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Montrose Voice, No. 327-A, January 27, 1987
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Montrose Voice, No. 327-A, January 27, 1987 - File 001. 1987-01-27. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 1, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1959/show/1946.

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(1987-01-27). Montrose Voice, No. 327-A, January 27, 1987 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1959/show/1946

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 327-A, January 27, 1987 - File 001, 1987-01-27, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 1, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1959/show/1946.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 327-A, January 27, 1987
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date January 27, 1987
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript HOME DELIVERY? ADVERTISING? Call (713) 529-8490 montrose VOICE Let's Soak the Poor to Raise Money Arthur Hoppe, inside egislative Move Underway to Repeal Section 21.06 Sheri Cohen Darbonne, inside ------ John Gould Rubin (right) portrays the embattled activist, Ned Weeks and Michel R. Gill portrays Felix Turner in the Alley Theatre's Arena Stage production of Larry Kramer's "The Normal Heart" Feb. 5 through March 8 with two preview performances, Jan. 30 and 31 , benefitting the AIDS Foundation Houston, Inc. The Normal Heart , J "''f\\1~1 ~'~ '~~ \¥ i\\'t (jlt\'l?~ \\. 'f\\\~ ~ ~•t\~~\l. ~~--~~~~¥\~\~.~~ - news, inside 2 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 27, 1987 National Help Line is a Resource for AIDS Doctors montrose VOICE HOUSTON TEXAS ISSUE 327-A TUESDAY. JANUARY 27 1987 By Rob Stein United Press International BOSTON-A doctor treating an AIDS patient comes across a complication she has never seen before. Reading through the medical literature in search of the best treatment, the physician finds no guidance. In hopes of finding a therapy that may prolong her patient's life, the doc· tor takes advantage of a new service now available to physicians treating victims of AIDS. The service, called the AIDS Physi· cian Link, is the first nationwide refer­ral service for doctors involved in caring for AIDS pateints. "Because the disease AIDS is so diffi­cult to treat, we felt in the next few years there was going to be a tremendous amount of information being passed around about how to treat these patients," said Patrick Smith, president of New England Critical Care Inc. in Marlborough, Mass., which runs the service. AIDS destroys the immune system, leaving victims susceptible to a variety of deadly infections. Because AIDS patients are prone to such a wide variety of complications, even doctors familiar with the disease often face new, unfa­miliar problems "It's such a fragmented treatment regimen," said Smith. "Llke cancer AIDS i• the type of di-.ase that there's so little knowledge about." The service consi~ts of a computerized registry of doctors treating AIDS patients nationwide who can serve as reHources for one another, he said "We feel that by providing physicians access to their peers, the AIDS link fills the need for an important source of AIDS reRearch information as well as for referrals and physician peer sup­port," said Smith. The company, which specializes in providing intravenous therapies to patient.. at home. decided to establish the service and offer it for free as a pub­lic service. Smith said. "We feel it's just part of our contribu­tion to this complicated disease," he said. The company sent out questionnaires to more than 1000 doctors involved in treating AIDS patients nationwide this fall and has received responses from 175 physicians so far, Smith said. "I think this is an excellent way for our colleagues in the suburbs and the smaller towns who haven't been expoi;ed to this ao much to achieve some knowledge," said Dr Michael Pistole, a If you think you're having a heart auack, think out loud. fil Chest discomfort that lasts longer than two minutes 1s nothing lo fool around with. Play it safe and ask someone to get you to a hospital emer­gency room- immediately private practitioner in Washington par­ticipating in the service. "I've seen the need for it because there's many times I've seen situations where doctors have difficulty dealing with the disease and they get very frus­trated," he said. Each doctor is listed in a computer with their name and experience with treating AIDS patients. Other doctors can call a toll-free number, explain their problem and receive a list of names and phone numbers. "Say a physician in San Diego has had success with a particular type of treatment regimen. Through this net­work, the physicians can share that information," said Smith. The service can also be used by AIDS patients who are looking for doctors to treat them. If a patient is traveling or moving to a new area, their doctor can call the service and obtain a list of names to refer their patients to in the new area, he said. "I think the bottom line is better patient care and a better information source for treating this epidemic," Smith said. Published bi-weekly (Tuesdays and Fridays) Community Publishing Company 408 Avondale Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copyright 1967 Office hours: 8am-6pm Henry McClurg,,pvt:il•.shet·«l•tCN Lmda Wyche·man•gmg «111or David RoumlOrt"Produc110n Elroy Forbes .so<:1•I d•recto1 Sheri Cohen Darbonne n-.s SUBSCRIPTIONS (713) 529-8490 ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT (713) 529-8490 Truffles of Wrath: Jerry Mulholland Mtverl•.S•ng d•rectm Ken Boge •ceount ... e<:"ul•v• ·----- POSTMASlfR Serw:t lddtf!Q couect•OflS to ~ Avon dlle, Houall'.H' n: 77006-3028 Let's Soak the Poor Subl.c11pl1011 t•I• ltl US rt:iy Voft:e c•mer O< US M••IJ SI 25 ~w•!ek(upto2iuues1 $65peryNr(52weeks).or SJ2 50 per ••• months f2B wee1111 N•t•0t>•l •dvefl1s1ng repreSIJf!l•l•YI A•vefld•H Marketing 666 6th Aveoue. Nf'w York 10011. (212) 242-6863 The Innocent Bystander By Arthur Hoppe Nationally, the uery rich pay a far smaller share of their income in state and local taxes than those living below the poverty leuel, a new study shows. In Wyoming, the poor are taxed 4.4 percent and the riC'h only .9 percent. In New York hou:ever, the rich are hit for 12.9 percent.