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Montrose Voice, No. 268, December 13, 1985
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Montrose Voice, No. 268, December 13, 1985 - File 001. 1985-12-13. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 12, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2075/show/2050.

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(1985-12-13). Montrose Voice, No. 268, December 13, 1985 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2075/show/2050

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 268, December 13, 1985 - File 001, 1985-12-13, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 12, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2075/show/2050.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 268, December 13, 1985
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date December 13, 1985
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Health Card Committee Begins Meetings The City of Houston Council Committee on Communicable/ Infectious Disease Control (AIDS/ health cards) began its series of meetings on November 27. Jim Greenwood, Ninth Floor, City Hall, Post Office Box 1562, Houston, TX 77251 The committee plans to bring its recom· mendations before the full city council on March 3,_1986. Are You on the Warpath with Others? Take the Voice Quiz P. 9 Chaired by Councilman Jim Green­wood, committee members are Councilper­sons Eleanor Tinsley and John Goodner. Houston Health Director Dr. James Haughton serves as chief medical advisor to the group. Remaining scheduled meetings are Dec. 20 and Jan. 10, 17, 24, and 31. All presen­ters will speak between 9:30 a.m. and 12 noon in City Council chambers. All meet­ings are open to the public and public com·'· ment will be solicited in the January meetings. CHE Joins the 21.06 Battle Committee meetings involve advisors selected from Dr. Haughton's expert com­mittee on AIDS questioning presenters who are experts on food-borne illnesses. Experts who are scheduled to speak are Dr. Roger Rosen, chief of Allergy and Immunology Veterans Administration and ProfesRor of Microbiology, Immunol· ogy and Medicine, Baylor College of Medi­cine; Dr. Walter Dowdle of the Centers for DiseaPe Control, Atlanta, and State Health Commissioner Dr. Robert Bern­stein. The committee is investigating whether a need for health cards, as a means of controlling the spread of AIDS, exists and, if so, the logistics of administering tests. It is estimated that each test for the HTLV·III virus would cost $600. Other groups whose input has been invited are day care providers, the Texas Restaurant Association, blood bank workers, and the teacher's association. Councilman Jim Greenwood chairs the city council's AIDS. health card committee Any written comment, suggestion or question shou Id be directed to Councilman From a Press Release Citizens for Human Equality, C.H.E., announced recently that it will take an active role in assisting the Texas Human Rights Foundation (T.H.R.F.) raise $230,000 statewide to continue its chal­lenge of Section 21.06 of the Texas Penal Code. Section 21.06 criminalizes consen­tual sexual activity between adults of the same sex. C.H.E."s activity will focus on the Gulf Coast Region in which it expects to raise $27,000 for T.H.R.F. through a seriei; of cocktail parties. C.H.E. will solicit hosts and/ or underwriters by providing infor· mation on the case and raising the aware­ness of Uiterested groups or individuals. Organizational and individual commit­ment's of time, and/ or money is needed by C.H.E. to make this endeavor a success. C.H.E. and the T.H.R.F. GulfCoast2!.06 Task Force are available to respond to all Montrose Voice "The Newspaper of Montrose" December 13, 1985 Issue 268 Published Every Friday (713) 529-8490 -~-- ~~~~~---------~ inquiries of how an organization or indi­vidual can help. Interested partiei; may call 680-3346 or 869.S944 for more informa­tion. Killer of Store Clerk Sought by Detectives Houston Police Department homicide detectives are still seeking a suspect in the Dec. 5 killing of a convenience store clerk in MontroRe. Sadiq Ali, 45, of the 1400 block of Dun­lavy, was shot once in the face by a man attempting to rob Ankar Drive Inn Groc­ery, 1660 Westheimer. The suspect entered the store shortly after 7:00 p.m. and demanded cash. Ali and a firend opened the cash register and told him to take the money. According to Sgt. Steve Ward of HPD'i; homicide division, the suspect "fired one shot without provocation." He then left the store without the money. Police are searching for a slender black male, about 6 feet tall with ;;hort hair and slight goatee. At the time of the incident, he was wear­ing a blue knit cap and gray jacket and blue jeans. Early Morning Fire Damages New ~ontrose Cafe (left) Workmen begin the cleanup and repair of the Driscoll Street. (right) Some of the damage done by the smokey electrical fire. (Roger Lackey photos) A fire which began in a dining room elec­trical outlet caused extensive damage to the newly·opened New Driscoll Street Cafe, 1834 Westheimer. The fire was disco· vered around 1:30 a.m. Sunday, Dec. 8. Owner Ed Muncey says the estimated damage is $70,000, much of which was from smoke and water. The restaurant is closed for repairs. Reopening is slated for Dec. 18. State Health Board to Consider Quarantine Plan This Saturday The state Board of Health is scheduled, this Saturday, to consider a proposal to isolate AIDS victims. The proposal would allow state and local health authorities to quarantine AIDS victims who pose a threat to public health Lesbian I Gay Rights Advocates, which represents nine Texas organizations, opposeR the plan 11aying that it would hinder efforts to stop the disease. Dr. Robert Bernstein, state health com· missioner, defends the plan stating that it would only be used for persons who can transmit the disease yet continue certain activities hazardous to the public. Last month, Bernstein met with leaders of sev­eral gay rights organizations and city health directors from most major Texas cities to discuss the plan. Sue Lovell, president of the Houston Gay Political Caucus, was pret>ent at that meeting along with Houston Health Direc­tor Dr. James Haughton. According to Lovell, gay leaders as well as medical pro­fessionals attending the meeting agreed that "quarantine is not the solution." Cooperation between grassroots organiza­tions and the state health department would render more viable solution.; to problem. Glen Maxey, spokesman for Lesbain I Gay Rights Advocates said quarantining might prevent individuals from seeking diagnosis or early treamtent and cause physicians to hei;itate reporting AIDS cases to health departments. That could hinder reAearch and rei;ult in a drop in federal funding. Dr. Phil Richardaon, an Austin physi· cian and Dr. Toby Johnson, a.San Anto­nio psychologist, will represent gay righto organizations at the board meeting. 