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Montrose Voice, No. 322, December 24, 1986
File 004
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Montrose Voice, No. 322, December 24, 1986 - File 004. 1986-12-24. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 10, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2015/show/1993.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-12-24). Montrose Voice, No. 322, December 24, 1986 - File 004. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2015/show/1993

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 322, December 24, 1986 - File 004, 1986-12-24, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 10, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/2015/show/1993.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Montrose Voice, No. 322, December 24, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date December 24, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 004
Transcript DECEMBER 24, 1986 / MONTROSE VOICE 3 £_£ NO M NO Will' TAI^THE FIFTH. Some Houston Gay Hispanics Leaving Due to New Immigration Law By Sheri Cohen Darbonne Montrose Voice Gay Hispanics are leaving Texas for New York and California in the wake of difficulties caused by local employers' paranoia regarding the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986, J. David Zavala of Gay and Lesbian His panic Unidos declared Friday, Dec. 19. One of the more radical issues involved is the Dec. 18 announcement by the Social Security Administration that it will set up a program in January to allow Texas employers to check whether job applicants are illegal aliens. Under the new law, employers who knowingly hire illegal aliens will face civil penalties. Employers will not be penalized for illegal workers hired before the law was enacted. A first offense carries a fine of $250-2000 for each illegal alien hired. Second offense fines range from $2000-5000, while a third offense is punishable by a fine of $:.000-10,000 per illegal worker hired. Employers with a "pattern" of violations could face a six-month prison term, a fine of up to $3000, or both. The law also provides for "amnesty" for aliens who have continuously resided in the United States since Jan. ], 1982. However, the provision excludes any aliens who arc ineligible under current immigration law. This places gays, who are restricted from immigrating undercurrent laws, at increased risk for deportation and discrimination. Also excluded from temporary resident status under the provision are convicted felons and anyone with three or more misdemeanor convictions in the U.S. Zavala, treasurer of the local I_atin American group, said he has heard close to 70 reports of job discrimination related to business peoples' interpretation and fears of the law. Although many who have lost their jobs are illegals, some were singled out merely because of their Spanish accents or appearance, he claims. "The law is already casting suspicion on anyone with brown skin or an accent," Zavala said. In one incident, a Hispanic employee of a Montrose fast food restaurant was told he was being transferred to a location near the Galleria. When the man reported for work at the other store, he was told that he was not hired. In another case, a legal Houston resident told Zavala he was fired because of his accent. Paranoia and confusion over the law is also causing a reluctance on the part of local employers to even consider hiring anyone with brown skin. Being gay as well as Latin probably makes the situation worse for an employee or job applicant, but many Hispanic males are able to keep their sexuality a secret, Zavala said. Many Mexicans and South Americans, particularly illegals, are closeted or bisexual because of culture and close-quartered living, but Salvadorans appear to be more liberal, he said Although gays do not have as much "pull" on their finances—from families in the home country, for example—they tend, like most foreign workers, to send a considerable portion of their earned income home to parents and relatives, Zavala noted. Gay illegals also seem to be the most ambitious of all illegal immigrants, and if unable to find work in one location will move On to another. he added. "The new law will make more people leave, and ultimately will cost more people their jobs," Zavala said. On the other hand, the fear of "getting caught" is preventing illegal workers from taking some jobs that are available. Zavala reported that a local business person told him certain jobs usually taken by illegals were going unfilled because "no one else wants to do that kind of work." "People who are caught using false Social Security numbers can be put in jail," Zavala said. "It adds on to the fact that these peo ple come to this country for the 'Great Promise,' which just isn't there for Latinos. It might be there for Czechoslova- kian or Russian defectors, but not for us, America's neighbors." The Social Security telephone verification system was criticized Friday by Wade Henderson, an attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union. Henderson said the SSA's poor recordkeeping could result in many people who are legitimately entitled to work in Texas losing their jobs. Social Security Commissioner Dorcas Hardy admitted at a press conference announcing the new program that there were "discrepancies" in the administration's earnings records. A short course will be held at Rice University Jan. 19 to explain the new immigration law and its provisions. Immigration lawyers and officials of the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service will be on hand to answer employers' questions regarding interpretation and enforcement of the new law, and how to comply with it. STEVE D. MARTINEZ, M.D. INTERNAL MEDICINE INFECTIOUS DISEASES SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES AIDS'KS DIAGNOSIS OPEN MON.. TUES. THURS.. FRI. 8.30AM 5PM OPEN SATURDAY 830AM-4PM CLOSED SUN. & WED. Twelve Oaks Tower 4126 Southwest Frwy #1000 Houston, TX 77027 621-7771 Jorge Vazquez Show "The Best ot the Year" Appearing at One on One Christmas Day 11pm New Year's Eve 11pm S3 Cover Charge 1016 West Gray 528-2475 ^ The Pot Pie (formerly Westheimer Cafe) Happy Holidays from Our Staff Early Bird Special llpm-7am 2 eggs. 2 pancakes. 2 sausage. 2 bacon '2.49 Closed from 7pm Dec 24 to 6am Dec 26 1525 Weslheimer 528-4350 AT YOUR BREAKING P£INT? £Z>: Tension, Irritability, Nervousness, Inability to concentrate, "\~ Self-Doubt, Increased pulse. ANXIETY has become\ a part of your life. A part you don't seem able to cope with. The FABRE CLINIC offers FREE medical treatment for anxiety. Our services always remain confidential and anyone in good health may qualify. Call us for an evaluation and appointment. FABRE CLINIC 526-2320
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