-news item Our moving saga opens with young Tom Buffum !Henry Fonda) just relea>ed from the Wristslap Federal Rehabilita­tion & Lawn Bowl­ing Center where he has done 30 days for insider trading. His bitterness against the system is fueled when he returns to the family's little 12-room condo in Manhattan's East 80s to find his par­ents confronting a villainous tax collec­tor. "We're down to our last dog walker and we're eating pate-de-fois-gras helper," says Tom's strong-willed mother, Ma Buffum (Jane Darwell). "If you have to ask, you can't afford it," says the tax collector coldly. "Ma. Pa," pleads Tom, "our president (Ronald Reagan) wouldn't want us to sit here watching our dreams turn to dust. Let's pack up and head out west where a man can still find breathing room and the opportunity to build a little tax shel­ter to call his verv own." There is a poig.nant scene where the Buffums have to decide what to leave behind as four auctioneers from Sotheby's 8tand waiting. "Are you say· ing. Pa, that I can't take the Faberge eggs my grandmother gave me or my three 15th century Florentine jewelry boxes?" a•ks Ma, fighting back her tears. "We've only got room for the bare necessities, Ma." say8 Pa, "like our 10- percent tax-free municipals." At last they set forth in their Mercedes 560-SEL with a Beautyrest mattress strapped to the roof. They stop for the night in a seedy little five-star hotel in Philadelphia. "We're down to our last jar of beluga caviar," says Ma over a frugal 10-course dinner in the dining room. "We're going to have to make do with servuga before we get to Califor­nia." "California?" cries a grizzled rich migrant !Gabby Hayes) at the next table. "Why, their 11 percent income tax aloot1 will •kin you ali<e. All us rich folks are heading for Wyoming. That's where a man can be all but .9 percent free." The Buffums decide to strike out for Wyoming. But at a garden party in Grosse Pointe, disaster strikes. Tom offers to trade his Mikimoto cufninks for a stranj{er's Cartier lighter. The stranger suggests they step inside a gazebo. \\'hen Tom does, the stranger reveals he is an REC agent and Tom is under nrre"t for insider trading. Tom eRcapes, and Ma hides him under a Coon. cap until they can reach Wyom· mg Free at last from persecution, the Buf­fums build a beautiful little tax shelter with crenelated loopholes and a lively oil depletion pumping in the front yard next to a perfectly groomed soil bank devoid of any shoot of corn. Overhead, an alternative·energy-credit windmill spins productively in the breeze as Tom makes his farewell. "Can't you stay, Tom, and enjoy the fruits of our tax calculations?" begs Ma. "I'd like to, Ma," says Tom, "But there's something here inside me that says I've got to go out and fight for social justice in the state capitols every­where until all the rich folks are a~ free as we Pa puts his arm around Ma's shoulders as they watch their son amble off down the road in his Maserati. "Is that a good cause our boy is fighting for, Pa?" asks Ma. "Well," says Pa, "It's a perennial winner." e1967 (5 F) Chronicle Publishing Co Finl/ edvert1111ng dflad1111e All d•spley eds 5prn 2 deys prtor to pubhc111on date All class•l•ed eds 2prn 1 day pnor to publicatiQO date Notice to Mh•rl•sets Advert•11ng rate schedule Eight-A w eHect•veApnl II. 19116 R•SPOfll•tM/1/y We do not uavme fll'l1nc11I rnpons1bd1ty for ch11ms by ldverttsel'I bu1 •eai»rs are Uked to 1ctv1se llWI /lf'WtilollperOl atly 1uspn;fOll ol lr1duk'ot or 0e<:ep11~e I :::v~c:~~~!.c~::, ~1::;:.;:t;g-: __ _ ~Plel;y ~Safe! Attention Members: J.O.E. J.O.E.'s Admission Times Tues. & Thurs. 8-9pm Fri. & Sat. llpm-2am Sunday 6-9pm J.0.E. is a private organization for m~mbers_on.ly (adult gay men) .. J.0._E: is not a public club. 'rhere arememb~rshtp n·str1ctions. New membermqu1nes may be mQ.de dunng the above listed hours. J.O E. currrntly meets at the Cotta1re P/ayhou.-e, behind the lot at 611 Pacific. Entrance is at rear of house. l<xJk for the Play Safe flag. JANUARY 27, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 FEIFFER® {3IJ( 1/m~ A VICTlf'f /IJ HI/ ttAV WHO 71-.Yt'? •{).).fCH 6.J(t 11J(Jl'U . HURr V'alf' rJtflfJ"8~ _.,. __ J J tiWJI A R'6'lAffC4.9i/P Legislative Move Underway to Repeal Section 21.06 By S heri Cohen Darbonne Montrose Voiu Texas Lesbian and Gay Rights Lobby hopes to ha ve a bill to repeal the state sodomy law within the next two weeks lobbyist Glen Maxey reported Mondav' Jan. 26. Maxey said he expects the legi·s: lation on Section 21.06 of the Texas Penal Code to have at least two co­sponsors in the Senate and Aeveral in the House of Representatives. The action is one of a "number of things" lobbyists expect to see now that tho chairs and makeup of legislative committees are known in the 10th ses sion of the Texas Legislature, which convened two weeks ago, Maxey said. On a positive note, gay interests have some friends on the House of Represen · tatives' criminal jurisprudence commit· tee, where negative legislation can often be blocked or slowed down. The commit­tee is chaired by Rep. Juan Hinohosa described by Maxey as a past supporte; of civil _rights. Rep. Debra Danhurg, whose District 137includes Montrose, is also on the committee. In the Senate, Sen. Bob McFarland of Arlington has been named to chair the criminal justice committee. McFarland, a Republican, has proven in the past to be "extremely open-minded and fair" Maxey. ' We're not in the position, in this ses­sion, of having our worst enemies in positions of power," Maxey noted. TLGRL's primary goal at this point is educating legislators about the impor· tance of the decriminalization bill he said. ' Regarding AIDS issues, Maxey said TLGRL is tentatively supporting the Communicable Disease Act proposal being drafted by the Texas Department of Health. Involving recodification of statu~es dealing wtih sexually transmit­ted diseases and tuberculosis the act deals in particular with the qu 1 estion of medical isolation. "In the form that it is in now, the prop· osal is well-drafted . . . a good approach " Maxey said. Having a law on the ~k to deal with the question of isolating persons determined to be behaving irresponsibly will Hcalm the fears" of 8~?'1e who are pushing for quarantine measures, he added. "As long as we have nothing on the books to deal with this, we are com­pletely vulnerable to the right-wing for­ces calling for quarantining," Maxey noted . Considerable due process is required according to the drafted prop­osal, and isolation measures are against a behavior pattern rather than a condition, he pointed out. The legislation is sponsored by Rep. Nancy MacDonald, D.