Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Montrose Voice, No. 322, December 24, 1986
File 012
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Montrose Voice, No. 322, December 24, 1986 - File 012. 1986-12-24. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 11, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2015/show/2001.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-12-24). Montrose Voice, No. 322, December 24, 1986 - File 012. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2015/show/2001

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 322, December 24, 1986 - File 012, 1986-12-24, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 11, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2015/show/2001.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 322, December 24, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date December 24, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript DECEMBER 24, 1986 /MONTROSE VOICE 11 'Nutcracker,' Not Just for the Kids Live Review by Bill O'Rourke Montrose Voice Although Tke Nutcracker, (at Jones Hall) is a classic created for children, it's maybe even better entertainment for adults. Little Clara has a hyper brother who continually disrupts the family Christmas party. Her uncle, the magician, smoothes things over. Later Clara has a magical dream. At first her excitement over Christmas and tension from her pugnacious brother cause her to sleep fitfully. She dreams about a war between the mice and the toy soldiers, led by her own nutcracker. At a crucial moment she saves his life. In gratitude, he takes her on an enchanted journey into fairyland—to meet his girlfriends. As she falls deeper and deeper asleep, she progressively takes on a much less active role. The handsome nutcracker disappears for a long time with the Sugar Plum Fairy— presumbably to discuss adult matters. Tbey leave her with the court of entertainers, who keep her (and us) very well amused. Finally, just before dawn when she must awaken, the two return and show her how beautiful love can be. It's grand pas de deux. Ben Stevenson's staging pays much more attention to the story than several others I've seen. Clara acts like a real Kenneth McCombie as the Nutcracker Prince and Mary MeKendry as the Sugar Plum Fairy in Houston Ballet's production of "The Nutcracker" Joseph Woelfel and Gregg Garrett in the Chines' Nutcracker" ' from "The little girl. When the dancing becomes infectious—like with the snowflakes and the flowers—she jumps up and joins in. She's usually blocked from the nutcracker by a bevy of dancing girls. I don't think he ever actually dances with her. Ah, the frustrations of the young! Stevenson also has a sparkling sense of humor. There are funny touches all the way through. These jokes must be seen to be appreciated. Need I say anything about the superb grace with which these dancers move? They make the impossible look so easy and so stunning. Ballet forces its own respect. All of us would love to be able to move like that— with our perfect bodies effortlessly breaking the law of gravity. Unlike acting, most people are smart enough to know that they could never do it themselves. Self-centered people might feel inferior and not like it. Childlike, the rest of us are held in awe. Unlike children, we can, if we wish, see not only the sheer loveliness. We can imagine the
File Name uhlib_22329406_n322_011.jpg