2 MONTROSE VOICE I DECEMBER 13, 1985 Companies Place Workers on Leave after AIDS Testing From an Associated Press report Two companies have placed four employee~ on indefinite paid leave after they tested positive on a test that deter­mines exposure to AIDS, even though three of the men do not actually have the disease, an attorney representing the workers said in Dallas Dec. 6. The lawyer, Robert Holt, said he has written the two companies, Enserch Corp. and General Telephone Co., asking how long the employees will be on leave and how long their pay and benefits will last. He said three of the employees tested positive on the HTLV·III antibody test, which shows expoi;ure to the di~ease, but they do not actually have acquired immune deficif'ncy gyndrome. The HTLV test "does not show conta· giousness or the virus," Holt said. The E'mployeei; put on leave by Enserch worked in food service and were tested under a new company policy testing food Montrose Voice ANO TEXAS • S"'AR MONTROSE. TEXAS Populatoon fest t985) 32.000 Census 1ract1 401 01 .tOt 02 .t02 Ot 002 02 C05 02 403 and 404 01 Zip COdeS rouohty) 70006 77019 portion). 77098 Sounded roughty\ snepl\erd Or est) Al en Pmr••av (north) M.a1n S1 least) US 59 south) Lat!IUCle- {Montrose 8lvCl at W.Slheuner Rd ) W 4' 13 .. N Long•tud• 9S•nww Albiuoe .a ELECTED OFFICIALS FOR ,_,CNTAOSE ~ GtM"°n'i .u HoAton C ty Counot fdlst C> ~gOy ,,,, 721 '933 £ Fra~ "'" Hams County~' {pct 1 roor Praton f113J nr-er '' W•lt.-r Rant11n Constable {pc.l 1) .JOr San JKJnto.. t713J 221 5200 Oebt• Ollnburg Te•n ~ of ~rtet Cdisl 137) 191' s w ,., (113> 510-8068 Ct..g Wa.srungton Te .. s Sl!Nlle- f~l 13) 2313 C•rohM 11 r JI 659-4 i43 M ei.ey Leland US House of Aeprewnrarrvfl dtSI 18) r9 9 Snuth •820. '7131 139--1339 The Newspaper of Montrose Established 1980 OUR 268tl> ISSUE DEC 13, 1985 Published every Friday Montrose Voice Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006-3028 Phone (713) 529-8490 OISTRIBUTIO" 9 000 cop.es '#eekty n Houston tt'lrouQh 140 maJOI CrSttibutJOn pomts 1n lhe Montrose trte Village U\e Heights at tNled p.s.s on r•t• f~ctor l 8 •at mated rHcterstup 25 200 wnk ty 1 000 coptes we@k 'I ets~e through lO other :1 SI butron points nt ~tect pass on rare t~aor 2 5 at mar«J re.aerlh p 2 .SOO weetdy TOTAL OISTR Bl.JI ON GUARANTE.EO 10 000 CoP'85 weekty total .:st tNled 1ea~ship 21 700 weelr 'y Contents copyright 1985 Office hours 10am-5·30pm Henry McCIL1rg publqher fld 101 Lnda Wyche manog"'fl ""tor Roger Lac~ey otr <• "''"'.g"' Mark Btaz ek Austin conaponcenr Scott Cutsinger Boll 0 Rourke «arc0tou 1>u10<s Steve Warren ,,.,;on. cOllespondent ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT Houston (7 t3) 529-8490 Elsewhere Texu (800) 222-1537 EXT 995220 Elsewhere U S (800) 225-<l227 EXT 995220 Jerry MJJlhol and Miiien sing d11«:tor Rick Hill •ccount ••llCUlmt Paul Ganter •ccout'rf ••ecut w-e Found no u.tnbffrs Oreater Montrose Bus ness Guild Gay and Ln~n Prn.s Aaaociatl-0" News S.rv c., Nevios-One Plic.ihc News Service SyndJC•t•d Fe•tur• SlllY.Ctts & Wrihtrs Brian ~c Naught Unt versal Press Syndicate New' Amenca Syndica1e PC$T~AS'TER Send llddrns correcttans to 408 AlfOnd•le Hou$ton nc n~3028 SulJKrtpt.on r11te ,,. US n u•led envel(Jt)ll $49 per year •S2 iSSUeSJ $29 per 10: rnonlhS f26 assues> or S I 25 per vweek (less than 26 iuues Back IPUft $2 00 Mt;h N•tlCNlal «lv9rt4 ng t•P1•Hnl•ln1• Joe- 01SabalO R1venoefl U11ri.1t1tng 666 6th Avenue New YOrk 1001 t (212) 2•2~6863 AtJv•rtlSlltg deadl:N Wednesday 5 30pm for .s9Ue released Friday even ng NoltC•to~ ••fl Loaladvef1 s.ingratetchedua.Seven--A wuefl'ecbveOci 12 1964 .,,ciEIQhl·.Aw ltteettecuveJan 3 t986 ~'~ The< Montrose VOtCe does nae assume re:spon- 1 bi ty tor actvertts'"O ciaMM Readers Should advise the ~p!lper IO any oec;epuve ~sing service worker,; for communicable dis­eases. Guidelines by the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta say AIDS cannot be communicated through food. At Enserch, parent company of Lone Star Gas, David Bonner, director of food service, lf'sted poi;tive, but does not have the di~eaRe Thf' other worker, Terry Ulrey, a maitre d', does have AIDS but said he is "perfectly capable" of working. Refusing to confirm or deny whether any GTE workers were put on leave because of AIDS testing, company spokei;· woman ,Jean Ryon in San Angelo said, "Our policy is not to diRcuss individual health situations." SIR,\ ~iP10 ~mL i\V\i ~Ck ~EIROO.$ "'ffiC1£ ~IS~~ ~ Jusncf ~11\~"- l't<\ t-AWt> i\lDSE »Ji 1\\' JU5m ~I.A~- =- 10% OFF PARTS & lABOR with this ad FOREIGN CAR SPECIALIST Semi-Trucks & American Cars WEST GRAY AUTO • Electrical Work • Converters • Mufflers • Tires • AIC Repair 8am-5:30pm MON.-SAT. L----------..J ~~ ~;; STEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D. INTERNAL MEDICINE INFECTIOUS DISEASES SEXUAU.. Y TRANSMIITED DISEASES AJDS1KS DIAGNOSIS OPEN MON.-FRI 8:30AM-5PM SAME DAY APPOINTM£N1' MON:r. YJEO·· FRI. EVENINGS AND ::.A TURDAY MORNINGS BY APPOINTMENT ONLY 2801 B.LA BL VD., SUITE G HOUSTON, TX noos (713) 868-4535 ___IN '-"rnE Hf!GHTS .. r::1r1~ THE BEST LI'ITLE GUEST HOUSE IN TOWN REASONABLE NIGHTLY & WEEKLY RATES PRIVATE BATIIS FREE PARKING FOR RESERVATIONS CALL (504) 566-1177 1118 URSULINES STREET, NEW ORLEANS, IA 70116 DECEMBER 13 ' 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 4 MONTROSE VOICE DECEMBER 13, 1985 Bringing Holiday Joy To Those With AIDS By Linda Wyche Montrose Voice Managing Editor AB we hurriedly begin the rush to find spe­cial holiday gifts for friends and relatives, members of the Montrose community should not forget those among us who have been stricken by the tragedy called acquired immune deficiency syndrome. The Montrose Voice asked represent&· tives from the Houston KS, AIDS Founda­tion, Aid for AIDS, and Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays for sugges­tions that will brighten the holidays for AIDS patients. George Budd, a spokesman for the KS 1 AIDS Foundation says that the McA­dory House, a resident facility for AIDS patients, has devised a "wish list" of items needed for the house. Currently the house need!l: fixtures for a planned downstairs bathroom, carpeting for the stairs, screen doori;, twin bed sheets, twin bed pads, twin bedspreads, towels. a garbage disposal, ceiling fan, washer and dryer, lawn equip­ment, blankets, and a microwave. Budd added, that for individuals, any­thing that would be given anyone else will also be appreciated by AIDS patients. Those wishing to make holiday contn· Holiday Party Tips from the Houston Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse From a Pre.a Release The Houston Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abu,;e offer8 these suggestions to help