-EJ Paso and Sen. Ray Farabee. D.-Witchita Fa lls Both have been supportive of the gay position on AIDS issues, and MacDo­nald 1s a member of the Commissioners' Task Force on AIDS, Maxey said. He ~dded that the sponsors' position is important because the bill could be turned into bad legislation by amend­ment. If this were to happen, the spon­so~ s could kill the legislation, Maxey said . . The lobby is working on several other pieces of proactive AIDS legislation Ma_xey said. One, a comprehensive bili which prohibits discrimination in hous­ing, employment and public accomoda­tions due to AIDS-related conditions is similar to a city ordinance enacted ' in Austin, he said. Other suggested legislation would prohibit requiring HIV testing of another person for employment or other purposes; require informed consent for performing an HIV test; and require informed consent for release of HIV test results to a third party. Insurance concerns are harder to approach, Maxey said, because "insu­rance is a discriminatory practice in the first place." AIDS-related problems with the insurance industry fall into three categories, he said. The first is a new practice by some companies of writing policies with blanket exclusions of all AIDS-related conditions. The seco.nd is a policy requiring HIV testing of insurance applicants. Third, some companies are now denying cover­age. based. on lifestyle, discriminating against single males in certain age groups, residents of certain neighbor­hoods and persons in particularoccupa· tions, Maxey said. Reqμiri11i applicant.. w undergo an HIV antibody test is probably legal for msurance purposes, Maxey said. The question in this case, he explained. is who the companies are requiring to take the test. "IR it all applicants, or just single males, or those who name a same-sex beneficiary?" Maxey commented. TLGRL has decided that in order to begin to approach the problem, inquir­ies must be made to the insurance com· mission .a?out companies practicing these pohcies. Because of the commis­sion's procedures, it would be impossi­ble to obtain information to determine how widespread the practices are, or answer any questions, except through individual complaint inquiries. The lobby is asking anyone who holds or has been denied a policy by a com­pany practicing these exclusions to mail a copy of the paperwork or policy to its office, P.O. Box 2505, Austin, TX 78768. Sections identifying the appli­cant or policy holder, such as names and addresses, may be marked out Maxey said. ' "Of course, if someone feels he has been discriminated against because of where he lives, or because of naming a same-sex beneficiary, enough informa­tion should be left to show this " he noted. ' General Auto Repair Tune Ups • 011 Changes Brakes Tues.-Sal Business Guild Accepts President's Resignation By Sher i Cohen Darbonne Montrose Voice Current officers and members of the board of directors of the Greater Mont­rose .Buisness Guild voted at a special meeting called by acting president Bill Yon Thursday, Jan. 22, to accept Phyl­lis Frye's resignation submitted to the guild Jan. 15. In doing so, the board did not acknowledge a letter submitted by Frye on Jan. 16 rescinding her resigna­tion as president and member of the organization. Frye insists she rescinded her origi­nal resignation , delivered to board chairman Bob Bagot in the form of a handwritten note, then resigned as president, but said she would run for office again if nominated. Elections are scheduled for tomorrow night, Jan. 28. But Ba got said the organization's by­laws do not specify a formal procedure in the event of a resignation. "Our by-laws also require that per­sons be members for at least 60 days pnor to the annual election in order to vote or be a nominee, Bagotstated. "Her acknowledged resignation in itself pre­vents her participation," he said. But Clark Moore, who cast one of two dissenting votes on Frye's membership said he will attempt to put the matter u; a membership vote at Wednesday's meeting. Mike Reuter was the other per­son who voted to retain Frye as a guild member At the meeting, the following slate of candidates was nominated by the board: Frank Turner, president; Mike Reuter, vice president; Linda Reynolds, secretary; and Craig Litton, treasurer. Marjorie Kerr and Norman Guttman were nominated for one-year board terms; Joe Porro, Bill Yon, George Bene­dict, David King, and Terri Shaw for two-year board terms. Bagot and Elrov For~. whose terms expire next yea;, remam on the board. Nominations may also be announced at the election night meeting, Bagot noted . Tom Graham has been men­tioned for a possible board seat. Frye said her differences with the guild 's present board of directors is rooted in disagreements over involve­ment in gay and lesbian issues. Her original resignation came after the board "restricted" her presidential authority in refusing to allow her to take part in a scheduled press conference, later cancelled, on a gay matter, Frye claimed. "It is my feeling that the present board feels the guild is for business only, that speaking out is always a polit­ical action, and that the guild should stay away from issues, especially gay and lesbian issues," she said. "I believe this business organization is different from others in that it pro­motes a policy of non-discrimination. Discrimination is bad for business ... in the interest of good business, a busi­ness organization should be able to speak out against discrimination of all kinds," she continued. Frye added that she feels using the power of business against discrimina­tion is not political, and that doing so furthers the long-term business and social interests of its members. Call 529-8490 and You will be in Next Week's Newspaper of Montrose 4 MONTROSE VOICE JANUARY 27, 1987 Sheperd Play at Stages is a 'Curse' From left. Walton Wilson as Weston, Donna Whitmore as Emma, David Kaye as Wesley. and Candace Compton as Ella in Stages Theatre production of "Cur.