10:30am San Francisco Cafe Tara Bond vs. Houston Montrose Voice, 11:30am Kansas City Cabaret vs. Tulsa Blue Boys, 12:30pm Winners of 9:30 and 10:30 games meet, 1:30pm Winners of 11:30 and 12:30 games meet, 2:30pm At Leuy Field (From Montrose, go out Richmond, past Kirby, left on Eastside) Losers from first round at Westwood and Heights-Lyons Fields match up, 3pm Sunday, July 4 Westwood Field More preliminary competition, 9:30am Finals, 2:30pm No games at other fields Sunday Armadillo Grph Twins Kindred Spirits Royal A's Chuck's Angels Speclal Blend 1 571 500 375 .375 2116 167 3 ..3..'..• 5 51; THIS WEEK'S GAMES (Regularglll'Mt•lfondllhtll T•k•l""'55outh10T~u11 T•ll• 1-der- to Muno-r. nghl on Munger. go 1 bloc:k. rum i.ri Sunday, July 4 No garnet scheduled MSA Monday Night Bowling LAST WEEK'S GAMES Monday. June 28 HIGH GAMES Steve Stepleton Tommy Davis Don Housen Dfvi110nA 1. Eurotan lnt'I 2. Blmyard Hoeri 3. 69er1 4 Daddy"1 01v111on a 1. Five Easy Pieces 2 Lois Lanes 3. EJJ'1 Protein Suppllment1 4 Hote E Rolleri HIGH SERIES 234 Tommy Dav11 604 224 Steve Stepleton 598 215 Bob Atkins 577 STANDINGS D1v111on C 1. Cock-TaJlers 2. Citizen Pam 3. Strikeri 4 Strike Force Dlv11ion D 1. Happy Trails 2 Galleon One 3 Gator-Aid 4. Interact THIS WEEK'S GAMES (AM g•r"Mm II stadil.Wl'I 9owl. 8200 lr-n) Monday, July 5 Regular compet1t1on, 9pm MSA Eddie Chavez Mixed Bowling League PREVIOUS WEEKS' GAMES Thuriday, July 1 Results next week HIGH GAMES Thursday, Jun• 24 Phil Blakeway 241.210 Kevin Hull 219 Bob Atkins 216.213.207 STANDINGS (Through June241 1. Just Marion & 7 Thursday Knights Lynn's Tropical Fruit 8 4 to 1 2. The Rockettes 9 Thursday Night 3. For a Few Daddies Tricks More 10. Gutter Sluts 4 Chases 11. Kindred Spints 5. Klndr9d Splrita' Leather & Lace Ac. High 12. Hang 10 6 Salt & Pepper 11 THIS WEEK'S GAMES (All~ •t Stmdium Bow<. 8200 e,_,..111> Thursday. July 8 Regular competition. 9pm Pool Tournaments THIS WEEK'S GAMES Mondey. June 28 K1ndr.<1 $p1r1ta (5245 BuffalO $peedw9y. 865-975eJ at I 30pm. 11ngle ellml.t1111on. $2 entry, winner tAll.e ,1, Rench (8820~ M••n. 53-11730) •t 9 pm. 11ngle e1<m1nal•011. $2 entry, winner lake 111 ($50 ;u•r1ntMI TCHsday, June 29 Lampo9t (2417 Times Blvd, 528-8921) •18pm. aingie9l1~ n1\1011. $2 enlry, winner tAll.• all W«lntdd•Y. June 30 Bt••r Pa!ch (22"' W Holc:omti.. 865-9671) 11 llpm. •l'IQl9 eflm•nahon. $2 entry. S50 pnz• GB I (1•19 Richmond. 52t-ll03) II lpm, ••"91• ehm•na· bOl'I. $2 entry. winner tAll• •II plua new pool o.- Thuf'9dey. July I Barn (710 P9(;1!1C. 52&-14271 at tpm, doUble•hm1natlOl'I. S2 91'111)'. 125 hr11 round pn;r:e. S15 MCOnd round pna Jwt Mli11011 •nd Lynn's (1117 Fauv1ew. 528-9110) at lpn EfJ"I (1213 Richmond. 527·9071) 11 10pm, double •hmlf'ltl· tJOn, $2 entry. W•t\NH' taka 1+1. Sports Barn gives Sally's their first loss Dirty Sally's finally lost. They took their first beating of the season from the Barn, who honestly outplayed and out hit Dirty Sally's 7 to 2 in a very exciting game ... a game that was the best match of a rain-shortened week. It was also one of the season's best games. Dirty Sally's was not up to their usual hitting. But the Barn was superb at bat-they weren't putting many over the back fence, but they were scoring consistent good clean base hits. The Barn's Bill Schmidt did put two home runs over the back fence; but he was also intentionally walked once. Contributing to Dirty Sally's loss were errors in the field that allowed The Barn to keep racking up the points. From beginning to end, it was an exciting and lively contest. Though Dirty Sally's lost, the break in their winning streak was the game of the week and worth seeing. And the Barn? They are ecstatic over their victory even though most of Sally's players don't seem to feel The Barn could do it again. The Barn thinks so. They're already chanting "San Francisco." MSA Tennis TEXAS CHALLENGE CUP RESULTS Rich Ryan ( MSA) over Al Leong (OL TA) 6-1. 6-4 ~ed Lopez (MSA) over Ron Duron (OL TA) 6-2, ~n Draper (OL TA) over Ron Landrum (MSA) 6-1, Jon Papp (OLTA) over John Ryan (MSA) 6-4. 7-5 Mike w .. 1 (OLTA) over Lester V8'a (MSA) 6-1, 6-1 Dav+d Robicheaux (MSA) over Bnan Stamn (OLTA) &-4. 7-5 Jon Colbert (MSA) over Luther Menke (OLTA) 5-7 7-6. 6-4 RyanlRyain (MSA) over WettlPapp (OL TA) 2-6. lh"l. 6-4 Leong/Draper (OL TAJ over RobtcheaUJUElliot (MSA) 6-1. 6-0 Starnes/Duron (OLTA) over Houston/Green 1MSA) 6-0. 4-6. 6-2 CofberVL.andrum (MSA) ~ Menke/Bill NelSOn (OL TA) 2·6. 8-3, 6-3 STANDINGS TOP TEN Bl.ADDER 1. Rich Ryan 1. MichMI Houston 2 Fred Lopez 2 Rich Corder 3 Ron Landrum 3 David Garza 4 John Ryan 4 Char11e Brown 5 Jim Kitch 5. Terry Rich 6 Lester Vela 6 Eddie Cha\19z 7. David Robicheaux 7. DanuM Casillas 8 Jon Colbert 8. Jim Olson 9. Don ''Ringer" Smith 9 Randy Jierscheck 10. M•chHl Green 10. Jimmy Thames 1. RyanlRyain 2 Lopez Hopkins DOUBLES LAOOEA 4. COibert/Landrum 5 Houston/Green 3. Rob•cheaux/Elliot THIS WEEK'S GAMES •eo..naioc.'9donlN~..a.ot t.lenloNi1 0n ... 111,,...,..,,... PwllJ Saturday, July 3 No regular games (Wtmbleton party) 14 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 2 . 1982 Houston wins Texas Challenge Cup By Billie Duncan In a clotiely fought struggle, the Montrose Sports Association Tennis League edged out the Oak Lawn Tennis Association of Dallas to win the Texas Challenge Cup for the second year. The singles matches were generally pretty one-sided, with the side switching from one city to another. Only one of the matches was a real wringer. That was the swat-meet between Jon Colbert of MSA and Luther Menke of OLTA. Luther had been out of action with hepititus, but had worked hard to come back and be able to play in the tourna­ment. He took the first set. 7-5, but Jon came back in the second to swing his way to a tight 7-6 victory. The last set, both men were feeling the heat, but Jon pulled it out, 6-4, to win the match. At the end of the single compition, the MSA was ahead, four matches to three for OLTA. Then the doubles started. The second seeded team from MSA (Lopez.1 Hopkins) had dropped out of the compitition because of the illness of Bobby Hopkins. So, the number three team (Robicheaux/Elliot) moved to the second spot, while the alternate team (Houston/Green) moved into third. Number four (Colbert/ Landrum) remained the same. Robicheaux/Elliot faced the number two team from Dallas, consisting of their number one and number three singles players, Al Leong and Don Draper. The Houston team got squashed, 6-1, 6-0. , The next match saw the third ranked Dallas team of Brian Starnes and Ron Duron facing the fifth seeded MSA team with Michael Houston and Michael Green. In the first set, the OLTA team wiped out the MSA guys, 6-0. But in the next set, Houston/Green ral· lied and pulled out a 6-4 victory over Starnes/Duron. The rally did not carry over into the third and deciding set, how· ever, and they went down, 6-2. So now OLTA was ahead in matches, 54. With only two remaining matches to be played, all Dallas had to win was one more to take the Cup back to Big D. The next match pitted the top teams from each city. John Ryan and Rich Ryan of MSA faced Mike West and Jon Papp of OLTA. Rich was extremely ill from the heat at this point and was vomit­ing between volleys. Jon Papp was also suffering quite a bit from the heat. The first set was won rather decisively by Dallas, 6-2, but Houston came back and set the record even with a 6-3 win­ning set. At that point, the players were given a rest and the action moved to the next doubles match. At the end of two eets between Colbert/ Landrum (MSA) and Menke/ Nelson (OLTA), it looked like an instant replay of the last match. Dallas took the first set 6-2 and Houston took the second 6-3. ' Play then resumed between Ryan / Ryan and West/Papp. Rich Ryan later said, "I was so sick, but I just kept think­mg that I had to do it for MSA." The extra will power helped and the MSA team won the last set and the match by defeating the OLTA team 6-4. TM winnera from Houston and Dallas. Photo by Carl Firn1a. Jon Colbert, winner in the tightest singles match Everything was even up. The tourna· ment W&.8 closer than rush hour traffic on the Southwest Freeway. Everything would be decided by the last set of the last match. Said Carlos Banda ofOLTA, "You had to be out there to understand the emotion of it all." Dallas won the first three games of the set. breaking Houston's service twice. Then ColbertlLandrum caught fire and pulled out the stops. When the last ball bounced, MSA had won the set 6-3. The Texas Challenge Cup would stay in Houston. But the Oak Lawn Tennis Association is undaunted. Said CarJos Banda, "We're hoping to come back next year and bring it back to Dallas." • Racquet ball forming A new group 1s getting togtt}ter to form a racquet ball lt>ague. There are about 40 intere11ted parties so far, according to Phil Blakeway. The group ie not part of Montrose Sports Association but would like to be once they get organized. There will be an organizational meet· ing at Phil's house (call 961-1523 for info) on Tuesday, July 6. Live longer through starvation If the thought of getting old worries you, try eating lees. The New York Tinvs reports that recent animal studies show death and diseases of old age may be put off by limiting your in~~:'.1fr::!,~her Dr. Roy Walford said his "undernutrition" diet contain~ all the required nutrients but abou~ a t1?rid few~r calories than needed to mamtwn whats considered a "nonnal" body weight. His studies indicated that a low-protein, Jow­fat, low·calorie _diet would extend the max­imum human life span~ 140 years, whiJe the average life would mcreaae to more than 120 years. Says Walford, "Long-term undernuti· riton is the only method we know of that retard• aging and extend.a the maximum life span of warm-blooded animal• " He adds that there's noreaaon to believe the diet wouldn't work just as well in humans. MAN'S PRIVATE CLUB LOCKERS SHOWERS PRIVATE ROOMS 1625 RICHMOND 522-1 625 TUESDAY Buck Night ($1 admission) WEDNESDAY: Leather Night THURSDAY: Gym Night ($1 with gym card of T-shirt) SUNDAY; Buddy Night (2 for 1) OPEN NIGHTLY, TUESDAY THROUGH SUNDAY JULY 2, 1982 /MONTROSE VOICE 15 Now an estimated 21,600 readers each week NO ONE covers Montrose like the Voice NO ONE covers Gay Houston like the Voice PROFESSIONAL Hypnosis U Counseling Service ~ ~ SALE! SALE! ~ SALE! SALE! _., Simmons Beauty Rest Discount Center 0 King Size 1reg S600J l; now 15QOO n Queen Size 1reg S400J llllli now 14QOO Personal • Confidential James D. Kristian, Ph.D. REGISTER HYPNOLOGIST IMPROVE: Sleep, confidence, self-worth, shyness, memory, concentration, self-esteem, relaxation, habits, love emotion. OVERCOME Fear, anxiety, guilt, depression, nervousness, drug abuse, alcohol u..J 523-8278 abuse, anger, loneliness, weight. ~ 2115 Norfolk 10-7 M-F 10-6 Sat liWl....iiiiililiillWfllliiilllll• STUDENT AHi> nRST VISIT SENIOR CITIZEN CALL 977•248S DISCOUNT DISCOUNT WITH AD INTERNATIONAL CLUB RESTAURANT 243 WESTHEIMER (in Montrose, near Downtown) l Tel: 523-2795 A GOOD PLACE FOR YOU TO ENJOY "CHINESE LUNCHEON BUFFET" All YOU CAN EAT ... Only $3.75 Buffet served 11am-2:30pm Monday-Friday **** C-- r ·1 " ; ·- . <l,\v>-<"-. I ,,/,~ - vn.tr\"" \_ '- / ,,,. ;r- 4 to 8 PM * TRADITIONAL CHIU-CHOW STYLE (OLD CHINESE) * * Chief cook with 20 years experience-just came from Hong Kong * * Crispy Kung Fu Duck * Crispy Fried Scallops * Sharks Fin with Crab * Chiu Chow Style Meat Shrimp Roles * Sliced Abalone with * Chiu Chow Style Fried Black Mushrooms Oysters * Lobster Tail with Blck *And Many, Many More Bean Sauce Delicious Food-Reasonable Prices Relaxing Atmosphere-Fast & Courteous Services FREE PRIVATE PARKING AREA ORDERS TO GO, Tel: 523-2795 16 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 2, 1982 I Reasonable Hours Likeable Prices at Francisco's 901 Richmond Jerry's Everyday Prices: haircut/blow dry or haircut and set $10 permanent waves $35 colors $20 & up Call us 523-0438 LET YOURSELF GO! TO ALLNEWr GLJJf·G "~. iil~111lhEDmoN1 'l>llpos · · , &'8 OM f\;11 c~R us ~Ill\' Produced By IRYIN FELD and KENNETH FELD Jny 13 thru~y25 .