partygoers and party givers enjoy the holiday season with greater safety. For the host and hostess: -Do not make drinking the primary focus of your social event. -Do provide a variety of non-alcoholic drinks. -Do provide a variety of attractive, nourishing foods. -Do instruct your bartender to measure standard drinks. -Do not permit your guests to mix their own drinks -Avoid carbonated mixers. Carbona· tion speeds alcohol absorption Do not accept unacceptable behavior just because someone has had " too much to drink." -Cloi;e your bar one to two hours before the end of the your party. -If one of your guests drinks too much provide transportation home or overnight accommodations. For guests: -Choose your own drink. Know what you are drinking, Know the alcohol con· tent of beverages you consume. -It is alright to say "No, thank you," to an alcoholic beverage -Know that the alcohol in 1-'fi ounces of distilled spirit.. is about equal to the alco­hol in one l 2·ounce beer or five ounce,; of table wine. -Using fruit juice or water as a mixer olowf> down the abi;orption rate of alcohol into your blood stream. -Don't drink on an empty stomach. -Do not combine alcohol with other drugs. -Remembf>r that alcohol is a drug -Know the calorie count of the bever-ages you consume. For example, over the course of a year, 2 cans of beer a day in excess of your normal caloric needs could result in a ~pound weight gain and a daily gla; s of wine could add IO pounds a year -Don't dnnk and drive. -If you nre a woman, realize that alco-hol will have a greater effect on you even if you weigh the saml' as most men. butions to the Foundation or the McAdory House may write KS AIDS Foundation, P.O. Box 66973 Suite II55, Houston 77006 or call 524-AIDS Joe Porro, director of Aid for AIDS sug­gests gift certificates for vitamins and whole foods as good ideas for holiday giv­ing. "A lot of little boxes with little things," adds Porro, "are very exciting to these guys." On an organizational level, Porro says that his group needs an additional $1,800 by Jan.I for membership in the umbrella organization FOCUSS. Porro adds, that BO'lf, of all Aid for AIDS funds go for doctor's bills, home support, and spending money for patients. Donations to Aid for AIDS may be made by writing P.O. Box 66414, Houston 77006, or by calling 526-6077. Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays feel that financial output needn't be a factor in sharing the holiday spirit with an AIDS patient. Their guidelines are sim­ple and cost little or no money. A brochure available from Parents­FLAG suggests a personal visit. It recom­mends calling before planning a visit. Visitors should be reminded that the ill often tire easily and not plan long visits unless requested by the patient. When cal­ling, offer to bring a special dish. Bring the food in disposable containers, so he won't worry about washing dishes. Don't be afraid to touch him. You can't contract AIDS simply by touching people. Friends of AIDS victims can also bring festive decorations for the home or hospi­tal room Bring flowers or other specific treasures . Remembering the patient's lover, care­partner or roommate is also important during the holiday season. These individ­uals may need a small break from the illness from time to time. Offer to stay with the person who is sick in order to give his loved ones a break. Invite them out. They may need someone to talk with as well. Sharing the holidays with someone in our community who has AIDS not only benefits the person who's sick. The good feeling knowing that you were there for them may be the best present you get. d in these days that will come to pass, that fat ole eH is gonna tell me to load up the sleigh and hit the air. And I'll tell'm ... "Not MOI bubba!" ... I'm stayin' right here to see the Montrose Symphonic Band's • 'HOME FOR CHRISTMAS CONCERT' • Dec. 14! It starts at 8. At Lanier. So give your"'--...... ..... Concert Guest Artists MCCR Choir Don't be late. Middle School self a •s Gitt! Tickets available at: Pre-Concert Entertainment by the Montrose Singers • 7:30 ?r;t;. K.A/.1?. 1'2 OFF Showtix, Union Jack, Wilde & Stein Books, Half Price Books, TLC, Tim's Coffee Shop. Eagle Leathers. ............ · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · · ·· · · · ········TICKET COUPON············································ We'd Ike to tllanll you fOf 111pportln9 the band. H rou wlll Pft•ent this ad at the dHr with the purclla .. of OM f\IU price ticket, your 1ue1t's ticket d bt $2.50. So 1111lle your lat and check It twice - we'U give you •i. off !Of being n1111hty or nice! ................................................................................................................. DECEMBER 13. 1985/ MONTROSE VOICE 5 DuWjS~A AVONDALE ANSWER 220 AVONDALE HOUSTON, TEXAS 529-7525 Casino Craziness Cures Barroom Blahs By l.M. Lucky MONTROSE-It was one of those nights. The streets of this innercity neighborhood were quiet as most of its residents were sitting down to dinner. It was shortly after 6:00 p.m. and this reporter was preparing to venture out on the nightly Montrose beat. Little did we know that, on what had become a slow, repetitious assignment, we would soon uncover somlthing so exciting it may change the course of MontroRe nightlife for some time to come. It all started as I turned the corner at Westheimer and Mason. Since I found nothing of interest at the bookstore, I headed towards Avondale. As I neared the comer of Avondale and Mason, I witnesst'd several cheerful individuals entering an establishment called Dirty Sally's. With my curiosity aroused, I followed the crowd onto the other side of a tall wooden fence. Once inside it was hard to believe what was going on. An air of excitement permeated the room. Patrons exchanged stories about some activity that had transpired a few nights ago. At the time I could not figure out who was a Prycene or a Drunkin, but with after some investigation, I would soon be able to clue in on the prevailing conversation. I ordered a cocktail. I was a little surprised and suspicious when I received change from $2. This can't be Houston. Something's up here. I decided to explore. To the right of the main bar area, I saw two tables the like of which I have only seen in gaming towns. Above theRe tables were rows of blinking lights, reflecting off a mirror. Not being new to the streets, I knew that the game here was black iack. QuestionA began to buzz through my head. This is not a legal gambling state. What's going on here. As I continued my investigation, I heard applause go up from several patrons sitting at the bar. Two people dressed in tuxedos had arrived. People began to clamor as they claimed places at the tables. Tales abounded about winnings of over 2 million in chips. Being the thorough investigative reporter I am, I An 