•e of the Starving Class" by Sam Sheperd Review by Bill O'Rourke Mvntroar Voal'e Sam Sheperd. author of The Curse of the Starving Claas. is an actor. He writes for actors-long, poetic speeches that are exhilerating to perform. He does not write for the audience. His poems are obscure. There are so many things that must surely be sym· bols that we obviously are expected to take away some deeper meaning. I didn't. It's as if he's forgotten a basic, ba:-1ic rule of writing. Writing i~ com· munication. He raises dreary, almost colorless peo· pie up to the stature of gods. But what does thiR mythos mean? Perhaps he could be unden;tood if he was written down and could be re-read with notes·to-­my~ elf in the margin. Bu~ no, he writes plays. We only get one go.by on any one word. I don't mind working a little ID understand what I'm seeing but this man asks too much. And although, in the production cur· rently running at Stages, there are at least three actors whose work I gener· ally love-Candace Compton, Donna Whitmore, David Daye-and they seemed ID be doing a good job here, there were no characters whom I really liked. Oh, here and there for a minute or two, sure. But no one that I'd care to spend an entire evening with. Well, I didn't. I left at the second intermission. Plot: A sloppily overacted drunken father and a compulsively overeating mother each sell the old family shack to someone different. Their handsome, emotionally disturbed son wants to stay on the land. Their daughter, in the throes of her first "curse," wants to run away to Mexico. Eventually, everyone wants to run away to Mexico. It has something to do with American farmers back from the Nam having to sell out their farms to corporate inter eslB. I think. The Be;art Ballet of the 20th Century returns to Jones Hal/ Jan. 28 & 29 I know Shepard has a cult following Those are about the only people \\oho should attend this . o Notes The Business Arts Fund has extended membership to Stages. It is the first organization admitted ID that body since 1984 when the Harris County Her· itage Society joined. Meanwhile Stages' new associate artistic director, Jose Cantu. is at the Eugene O'Neill Theater Center in Con· necticut teaching a two week intensive course in speaking voice fora actors as a guest of the National Theater Institute. He returns Feb. 4 Those two previews of The Normal Heart (Alley) benefitting the AIDS Foundation are Jan. 30 and 31. There will be receptions afterwards to meet the cast. The Cullen Trust for the Performing Ar!B has given the AUey a grant for $100,000. The money must be matched two·to-one. The resulting funds will be used to renovate the lighting system. Prei;;;ently they're using the equipment that was installed when the theater opened this building in 1968. The male and female overall winners of the Abercrombie & Fitch Fine Arts 5K Run this Saturday will win two Con­tinental Airline tickets to anywhere in the domestic U.S.A. There will also be three trophies awarded in each of seven age groups from 14 and under to 60 an dover. You can sign up anytime up to 7:30 a.m. the day of the race. Tickets went on sale yesterday for VIP bleacher seating at the Galveston Mardi Gras Momus Night Parade on Feb. 28. - o Celebrate! Jan. 29, 1985: Lyons, France. Holy pro­testors singing hymns outside the movie theater showing Hail Mary got out of hand and bombarded the theater with tear gas. B'days: 27-Leopold von Sacher­Masoch, Ethan Mordden, Jerome Kem. 28-Collette, Jackson Pollock, Artur Rubenstein. 29-John Forsyth, Greg Louganis, Tom Selleck "Sometimes I've believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast "-Lewis Carroll (born Jan. 27) o Openings Marcantonio BaronE>, pianist (Univer· sity of Hom•ton, 27)-concert, Freebie~ . ONO' tOne Nii:ht Only) Delbert Mann (Jone• AudilDrium, University of St. Thomas, 27)­Academy award winning director gives a lecture. ONO! Gilbert Sorrentino (Museum of Fine Arts, 27)-a readini:, Freebies, ONO! Bejart Ballet of the 20th Century (Jones, 28 and 29))-Three new works choreographed by Bejart to music by Hadjidakis, Bach and Mahler. The Glass Mena(./erie (Stages, 28)­Tennes~ ee Williams play about a gay man remembering the mother and sis ter he had to leave behind. Rice Design Alliance Lecture (MFA, 28)-0N01 The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (Alley, 29, 10:00 a.m.) Charlotte's Web (Stages 29, 10:30 a.m.)-the return of last year's child­ren's hit WARNING: i This could be habit forming! Now at 11IE COMEDY WORKSHOP St~s 111111~011 Lale \ight Performance1i \JlurdJ\. l lprn "'undJ\, Xpm \II 1ll:rfnrma11n·' SX LlurJ.:t' tul-.1·1 ~ lo 7he JJ011lrose lbice \thln1.Jnl \I'\\ ur \nlt'mJ1\ bprt.,._.., l1HOI I' lt\H~ \\\II \Hll 1M.i..1·r..J"u" ;a11 hlr \JH 11r.tl\ u lrJ1' m FOR TICKETS CALL 5 2 -S T A G E John Gould Rubin (right) portrays the embattled activist, Ned Weeks, and Michel R. Gill portrays Felix Turner in the Alley Theatre's Arena Stage production of Larry Kramer's "The Normal Heart" Feb. 5 through March 8 with two preview performances, Jan. 30 and 31, benefitting the AIDS Foundation Houston, Inc. J<'ine Arts Mixer (MFA, 29, 5:30)­Freebies. ONO! A Chorus Line (Stratford High School, 29) A History of Jewelry (MFA, 29)­lecture by Shirley Bury, co-author of a catalogue of the English Crown jewels. Freebies. ONO! Mr. Poughketsie and the Actuary Man (Country Playhouse, 29)-written by Houstonian Terry Barhorst. Black comedy about a man conning death Community News from Neighborhood & Community Groups .. AIDS Foundation Can Now Serve the Deaf AIDS Foundation Houston (AFH) recently completed negot1at1onswith the Texas Commis· s1on for the Deaf for the placement of a TOD (Telecommunication Device for the Deaf) at the AFH office. "We hope that the deaf community will use this new service at AFH to access AIDS information or services," said Curtis Dickson, executive director The TOO number is 524·2427 and wlll be answered from 9:00 a m ·6:00 p.m. This number is for AIDS 1nformat1on and services from AFH Dickson indicated that AFH is looking for volunteers to fill positions m many areas More information on volunteers or AFH services is available by calling 524-2427. .. 