~T~HE=su=MM=IT TUE ... THUii "' SAT " ,. " " 17 1100AM• 318 , .. .. ,., .. ,.. ..,.. Hint 100 ,. " " " " .. .. U,D,.I A..M. • ,... .. ,. . .. ,.. ... ,. ... ,. tKPBC-F AMR y NIGHT TV AU TICKETS 51.85 - 53.35 54.85 a 56.35 1:00 PM SHOW Tuesd1y, JULY 13 TICKETS Oii SALE: SUMMIT BOX OFACE • TICl(£TMASTER Al AIH MOJ\ITGOMERY WARD Storts. DOWNTOWN TICKET • n~:::~NIM::,:Jo~k~o~~i:...~:."~HROU~~SIC ROCKERFELURS. UHIVEllSrTY OF HOUSTON STUDENT CENTER. ASTRODOME BOX OFFICE TOWER THEATRE. WESTCHASE TICKETRON FOR INFORMATION CALL: (713) 111-9003 FOR GROUP RATES CALL: (713) 127-90 0 ... .$.U.N. . , ..... ",, , ... ,,.. 11'I·~ ,·1~1· MONCDAAYL Lth:N ( S7A1TU3ftD)A Y6 2,_7A-M94 t5o·.2 ~ PM ; ' ; Ll Use Your VISA or MASTER CARD (12.• ..... a....,.,.... OrMr) *SAVE $1.00 ON CHILDREN UNDER 12 AT STARRED l'ERFORMANCES ALLSEATSllESEJIYEO M.35 · '5.15 17 .35 • 18.15 Houstlln's Friendliest Country & Western Bar SUl!DAY: 4th of JUiy Bar·B·O. JlON-SAT: Open 7am. llOllDAY: Barn T-Shirt Night & MSA Bowlers Night. TUESDAY: Steak & Marguerita Night. WEDNESDAY: White Light'n Night. THURSDAY: Club Color Night & Pool Tourney. 710 PACIFIC 628-9427 Member Houston Tavern Guild & Home of the Mustangs Congratulations to The Barn's softball team for beating Dirty Sally's, 7-2! This Weekend We support Lone Star Classic '82 The Briar Patch welcomes Tulsa! July 4 Hot Dog & Hamburgers 4pm at the Briar Patch Briar" l~h 2294 HOLCOMBE HOUSTON 665·9678 JULY 2, 1982 /MONTROSE VOICE 17 Montrose Live Ruth Hastings and Craig Jessup: a musical marriage By Billie Duncan They are both preacher's kids and grew up singing in church. Ruth HaAtings' father was a Southern Baptist end Craig Jes sup's dad was an American Baptist. So how did they get together? "We met in a bar," explained Ruth. From choir to cabaret was quite a trip for both or them. Ruth got bitten by the theater bug and decided to study drama in college. The col­IE> ge that she attended was William Jewell College in Liberty, Missouri. A real biggie. Actually, the college was famous for one outstanding reason. lt was the home of the Concert Choir of William Jewell College, which toured all over the world under the direction of Wes Forbis. Ruth auditioned and was accepted. So when she was not going to classes (in "tasteful wooden stacked heels and tweed skirts"), she was practicing with the choir and touring. Not only did she tour all over the United States, but she went to eight countries in Europe and a great hunk of Mexico. Sa.id Ruth, "That was the best training I got, music-wise." In the meantime, Craig Jessup was a drama major at Oregon State University. Both of them wound up in or around San Francisco, Ruth as a music teacher and Crqig doing what he could. While Ruth was performing in Jacques Brei in Palo Alto, she was approached by a person who said he was putting together a Noel CowardlCole Porter show. He asked her if she would be interested in being in it. Ruth said, "Sure." She auditioned and got the job. "And on top of that, I was going to get paid!" The show was rehearsed and ready to Ruth Hastings. Photos by Billie Duncan. opE'n at a club called Le Domino. Ruth showed up on the night that the show was to open, and the sidewalk was lined with motorcycles. Explained Craig, "They were the kind of motorcycle riders who liked Cole Porter and Noel Coward." After the show closed, Ruth was kept on as the featured singer and started to build up a following. Craig heard that there was entertainment at the club, so he applied as a piano player. He was told, "We don't need a piano player, but we do need a bartender." Craig replied, "Okay, I'll do that." When he heard Ruth Hastings sing, he fell in love-with her voice. Over the next year or so, they became good friends, with Craig supporting her by providing a friendly shoulder and by carting her ward· robe around for her. One night, she was singing "Look at Me, I'm Sandra Dee" and he "started doing the doo-wahs. '' That was the beginning. Slowly, very slowly, he started being worked into the act. "I was very rough then," said Craig, "I was )earning." "We were both )earning," added Ruth. One thing they learned was that they wanted to share more than music with each other. They were married in Oregon. And now they have even more to share with each other. Craig Robert Jessup is six and a half months old and almost as entertaining as his highly entertaining parents. Ruth worked until she was seven months pregnant, and Craig was lucky in that he was cast and started rehearsals for B.-r Grorge, a musicaJ revue that featured George Gershwin's music, just when Ruth could no longer work. Nona Hendricks 'one on one' concert at By Nick Fede The stage curtains parted to reveal stands of light and kelly green balloons which surrounded a large Gay Pride Week poster that read. "A Part Of-Not Apart From." Then the dynamic Nona Hendricks liter­ally burst onto the Numbers 2 stage in her performance at Sunday, June 27, by s~ep· ping through the poster and launching into the lyrics of lady Marmalade, a well rememi>t:red hit she recorded as part of the disbanded three member group "Labelle". Resplendent in a red and black quilted jacket and skirt that featured matching gloves and hat, the songstress emitted aura and lambda·high energy and pure light The lady is not afraid to get hot, to swea.t and to give her fans a 100% en.ioya· hie show. "l'vr always strive to have~ one to one relationship with the audience even though I can focus on one ?r ~ore (J:"H!r­sons)," she said in an exclusive mterv1ew after the show at the Montrose club, 300 Westheimer. Nona Hendricks' focus was clearly evident as she sang her. remake of the Supremes 1960s hit, Itching In My Heart. Throughout the number she directed her lyrics to individuals seated 0!1 the stage steps. She also stooped to a posi­tion that created direct eye contact with them. While most performers are ve~ careful to have the steps and the immediate stage area cleared for security r~asons when they perform, she did not. This allowed the packed fans seated on the steps and stand­ing throughout the c~ub a clearer and closer view of her 3().mmute per~ormance. Energetically sweating, the smger took off her jacket to reveal ~ new. w~ve inspired T·shirt imprinted with a pambng of a computer. She next sang her new_est release, Do What You Want ~? Do, wh1c~ was recorded with the group The Cage: The singer was joined on stage fo.r this number by two men who danced w~ile the audien<'e clapped along. At one point two more men jomped up onto the stage and they were followed by yet another. "(Only) two of the guys I had asked to dance and they all came up", she explained later. When asked if the impromptu perfor· manct> by some of the audience members di$turbed her she replied, "Yes, I can see audiences feeling left out because of that kind of stage participation." She explained that "It breaks up the focus of the attention," but said she con­tinued to perform with the situation after iL was created. She spoke about her former grouP, Labelle, and remembered their per­formance at the prestigious Metropolitan Opera in New York. ''We were the first black group to play at 'The Met,' she said. What about her appearanace on the Numbers 2 float in the Gay Pride Parade earlier that day? "I did enjoy it," she said. She also joked that this was her first time The 'Best of Diana' outdid the Academy By Nick Fede (Editor's note: The Diana Foundation is a gay community support organization that has worked for 29 years to aid members and groups. 1'hey provide funds for scho­larships, cancer reasearch and other rauses.) Outrageous fun for a good cause was the order of the evening when the Diana Foun" dation presented "The Best of Diana" on June 22 at Numbers 2 Disco, 300 Westheimer. The show was a benefit for the Gay Political Caucus and the Montrose Chnic. It consisted of a video-taped presentation interspersed with Jive performances on stage of some of the material that was performed at the 29th Annual Diana to ride in a parade because, "The Rose Bowl never called." She said at different points during the long ride down Westheimer, different thoughts were flying through her mind. They wE're, .. What am I doing here?, this i8 wonderful (the parade and people)," and somt>times she thought of "Nothing at all." She had recently taken a nine month leave from performing and recording in Europe, when she was asked to do the vocals on Busting Out, which she co-wrote with two friends and recorded with "Material" (In Europe). "I was writing and thinking, but basically I wrote music," she said. She expects to do the vocals on another single with Material, which is scheduled for a late August release. She has written new material for an album, which she will Award Show held earlier in the year at the Tower Theater in Montrose. Just what is the Diana Award Show? It is simply the Foundation's spoof of the annual Academy Awards show. Presen· ters included prominent members of the Montrose community, sporting elaborate drag and names such as Louella Phoebe, Angella Lynnsbury and Alice B. Toklas. Alice was a favored presenter who had flown in for the ceremonies from her "stud bull ranch in Lesbianola, Texas"-or so she said. One interesting musical number was "We've Got a Lot of Giving to Do," sung to the melody of"We've Got a Lot of Living to Do" from the Broadway musical Bye, Bye, Birdie. Among the "awards" was one given to the now·defunct Montrose Pub. Quipped the presenter, "What aspired to be a P?Or man's Baja Sam's was, in reality, a nch man's Midnite Sun" One number in the show was "BalJet de Swine," danced humourously by cast members. Les Trocadero Des Monte Carlo Since Craig and Ruth wished to share the birth experience, there were "greatdis­cui;; sions'' on what would happen if she went into labor when he was in the show Labor started at 3:0 a.m. on a Saturday All day long, Craig called the theater explaining that the baby could come at any time. Fina11y. the- theater cancelled the performance. The new star arrived at 9:30 p.m.