1nexpens1ve evening with old friends or new ones Is always a winner felt my work would not be complete without joining the "gamblers" at the tables. I was told that for $5 I could play 2,000 in C'hips. For $5, what the heck. I sat down at a table with a dealer that looked as if she would cry before taking anyone's chips. After one hand, I knew I was wrong. This was the professional dealer of death. I looked over at the next ta bl!' thinking surely, these were just some out· of·work bartenders trying to make a few bucks. Wrong afain, there was another dealer with th!' swift hands o a Los Vegas professional. Soon the bug bit. I got my first "21." I was hooked. With oil this going on around me, I needed another drink. As I turned to leave the table, a handsome young man, also stunningly attired, asked ifl needed anything from the bar. I stopped a minute to again ponder my exact location. I felt as though I had You make the decision ... . and Margie prepares to pay off. blacked out and came around in Atlantic City. As the night progressed, so did mv winnings. The cards just seemed to falJ my way. Even though the dealer had many good hands, I was stilJ ahead in the game. After a while I noticed that I was sitting among strangers. I thought to myself that the~e were alJ old friends as they were talking and laughing as though they had known each other forever. Another error in judgement. no one at the table had met before this fateful night. It seems that a C"ertain comraderie develops among those trying to "beat the house." Even spectators shared in the tenor of the evening. The night quickly progressed as the dashing waiter kept the drinks coming and popcorn and pretzels on the table. For those who didn't care to have alcohol impair their card playin~ , plenty of juices were available from Dirty Sally s well-stocked bar. One of the spectators remarked, "This •eems fun, but I don't know how to play." The dealer carefulJy explained the game. This didn't cause much of a delay in play because the game is very easy to understand. Just try to get "21," or at least, a higher number under 21 than the dealer. I knew before the end of the evening that this was one night I wouldn't have to calJ my contact down in the vice division. There was no gambling here. Plu8, everyone was a winner because friends were easily made and you can have fun and not lose your shirt. WelJ this C!lse seems closed. Croupiers (dealers) L(mme, Margie, Pam, Sharon, Keith and Connie don their tuxedos and man the Dirty's Sally's Black Jack tables on Sundays, Wednef<days, and Fridays. from ALL HAIL MISS AVONDALE Thousands watched in amazement Thursday night as thl' royal sceptor was paRsed on to the 7th Miss Avondale. Gary Lingenfelder will proudly serve as thl' 198fi Mi11s Avondall'. For theserondyearin a row, Prycene will he lady.in-waiting. Members of the royal court were Royal C. Olivia (80). De De Drunkin (81 ), Pigm~ Peter Williams (82) Kalvin a Mae (83), Five & Dime Ray (84 ), and John L'. (85). As the smo_ke rObe from the Dirty Sally's chimney, the tearful Miss Avondale promised to reign with the same distasteful lewdness as her predecessors. 6:00 p.m. until closing. On Fridays, there's a free buffet. Those wishing to investigate this new Montrose phenomena should arrive early to get a good seat. Strictly for professional reasons, I will be making several follow up visits to ensure that the fun continues. This story may be finished. but Dirty SalJy's invites others to investigate "The Story of New Found Fun." Professional croupiers really make for that Vegas feel ing Everyone Wins with Dirty Sally's Drink Specials Dirty Sally's deals a winning hand every day with Happy Hour prices, all day, "€ven days a week. The ~ draft beer in big goblets is an instant jackpot. Double down on Monday 1'ith alJ the draft you care to drink for $1. The $5 all-you·can drink Liquor Bust makes Saturdays and Sundays between 4.7 a sure bet. Don. the waiter, keeps the drinks and free munchies com mg I H,O,U STON 6 MONTROSE VOICE DECEMBER 13, 1985 Montrose Country Cloggers to Host Fundraising Christmas Party forMCCR From a Press Release In a gesture illuminating the true spirit of Chrii;tmas, the Montrose Country Cloggers will hoi;t a "Country Christmas Party" in the Fellowship of the Metropoli­tan Church of the Resurrection, 1919 Decatur, on Saturday, Dec. 21. All pro­ceeds from the party, which begins at 7:30 p.m., will be donated to MCCR to help defray the moving expenses of its newly­assigned pastor, Rev. John Gill. who joins the church from Orlando, F1orida. For a tax deductible contribution of $5. the Cloggeri; have planned a delightful holiday evening which will include food, non·alcoholic beverages, entertainment and country dancing. They will award door prizes donated by such area mer­chants as TNT T·Shirts and Bentley's F1ower Garden, Inc, as well as compli­mentary bar tabs from such country bars as the Brazos River Bottom and Bear's. Rumor hai; it that Santa Claus, on his way to the North Pole from a winter vacation in Orlando, will pay the party a surpri•e visit. Since its formation in 1979 by the late Gilbert De La Garza and Rusty Stubb. the Montrose Country Cloggeri; have given freely of their time and talent in support of area benefiti;. Under the current leader· hip of Director Stubb (who was recently elected chairman of the newly-formed International Gay Clogging Association which represents 23 performing groups across the nation) and its newly-elected President Rick Flory, doing good deeds in behalf of the community appears to be a continuing goal of Houston's energetic Montrose Country Cloggers. Advance ticketi; are available from any clogger at church functions and at the door on the evening of the party. League of Women Voters Seek AIDS Activists From a Preu Release The Houston League of Women Voters is seeking AIDS activists to work with the league on a statewide health care project. "Once again, our community has the opportunity to utilize the existing commit· tees and the future local statewide lobby· mg efforts of the Lt>ague of Women Voters, this timeconcemmg AIDS.related isoues," said Houston League board member, Phyllis Frye. The Houston League is planning a health care study for next month, and agam. next fall. In addition, the Texas League is beginning a two-year study on ~tatewide health care. "I know that both leagues wou Id include in their study pro­grams care for AIDS patients and the need for health cards," Frye added, "if some knowledgable community AIDS activists would JOm the League and provide their womanpower-or manpower-to the Lt>ague committees." Frye emphasized that although she 1s a League member, she is not an AIDS expert. "I do not feel qualified . But I do know that the League wants theinforma· tion and ,.;u act on it, if knowledgeable folks will join the League and participate •in then health care committees." She sug-gests that those interested ~hould call the Leauge of Women Voters' office at 529- 3171 or stop by their offices. 