'Homosexuality and the Bible' at Church of the Rock Begmnmg Fnday, Feb. 6, at 8:00 p.m., and conttnumg on each Friday m February. Rev Laura Sieczynski will teach a free semmar on "Homosexuality and the Bible" at Church of the Rock, 10133 Long Pomt To reach the church, take the Gessner extt off 1-10, go north to Long Pomt. tum west on Long Point. For more mformat1on, call 580-8456 JANUARY 27, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 AIDS Funding is in Kennedy's Agenda By Elaine S. Pavich United Press International WASHINGTON-Sen. Edward Kennedy, D-Mass., may not be running for president, but he is trying to build a platform of social initiatives that most Democratic candidates would like to stand on. From raising the minimum wage and helping children with their education to revamping welfare and insuring the elderly's health in times of crisis, Kennedy sees the next 15 months as ones in which the new Democratic Con­gress can move quickly to establish its credentials before the 1988 elections. Other new Democratic Senate chair­men have jumped out early on issues such as trade and nuclear ban treaties, but Kennedy has tackled the widest range of social programs-including money for AIDS research, catastrophic health insurance, education and jobs training. "The pressure I feel is the need of the American people," Kennedy said in an interview, brushing off suggestions that Democratic Party politics is behind his social agenda. But Kennedy acknowledged that his decision to move on social issues in Jan· uary is aimed at giving Democrats an "early start and an early focus on these proposals." "! would hope that a number of them (the proposals) would certainly be embraced by the candidates," Kennedy said He spoke quietly through most of the interview, saving the fire he feels on some of his major social issues for speeches on the Senate floor or on the speaking circuit. He has toned down his ideas, too, putting aside national health insurance in favor of programs like making sure elderly people don't have to sink into poverty if they get terribly sick. "A lot of it depends on how it is per­ceived," Kennedy said of his ambitious program. "If it's perceived as the same old business wanned over there's going to be the hesitency. They (Americans) may be hesitept about national health insurance; I think they will support catastrophic health insurance so the elderly will not be wiped out." Health and Human Services Secre­tary Otis Bowen has proposed a catas· trophic hea1th insurance plan for the elderly, which basically picks up expenses beyond that Medicare will now pay, but President Reagan has not decided whether to support it. STRMNGFOR POSITIVE CHANGE ••• 1s a process of growth. Deal "'°1th personal problems w1tt11ri a caring atmosphere DR. NICHOLAS EDD, PsyD. Psychologist e ,, 1v1dlUll and t~ 1ly t rap_. e r 11 tp QPur hng • blofeedbac.k .tnd stress n1fl'' • habit disorder, {tmok1 1ciie11 • COUl't eva ... a1.nns Memorial City Profeaolonal Building One 902 Frottwood. Sutt. 269 Houaton, TX nD24 465-23n Montrose: :m:e Wtleh 527·'680 - HCK1llon nott • 24 hour phorte ser'V1..;e • ln6urance weteome • evenings and enclt available Aecepling $anus .tnr1 Human Enhane<t peroonal growth with pro'"'fon•l oupport Kennedy has embraced Bowen's idea that Medicare recipients should be asked to pay slightly higher premiums for getting more insurance coverage, a method, he maintains pragmatically, that will not cost the federal govern· ment much money in these times of budget deficits. Asked if Reagan's support for catas­trophic health insurance matters, Kennedy responds softly, "No." He says he would like administration backing, but notes that even during the past six years, ";th a Republican-led Senate, Reagan has signed into law things he originally opposed, like the extension of the voting rights act, the Martin Luther King holiday and job training programs. Kennedy talks about being able to "Juggle" money, especially taking some from Reagan's pet projects like "Star Wars" and the MX missle and putting it toward education and job training. In a lighter moment, he allows him­self to geta bitexcitedaooutmovinghis office in the new Democratic Senate, taking over the suite formerly occupied by Sen. Paul Laxalt, R-Nev. "Yeah," he says, smiling, "We're going to new offices upstairs where we can see the park, the trees, the leaves in the springtime." Place a 'Personal Ad in Next Week's Montrose Voice Seek a dote, on adventure, on encountef Send o message for oll k> see to someone you love Advertise your secret fantasy TO P'lACE A 'f'ERSOHAl. IN THE NEWSMPER OF~ .MT CALL 529-S490 Next time you feed your face. think about your heart. Go easy on your heart and start cut­ting back on foods that are high in saturated fat and cholesterol. The change'll do you good. • American Heart Association wrnE AGHTINS Fa< \Q,QUfE 6 MONTROSE VOICE JANUARY 27, 1987 It's January But It's 'Summertime' with 'Porgy and Bess' Around Town by Elroy Forbes Montrose Voice Social Director Robby Martm of Kirby Glen and I attended Houston Grand Opera's pro­duction of Porgy and Bess. It was mag· nificent! The orchestra, the chorus, the featured singers, the sets, lighting­everything that could possibly enhance a production was there in full concen­trated effort which the audience appre­ciated and approved. Ladies put on their fur coats during the rainy part of the hurricane scene. Small children wept when the goat headed for New York. Grown people cried when Bess left with Spartin' Life. The crowd recoiled in horror when the Happy Du.