­showtime~ So now. they travel together. The warmth and love of these two people comes across as clearly as their talent when they perform. Care is taken in the selection of material and in the construc­tion of their f!ets. "Even when we get requests, we try to put them together in a cohesive way," said Ruth. Added Craig, "We try to make it more like a theater" They succeed. Their shows are tight and aimed as truly as Robin Hood's arrow. Ruth Hasting's voice is fl masterpiece of sound with a depth and vibrance that is astounding. Craig's vocals support and add to an already full performance. The third member of the team is pianist Barry Lloyd, who has a story of his own. His backgrond is also theater. His mother was an actress, and he used to help her learn her lines. She did lots of musicals, so music was always around the house. Explained Ruth, "He coulcln 't eacape it." Thank heavens he did not escape it! But for an e~cape from the hum-drum and the half-way, try Ruth Hastings & Company at Baja's, 402 Lovett, through July 17. Nona Hendrick1> begin recording soon. Do What You Want To Do is being released on the Warner Brothers label as a remix and should hit Houston record racks by pret;S time. (the imfamous ballet company) might have rejected this bunch A di~co intermission followed during which the crowd mixed and boogied on the dance floor When the tape resumed. one song. "Your Aas Belongs to Mommy," (a parody of "My Heart Belongs to Daddy") was out­standing. It featured a Joan Crawford look-alike who sang while seated on a huge representation of a coat hanger. The Loading Dock was also awarded a Diana. Cracked Alice after the award, "l always thought a harness and stirrups were made for a horse, not an ass." A musicaJ tribute to fashion featured "Thouroughly Modern Preppy" and "We're into Leather." Both numbers had performers in costumes that appropriately matched the lyrics. Bath towel choreography was heavily employed in "Hepatitus Eyes," a parody of the popular Bette Davis Eyes." It was definitely the best award show of the season, and a much more entertaining program than the Academy Award pres­entation. Any day. 18 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 2, 1982 Cynthia Manley pleases Copa crowd as last minute substitute By Nick Fede It wa.o.; a night of pleasant surprises on June 25 at the Copa, 2631 Richmond, when Cynthia Manley took to the stage. She replace scheduled headliner Kelly Marie. who for the second time cancelled her appearance at the club. The Copa management informed the crowd by loudspeaker that they had can­celled Kelly Marie for "a derogatory remark she made abciut gay people." They added. "There will be no more Kelly Marie records played in the club." Manley began her show with When Love ls G<mt", a high stepping and fast paced tune. The audience responded by presenting her gifts of roses and money throughout the number. She next sang Weak Woman in a Strong Mari'• World, a searing and soulful ballad. In mid-number she attempted to walk off the stage via the steps but tripped and fell. Composing herself and looking up she craC'ked to the audience, •·Believe it or not I took modeling school." l'he pile of money behind her kept gain· ing intt>reet as she sang Ain't No Mountam1 Remember Me. After the song she made reference to riding on the Copa's float in the Gay Pride Parade on Sunday. "Yes, I'm the lucky bitch who gets to ride on the Copa float," she teased. An interetiting lighting touch was color­ful neon lightening bolts built into the Copa's dance floor ceiling, adding excite­ment and emphasis to her lyrics. Her remake of Back In My Arms Again, a familiar hit by Motown writers Holland and Dozier, finished her eel The ~ver growing piJe of dollars was by then a tribu­table hill of money. She later joined Copa owner Gene Howle in the small quiet bar for an on· titage duet. They sang standards such as Old Cape Cod. which prompted him to Cynthia Manley remark atter the song to her, "Would you be my partner forever." A wonderful ad-lib of Last Time I Came To Texas sung in the same melody as the Diana Rose hit Last Time I Saw Him, followed. The song I'm in the Mood for Love, usu­ally a tame love tune, became a hilarious X-rated duet. Howlesang"I'min the mood for love, simply because you're near me," to which Cynthia chirped, "Only because you're well hung." Manley is best known for her vocals on the Boystown Gang recording of Ain't No Mountain/ Remember Me. "I had gotten great money to do the two tracks," she said in a post-show interview. She talked of her involvement with Moby Dick Records, "Moby Dick was very good to me, but they offered me a contract that I could not sign When the deal with Moby Dick did not work out, "I went independent," she said. At one time the powerhouse blond singer seriously thought of teaching grade school. "I started working li· .. a and never stopped,'' she said. Having worked with many bands and performing at clubs were part of the singers early performing day.a. One of the main influences in Cynthia Manley's life is friend David Harvey, her manager, and producer and song writer. He wrote and produced When Love ls Gone, in addition to producing Weak Woman in a Strong Man's World. When asked how she felt about ridingm the Gay Pride Parade atop the Copa's float. she replied. c•rm looking forward to seeing all those beautiful bodies in Hous· ton, Texas.' .. It's an orgasm," she said referring to performing Jive. •·The only thing better than sex is a good crowd." Nightclub Entertainment This Week In Montrose 'F 1y. ly2 tnrougn T~l'ld•y. Juty8) • PIANO Nat & Janet 9pm Friday and Saturday; Montgomery Mayes & Stntch 9pm Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday at Rascals. 2702 Kirby, 524-6272 Greg Davia 8.30pm Friday, S 1Spm Saturday and 830pm Sunday. Tommy Williams 8:30pm Saturday, Monday. Wednesday. Thursday; Kenny Parton S 1Spm Sunday and 830pm Tuesday: and V1rg1I Dixon 5 15pm weekdays at Keyboard. 3012 Milam 528-6988 Richard Askin and Dana Rogers 10pm rughtly 1exc.apt Monday and Tuesday) at the Copa (piano bar) 2631 Richmond. 528-2259 Ruth Hastings 9pm nightly (except Sunday and Mon­day); L10nshare 9pm Sunday and Monday at Ba1a·s. 402 Lovstt. 527·9866 Lee LaForge 8:30pm nightly (except Sunday) with Alexandra Haas Friday. Saturday and Wednesday at Arno·a, 4002 Montrose. 528-2993 Marquerite 4 30pm Monday through Friday at Bae· Chua 52'.l l0¥~1. S.:V--'3396 529-7525 ·,~'.~ Saturday & Sunday only $5 Liquor Bust, 4-7pm Houston's Wettest Happy Hour WEEKLY SPECIAL: Frozen Strawberry Daquerles • ORGAN Keok1 Kona 5pm Friday and Saturday. 3pm Sunday and 5pm Wednesday and Thursday at the Hole, 109 Tuam. 528-9066 • COUNTRY a COUNTRY/ROCK The Happy Trail Riders 9pm Friday and Thursday at Happy Trails. 715 Fairview 521-2792 Ab & the Rebel Outlaws 9 30pm Fnday and Saturday and 8:30pm Thursday at the Exile. 1011 Bell. 659- 0453: and 8 30pm Sunday at Brazos Rrver Bottom, 2400 Brazos. 528-9192 Ftying Blind Band nightly (except Monday and Tues­day) at Miss Charlotte's, 911 Drew. 528-8840 Mustang Band 9:'JOpm Fnday, Saturday. Wednesday and Thursday at Brazos A1¥9f Bottom. 2400 Brazos, 52~9192 •GUITAR ~usan Chnatian 5pm Fnday. lyratKat Graham & Linda Aum Rhyme 5pm Monday. Wednesday and Thursday. and Rawslyn Ruffin 5pm Tuesday at Kindred Spints. 5245 Bullalo Speedway. 665-9756 • SHOW GROUPS D1K1e Kings 9pm Saturday and Spm Sunday at Happy Trails. 715 Fa1rv1ew. 521·2792 Mata Han 9:30pm Friday and Saturday at Lampost 2417 Times Blvd 528-8921. and 8pm Wednesday at Bacchus, 523 Lo..,eu. 523-3396 John Day & Co 8pm Sunday at E/J's, 1213 Rich­mond. 527-9071 Manning Music Company 7pm Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday at Happy Trials, 715 Fa1rv1ew. 521-2792 • REGGAE Paul Hurlock gpm Friday and Thursday at Harrar·s. 429 Westhe1mer. 526-2895 • IMPRESSIONISTS Tiflany Arnegus. Donna Day. Naomi Sims & Hot ChOColate Sunday evening at the Copa. 2631 Rich­mond. 528-2259 Utlle Bobby, Tracey and guest Sunday evening at Exile. 1011 Bell, 659-0453 "'Playgirl Follies" with Jill Jordan and Jerry Harper 1030pm Saturday at Pmk Elephant. 1218 Leeland. 65!1-()040 • MISCELLANEOUS Talent shows Tuesday e¥enmg at !he Copa. 2631 Richmond. 528·2259. Wednesday evening at M1dnite Sun. 534 Westhe1mer. 526-7519, and Thursday eve­i1ng at Tw1n1, 535 Wes1he1mer. 520-0244 . :~~. TWELVE, FOURTEEN, SIXTEEN INCHES? Star Pizza will deliver hot and juicy to your door COME PLAY IN OUR NEW UPSTAIRS VIDEO GAME ROOM * OVEN HOT DELIVERY * PIPING HOT CARRY OUTS * CASUAL DINING ROOMS * New York-Style hand-thrown pizza * Chicago-style deep-dish pizza * Also available with whole wheat crust * Vegetarian p izza 2111 NORFOLK * Star burst deluxe p izza (the works!) HOURS: * Super sa ndwiches & salads Mon: 11 :30am-11 pm * Fantastic deserts ~=~:s~~:Io:!:~~~pm * Imported & domest ic beer Thu: 11 :30am-11 pm TRY OUR NEW LASAGNA Fri: 11:30am-midnight CALL 523-0800 ~:~, ':.,:-.';'~~;~~~ PLEASE ALLOW 1 HOUR FOR DELIVERY Intimate moments can make for pleasa.nl memories, but oc asionally something a lot less pleasant lingers as well ­cr; bs. for ex~mple. Now there's RID,* a liqu1d .treat".'ent that kills crabs in 10 minute~ and provides rapid rehef of 1tchmg RID contains a safe. medically proven natural mgred1e~t at al most twice the concentration of the leading non prescription product. Each package also includes an m struct1on brochure and fine-tooth comb for lice and nit removal. You can .buy RID at _your pharmacy without a prescription and began treatment at once. . But remember. 38% of the people _w1th crabs have been found to have something worse like VD So if you thank you may have been exposed 10 something more than crabs. see a doctor. RIO -Safe, effective treatment for crabs. JULY 2, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 2~02 Kirby 524-6272 MonJ.§~~~~f_:s~~f,~~u~. ~'~~itch serving Lunch Monday-Friday 11:30·2:00 Dinner Monday-Thursday 6:30-11:00, Friday & Saturday 6:30-12:00 July 4 Sunday Brunch 11:30-3:00 (closed July 5) Harrar:s Ethiopian CuisinE And Club A touch of Elegance, Intim acy and Fine Ethiop ian Food 428 Westheimer 526-2895 Reggae Music every Friday and Sat4rday night Tuesday is lady\ night Free d rinks Wpm 2am Wed n esda ~ Happy Hour all night OPE ror lunch and dinner Daily Lunch Special w1tli complinwntary gloss of \l\.'111{ from 39s 20 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 2, 1982 Gay artists put on show By Johannes Stahl The Second Annual Gay and Lesbian Artists (GALA) Show was held June 23 at the Houston Guest House, 106 Avondale. The GALA committee engineered the evening that contained both the "plastic" and performing arts. Awards were presented for the "Best of Show" in fibre art, black and white photo­graphy, color photography, print making, multi-media. oil pBIDting, acrylic paint­ing, pen and ink, pencil and commercial art. This show was the sequel to the Men & Women Together presentation during Gay Pride Week 1981.. Community phot<r co-chair along with Dennis Dunwoody, out-growth of a desire to have men and than committee meetings and cocktail grapher Roz Vecchio, this year's GALA graphics artist, said that this project is an wome interact socially in something more hours. GRANT STREET St'/f.J I 0 N KRAZY HOUR 7 days a week. 9-10. 