3400 Mont· rose No. 299, between 9·00 p.m. and 3 p.m EMBASSY FILMS ASSOCIATES• POLYGRAM PICTURES 'FEUER• MAKTIN - RICHARD AffiNBOROUGH's """A CHORUS LINE" "":.::=!! ..... ; MICHAEL BENNITT .:.:.~ JAMES KIRKWOOD • NKHOLAS DANTI • ~:JOSEPH PAPP~.··:~,\".'r.:J,111 ":MARVIN HAML.ISCH ·;.EDWARD KLEBAN -:::::: RALPH BURNS ::;: FAYE POLIAKIN ':;::PATRIZIA VON BRANDENSTEIN .:0.. JOHN BLOOM ..:;:,:: RONNIE TAYLOR B.S.C. ~JEFFREY HORNADAY """": ARNOLD SCHULMAN '.:roROON STULBERG E-..:.~.:-:::.....:.::::::-- 4 -:cv FEUER-ERNEST tl MARTIN'"":RKHARD ATTENDOUGH t1!'mm~s~'..miW Q:=;." CD~'~~~- ~~'::.':'. .~ ~ Now ploying in New York and Los Angeles; Opens at theatres nationwide December 20th. 1022 WESTHEIMER HOUSTON 528-8851 MSA "JOCK NITES" MONDAY & WEDNESDAY SPECIAL DRINK PRICES WITH YOUR M.S.A. CARD DECEMBER 13, 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 1H Sunday, December 15th SPM-Unscheduled Bartenders Benefit Drag Show In Memory of FABIAN PALASIOS • Guest Bartenders & Live Music • Brown wrapper auction of Fabian's favorite explicit magazines 8PM-The Ranch Anniversary Show • 5th Year Anniversary for The Ranch • 1st Year Anniverary in New Location Live Band Friday & Saturday Nights Dec. 13th and 14th Featuring "E.D. Davis Country Band" 9150 S.Main 666-3463 8 MONTROSE VOICE I DECEMBER 13, 1985 ~tt Ja!I.emoriam Bill Van Velsor Bill Van Velsor died Monday. Dec. 9 at M.D Anderson Hospital from AIDS complica­tions 8 111 touched the hearts and lives of many people by his work with the KS/AIDS Foun­dation. AIDS support groups. as well as AA and NA His fight to live a full and inde­pendent life with d1gn1ty 1s an 1nspirat1on to all who face great obstacles in their lives 8111 was 29 years old A memorial service was held Thursday, Dec. 12 at MCCR. In lieu of flowers. memorial donations may be made to the KS/AIDS Foundation. Wayne Romero Wayne Romero died Monday, Dec. 9, 1985. He was born Jan 17, 1952 in Crowley, La Survivors include his mother, Lee Romero, two brothers. Mark and David Romero. and his lifemate, Patrick A candlehght memorial service will be held Thursday. Dec. 19 at 6 po p.m. (cor­rected time from that previously announced) at the Metropolitan Commun­ity Church of the Resurrection, 1919 Decatur I lieu of flowers donations may be made to the KS/ AIDS Foundation and the Montrose Counseling Center Dennis N. Weber Dennis N Weber, 53. died Nov 30 at M D Anderson Hospital of AIDS-related com­plex Weber was a former resident of Col­lege Station, Texas. and moved to Houston three years ago He 1s survived by a brother, Gary Weber of Minneapolis. and compan­ion Gordon Kelley A memorial service was held Monday, Dec. 9 at the Grace Lutheran Church Mem­orial donations in hos name may be made to the KS I AIDS Foundation of Houston. Fabian Palaslos Fabian Palasoos. a longtime employee at the Ranch, died Dec 12 He was 25 years old He is survived by hos father, Raymond Sr , five brothers, Raymond Jr , David, Jesse. Johnny and Henry, and one sister, Rose Mary Funeral services will be held Saturday Dec. 14 in Rosenburg. Texas Hernandez Funeral Home, Rosenburg. 1s in charge OUR POUCV Tho Monttole VCMCe w I commemotate the pas1ng of Montro. fftfdentl and Hous1on gay commundy members w1tn an announcement f'nends or rNtzves of lhe deCeeed nwy provtde us wlftl IKts at>out the person 1 re names of the doMl11UfYNOn and bunmf 1rn~sa Prose or vene can be tncJuded Pictures we appreciated and w I be" returned Natne ol me dKMSed should be attached to the phOIO tnrorrnat.on lhO\.lld be provided to the Mantrow VOtCe 9t the eatbe$t possible date and ..ti be pt,tbkShed In the Milt -od-T..,.11no~1otuussemce WE MAKE THE DIFFERENCE DRIVE THE CAR OF YOUR DREAMS FOR LESS!! Cash for Your Trade ... No Down Payment CADILLAC BMW TOYOTA Sedan Deville 3181 . . ••••.. 269mo Cresida . . 259mo . .. • • • .. • • • • 278mo. 325E 339mo Celica . . 178mo. 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MASTER CARD, AMERICAN EXPRESS, CHECK or CASH DECEMBER 13. 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 Are You on the Warpath with Others? -----------, By Salvatore V. Didato, Ph.D. News America Syndicate Special to Montrose Voice W.C. Fields was once asked: "Are clubs good for children?" His response was tart: "Yes, but only if all else fails." Fields' wisecracks, of course, were calcu­lated to maintain his Hollywood image of a rascal of social irreverence, not only toward small fry but toward adults as well. While Fields' hype was done for box office profit, some of us get bogged down in ill will concerning others as a way of life, feeling chilly about everyone in general and usually losing friends as a result. But we humans are not born angry; rather, our frustrations usually cause such emotions to build up within us. If left unchecked, they can bring on personality distortions. A recent survey by Psychol­ogy Today found that those who are grouchy toward others are those most likely to be lonely, depressed and have low self-esteem. So, one's animosity is directly linked with a lack of emotional well-being. Where do you stand? Do you have more than your share of hostility toward the world and not be aware of it? The quiz items ahead are similar to those used on tests which measure social interaction patterns. Answer yes or no to each. Expla­nations follow. 1. I am usually the one to stand up for the rights of others. 2. It irritates me when peers or family members give me orders. 3. I would feel quite glad if an obnoxious person were told off by someone. 4. It bothers me very much to come out second best with others. 5. Most of the time, I am willing to fight for what I want. But we humans are not born angry; rather, our frustra­tions usually cause such emotions to build up within us. 6. I would have no qualms about talking back to an authority like a guard or police­man. 7. I like to direct the actions of others. 