•t element came into the opera. But when Maria sang to Sportin' Life that he could sell all his rot gut whiskey, gamble away their earnings, but he'd better not destroy her friends with his Happy Dust, a ripple of approval was felt in the house. The song, often cut in the short.er v'ersions. was strongly sup­ported, alternating between comic ges­tures and bold threats. The audience loved it. I have a feeling that as the opera trav­els, more will be heard about his very special production, marking the 50th Anniversary of George Gerswhin 's death on July 11 1937, at the age of38. o Great Loss to HGO During the production, I remarked sev­eral times to Robby, that my friend, Michael Holloway must be somewhere in Jones Hall and we made an effort to find him. I did not know that earlier Thursday, funeral services were held at Heights Christian Church. Lew Hondros is in Kentucky There is a great deal to say about Mike. Much earlier in his career, he was a youth leader in a Christian ~hurch thatdid not agree with his lifestyle. The loss of that career haunted him, but did not make him bitter. He was a success­ful busine&;man with his last career as a medical doctor recruiter for the Medi­cal Center. He loved the KreweofHydra and served as their treasurer. He also loved Houston Grand Opera where he served in many productions as super or Ron Dionne meet Mahnattan Transfer active with the guild. Mike often tra· veled to San Antonio or Dallas to see other opera productions. His zest, humor and great generosity will be missed. He loved to travel and experience dif­ferent styles of living. Now, I feel that Mike is getting to do a lot of traveling and spreading his own particular type of sunshine. o Correction Last time it was printed that the Tower could become a parking lot. It should have read: "Inside authorities tell me that the Tower will remain as is for 1987 but in 1988 Pace will consider alterna· tive propsoals. I hope not a parking lot, which is most unlikely, but we do not need a closer Book Stop either." When the Tower's neon was restored to full original condition, an effort was made to place it in the National Regis­try. The building can have many pur­poses, but will not be destroyed. It is protected. o Names in the News Decorator and community supporter, Warren Duncanson is having surgery today. We all hope he is on the recovered list soon. He would love cards and letters-702 Avondale, 77006. Mike Cooley is converting. No, silly, his garagl'.! into an apartment in order to keep someone on the grounds. February is really going to be a full month. Benefits, parties, promotions, all in Mardi Gras month. The Sirrom School of Middle Eastern Culture is having a major show Feb. 12 & 13. More on this later. Tanya Seville, the famous handker· chief girl, is having an event at The Ranch early in February. Realtor Chuck Urban reports his busi­ness is up with the possibility of five to seven deals in the "works." All those Super Bowl fans dried their eyes, others celebrated but packed The 611 and other Pacific Street watering holes for the game. I love the games. It gives you a real chance to see who bet and lost. Handsome Photo Bill is sprouting a sleek black beard these days. Our man in Atlanta Lew Hondros is in a hospital in Louisville, KY. He called to tell me he had a rough operation and the second one is Wednesday, followed by more surgery on Feb. 3. o Good News If you didn't get your tickets for this Friday or Saturday performance of The Normal Heart at the Alley Theatre, you are too late. All tickets are sold out and there is nothing else available. Congrat­ulations Del McGee. Mitzi at The Ripcord Gay Pride Week Committee Has First Meeting for '87 By Sheri Cohen Darbonne Montrose Vofr·e Participants m the first 1987 Houston Gay Pride Week planning meeting, Sun· day, Jan. 25 at Dignity Center, approved restructuring the coordinat­ing board and discussed ways to "revi­talize" the celebration. The new board wi11 consist of two co· chairs elected by persons attending the monthly organizational meetings, the coordinators of events that are planned for the week, a media coordinator and a community outreach coordinator. Until Jast year, the Montrose Activity Center board of directors had been coordinat­ing Gay Pride Week activities. The new structure reverts to the earlier days of GPW planning in Houston, according to Ray Hill. named tentative meeting chair until the organizational co-chairs are selected. A tentative planning schedule was also adopted. Participants agreed to select a theme for this year's celebration at the next meeting, Feb. 22, and to name the grand marshal of the Gay Pride Parade at the May 31 meeting. Other meetings are scheduled March 22, April 26 and June 14, although the coor­dinating board will have the option of calling special meetings. The group discussed refining the cele­bration "week" to eight days, but opted to stretch it to 10 if necessary, taking in the previous weekend to prevent con­flicting event schedules. The conclusion date of June 28 was agreed on, with events beginning either June 19 or June 21. Suggestions to change the time, date or location of the parade drew a mixed reaction. Some who opposed the idea of holding the parade atnightsaid it could prompt violence by teenagers out of school for the summer and "partying" in Montrose. Others said a night parade might discourage participation of gay suburban and county dwellers who don't come into the area at night. Proponents of the night parade said there would be ample security to assure violence would be no more likely than during the day, that the temperatures be more tolerable, and that the sun would not be in people's eyes. A suggestion to hold a night parade on Saturday rather than Sunday, out of consideration for many people's work schedules. also was debated. Hill noted during the discussion that many people see the parade as the "cap piece" of Gay Pride Week. Alternatives to the Westheimer route and post-parade acitivities were dis· cussed. Hill said that a festival on Pacific Street and a"light up the Mont· rose" event had been suggested as alter· natives to the traditional rally at Spotts Park. Suggestions for this year's Gay Pride Week theme included "Come Out and Celebrate," "A Family of Friends," "A Cry to Unite," "Praises of Pride," and "Join the Freedom." Hill encouraged those with theme ideas to solicit visual representations from area artists to show at the next planning meeting. Jack Valinski reported that the National Conference of Gay Pride Week Organizers had adopted the rainbow flag and lambda symbols to be incorpo­rated into Gay Pride Week logos. Hill added that the theme chosen by the national conference is "Strong, Proud and United." Trainer Announces 'Worst Shapes Hall of Fame' Umted Press International Celebrity fitness trainer Bill Calkins announced his nominees for the Worst Shape• Hall of Fame and says his motives in mocking them