75¢ well drinks 2377 Grant at Fairview 528-8342 A People Place ···~~~~~~·~ WHEN YOU'RE TIRED OF GAMES ..... LDNBi*STll u I c: CLISSIC '82 CLUB HOUSTON 2205 fannin 659-4998 ..•... JULY 2, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 An open letter to Bagneris From Steve Shiflett Preaident, Citizen• (or Human Equality For five years the community and myself have participated with and watched you and the loyal GPW volunteers assimilate unbelievable resources resulting in stun­ning displays of our community's self­pride, progressive attitude and serious determination to be "A Part Of-Not Apart From" through the 10 daysofqual· 1ty events you coordinate. fl'rom my own experience, frequent and meaningful Thank Yous for a job well done are somewhat few and far between in this line of volunteer work. Let me take the opportunity to say that the appreciation and the ''Thank Yous" that you might not receive directly were reflected in the inspiring smiles and thunderous applause pro1ected by the thousands of participants at the Parade and the Rally. Letters & Comments needed a message this is it. I have read a lot of things in my 55 years but have never been touched so deeply. Thank you Clown for touching me. Editor's note: the poem follows. We nttd ro feel morel To understand others. We need to love more/ To be loved back. We need to cry more/ To cleanse ourselves. We need to laugh more/ To enjoy ourselves We need to see morel Other than our own little fantasU!s We need to hear morel And listen to the needs of others. We need to share morel And own less. We need to look more! And realize that we are not so different from one another. We need to create a world where eve­ryone can peacefully live the life they choose. THRF projects Furthermore, many friends and opinion leaders commented to me what a fine job you have done. As usual, the Gay Pride Week's event& were chocked full of new and exciting firsts. Again, a reflection on the people behind the scenes. Larry, from CHE and myslef, pass the word: Everything was a~solutely incredible, moving, profes· s1onal and most importantly of all, good clean fun ... a true celebration. Men from Black and White Men Together inm the Gay Pride Week Parade. From a spokespereon for Texas Human Riarhte Foundation The Texas Human Rights Foundation (THRF) is focusing its attention to the con­stitutional challenge to Texas Penal Code Sec. 21.06, which proscribes consensual acta between adults of the same sex in private. Thie is the only state statute crim­inalizing private consensual sexual con­duct of adults. Let the energy of this last week take us to new levels of influence, provide us with bigger and better resources, and develop new and trusting leaders for the quantum leapa our movement must keep making in order overcome the almost insurmounta­ble forces that continuously throw their mud and their money at our simple goal: that of Human Equality for All. A barbeque to talk about From John Hubert Houston is a city, at least within the Gay Community, that enjoys throwing scrumptious free buffets. Thanksgiving, Christmae and New Yeau are exceptional. For Gay Pride Parade Day 1982, the Midnite Sun, located on the Westheimer parade route, threw a finger licking good chicken barbecue with all the trimmings. Youngsters and oldsters, and those in between, some having their best meal of the year, kept digging in as the Midnite Sun chefs kept the food tables overflowing. While waiting on the Sun's front patio for the parade to come by and enjoying my second barbecued leg and thigh, it occurred to me bow fortunate the gay com­munity of Houston really is. Perhaps it is best symbolized by the eurging parade crowds with their inevita­ble Lite or Bud in hand. In Los Angeles, where I spent my last eight Gay Pride Weeks, the police state still reigns supreme and one would never dare to even think of carrying a beer outside. Like at the Westheimer Colony Art Fes· ti val, the Gay Pride Parade crowd stole the show. While the parade was gaily wonder· ful, the "free spirited" spectators/ participants gave the day its maanificence. And the Midnite Sun gave it a barbecue to talk about. Parade incident proves police need greater sensitivity, says reader From Nell Iobln It was around 5:30 p.m. The crowd wa• thickening and the air was charged with enthusiasm. The Gay Pride Week .Parade was about to begin. While Westheimer had not yet been closed, traffic was so sparse, it seemed to be closed. Suddenly a car screeched to a halt and the crowd observed that a gay man had narrowly escaped being hit Whether that man bad thought the street was closed and had croased without look· ing or whethr he had arrogantly crossed the street expecting approaching cars to yield was unclear. What was clear was that two police offi- ~::i;;::r:,~::~ce:;.~ b!!° ~~ ~~~:: they escorted the man off the street. The officers didn't stop with issuing a warning, they arrested him. The gay man had done a foolish um.. by Jaywalking without regard to traffic, endangering both himself and the pas­sengers in the car. Technically he had vio· lated the law, but the situation did not warrant his arrest. Ae one of the parade marshalls encharged with crowd control, I became concerned with the effect the officers' arrest was having on the several hundred people who were watching. Twice I approached the two officers and attempted to reason with them. I tried to explain that proceeding with an arrest was overrreacting and creating needless animosity and tenseness in the crowd. The officers were abrupt. rude and defi· nitely not friendly. I was told in no uncer· tain tenn1 to butt out. One officer, visibly upset, told me to 1top the crowd from malt· ing obscene 11estures and cat calls. The arrest seemed to be their way to get even. They seemed to exude a contemptu­ous 11we'll show these faggots who's the boss" attitude. Fortunately there were no more inci· dents with those two officers, although another possible incident was narrowly avoided by the quick action of the parade marshalls. The police have never commanded much respect in the gay community and the above arrest certainly didn't encour· age respect from the several hundred at Mary's who observed it. However, not all the police allowed their prejudices to over· shadow their judgement. In fact. it was the contrary. During the day, I had talked to at least five other officers. While most seemed uptight about working with the gay com· munity, they all behaved profeasionally. However, it doesn't say much about the public's perception of the police for me to realize that I was more surprised by the decent behavior of the majority of tho offi· cera than I was surprised by the fearful and negative behavior of the two officen at Mary'•· Being a police officer i1 a difficult and demanding profeNion. However, their job ia difficult enough without be.in& com· pounded by the fears and preJudices caused by ignorance. For all I know, the two officers, described above, could be excellent policemen who, unfortunately, allowed their prejudice to overcome their better judgment, causing them to overreact. The regrettable arrest marred Gay Pride Week for the individual arrested and caused needless animosity between the police and the gay community. It is just one more example of why gay sensitivity courses are needed in the police academy. With proper counseling to overcome their homophobia and proper training in the diplomacy of crowd control, the above incident could have been avoided. It is essential that Chief Lee Brown pro· c with our community's continual recommendations for better officer educa­tion and training. That is not too much to expect. Wedon1texpectmiraeles, but we do expect movement. As long as the deputy police chiefs con· tinue to regard gay people as criminals and lawbreakers by the fact of their being gay, as long as the Department refuses to screen applicants for homophobia, and as long as the Department refuses to allow the gay community to participate in the education and training of new and current officers, there can be no repsect for the Houston police in the gay community. Instead, there will be only continued dis· trust, fear and contempt. Thanks, Gay Pride Parade From Mark Alford I would like to express my appreciation for the 1982 Gay Pride Parade. I am from New York City and currently visiting your city. The Community Clowns was one unit that I enjoyed very much. These clowns brought much laughter and joy to me and my friends. The floats were very well done and the bands were in perfect harmony. This chemical mixture made a great day for us all. And thanks from non-gay mother From Mrs. R.A. Donovan I am a 55 year old straight mother of three and was in attendance at your Gay Day parade on Sunday the 27th. (I have a aay sor;aa very impresed with the float. and band.I but the thing that touched me tho moat waa a poem that a Community Clown gave me. Encloeed in a copy of the Po01J1 oo that you might share it with all your many rsaden. If the world as a whole ever Baker vs. Wade was argued June 15, 1981, in federal court in Dallas to chal­lenge 21.06 and the decision is expected next fall. While THRF remains guardedly optomistic about the outcome, an adverse decision will be appealed to the Fifth Cir· cuit Court of Appeals. THRF will continue to direct strategy and bear full costs of this action In regard to the Richard Longstaff natu· ralization case, where the petitioner was denied naturalization based on his sexual· i ty deepite a recommendation to the con­trary by Immigration and Naturalization Service, the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals has ordered a remand to determine if the petitioner violated Texas' Homosexual Conduct Statute. THRF will file a brief in this action directed toward challenging the constitutionality of the statute. THRF remains active in the immigra· tion area and will continue to make known its interest in this area to those key indi· viduals who would have the greatest access to potential litigants. Detention of a gay person at either of the major airport.a in Houston or Dalla.a under immigration rules as now enforced, would likely result in THRF action. Committeee ofTHRF in both Dallu and Houston continue to monitor police activi­tiea. Brutality against gay persons and selective law enforcement activities are