8. I probably would try to get back at (oppose) people who are bossy or pushy with me. o Explanation Social hostility is found so extensively that some see it as an inborn characteris· tic of man. But this belief has undergone revisions. Dr. Karen Horney, a Freudian disciple and psychoanalyst, maintained that interpersonal hostMity is not an inborn trait, but a reaction pattern acquired through experience, especially with one's parents. She theorized that we have a built-in capacity to be hostile and it is triggered when one is faced with parents who are indifferent, inconsistent and interfering. A child in such a situation is reluctant to express these feelings openly, so they are repressed and often cause a child to feel unworthy or guilty. This creates a kind of love-hate conflict which is resolved in one of three ways: The child moves toward others (trying to please or placate them); againstothers(by being anti-social or domineering); or away ALL NOVA TITLES s499s_s549s Biiou Video Sales' Every-day Low Price $4995 BEACHED TUB TRICKS BIG BROTHER IS WATCHING YOU THAT BOY NEXT DOOR BRIAN'S BOYS SHORELEAVE OH BROTHER DORMITORY DAZE THE MAIN ATTRACTION DOWN ON THE FARM MADE TO ORDER FOUR IN HAND LOCKERROOM "EVER HEATWAVES LITTLE BROTHER'S COMING OUT HIS LITTLE BROTHER HOW I GOT THE STORY KEPT AFTER SCHOOL s549s HUNK HEROES HOT LUNCH SOMETHING WILD If there's a Nova title you don't see listed above, call our toll-free number for availability. For charge orders . coll In lll1no11 1-800-932-7111 1-800-572-2369 FREE CATALOG WITH PURCHASE Or send $5. State tha t you are over 2 J. loorderbyrTo . :..er,Jcos.h1er· c iec ~- m _or VISA. Mas1erCord or AmEx number, with e 11p1tot1on dote. along with o stotemen1 that yo1.1 o re over 11 Include sh1pp1ng charges. {SJ for the f11s.1 rape SI for eoch odd11ionol rope) ot'ld 1nd1co1e w hether you fleed VHS Ot Beto format A ll soles o re f,nol Dep1 M BIJOU VIDEO SALES TllE ~IW WOEO EXPEffl --1349 N. W.llt, Chp, ll-10-- from others (by being aloof or distant). Normally, a healthy personality blends all these three patterns into a lifestyle, cal­ling on one or the other when appropriate. The trouble begins when we lose flexibility to shift from one pattern to the other as circumstances warrant. An example: If a new worker typically declines to lunch with peers (moving away from others), he may soon be seen as odd and it will hurt his chances for being accepted in his new job. o Score Those who answer yes to the items tend to bear more hostility toward others than those who answer no. They are likely to be unfriendly, untrusting types who survive with few friends or social commitments. Self-sufficiency is high and they skill­fully avoid situations in which people are apt to take advantage of them. When all is considered, most experts would agree that grudges we bear against others are likely to be a displacement of our own displeasure with life. Our quiz isn't an official test, of course, but consider that if you answered yes to four or five items, you are average in the degree of hostility you have toward others. A score of six or more is above average, and it might be best to examine the frus­trations which could be at the bottom of the problem. Note-The Quiz Dilemma On any test, there is always the chance that our introduction might clue you in to what the quiz measures and possibly cause you (unwittingly or not) to slant your answers in the socially approved direction. To get another point of view, give the test to someone who knows you well, ask him I her to take it with you in mind and then compare your answers. i 'TIS TH E MEXICAN RESTAURANT 4701 N. Main Houston 869-1706 2for1 DINNERS ~ Expires 12131/85 A TASTE OF MEXICO, 24 HOURS DAILY CLOSED TUESDAY 10PM REOPEN WEDNESDAY 10AM I I I I I I I I I .L------------1. S EASON I GIFTWARE PARTYGOOOS STATIONERY • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • [P A_P_E R ' ETC • - 87l1KCJly fwy 46551)7 11o ..... oa.. ... W ;.av 520 5700 Gonerio 203~ Posl Ooo lllYd. 961 IW fM 1900 3341fM 1'100 West!>!\(> ~I """'~"""' 11101- 952 5556 10 MONTROSE VOICE I DECEMBER 13, 1965 San Francisco Candlelight March Honors Hundreds A~ reported by Allen White in the Bay Area Reporter The names of over 700 people who have 808 Lovett Complimentary Mimosas with Meal Purchase 521- 1015 GIVE YOUR FRIENDS A PIECE OF HOU.VWOOD ••• ••• GIVE THEM A VIDEO GIFT FROM VIDEOTRENDI AIDS or AIDS-Related Complex were taped to the side of San Francisco's old Federal Building on Wednesday. Nov. 27 Saturdays 8am-4pm, Sundays 12 noon-4pm • RENTAL GIFT CERTIFICATES at the conclusion of the seventh annual AVAllABLE candlight march honoring the late Super-visor Harvey Milk and Mayor George Moscone. Milk and Moscone were mur-dered in their City Hall offices on that date in 1918. This year, as has happened every year since the assassination, people marched with candles from Castro and Market streets to City Hall. Each year the march has expressed different concerns and feel­ings of the people of San Francisco. Leading the thousands of marchers were signs honoring Milk and M08cone, followed by the rain bow colored flag of the Lesbian I Gay Freedom Day Parade. Hundreds of people carried signs with the names of people who had AIDS or ARC. When the crowd reached City Hall , Cleve Jones, who has led the march each year of its existence spoke. In a brief but Jarring speech Jones listed the names of people for whom he has cried in the last seven years. After listing the name;; he said, "I can't cry anymore." He told the crowd that it wa;; now Ameri­ca 'a turn to experience the tragedy AIDS. ".Sow I fear it is your turn to cry, America. Now it's your turn to pace the hospital corridors, now it'• your turn to wait up all night, now it's your turn to count the days, now it's your turn to wonder; why?" said Jones. Jones answered his question by saying, "The simple truth of this tragedy is as clear to see as the sun shining up at dawn. It's so simple even the small children dying from transfu•ed blood in the Midw· est can understand it easily: Let them die." Jones continued, "That was the decision in Washington and Atlanta. Those are the words whispered m the cloakrooms of Congress. Those are the word" embla­zoned in the silence over the Wbite Hou•e today. Those are the words screaming behind the smiling face of the Secretary for Health and Human Service~ . Those are the words echoing throu11h the closet.> and hallways of Gov. George Deukmejian's administration: Let them die." Jones stated that the demands of gayR m thlS country are no different from anyone else's. "We want to live, without fear of violence, without need for deceit. We want decent jobs, free from discrimina· tion. We want a chance, a <'hance at find· ing love and happiness in our lives. We want our families. We want to be healthy, and cared for if ill or dymg. We want to hve." When he concluded, Jones a-.ked the crowd to leave their candles, as in past years, on the steps of City Hall. He then asked the crowd to proceed to the old Fed· era! Building on United t\ationR Plaza one block away. The old Federal Building Houses the Department of Health and Human Servi ces. It was there that hundred' of names were posted covering the walls of the building. Many were surprised to see names of people they recognized. having no idea the person had died of AIDS Also at the old Federal Building, several protestors remain chained to the doors as part of a protest which began Oct. 28. They are demanding the federal goverment allow American physicians to prescribe medicines now available in Mexico and France for people with AIDS and ARC; proper funding for people with ARC, and 500 million directed specifically by the federal government for finding a cure for AID!':>. Lunch & Dinner Specials Mon.