are purely altruistic. "All of these luminaries are in dire need of my services," he says. "Of course, I'm sure that Mr. Blackwell probably feels the same way about his worst-dressed honorees." Topping Calkins' list is Sarah Fergu· son ("her royal hiney"), followed by Oprah Winfrey ("the Grand Ole Oprah"), Imelda Marcos, Robin Leach, rap group Run-DMC, evangelist Jerry Falwell ("God's Little Acre"), Sen Edward M. Kennedy, David Letter­man's bandleader Paul Shaffer ("would lose an arm wrestling match with Mother Teresa"), Chevy Chase and Lee Majors. JANUARY 27, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 Cd[Jtllin Video! I TUESDAY January 27 I 6 Q CD Ill It;) m II:) KPRC KUHT KHOU KTRK KTXH KRIV KHTV A&E WTBS CNN DISN ESPN USA WON SHOW HBO MAX TMC 5 ,. _ w- - .... -- fltlollll , ... _ Amod5 r05l Nwtr .... _ - c.m. F.::tot lA ... -- :• NBC Ntws W•- CBS- ABC- ''"'""" '"""' .... ,,... (35'AtHorn , ...... .... """""""' - - ....... d ..... ""'"""' 6 ,. - """"' - - ·- ,.. ..... ""'"' ...... <051~QI' - '- ..... " ... - ""' - ;31 HollyWOOdS '""' ""'""" -- For Kid~ " ... 13511.moone Cfonlll'I 1«JlM Tht ........ ........ 0..21'1dVr .,..,.._ 7 "' hlilllocil ,_ .. ThtWlllrd Who• Bou? 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"""' - 13:51 r*'"' """"'""' - - """"' -... ......... - 4 ,. ._...a """'""' ""' ..... - - - l1l0) .... - """""' -·""' GJ . ... - -- """'EMI; :II P9oplie 1 Q '""""" - ,_ GoodT""' _.. 13S!AI Hom ..... ,_ """'"" -- ni.·1t11e Nl~'t7S 'l1ll1l'l1 (~1ll~''l1 '''1ll'l1 l~f)ll '11 111~ '''l~l~lil~NI)! Now, Every Tuesday, the Montrose Voice "Midweek Extra" JANUARY 27, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 Why Drug Use is Becoming Rampant Worldwide Commentary by Franz Schurmann Pacific News Sat11cr Special to th(• Montrose VoiC"e In the middle of winter, working people often daydream of a tropical paradise they can flee to. One such place is the island country of Mauritius in the Indian Ocean. Its vital statistics even read like a paradise: a peaceful multi-racial and multi· religious sociC'ty, an economic boom m full swing, tourists flocking in with scads of hard currency. Yet of a population of one million 6.5,000 are drug addicts. Of 1400 prison'. ers, over 1200 are incarcerated for drug related offenses. A leading Mauritian member of Parliament was recently arrested in the Netherlands for carrying some 40 pounds of heroin. Some might think this is just a tropi cal oddity, except that drug use appears to be spreading worldwide at an aston· ishing Hp£•ed. Thf' puritanical commu· nist countries w{'re once thought to be immunP from drug addiction. But China hos just had its biggest drug trial ever, involving heroin smuggled from Thailand, and in the Soviet Union 4000 people were just arrested in a hugP opium swPE'p. Low grade drug use has long been common among the poor in Third World countries. Now high grade drug use is becoming similarly common among their middle classes. As a result, the drug eronomy has become global and huge. One country, Peru, gives a sense of its size, Westrrn observers put the value of Peruvian drug exports at $1 billion­rqual to one third of all Peruvian exports. Drugs were at the core of some of the worst ethnic violence on the Indian sub· continent in rerentyears when Pathans and Mohajirs (refug<'<'S from Bangla· drshl rlashrd in Karachi, Pakistan. Pothans (another name for Afghans) got much of their livelihood from the opium trade. The Mohajirs didn't like that. The police cracked down, and the Pathans turned viciously against the Mohajirs. The Pathan network sells heroin­quality opium derivatives to Western markets, while the low grade stuff goes to the local poor. In Colombia, the same pattern exist.c.:i. The high quality cocaine is shipped to the United States, but the poorer stuff ("bazuko") is consumed locally. Why is so murh of the world going drug crazy? Economic historians have a ready answer, even if unsatisfying. Consider tobacco, a mild narcotic. Hardly had Europeans set foot on the North Ameri· can continent but that tobacco spread to the remotest corners of Europe and far In Colombia, the same pattern exists. The high quality cocaine is shipped to the United States, but the poorer stuff ("bazuko ") is consumed locally. into China and India as well. The same happened in tho 1700s with the mild South Arabian stimulant, coffee. A lot of middle·class Western cocaine users would agree that drugs and mari· juana are spreading like tobacco and coffer earlier They look upon all of them as "re<"reational drugs." Rut cocaine and other drugs are more than mild stimulants. They seriously affect body, mind and soul. Govern· ments throughout the world have launched severe anti·drug campaigns. (Malaysia does so, for example, with lib· era! uHe of tho death penalty.) Why would ""many people therefore risk so much'' Mauritius may give a due. People there use the Arabic word "nisya" to explain why they sniff or •hoot drugs. Nisya means to forget. And that con· jureR up testimony of drug users a cen­tury ago in China-all they wanted was to forget their miseries, bitterness and especially the life they were living. Modern life, whether for the poor, the middle classes and even the rich some­times, is very stressful. Consider the successful communist middle-class country Hungary and its equally suc· cessful capitalist neighbor Austria. Both have some of the highest suicide, heart attack and cancer death ratetJ in the world The main reasons for the skyrocket· ing use of drugs among the Western and Third World middle class is a yearning for the same kind of "nisya" that so many Mauritans seek in drugs. And the predictable results are passivity, poor work performance, moral laxness, not to mention impaired health. Confiervativeti want to combat the disem;ie by an even more forceful crack­down on drugs, while many liberals lean toward legalization. But the only way to combat drug use is through the health revolution. A counterforce against poor physical and spiritual health has been spreading among Western middle classet1. I tis tak­ing the form of self-care in health and self-disripline in food, sex and stress. In some ways it is becoming like a religion without a theology in which drugs are simply evil. Pae1!1c News Service echto;:-Franz Schurmann teacheS history and soc1ok>gy at the University of Cal1forma. Berkeley Place a 'Personal Ad' in Next Week's Montrose Voice Fortunes By Marl< Orion Your Horoscope from the Vo•ce For Tuesday 9llenmg. Jen. 21, through Friday mommg. Jan. 30. 