under scrutiny. THRF stands ready to seek extraordinary relief in these areas if necessary. THRF is monitoring state regulations as they apply to employment rights of gay persons. A survey of all licensing boards and echool boards in mfijor cities is under way. If a pettern of discrimination is found to exist in state employment or in licensing, action will likely be taken by THRF. Over the next several years greater emphasis will be placed on the use of volunteer attorneys who will evaluate and accept ca.see of interest to them under the direction ofTHRF. The Dallas Local Committee haa focused its activite8 in eupport of three criminal cases in which there had been blatant discrimination againatgaypeople on the pa.rt of law enforcement officials. The Houston Local Legal Committee con· tinues to evaluate potential litigation efforts and maintains close liason with other groups in the Houston area which are engaged in public litigation. Should the outcome in Balter vs. Wade prove unauccesaful, another challenge to the statuts will be undertaken in the near future. If the outcome in that case ia favor· 22 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 2, 1982 Houston's Special Club for Women Monday, July 5 Free Country & Westerm Dance Lessons at 8pm Plus The Montrose Cloggers appearing 8:30 and 9:30 5245 Buffalo Speedway I (713) 665-9756 Sunday, J uly 4 u.s.o. PARTY 40s dress welcomed Carnival 3pm John Day & Co. 6pm U.S.O. Show Bpm 1213 RICHMOND 527-9071 Watering Hole MC's Bruce/la De'Vall & Maude xxxxx plus The Montrose Sluts & other special guests NEVER A COVER CHARGE Monday: Free C&W Lessons by Dennie Rodriguez, 7-9pm ~STJ" Tuesday: Steak Night 't:Jlll( a Wednesday: Country & Western JSSIC '83 Night-Live Band Thursday: Pool Tourney-!Opm Morning Happy Hour 7am-Noon Evening Happy Hour 4· 7:30pm Extra parking on the corner of Mt. Vernon & Richmond (,.,- Old Fashioned 4th of July Picnic • Home fried chicken • Fresh corn on the cob • Real mashed potatoes & gravy • Live C&W music THE DEEP ( ( BACCHUS GOES DANCIN' at 523 Lovett Grant at Jackson 528-8234 Happy hour daily 7am-7pm Come in and strut your stuff on our new dance floor. We're open SEVEN days a week for your drinking and dancing pleasure. Bring your best guy or gal and enjoy our warm and friendly room, or our beautiful deck. Happy hour 4-7, Well drinks 2 for 1, Beer $1 Let's Get Acquainted Happy hour entertainment: Marquerite at the piano. Evening entertainment: Maryanne Mahoney & Mata Hari Wednesday nights (cover charge) 523 Lovett 523-3396 able, then it is anticipated that further action will be required to assure that var­ious governmental units bring t~eir poli­cies into co n formance with an invalidation of the statute. 'Larry Kirk is a good man' li'rom J irn Reagan Pr('l'iidt•nt, Montrosl' Sports AHsodution On Jun(' 16, 1982, Larry Kirk was chosen by acclamation as new Assistant Dir<'ctor of SpeC'ial Projectx for Montrose Sports Axsotiation . It became necessarv to elect a nt•w AsRistant Director after th.t' resigna· ti on of Rob ( 'onnt>rs. It is lht> ft>eling of tht> board that Larr~· will maintain the same high standards that Rob Connors set for the position. The hoard also fr.els that Larry, because of his (•xperi<•nce, organization , and business skills, will add m·w insights to a difficult position. La rry, owner of A&K J ewelry, has been active in MSA for three years, sponsoring both bowling and softball teams. The board looks forward to working with La rry and is s ure he will be an asset to MSA. NGTF blasts CBS Th<' Na tiona l Gay Task Force forma lly compla ined to CBS-TV regarding press accounts ofrecentchanges in the "Cagney & Lacey"TV show, a June 11 news release from NGTF • la ted. NGTf', siad it reques tt'd a n immediate clarification of CBS's policy regardi ng the portrayal of gay Americans on its network programs, Tht> J une 12-18 issue of TV Gwde rep-Ort('() that the cop show about two women detectives is being "softened" lM·rause the main characters are "not fem ~ mine" und the CBS r(':;earchers perceived th•m a• "dykes." Lucm Vul('skn . f"X('Cutive dir<>ctor of NGTF, statc•d, " If TV Gu1d1•'s portrayal of curr('nt CHS programming practices is accurate ('HS is once again guilty of per­pdratin~ an unseemly and damaging virw of both women and gays. In doing so, it contradictH i tM own stah.·d inu.·rnal hir· ing pructic£·R whic'h "late that ('B8 d o~.-M not ..iisc:riminate on the basis of st.·xuul orit'ntntion. If the TV Guide article m1sre· pr(·~ents the CBS case. the~ CBS ought ~o come forth with a retractwn and public ap~~I~~~: notl'd that there are a number of grounds for obj£'Ction, including a) the implication that if the charact£•rs were guy that would be unacceptable to CBS's progrumH and practices. b) the derogatory use of th<' words "dyke," "fags," a nd "homos," and c) the implication that lefbi· a ns a re not femi nine and that feminine women could not be gay. Street carnival in nation's capital "W<' fo ll it wasn't enough to have Gay Pride Day on just one day," Rich Wagner of the "O" Street Block Association was quoted . So the group threw a block party on June 19, the day before Gay Pride Day in Washington , D.C., reported the Washing· ton Blade. Or, as Wagner was quoted in the newspaper, the group was th rowing an "Oscar," an "O" Street Carnival. Frstiv ities incl uded mus ic, fema le impersona tion shows, appearances by poli tiral <·andidutes, lots of booths and tahleH, a nd a heer truck, gay newspap<'r said. Tht• merchants here have always fe ll )(• ft out " Wagner was quoted. "Peo_ple think of us as the Rex and sleaze sect1~n and we want to show the r~~t of the city that we art' mort- than that. 9fds,~ SI:, ease Houses & Apartments. Montrose & Downtown area Base Realty Inc 330 Fairview 524-1871 Hardwood floors, mini blinds. track lighting adults only JULY 2, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 MONTROSE TRAVEL WHERE ALL CLIENTS ARE FIRST CLASS rn-DAY EXTRAVAGANZA Depart July 30th RENO RODEO (3 nights) s799oo HONOLULU (4 nights) SAN FRANCISCO (2 nights) ALL INCLUSIVE!! '"''"•'··~""'"'" ~~ 2506 RALPH-522-8747 - "--- _''A_~-~a.!~-\J c_Yisil om ~ommel '-Xitclzen and !We our Cf::ounluj Cf!aok .!:Accessories ... ';J1u1uhe af.oul om 9ommel co.ohin9 classes a fa pwvencafe 1727 Westlu>imer '-Xousf.on , CCexas, 77098 'fJefep. fwne 520-1397 24 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 2, 1982 Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat JULY JULY 2 3 JULY JULY JULY JULY JULY 4 5 6 7 8 Ft acldil•Ofl•I nlorm•loc>n 1bol.:t eventt 1s1ect ~ look for tt1e IP< 11011ng organ1zato0n und• lfg.atiiZ11llOf'4- '"the Montrose Cla.s•hed Selected Events through 7 Days rAFRIDA Y: Interact Houston's Community Coffeehouse 7:30pm-midnight, 3405 Mul­berry rAFRJDA Y: Lambda Alanon meeting at First Unitarian Church. 5210 Fannin llSA TU RDA Y-SUNDA Y: The Lone Star Cl8ll8ic 1982 gay softball tournameat in Houston .SUNDAY: Independence Day .SUNDAY: Mustang's Recrea­tional Land Fund Committee organizational meeting 8:30pm, The Barn, 710 Pacific .SUNDAY: Lone St:u Classic softball tournament trophy presentations, 9:30pm, Brazos Rivn Bottom, 2400 Brazos, July 4 mMONDA Y: Full moon, L32am (Tuesday morning) a'llONDA Y: Montro.e Sports bowling, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain • TUESDAY: Montrooe Sports Volleyball League games 7:30 p.m., Gregory-Lincoln School, 1101 Taft • THURSDAY: Montrose Sports bowling, 9pm at te­dium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain • THURSDA Y: Wilde 'n Stein gay radio show lOpm-m.idnight on KPFT Radio, FM-90 Selected E vents in Future Weeks fl!N 1 WEEK: Bodybuilders conteat, Cherryhurot Park, July 10 U N l WEEK : "Womyn's Mini Feat" 1-Hpm July 11. Heidi's & Co., 1905 W, Alabama • IN I WEEK: Annual confer­ence of International Gay Association opens in WBBhing-ton, D.C., July 12 fl!N 3 WEEKS: Colt 45s "Pills­bury II Bake Off' benefit at Brazos River Bottom. 2400 Bra­zos, July 25 U N 3 WEEKS: "As•embly '82," 3rd biennial convention of Lutherans Concerned for Gay People, opens July 29 in Hous· ton, lasting through Aug. 1, at Grace Lutheran Church fl!N 4 WEEKS: 7th Annual Reno Gay Rodeo, July 30-Aug. 1, with Joan Rivers & Rose Maddox as grand marshalls •IN 4 WEEKS: MSA Women's Softball League post-season tournament July 31-Aug. l, location to be announced fl!N 6 WEEK S: National gay leadership conference in Dallas, Aug. 13-15, sponsored by Dallas Gay Alliance at Grenelefe Hotel • IN 6 WEEKS: MSA Volley­ball tournament Aug. 14 at Fonde Recreational Center fl!N 8 WEEKS: 1982 Gay Athletic Games in San Fran­cisco begin Aug. 28, lasting to Sept. 5 fl!N 8 WEEKS: Gay Softball World Seriea betrina in San Francieco Aug. 31, lasting to Sept. 4 fl!N 8 WEEK S: ln!A!grity Jn!A!r­national Convention opens in New Orleans Sept. 2, lasting to Sept. 5. • IN 9 WEEKS: Texas Gay Conference in Houston, Sept. 3-5 fl!N 9 WEEKS: North Ameri­can Gay Men's Music Festival, Sept. 3-5, Minneapolia U N 9 WEEK S: Labor Day, SepL 6 U N 11 WEEKS: 3rd Annual Gay American Arts Festival in Chicago opens Sept. 17, lasting to Sept. 30 Montrose Classified BuSIN-ESS OWNERS 111 W• 1111 ''"NC~-;, •• in tt'I" d•rklOfy ~I) buln, ... Mt.b'.,,mer111 MO<<r>g IS d11trobutlon PQlnts for I he .,.....~pe< lb) Curren! doapLay ~I-ti (C) all HOualil>t1 g1y two rs & p!"Mite club1 {lor !he i.n.111 ol out-ol- 10'#0 .,, .. tors} and tdl nQfto-PtOf•I O'lmmUftlly org1n1ution 91ndatft MonttoM Vok:e dlllrtbuUOn potnt. DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES Med Center-The Works from the low $40s! 5%down• 11 .SIMI avail . New construction. Park on Cambridge Call Gary Sykes. 797-0443 Acker­Blum & Assoc. Realtors Pulitizer prize winner Ben Sargent, exclusive in Houston 1n the Montrose Voice EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED RN'• and LVN'a Houston's only not­for- proht. community sponsored CLINIC for the diagnosis and treat­ment of SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES needs your skills If you have a few hours each month to volunteer your skills in the care of others in this community, we would like to talk with you! Call us at the clinic, 528-5531, or call nursmg supervisor Michael J_ White. RN BSN. daytime 960-9935. evening 529-9586 T HE MONTROSE CLINIC. 