-Frl. only $391 Incl. tea and coffee Come and Relax with Us After a Hard Days Christmas Shopping' Extending our warmest wishes tor the Holidays from our staff! Catering Available! • SAME DAY DELIVERY FOR MOST SPECIAL ORDERS • AU TAPES GUARANTEED HOLIDAY GIFT IDEAS 1985 Every year, it's the same ... "what to buy for Aunt Clara or Cousin Bill?" This year, bring your list of fickle friends and relatives to Say Cheese. i We have hundreds of gift i ideas, from the traditional toi the unusual. l I t ... i For starters, we sell over 60 i varieties of cheeses, dozens i of imported coffees and teas,i - .. · i delicious homemade choc­olates and candies, plus a wide variety of meats, from plain ham to proscuitto, sliced to your specificatiom. ... ... Look over our selections of / ~ imported wine.s and liqueurs,~ many in attractive gift ~ packages. ~ l We've .searched the world over for perfect gift item.s that will bring back memories, and put a smile on anyone' s 1a· ce ... even Aunt Clara's. !}1 You'll also find shelves ' stocked with rare finds, such as Italian fruit cakes, real Cajun hot sauces (for those serious about their hot sauce), and real, honest­to- goodne.ss jellies and preserves made by sweet little-ole ladies from the hills of Tennes.see. Don't forget to treat 1 yourself to our luncheon deli, serving sandwiches made to order, salads, and soup du jour ... good to the f' last drop! 1t You'll find .\omething for t everyone on your list at Say f Chee\e. Stop in soon before i Aunt Clara catche.\ on and 'buys out the inventory! ~~('{> ~·), iii ~[fl)©®~® \~ 1 The Gourmet Shop & Deli Highland v_illagr Shopping Cenlrr ~ Wrtthr1mrr " 621-18:>5 Sports Voice Tennis: Challenging Sport By Rich Corder Special to the Montrose Voirl' There were 11 challenge matches in last Sunday's Houston Tennis Club play. That may be a record, as HTC members are flocking to the courts to enjoy good, cool weather before winter sets in. The club is still trying to play doubles on Wedne8day nights, (at 7;30) but the last two weeks have been too wet; hence, greater partici· pation on Sunday. This Sunday may see some reduction in numbers of players as the HTC Annual Christmas Party and Installation of Officers iR Saturday night. There were three leap-frogs(challengers hopping the maximum four steps on the ladder with a victory over the fourth player above them) as Sabe Velez won No. 2 on the B ladder from Oscar Martinez, Rodd Rudd took over No. 9 on the Bladder from Eddie Chavez, and Mr. Bill hopped to No. 6 on the C ladder over Rick Knapp. Of the three vanquished, only Knapp made a contest of it, winning the second set 7-5, forcing Bill to a third set. They weren't the only challengers to be successful. In fact, all challengers won their matches except for one singles match (as Top Ten No. 9 Tim defended against Rich Corder) and the only doubles chal· lenge (Armi Alabanza-David Garza defeated the new team of Heiland-Corder 6-3, 6-2). Steve Bearden took over No. 1 on the B ladder from Rick Dupont 7-5, 3-6, 6--4. Ron· nie Ma uss took over No. 1 on the C ladder from Larry Jarvis 4-6, 6-4, 6-4. Randy Miller took over No. 1 on the D ladder from Steve Bryant 6-0, 6-1. All three challengers moved from No. 4 to the top. Other action saw Donny Kelley humil· iate Rick Hadnot 7-5, 6-4 to move from Top Ten No. 6 to No. 3. Rudy Garcia has a winning streak going as he beat J oe D. 6-3, 3-6. 6-2 in his close8t challenge match yet, and moved from No. 9 on the D ladder to No. 7 Outdoor Group Going South On December 15, members of the Houston Outdoor Group will travel to the Anahuac Wildlife Refuge for a day trip that will present an opportunity to observe a var· iety of birds that migrate to Texas to this coastal prairie and marRh. "Manatee hugging" in the warm Flor­ida waters is on the agenda for a HOG's Christmas. A covered dish dinner will be the feature at the group's Saturday, Dec. 28 meeting. Dinner will begin about 5;00 p.m. Call Jim at 680-3144 for more information and to coordinate dishes. Snow skiing enthusiasts may be inter· ested in the HOG's March 2-8 trip to Aspen, Colorado. The trip will include round-trip direct flight from Houston to Aspen via Aspen Airways, condominium accomodations at Snowmass Village, plus three day's lift tickets. The week is sche­duled around "Subaru Aspen Winterna· tional 19B6." More than 1,000 firework shells will open the event week, which will be filled with parties, parades, and films and capped off by the BASF Alpine World Cup Races. A meeting will be scheduled for mid-December to discuss the cost of the trip. If interested in any of HOG's trips, call (713) 680-3144 and I or (713) 521-3641. Rebel Wayne Romero A Ded1cat1on to His C1ft• & His ~inends A Candlelight Memorial Service 6:00 p.m. Thursday, Dec. 19, 1985, MCCR, 1919 Decatur In lieu of flowers. please make donations to KS/AIDS Foundation and Montrose Counseling Center DECEMBER 13. 1985 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 Sports Voice Calendar & Standings Regular Weekly Events SUNDAY: Frontrunners. Memorial Park Ten­nis Cenler Houston Tennis Club 10:30am-1 :30pm, Homer Ford Tennis Center Women's Bowling League Spm. Stadium Bowl WW B. Bowling League 7:30pm, Post Oak lanes MONDAY: MSA Men·s Bowhng 9pm, Sta­dium Bowl TUESDAY: Fronlrunners, Memorial Park Tennis Center MSA "Fun Volleyball League." 7pm WEDNESDAY: Houston Tennis Club plays 7.30pm Homer Ford Tennis Center MSA Pool league plays Spm, various locations THURSDAY: Frontrunners. Memorial Park Tennis Center MSA Mixed Bowling League 9pm, Sta­dium Bowl Special Events Feb. 14·16.· IGBO-affiliated Bluegrass Clas­sic. Lou 1sv1lle Feb. 28-Mar. 2: IGBO-affiliated Spring Break lnv1tat1onal, Ft Lauderdale Mar. 27-30 IGBO-affiliated D1x1e lnv1ta­llonal, Atlanta Mar 29-31 · IGBO-affiliated MAK.1.T . Kan­sas City June. Oak lawn Tennis Assoc. hosts Texas Cup Challenge, Dallas. compellng with Houston Tennis Club July 25-Aug. 3. 1986: U.S. Olympic Festival, Houston Houston Tennis Club Challenge Ladder matches through Dec 8 TOP TEN LADDER 1 Jim Kitch 2 Randall Dickerso" 3 Donny Kelley 4 Roel< Hadnot 5 JC Barrera t Steve Bearden 2 Sabe Velez 3 Oscar Maninez 4 Edward de Leon 5 Ron McCauley 1 Ronnie Mauss 2 Larry Jarvis 3 Mark Deardorff 4 Joel 5 Mr Boll 1 Steve Bryant 2 Roy Mendiola 3 John Murphy 6 Arm1 Albanza 7 Ron Bell 8 Dav•d Hetland 9 Tiny Tim 10 Roch Corder BLADDER 6 Lou Garza 7 David Garza 8 Ronn Rodd 9 Eddie Chavez 10 Thomas Cortez CLADDER 6 Rock Knapp 7 Gabe Herp1n 8 Rick Massey 9 Billy Green 10 Randy Moller DLADDER 6 Rudy Garcoa 7 JoeD 8 JV Khnger 4 Oa1wod Hendrickson 5 Oscar Ysass1 9 Steve Chesney 10 David Moskowitz 1 Howard Brown 2 Mike Holloway E LADDER 3 Randy Joerscheck DOUBLES LADDER 1 Jim Kotch & Dock Cotten 2 Arm• Alabanza & David Garza 3 David H811and & Rich Corder 4 Steve Bearden & Bill Santa•!