104 Westhe1mer Montrose Classified Advertising Rates You have a choice of these styles: 10C ~ reqular word Of 1$C PER All CAPITAL WORD •ri&-polfll type_ as1ho,...r1 here flt u11n9 lew worth •fl lh1111ze or 11 ceMonng on a lono, c;omp1•IOJ•I 80C •tin~. >JS!flQ ma•1mum 8 r99ular wordS or 5 ALL CAPITAL WORDS 10 •lone• 25C per regular word or 40¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WORD in 8-point type. as shown here (If using few words 1n this size or 1f centering on a hne. compute at $1 50 a hne. using maximum 6 regular words or 4 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a lme ) 40¢ per regular word or 60¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WORD in 10-point type, as shown here. (If using few words in this size or 1f centering on a line, compute at $2.00 a line. using maximum 5 regular words or 3 ALL CAPITAL WORDS to a line.) SOC: per regular word or 75¢ PER ALL CAPITAL WORD In 10-point bold type, as 30C per regular word or •s• PER shown here. (If using few ALL CAPITAL WORD In 8-polnt words In this size or ii cen- ::~dw~:~ ~t~~:;;e ~~~~~~1~1~~~: tering on a line, compute at on • line, compute • t s1 .so • llne, $2.00 a tine, using maximum using mH.lmum 5 regul•r word• or 4 regular words or 3 ALL 3ALL CAPITAL WORDS toallne.) CAPITAL WORDS toa line.) Individual or few words in any onf' size should be computed at the per line rate. You may freely mix ALL CAPS and lower case words, and regular and bold words, provided they are all the same type SIZE (6, 8 or LO point). Simply compute each word individually. BUT you may NOT mix type SIZES on the same line. THERE IS A MINIMUM charge of $3 per classified ad. BLIND BOX NUMBERS can be assigned for $2 per week extra Run the same classlfied 4 u:eeks in a rou' and deduct 15%. If your claRsified is lengthy. you may want to consider running a "display" ad instead. Call our advertising sales department for information WRITE OUT your ad on a plain sheet of pap~·r. Include your name, addres1; and sil(nature. and mail or bring'' to the Montro.'>c Vmce, .1.117 Montrose ~.'106. Houston, TX 77006. ALL CLASSIFIED ads must be paid in advance. We do not hill Support, join your community organizatior.s The Voice has more Mon­trose readers, more Mon­trose news, more Montrose advertising. We're Number One GAY BARS (A) Houtton ra .... m G1...1d member 1ndic•t1ori. placed If! 1t-11 d•r9CtOry at their t"9QU911 • •AccHUl--523Lc:Mtct_-:523-339&1;;..,,I.,, l•m,,,.nl See our ad elsewhere this issue e lAJ.t<I -""2-Lovett 527-98M- with r .. tau• rant."""' enteri.m~t See our ad elsewhere this issue ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week, now with over a hundred distribution locations • AIAAN 710 P•c•flC·-528-'427 counlry See our ad elsewhere this issue • BRAzC:i~f RIVER eoTTOM-2-400- Braios 528-9192 country _ _ _ ____ _ _ __ elAIAA PATCH -229-4 W Holcombe· .fS65- 0078 See our ad elsewhere this issue e cHA"sES-u16 R:Cttmond-~1M8d11Co • CHICKEN COOP--535 Wiilthe;ti;er-626: 2240 See our ad elsewhere thts issue • coPA- --2631 R•cflmond -s2a-22S'i d•sco with tho....-. cOve.:.2i12s-s~d- -Z2•~1_7~ Tremendous circulation in Montrose-the Voice • THI! DEEP -2212 eon .... rae -526-123-4 See our ad elsewhere this issue eDIFFl!AE:NT DAUM -1732 Wnthe•met-528· 5528 1. .1 her See our ad elsewhere this issue efotRTY SALLY'S -220 Avondale-529-7525 See our ad elsewhere this issue • !I.l's ·1213 R.Chmond-:52i:9c:l1i See our ad elsewhere this issue • AE>OL_E 10_11_a.11~53~coun111 Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 e QAUE:ON .23i)3RIChmorid-:s22-1i18 See our ad elsewhere this issue • GAY BOv 1NTERNATIONAL (G e.t.)· 1•11 RichtnOl'ld· ·!'i2fl-lt03 e QRANT ITRE:l!.T STATION -911 F-a,,.,•ew- 528-83-42 See our ad elsewhere this issue • HOLi! HOUR .,oer~m-528-9066 See our ad elsewhere this issue e J R-1-U-Pl.c1!1c--521.-251i· ~~;,~-0M.:!:!~~ &l YNN~a 11- Fa,,.,,e-w _ 011'! fN rlfl'IT C/95£ ••• Z30YS WtlL 8£ BOYS.~-I'LL 5P£1'1K--/o rll£ Jfurl/OR!T!f!..S- . WOul.f) YOU LIKE ro M/1K£ ,Q /)ON~rtON ro MY ( llVK<:.11,. ""THE c #Ulf'<!ll oF r/1£ SELF 1?le-11rEou~ l'flN'Oll'1T)~p •KEYBOARD 3012 M1lun· -5ia--6988 Wll-h p1an.:- •nt•1ta1111n•nt See our ad elsewhere this issue Welcome, softball players, to the Lone Star Classic e KINDRED SPIRITS -52~•!0 Speedway--US-9756 pr9dom1nan11y lab11n See our ad elsewhere this issue • LAMPOsT-24frT1mes 81vd--S2s·S9ii-i8s. b1an e LA,zy :;:_Jl2Tin.m~52&.i343 • L0AOIN(f -oQCK= 1135 Wesih91mer-52(): 1818 le1ther d11Co eAMARrs 1022 wes1h;;""mer.:S2s-8S51 See our ad elsewhere this issue There's more Montr-;;se sports coverage in the Voice • AMION!TE SUN :53.f w .. ,;;.mer-526-1519 cti,co 1h<iw$ • M1SS CHARLOTTE S-911 vi o;8¥11:..:m. 8840 country ~4':eONTR0sf MINING co ~805 Pac11ic-52i. •d1N\0U0 MBERS 2 -300 Wntrte1rner-S25-6s51 See our ad elsewhere this issue e PINK ILEPHANT i218 Leel1nd-:6,5~(f with ahC>WI See our ad elsewhere this issue e AANCH 66~ -~•1,..·-528-8730 • RASCALS -2702 Kirby· 524-6272 wrth res• 11urant.hveentert1inment See our ad elsewhere this issue Pulitizer prize winner Ben Sargent, exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice e ROCKY"S· 34111W O•ln-526-1922 teab11n • TWINS:-5~-we.1he1fne• -5iM>24CiMb.•n "e"V"E"N TURE-N ·2923 Mlll'l··-522.ooOiJ ORGANIZATIONS A CAPELLA ChOl"UI part ot (MonlrOM) Church o!Ctm11 ACLU:".' 1236-w o;;.y=-s-24-5925 AMEA1CANLEATHERMEN(ioc11T club)­mMtl 1t 01lle11n1 Drum. 1732 Westheimer- 528-8528 club n1gh1 w~ Support, join your community organizations ASTRO Rainbow A1 nee-S°24-i793 (voice & TTY) BERING M9morlal M"lhod11t Church- 1440 H•w1hor"9- !1:0.1017 U,.,1ted Mflli'Kld•tl w°' lh•P NJV1ce 10 SO.m Sun 8ETWEENTw0Wor1c11--529-1913 meei.~ :~~-~;~ITE MEN TOQ91h• iewMTi-529- SOOI. 7'7-te12 (Montroul CHURCH OF CHA1ST ·-520-K West· ~mer- 1"77-9288 w<:>fth!P MfVte.• 12 30pm "C"H"U RCH Of CHRISTIAN FA1TH · -413 Wes I he< ~~..d0!!:~n':B'= :~~Y~ni Tu• _....e~1nt;11. chem pr1c11 :e Wed evenin_g ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week, now with over a hundred distribution locations CITIZENS FOR HUMAN- e0UALITV- tCHE)- 609 F1nn1n ff1301- -236-8666· bolrd mMf•r"lg 2nd Tund1ys COLT 45·$ (IOC••I C1ub)-mee11 lit Biill0.1'11ver Bollom. 2400 Brnoa-528-9192 CoMMUN1fY. CO"FFEEHOusE· pro1eCI 01 Interact coNG-Ari"Z CHAYtM -rMets i1-MCcR.19-19 Oecl\ur•552-t340. 668-9997 MfV•Ce & IOC•ll lpm 2nd & 4th fridlyl CONROE AREA GIV Women· ·7~035::4 cOiJRT OF-THE $1NG"LE ST-AR-__:_.,,..,, 81 ~nk Ei.ph1n1. 1218LMlafld··659--00AO CRISIS HOTUNf:.._228-1506 Tremendous circulation in Montrose-the Voice OIAL-1-Gay·At~ll- 52:..2222· proiect of Gay Athe11t L.ague of Amar1c1 QIANA FOUNOA flON 2700 Mla(lrt< 524-5191 DIGNITY- tl'Mlltlt 11 C8th0hc Student C.nt9f 1703 Bolsov1r· 520-9269_ 528-76'4 trtfftmg1 7pm Slturdlyl Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 FAMILY & FRIENDS OI Gly1- 46'~­FIRST uN1T ARIAN Church..::-'21()Farui1n__::52&- 1571 wonih1p MrvlC• 1115•m Sun riREENSPOINT•FM1960 Atll f•r-Aw1y frl9tldl·-'82Hl811 GAY & Auve Shltitlo fxperienc.e (GASEl- 521-1311. 52&-CJ991 Welcome. softball players, to the Lone Star Classic GAY ARCHIVES Of, .... ~o.;ecl lntMllCI GAY ATHEIST .i. .. gue ol Amenca-524-2222 n1hon•I convention Oct 15-17. Americana Ho1e1. 3301 Southwtt1t fwy Hou11on JULY 2, 1982 /MONTROSE VOICE 25 GAY HISPANIC CAUCUS~722 Newfl\arl • 1-2· ~?_1~7_fTle!ll~d _ _!!lursd1y1 GAY NURSES & PHYSICIANS ol Hou1lon· --clo GPC. '600 Main •217-777·2287 GA.Y-PciLITtCAL CAUCUS (GPCi-'800 M11n 1217--521·1000 general bu11n1H mfft1,..g 7 30pm 111 Wedneld1y1. ffdUClhOtllll !Ofum 1 JOpm 3rd Wednesd1_y• Commentary How gay will be the 'Gay Olympics'? There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice GAY PRIDE WEEK-82 Comm1ttee-=78iS699 ~~sw1TCHBOARD-~~1_1 ~~·~=t~:-fl~~~~~s;,~·~pR:~:;. Montrose VOtCe. SJ»9dy Pnnt1ng. Spud-U-L1ke. Travt1I Tech travel 1gency HEPATm..is-HoTL1NE-- Jim Of David at ni- 2287 1 pro1ec1 of GPC's Medical Comm1ttM HOME COALiT10N · 10 01kCS.-1;..52i::O-i9e HOMOPH1LE -INTERFAITH- AJ\•1.,-ce-129 Minor--52~~ Pulitizer prize winner Ben Sargent, exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice Houston Ar" GAY &.LESBIAN ENG1NEERS & Scient1st1-52&-7386 meets 7pm Alh Wednn· d1y1 HOuSTON COMMUN-1TY- cLowNS..---862-8314 HOUSTON DATA PROFES510NALS--meetl1n EHi Room. Hohd1y Inn Centrll. 46'0 South Mam-523-6922 mMt1ng 7 30pm 2fld Tuesdays HOUSTON _ HUMAN RIGHTS LEAGUE ~Sif- 0969 HOUSTON MOTORCYCLE CLU8-to(:fo Marya, 1022 w .. the1mer -52&-8851 ~u11ofil'AvERN GU1lo memb«I ire -S.111 0Lfly Sllly"I. Exile. Mary·1. M1dn1t1 Sur. 1N-TEGRITY/Hou1ton. jlor1:;;1r"iY Ep1si;op1t lnt90rity)--meet1 11 Autry House, 62fi5 Mar~- 526-05S5 meetrng 7 JOpm 2fld Tuna1y1 ilNTERACf:HOUiton 1"i""i""H"~-ic.;;m.,1y lnteor•ty!Houstoot- 340!I Mu1berry-52t-7014 eg.a..1132 Community CoNMhouM 7 30pm· midnight F11. bol1d meetong 7.lOpm 111 Thuf11· d1ys (vltoed loclti0n11: educa!lonll IOl"um ~"W)pm'3~~U™'l_YI By Allen Young Gay people in San Francisco are planning a major event tentatively called the "Gay Olympic Games."• Dr. Thomas Waddell, chair of the Gay Olympic Committee1 writes in a fundraising letter that this event "will have a great deal of impact on the public image of gay men and women." He goes on: "This event is becoming an important opportunity for gay men and women all over the world to demonstrate that our character has a wide and varied range. It is an opportunity to expand beyond a falsely·tainted image. We invite you to become involved in our endeavor to expand upon our image." "Your help will enable us to prei:;ent to the world a serious sporting event from which more respect. for gay people will grow. The success of these Gay Olympic Games can effectively help balance the onslaught of the Moral Majority's perspective." "We work hard for ourselves and we very often work hard for others. We play and participate and contribute as much as other Americans. And now we must move into another corner of the American dream, Sport! But it must be done in our own way, which emphasizes participation and cooperation, not to create sports images that are bigger than life and not for commercial value." "AB gay men and women, we are still seeking respect from others ... Respect comes from perfor­mance, and we are ready to perform." Support, join your I found Waddell's appeal profoundly disturbing, community organizations not because I am opposed to these 91ympics • ~ut because I resent the palitical foundation upon which ~:~:on F:i~~-:~: ~"!",:,"! 1~ it is being buiJt. With his insistence on concepts like m1dn1ght Thurs "respect comes from performance," Waddell ignores LAMBOAALANON-maets 11 111 un1tanan something that has been basic to gay liberation ~h!',~ 5a21_0_'~'"~"'~"-_5_2_1 -•n_2~--'~'"-• -"-' _ s81e·~;.e.~tonewall: Respect comes from within our gay LESBIANS l GAY PEOPlE In Med.,;me- M$- 4700 mee11ng 7 JOpm 111 &iturd1y1 LUTHERANS CONCERNED- f!lffll at Grice Luther1n Church. 2515 W1ugh· 521-0863. 453· 11"3 meeting 2nd & .tlh Tues evenings "Assembly ·82." 3rd b11nn111 coo'l9flllon of Luth• lfl.nsConcerne<1lor~1y_~P~~l:!!_~~A~~ I ~~~~~~~T~~c~~~D~ %~~~~r~·'e~~ !~!: ~'•~! ~"~;~x ic. s:· 7 ~=·~=- memt>er.to1p inquire... clau 1 30pn Moll. Al1non meet.ng 8pm Mon . AlcohollCI AAQnym· ou• meeting 6pm Mon & Thurt ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week, now with over a hundred distribution locations MONTROSE CIV-1CCi.Jb (N9arto-Nnl-meets 11 Bering Church. UAO Hiwtnor,...__522-1000 meehng 7:30pm tourth T~1ys MONTROse-CL-IN•C--104 w911ne.m«~S28- 5531 open 6-10pm Fri 1-5pm Sun. 6-TOpm Tuea & Thuf11 MONTROSE COUNSELING C9ntt1ir· -900 LO~tt #102-529--0007 MONTROSE-PA iR0L:..521f We1the1mer- -528· 2~73 __ . -- ----- --- - -- MONTROSE SINGERS·-mMll II MCCR 19111 [)ecltur-528-055'0 uONTROSE SPORTS ASsOCiATiON(MsAJ= 622-331>4 - - - - . MofilroM Sports eOWLING- p11y111 St1d1um Bowl. 8200 &H1m1.n-960-1518, 981-1523 games Mon & Thu!! -~nu~• Tremendous circulation in Montrose-the Voice ~:;.t"::.=~"~.~~~:1~1 ;le;: ~~~::r~~-r:,r.;:i~lui~~!A~ 1 _ Gii Sottl>lll world Senn in Sin 1r11'1C:t1CO Aug· !'1-Slpt 4 _ • - ~-~~~:~·nt~~~I~ ~~.!~.~n ~2.~J1B:8~~ July 31-AUO 1. 1oc1t1on ~ b9 '"-~ M~t7"oae Sperl• TENNIS- 52•i1s1_ - -- Montro;~~r~..Vi~~~~L~~~~2h~ ~~g;e; 111_ tournament Aug U II Fonda Recre1- t1on1I Center MONTROSE SYMPHONIC t>and meets 11 Ber· ing Church. 1440 H1wtnome- 52M1669 mMl-tnO 7 )Clpm Tvn _ MUSTANGS 1~111 ciub1-metit1 11 the Blm 710 Pec1l1c~528·11427 club n1ghl Triur1 Aecrea11onal Lind Fund Com'""'" on;ianiu­h0f" tl1 mfflmg 8 30pm. July 4 _ OiifRATION DOCUMENTATION projtCI OI GPC _ RECREATIONAL Lend fund ComrMlff proiect ol Mustang Club FllCE Univ G1y 'Lllf*l't Support Group $24• b724 TEXAS BAY AREA Gllys ..332--3737 meelinQ Thurt evening 1 strongly believe that gay people should get together for any common ~urP?se that unites ~h.em, whether it be mountain-chmbmg, gourmet dimng, sexual orgies, karate lessons or baseball playing, and, in fact, all of these act~vities can already_ be found on an organized basis m the gay community. So Jet those who are athletically inclined, whether as participants or spectators, join together in the Gay Olympics Games. But, please, spare us ~he assertion that the promotion of gays as athletes is a technique for combatting the Moral Majority or improving our "image." This inclusion of organized Sport (with a cap1ta1 'S," no less) in the great American ideal is merely the opinion of Waddell and his associates. To me, the great American ideal has to do with democracy, fair play, and providing a haven for the oppressed (though this ideal has bttn corrupted oflete). Other aspects of American tradition, including militarism and obsession with competition1 are more akin to the world of sports, as far as I am concerned, though I realize sports don't have to be that way. True, WaddeJl's statement refers to "coopera· tion," but is this an afterthought? It seems to be. For many gay men and lesbians, sport has not been "another corner of the American dream," but a terrible nightmare, a nightmare of taunts, fail~re and humiliation. In promoting the Gay Olympics with statements about combatting 01.1r "falsely­tainted image," its supporters show a lack of sensi­tivity for the suffering of so many gay people, whether it be the "sissies" who failed at sports (and I was one), or the "tomboysu who even in their achievement had to deal with nam -calling and innuendo and the feeling that their lack of approir riate femininity made them something less than "real women." In an "overview" distributed with his fundraising letter, WaddelJ answers the question "Why a Gay Olympics Games?" "Gay men and women who live openly in society have created a viable subculture, characterized by the traditional media as an exclusive sexual life­style. Here, then, is an opportunity to expand our image and educate the general public on the vitd.lity, variety, and versatility of the gay community," Of course, our community is versatile, which is why it is perfectly valid to hold a Gay Olympics, even if the likes of me stay home. But why must we take this sad, defensive posture in regard to our sexuality? The gay subculture, by the way, has important roots not only in the sexual realm, but in that many of its members tended to resist the sex­role stereotypes (aggressive male, submissive female), a point ignored by Waddell and contra­dicted by the entire premise of these Games. Nowhere in the material publicizing the Gay Olympics does it state that the event will be impor­tant for social and sexual encounters, when the majority of the spectators, male and female, are surely going to be thinking about hot, sexually attractive bodies as much as they are about athletic skiB and prowess. Gay liberation is not about hypocrisy! These Olympics remind me of other events and groups that have been organized in gay communi· ties; marching bands, chorales, and even a gay rodeo, each promoted, at least in part, with the assertion that the gay "image" needs to be improved. Also related is the adulation, excessive in my opinion, shown to individuals such as Kopay, Matlovich, and Charles Chochrane, a gay cop in New York who came out in public supporting a gay rights bill. These commings-out are important, and the individuals deserve our thanks, but don't we overdo it because they are linked to macho values (military, sports, police)? I went to see the San Francisco Gay Men's Chorus in Boston last year, and I had a good timo. I still had some serious reservations. First, since I don1t attend concerts of choral music, wasn't it spurious to attend just becuase the singers are faggots like me? Second, the applause seemed to come not 90 much for the music, but ra ther for the gayness of the singers and of the audience itself. Third, non·gay music lovers, whom the cho­rus would really have wanted in attendance, were not present in sig£iificant numbers. OrtaketheGreatAmerican Yankee(GAYJMarch­ing Band of Los Angeles. It seemed to me that this band, smacking of militarism and patriotism. was one more example of the perversion of the original goals of gay liberation, which involves creating a new culture. not imitatins;c a sick, dying old one. I told myself that this was a misguided attempt to gain acceptance in the context of participation in the traditional American heritage. (What could be further from ••. sexual unmentionables engaged in by limp-wristed fairiee and diesel dykes than Sousa marches and baton-twirlers?) But at the October 1979 March on Washington, the band melted my opposition. They were fun, and so campy, too, that the gayness seemed not absorbed by the " heritage," but seemed ra ther to transform the heritage itself. Something similar can surely happen Wlth the Olympic Games. I hope so, but I think the organiz­ers need to re-think the manner in which they are promoting the event. A brief reference to "participa· tion and cooperation" seems hardly enough to make these Olympics "gay." It is announced that all events will have separate competitions foT men and women, and I wonder who the lesbians are on the committee, and whether this sexual segregation has been readily agreed upon. What will they do about lesbians who want to com· pete in men's events? Most of all, I hope these Gay Olympic Games will help break down sex-role stereotypes and not further damage gay people who may not fit the "public image of gay men and women" that Dr Waddell and his associates are so keen on promoting. •11182 STONEWALL FEATURES 6YNOtCAT£ Editor's rwtes: Nrxt wttk. an oppoamg l'iew in thu space. •The "Gay Olympie.." now referrft! to as the "'Gay Atheltic Game•" bttau.se of opposition by the official U.S. Olympic organization to the use- of their name, ia scheduled for AURU$l 28 to Septem~r 5 in San Franc:uro. 26 MONTROSE VOICE I JULY 2, 1982 " I'm sorry, Irwin . . It's your br....,th. lt't . .it'• h1h ond minty." Gary Larson Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-321 1 TEXAS GAY CONFER-ENCE 1x=-869-1231-CQl"I­'~ Sept 3--5 on Houston TExAS- GAY TASK -FORCE-52i-1014 522- IMll lllle conference in Hmo11on S.pt 3-5 TEXAS-HUMAN RIGHTS- -Foonc1a11on-=151i Mary1el'ld~9139 TEXAS RIOERS-cto Mary·1. 1oii weslhe.­mer-- 528-1851 UNITAAIANfuNIVERSAUST Gay Caucut-c/o 111 Unrtenan Church. 5210 Fanmn-520-9767 528-5842 meeting 3rd Sun. afternoons WE5-LAYAN!!ii.OWSH1-P~~e:a-99 Welcome, softball players, to the Lone Star Classic PERSONALS & ANNOUNCEMENTS ~~=RJ::i31~r·~:1::! •;i~t :i,:~ flOOr Houaton TX 17006 fd•lor ,.,.,.... ru;iht to :~\:o;~·~~ :"~ ve=1•P~!t~~~ b901nn1~ ol the c1as11! '4ICl1 RN'a and LVN'1 Houston's only not­for- profit, community sponttored CLINIC for the diagnosis and treat­ment of SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES needs your skills. If you have a few houri each month to volunteer your skills in the care of otheta In this community, we would Ilk• to .. tk with you! Call us at the clinic, 528-5531, or call nursing supervisor Michaet J. While, AN. BSN, daytime !le0-9935, evening 52 9- 9586 . THE MONTROSE CLINIC, 104 Westheimer. Relax and ~oYI~;~ massage. Gift certificates. Call Bill, 526-2470. - ----,;iii~-- -- ..-0. up toS&'hr. to put ProgteNlve C111zeri1 hrtyonNov e1ect1001blltJot C.ll.>Offta:.i!l-3882 or Ron 43'-1350 T:r!:~,,.rr~~~:~u5•~-r; There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice BODY MASSAGE. Your place or mine. Afternoon or evenings. aruce 521-2008. FOR AN A.TMOPSHERE ol soc11t variety tn(l .~.: ,,r .p~~r~:l~~-=~~~~=:~:;4~~ Pulitizer prize winner Ben Sargent, exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice PRIVATE GAY CLUBS ~:.~x OFFICE-1825 RichmonCl· ·522·1625 :~~1~0UITON Beths~22&-F1M1n-859 See our ad elsewhere this Issue. Support, join your community organizations :::!~~~7~u:::_ERThN19r-32ol LoU.i .. !_-:OTOWM PA·=.:31oO--Finrurl-s22.z3j9 See our ad elsewhere this issue • 2308 CLu8--2nC iene....-52e.~1Z)s-~ .. RESTAURANTS •11AJA·1- 402 Lo~ll -·527·98lMS See our ad elsewhere th is issue ~~A.SSERIE T00-1322 Westheimet' 526- e CHAP\A. TAPEC--813 R1chrTion~-S22-2365 ~~CA.TUR C°AFE·· 708 w A.1atNime--S28- • GAEE1< ISlA.NO- 302 Tuam-522-7040 ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week, now with over a hundred distribution locations •OY"O OY"OI SanClw•ch Shop 1$38 W911n.imtir 128-46~ See our ad elsewhere this Issue • HA,. lllJ .l.ft "I Elhlop1an Cu11•n•- 428 W•thelmer $26-2895 See our ad elsewhere this issue •HONG ntONG-424 W•lhe•JTMr-528-3275 See our ad elsewhere this issue • HOUsi:O f PIES-=3112 ~rb;:-528-381& - ei'NTl .. NAT1-0NAi. CIUbRelliU-renl-243 w .. tM•ll'l9f"-523-2795 See our ad elsewhere this issue e JADE ORAGON-224 Wutheilfltl(-526-2611.3 iMAACELO'S le. Crum-1521 Westnetmer­' 22-- •i!Rs- 1303 w.11he.m«-s2a-ae23 See our ad elsewhere this issue e OMAR'S-808 L0¥9ll-528-3569 •AAICALl-2702 Klrby-524-6272 See our ad elsewhere this issue. e RAUL'S BRASS RUBBING-91" W Al•b9m•-5~27 Tremendous circulation in Montrose-the Voice • SPUO.