• 5 Ronn Rodd & Richard Pregeant 6 Biiiy Green & Paul Brown Frontrunners Join 'Aid for AIDS' in One-on-One Exercise Program Frontrunners has agreed to work with Aid for AIDS, a group which works with People with AIDS and AIDS-related complex. Frontrunners, in coalition with Shanti of Texas, will work in a Health Support Network with PWA's and ARC's. Wherever You're At And Whoever You Be May You Remember And Know Good TIDles And Good Cheer; And Your Holidays Come Every Day Of The Year. The runners will work on a one-on-one basis for exercise and Shanti will train peer counselors. For additional information on Aid for AIDS, write P.O. Box 66414, Houston 77006 or call 526-6077. Christmas Lighting: Sunday, Dec. 15th ~••!Party! 12 MONTROSE VOICE I DECEMBER 13, 1985 DING-A-LING MONKEESHINES CHARGE BY PHONE Singing Telegrams Stuffed Animals Balloons NOW APPEARING Bearilyn Monroe Carmen Bearanda Scarlet O'Beara Humphrey Beargart Lauren Bearcall EMs Bearsley Napoleon Beamopart and The Entire Vandibear Family 521-0565 MC. VlSA AMEX Cobo1t BJ 1408 WESTHEIMER Gloss ue Dried Flowers Christrnas Rattle and much, much morel 521-2124 WE'RE BACK!! THE DIVORCE IS FINAL ~ c z (;) !"flm cz -om en :D o~ 0)> -c r~ Oo I~ )>o z~ C>­m< enm Jae -------- ___ Gene 0 J) m Ill -0 J) )> )>- ALWAYS COMMITTED TO "SERVICING THE MONTROSE" 1901 TAFT (AT WEBSTER) 524-8601 "m J) en MERIDIEN LEASING INC. '86 BMW '86 MERCEDES BENZ '86 HONDA 190E 349/mo Accord 159/mo Preludt' 179/mo 115 309/mo 518e 195/mo 300E 4'l81mo 735i 5691mo 560Sl 7251mo '86 CADILl.Af_ '86 PORSQ!E_ __'86 JAGUAR Dt'Vill" 319/mo 944 398/mo XJ6 569/mo 944 Turbo 498/mo __'8 6 MAZDA '86 BUICK_ _ RX.;o '86 TOYOTA~- Skyt.ri< 17'J/mo 616 lO'lmo 178/mo C•mry 172/mo El..ctr• 27'Jlmo Ct'liu 185/mo ~ CALL LEE BORBA ~ (713) 975-1986 r---1 "0 OOWN PAYMENT• LOWER MONTttlY PAYMENT • CA\H fOR YOUR TRADE £}ff_Pl£.)~1 :.llDff.~J'Pt "Where the World Meets Houston" 106 Avondale, Houston, TX 77006 (713) 523-2218 ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED YOUR HOSTS. Albert G. Nemer, John J. Adams and Gordon A. Thayer DECEMBER 13, 1985/ MONTROSE VOICE 13 Letters Writer Asks, 'Is GPC's Mission Complete?' From Jerel Shaw It is possible that some are perceiving the Gay Political Caucus of Houston as "mis­sion complete." It has reached the pinna· cle of its hard fought struggles to achieve human dignity and justice here in Hous· ton. For some, like the "straight slate" and its following, some politicians, and some of the general populace, signs may be pointing that way. Yet, if those who are gay, and the ones who have been involved in the struggle are even entertaining this mentality, it is delu­sion indeed. Yet when others allude to the status of the gay community, it is the GPC m which it is evaluated. Meanwhile there are a few things that have been happening in regards to GPC (within and without), which supports a theory of a declining influential institu t1on 1 The advent of new organizations in recent yearH. Citizens for Human Equality and the newly·organized Gay and Lesbian Coalition could be an indication that GPC is not the struggle bearer it once was. WhilP the former is an alternative and the latter a panacea. the development of the two can be saying that the whole gay front is not b!'ing addressed or represented. 2. For CPC the eightie.s came m with a row, but as the eighties progress, it has adapted to an image of maintenance or has rcvolut1on1zcd the word, "desensit· ize " Let's not make anybody angry. Unhkc I hr seventies when groups keyed in on and voiced their opposition to every injustice that homophobia could create, this lt•adership is maintaining (or trying to) what is has-proceeding to operate like any other "majority rule" organization. This may be fine for the less important issues like social functions and parties, but it's not enough for civil and human rights struggles. History has shown us that whenever people are struggling for justice a nd dig· nity, their approaches can not always be predictable. It was the unpredictability of the civil rights movement of groups like blacks and Jews that won them unprece­dented gains in human justice. Gains must be concrete and lasting. On a visit to Balitimore, Md., I observed that their city government was subsidiz· ing a community place for their gay com­munity and, also, this municipality is playing a major role in promoting AIDS education and contributing to the effort,; of their own in fighting the menace. Con· crete results like this are not happening in Houston, even though the referendum (even a modification) issue may have changed that. 3. Politicians are snubbing the gay com· munity and protecting their own political careers. It was Anthony Hall that theGPC so vigorously campaigned for and des­cribed as "progressive" who clearly stated that he would never "author a bill like the gay referendum again." It is George Greanias who has the delu· sion that only "20% of his constituents happen to be gay." The mayor, the over· whelming choice of the gay community was heard on a local radio station talking to a reporter about the GPC never bemg "as powerful" as it once was. All of these candidates and others made it clear that they wt•ren 't about to jeopardize their pol· itical careers by being officially endorsed by the GPC. However, political move,; are fine but our leaders must be guaranteed of a lasting result through thick and thin. 4. Last but not least. GPC, even though it maintains a (large) mailing list ... their recruiting of members or participants from the community at-large has been ineffective. They have failed to stimulate "new blood" and consequently dealing with new issues has less fervency. (Some exceptions may be someone in the person of Ray Hill.) Also, the loyals of GPC don't seem to get excited these days, save a few. Finally, I don't see what the gay com­munity can do without organizations like GPC, but a "mission complete" mentality can devastate the future of young gays. In a city, that, for the time being, has tenden­cies of homophobic hysteria. Depressing Incident From Loran E. Doss It is always depressing to hear of a police officer, like Sgt. William C. Staney, being shot while in the line of duty. When the officer involved is married and has child· ren, 1t becomes even more tragic. What society needs is more people like Dr. Eric Orzeck who came to the officer'~ ruosi,t· ance, and fewer people like the (accused assailant) James Steven Stacey. Items in the "Letters" section represents opinions of some of our readers and not necessarily the views of the MO,-.;TROSE VOICE. Readers are eneouraged to submit their thoughts on issues of interest to the community. 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