--v..LiKe- -4i6wM1he1mef~ e lTAR ptl:zA ~21 i-1 Norfolk 523-0800 See our ad elsewhere this issue e$rEAK 'N' EG~~1 Montroee--52M135 ,•,T.I.M 'S -co11.e-SnoP---=1'52S Wntheimer 529-­Dear Dorothy Letter from a gay parent Dear Dorothy, I am separating from my wife very soon and moving in with my lover. I am concerned about what to telJ my two daughters. Their mother has accepted my sexual preference and has never made any verbal complaints. What do I tell the girls, aged 6 and 9, about why Daddy is leaving. A concerned gay parent Dear Gay Parent, First off, I assume you have seen a lawyer and that you and your wife haue talked about a separation mouing toward a diuorce. If not, pkase do so immediately. Aa to the girls, I would suggest that you be very visible to them during the period of mouing out and following. They need to be reassured that you care about them and your spouses relation­ahip ia something that you need to work out with her and that they are not in any way to be blamed for the fracture. If I were in your place, I would sue for joint 'custody of the chil­dren. Thia seems to giue the chil­dren a more realistic approach to diuorce and tend not to giue one parent emotional leuerage over the children. Let me know how you come out, as I am a gay parent, too. · Dear Dorothy, While I was gone on ~a.cation my roommate proceeded to strip the apartment of everything, including many of my very per· sonal items that cannot, for sen­timental reasons, be replaced. Why is it in the gay community the seemingly present trend to rip each other off. We were not lovers or even sex partners. Really angry Dear Angry, J am aorry that one of ours has ripped off another brother! This new trend seems to be prevalent from recent euents I've seen. My only consultation would be that in this world there are winners and losers. And it seems that the losers are always rip­ping 1omeone off because they can't be winners. Also remember, things are thinga. And buy good insurance. •WINE SE.Llf:R :-140& W91tt1e<mttf-528-3878 See our ad elsewhere this issue SERVICES Carpenter/remodeler/ fix·up/palnt Will do small jobs or large projects References Experienced. Clint, 864-5652, 524-1234 Quality wallpaper hanging & painting. Call 447-6109. LESBIAN PROBLEM SOLVING AND SUPPORT GROUPS AND INDIVIDUAL AND RELATIONSHIP COUNSELING. Dr. Nonotto Brudtnor, poychologltt, 523-2180. Attorney at Law General practice. John P Barnich, 523-5006 Evenings 528-5566 REMODELING/IMPROVEMENTS Full carpentry including French doors, cabinets , kitchens , bathrooms_ Excellent workmanship, experienced, references. 529-3869. 4TC0 P...i Controi-~1--- See our ad elsewhere this issue IH QUICK O.hvery-723-5959 See our ad elsewhere this issue e FITNESS eXCHANGE- l11neu center-3307 Rlchmond- 524·9932 FRANCllCO~I hik Nlon--901-R~ 523-0438 See our ad elsewhere this Issue :_.~IRCRAF'rhe1rcer~le11~ Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 •HoUaTON QUEST Ho-uSr-iOdgl ng=-iQi AvondeJe- 520-9787 See our ad elsewhere this issue • IC1(NH0w-ER Buu1y s~ WM!n.<rner--521).7972 t'.DWARD JONH boo«kM~-~ =SEee• our ad elsewhere this issue D. KiltlTIAN Ph0. nYPfl0i;1__:977_ See our ad elsewhere this issue • KWIK-KAU M••I Bo11 .. --3317 MontrOM- 522· 1896 •L•OllH09 H•i• O.,lgri--909 WM!h .. ,,...,. 527-0188 See our ad elsewhere this issue e.,l .1.0 NEL -Hl1r Ol.19n- 3220 Yo.kum- 526- • MONiROsEHA1R o.11gn~ 522·2822 Welcome, softball players, to the Lone Star Classic eMONTROU: Tiii.i.ViL - 2508 Relph-522· 1747 See our ad elsewhere this issue •MONTI.ON -VOICE Mw~l)ef~ lroM. lhird lloor· · 529-1490 MOVING, HAULING. Movema1ters, 521-3155. PATRICIA ANNE O'KANE, ittorney--3323 Yot1kum- -52&-7911 See our ad elsewhere this issue e ii'RlvATE -POSTAL -SYS-fEMS m~ea--= 1713 WMtheimer- -529-3020 ~u~~L~;~~L h11r - Care - 1ffi Cherry· There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice ~EDY PRINTING ·5400 8oi'il1rt ~~ See our ad elsewhere this issue Pulitizer prize winner Ben Sargent, exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice ~VIL TECHlfeytl·ncy--57~ See our ad elsewhere this issue UNITf.D cu-*4~ See our ad elsewhere th is issue WOlllDCRAn 1yi)Me111ng :522-4251 See our ad elsewhere this issue SHOPS & STORES ARCHAEOLOGICAL ARTS A umque gallery IP«l•ILZ1t1g WI eutherthi;; mu..um quality tf1 end •rt•f1ci. fro,,.. ancient Greece. Rome. Egypt and Bible Lindi Items 1000 IO 5000 YMt• old 1ri ell pra ,.nge1 4'33 .8.1.u.o ,n.n .e.t. 11J11e204 Tueecl1ythruF~y1-.5ptn ,e,A..l.l.-.S,r.A A AC11.11i News~1· ~ONI­.•, A..l.l ,T,'H A i GufrERs"O·ril-4-325l .to'1trOM­e RICHl'.RD ALLEN Fk>f't11 - 1&41WfttM!rr-..r- 520-7705 Support, join your commu­nity organizations ·•AQ-UATIC llL.f. pet ahop--2011 sw- F-;;"- See our ad elsewhere this issue eASYLUM Adult 8ook1tor.-1201 Richmond e BAU PARK Adutt Book110...-1a3CI W Ala· bama •IAllC HIOTHIEAI UHd clothing 1220 W•the•mer--522· 1&28 See our ad elsewhere this issue •THE HD HOUM 2115 Nortollt !in-.278 See our ad elsewhere this Issue ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week, now with over a hundred distribution locations •BLUE IRIS-3818 $ SMpMrd-523-1127 • BOOM TOWN BLOOMS~ t1owen--=32'iOS ShepMrd--52&-ll'-'1-1'0-_-=-==,-.,.~- ~u·~=~tw.. n :~~n~ Fine See our ad elsewhere this Issue •CARGO HOUSE 1802 Paili~ See our ad elsewhere this issue • CONE OANCEWEAR--47~522- 1'173 iCOM'iiNY I military weir -5388 WMtlWllrner-965-9753 See our ad elsewhere this Issue Tremendous circulation in Montrose-the Voice ,i.Oi.N.E R~SA.ciutt N9--=-240 We1tne•mer-·5ie­e 00UBRAVA JONES: the-~nho1eCiOth-;no-- 1983 W Gniy- 522· 1099 eOOWN8EAT~7A~· "~"-' Q.tts-3224YoiikU~S7 • FACETS g 1ftl· 1412 wftthe.rn«--_SE-141!. Got a question? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 ifiiAMi'" Of REFERENCE Pl•"lt & lr.,,,ing- 1533 WMlhe11'1'181'-5.20-0710 See our ad elsewhere this issue .•.F.R. IDAY'S Flori11- .1mw. .1 l'le1mer-- 524- •KIRBY Newstand 311'5K1rby-520--0248 w~.,,...,,...,. -Jl.W LRY -. -;;;--1.4-.n=t I !\29--.:1&'1 see our ad elsewhere this issue Welcome, softball players, to the Lone Star Classic • OH eovlLMtherGood1-=91iweathe1m9r- 524-7151 eONE MORI! TIM! ,..ai. boutiq,,. 1"'°5 Coaltlomt•-523-5651 see our ad elsewhere this issue • OPTIONS nower. ~ 1503 Y11e et 15th- 886- 311JO iPLANTHOOSe- :i12 w .. tn .. rner- 526--7795 ·~1 LEATHE'::'~~Wei~mer-=--::527.9044 There's more Montrose sports coverage in the Voice ~RAcK musoc-=3.1cliS'""'Sh.c>herd- 52<1-31102 eTH!ROUGHCUT,......ry· -520Wea1he.imit1- 520-7050 See our ad elsewhere this issue • sHOEWAREHousE- 2024--Wi1the1m., . 52_~ ---~--------~ • SPORTS LOCKER clolhtl"lg - 311 Weatn .. mer--520-6555 .-sTUoi Ad~•- 1132 w A1ab;me­e~ AN&-Atm.d1ii0Flown~2 115 Dvniavy- 520-7019 9iiMfiii-jfAFF!T AC'i01n~-3 W•tl'letmer-5~ see our ad elsewhere this issue • TOTALITY Sl-0Af:t!21W-f!r8\'.-:_~iii Pulitizer prize winner Ben Sargent, exclusive in Houston in the Montrose Voice iTREsCHIC ~ear-520 w .. the,"*":::-528= 0171 9iRevMAN g•tt•~ w91tn••"*::__S2J..022i • "UNION JACKdOthirig· ·1212 W..,tt,;.m:.-,- 528-0000 e WESTHEIMER FLEA MA-RKET· n33 ~ Support, join your commu­nity organizations e WILOE- , - STEtN book ltOf'e: :s20W9alh91-- 529-7014 gey TRAVEL EL RANCHO VISTA PO Box 245 Glen Rose. TX 76043 (817) 897-4982 JULY 2, 1982 I MONTROSE VOICE 27 ByTycho Fortunes FOf Friday evening. July 2. through Friday •~mg. July 9. 1982 ARIES-While your relationships with the some in your life have neveY' seemed better, there's a definite problem with your main person. Trying too hard to impress? Be yourself, not who you think you're expected to be. TAURUS-You earthy types tend to hang on to old habits that just don't fit any more. The key could be in simply listening. You might hear some beautiful new music. When you do, grab a partner and dance! GEMINI-Jn your sign this weeli: Mercury (kaves next Friday morn.mg, July 9) and Venus. What a flirt! And you just can't help it. Somebody special catches your eye, and what you say and how you say it could have a big effect on your life. Choose your words with care-someone's doing heavy listening. CANCER-Jn your sign this weelr.: Mercury (enters next Friday morning, July 9) and the Sun. If you're a runner, run more now. If you pump iron, add some weight to the bar. Put that extra energy into something harmless. There's tension in the air from someone who thinks you're not in charge. Channel that hostility into something good. LEO-It's time to be the mediator, the negotiator, the diplomaL Others come to you for help, and you're willing and able to give it. You've got the talent for seeing both sides of the story, and the energy to seek both ouL VIRGO-Don't overdo it! You'll be tempted to bea glutton withfood or sex, or whatever sounds good. Examine your compulsions, and be better to yourself by taking the middle road. LIBRA-Jn your sign thi.s week: Mars, Saturn and Pluto. Pay atten· tion to the world of work and accomplishment. Fantasy may be alluring, but it's not the way to get where you want to be. You can realize an important goal if you stick with it. SCORPIO-Jn your sign this u•eek: Jupi~r. Have a good time. Be playful and fun-loving and even foolish . Your usual intensity just doesn't work now. Seek out friends to join you in this ~al time. Rock and roll! SAGITTARIUS-In your sign all week: Uranus and Neptune. Pass­ing through your sign this week: the Moon, through Sunday everung. Who am I? What is my purpose? What's it all about? It's a confusing time for you unless your home life is settled. Be grateful for all the support you can get, and stay open to possibilities. Remember that answers are often found in the queebone you ask. CAPRICORN-Passing through your sign this week: the Moon, from Sunday evening to Wednesday morning. Feeling moody and restless? Feel like you've got to get away by yourself? Go ahead. And don't feel guilty about it, either Everyone has these important needs. If you get away, don't be dragged down by thoughts of the past. Rem em her tomorrow. AQUARIUS-Passmg through your Btgn this week: the Moon, from Wednesday morning to ne.xt Friday evening, July 9. You know how to give it, and you know how to take it. Good thing, too. There's plenty of give-and-take going on. Give that special person what he wants and take his very special response. Stay close. PISCES-Look who's looking and feeling sexy! And not in a quiet way, either. Flaunting it can be so much fun; You find you·re out of control. No harm. It's summer and you're hot. Nice. Very nice. •1•2 STONEWALL FEATURES 8YN01CATE Last Word Does anyone have the answer? By Henry McClurg If America has roughly a 200 million population, then America has roughly 20 million gay people. (Most popular estimates are that homosexuals comprise 10% of the population.) . Last Sunday, in all major American cities, Gay Pride Week climaxed. The biggest show of all, of course, was in San Francisco, where the wire services estimated the crowd et 125,000. (Generally in such events, police underestimate the crowd, organizers overestimate it, and the press comes up with a figure somewhere between the two.) Anyway, adding all the cities up, it seems that perhaps 400,000 to 500,000 Americans participated last Sunday in Gay Pride Week parades or marches. With an estimated gay population of 20,000,000, a two percent turnout is not very good. Perhaps 20,000,000 is too high. Perhaps 500,000 is an estimate that is too low. Does anyone have an answer? 28 MONTROSE VOICE/ JULY 2, 1982 Coming: Tropical Night Party J~ly 17 DJs Otis James & Frank. Collins Lights by Frank Whitten 4th of July Spectacular Monday, July 5 T-Dance, Beer Bust Doors Open Bpm Sunday, ~ 4 LUE ARTY
File Name uhlib_22329406_n088.pdf