1987 ARJES-How deep 1s your love? Dis­covering that could make you most happy. February is your month, -and the one coming up can be one of the best ones yet. A new you 1s emerging from the depths you plunge TAURUS-Recen-t -r-es-e-ar-ch_b_ro_u-ght unexpected answers. Your ability to get to the heart of things doesn't go unappre­ciated. Co-workers see you as a go­getter, a guiding light. You've earned their respect. GEMINI -The moon's playing magic tricks, and unless you're a magician or a psychic. you may be confused. Some­thing mysterious is going on. you can bet Pay specia~ attention to dreams. CANCER-An unexpected visit or call from someone out of the past is in the future. Gifts and reminiscences will make it a special time. If the person doesn't show up, maybe It's you who should make the surprise visit LEO-If you don't have anything planned for the weekend. you should. Enough of these heavy days' Get out and have some fun. Indulge yourself. Back at work. a new idea could come up that gets things rolling in the right direction. VIRGO-Tears of joy, screams of delight, everything points to a tremend­ous emotional release. Heart over head, don't try to stop the flow of feeling . Express yourself-your closest one will love you for 1tt LIBRA-Think about 111 You can't help but be successful at what you really put your mind to. What concerns you right now is self-respect and respectability When you come on to someone, is all you're asking for a little respect?" SCORPIO-Funny how these things boomerang. Last week·s need for control turns around to become this week's dis­covery of someone who wants to control you. A new love might enter the picture, bringing exotic and delicious gifts SAGITTARIUS-Sex of an intense and exciting kind combined with playfulness and a need for simple pleasure can sharpen your sense of timing. The right touch at the right momeht does wonders Seeing the humor In a senous situation can add to the fun. CAPRICORN· Got the blues? What are you going to do about 1t? Check out the feeling You could learn about what 1t is to be alive. When you've done it. get on with your Ille (That's your life, remember.) AQUARIUS -Trying out new things is one of your best traits But the ability to discriminate between what"s good for you and what's not 1s very important. Stay healthy' (Don't let the bedbugs bile') PISCES-Comes the dawn' Recent mystenous happenings fall into place, strangely right. What was werrd is wond­erful, the strange becomes the familiar, and the unusual is now what always should have been •1N7 J.1:.l-NTAOSE VOIC::E ~Pl~y ~Safe! 10 MONTROSE VOICE I JANUARY 27, 1987 VOICE CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISING PROVIDING A SERVICE? Keep rt listed here 1n the Voice where l1ter­aUy thousands turn each week TARGET -YOUR MARKET A brochure. newsletter_ promotion can help our busineu target your goals and reach your market. Cari 524--0409 ----V0 1ce ADVERTISING WORKS Advertise your professional service through a VoiceCIMS1f1ed Call 529-8490 Pay by check or charge it on your Ameri­can Express Diner's Club. MasterCard Visa or Carte Blanche ANNOUNCEMENTS I Gary l1ngftnfe1ter w• no .anger be responsible for the debts or Dan C Kocurek. and should no longer be consi­dered 1n the repayment of loans made to Dan C Kocurek by otlier parties Jan. 23. 1987 KELi.Y BRADLEY, M.B.S., R.N.C. REGISTERED NURSE CLINICIAN lnd1v1dual. family and group practice l1m1ted 10 coping-stress. r~e reta11on­st11ps and sell-concept intervention Office 623-6625 LEGAL NOTICES The Voice. a general circulation news­paper ha~ing pubhshed con11nuousty tor over 5 years. is quahf1ed to accept legal notices ANSWERING SERVICES °HARD TIMES MESSAGE CENTER. 93J.. 19'5 Sll OUR OISl't.AY AO PAGE MEiCOMMUNICAT10NS SYSTEMS. 622-42.tO 5ElOCJRDl$h.ArAD ANTIQUES YESTERDAY'S w6R-LD-AN11-0uE·s 1715 Westhe1mer_ 526-2646 &El CUR Ol$PLAI'' AD ATTORNEY PHYLLIS FRYE 723--8368 General prac· tice ct aw ELA1N·E sHAW222-ffi2. S..s-3159 SEE OVR OOPLAr AD A-OON FORESTER. 1011 Bart1ett 528-4668 S!E OUR Dl$Pl.A r AO AUTO REPAIR MoNTifoSE AUTO AEPA1R. 25.16 Genesee (101 Paahc). 526-3723 SE£ (IUR Ot!PlA" AO SAL VIN AUTOMOTIVE- 524~8219 Uf OURDtSPl.All'AO TAFT AUTDMOlwE~ 14-11 Taft - 522-2190 SlE ~Ol$Pt.-rAO NEARTOWN KAAZ. 1901 Tat1. 524·8601 ;Uf OUR OISPl..A r AD WEST GRAY-AUTO. 238-w Gray 528-2886 SEE OVR OISPl...A AD BARBER SHOPS. HAIR SALONS O.no·s Barb8'r ShOp. 302W 11th Haircuts S6 up. 863-1520 tor appointment TOmmy's 88rber Shoi)~ haircuts S 10-and up 2154 Portsmouth Appo1ntments528- 8216 HA1RcUTs BY M1KE. '522-3003 SEE OUROISPt.AYAD JoN BARTON l515'it Dunlavy 522-7866 SEE 04.JR OISPlA r AO THE-ROMAN 2602 Wtutrwty. 522-8576 522·2263 SEfOUJlt£M$Pt.ArAD BARS BACCH.US. 523 l(,...en 523-3396 SEE OO.ct Ot$pt.A, AD BAA-zOS R1VEA BOTTOM 2400 Brazos. 528-9192 Slf OUR DIS Pt.Ar AD CHARLIE'S cluB. 1100·-wes1he1mer 527-8619 $EE OUR DISl>tAY AO CHEERS: ·2s54-FM1960 East. 44~2986 SEE CUR OfSPLAY AO CHUTES. 1132W9sthe1mer_ 5~221-3 SEE OCJR OISPlAY AD CRYSTAL.$ OVERLOOKING MONTROSE Slf OCJR OfSl'lAr AO DIRTY sALL y·s. 220 A;onda1e 529-7525 Sff OU.ct OISl'tA r A" HOT ROo~ Pacific_ 524--0i.:>6 SE£0UA~Y AD K.fS. 11930 A.~;;;;7.cS:5849 $EE ()(.JROl.SPLJIY AO MARYS. 1022 wMtheim.;. 52&-8851 $E£ OVROtSP'l.ArAO To odvert1•e ca1 529 8490 during bus1nC!'' hi"·" MICHAELS. 428-Weltheimer 52-g..-2506 >EE m11t OISPlAY AO N~~·.~~~,s~}~:gherd: 863-0o10- THE RANC~ 9-1-So S Main. ~3464 SEE OUR OtSPLAY AD RJPC0RD.715 Fa1n11ew. 521·2792 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO ROCK·-,;{ HORSE. 5731 Kirby. 520-9910 ~E_!!y_'!.!!!_S~~'!__ THE 611, 611 Hyde. 528-9079 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO TAM o·SHANTEFfs 6121 Hillcrofl. 771-2470 SE£ OOR DISPlAY AO VENTURE~N2923 Mai;,, 522-0000 SE£ OUA DISPLAY AD BEER BIG TOM~.-2323 Mila,..,_ 529=0533 "f OUR OOP1.AY Al BONDSMAN BOOKSHOP BOOK STOP ALABAMA. THEA TAE~ 2922 S. Shepherd. 529-2345 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO BOOTS OH BoYi LEATHEAGOOos. 912 Westhe1mer at Mu"'ltro fl 52'"7859 ;;ff OUR Of)l>t..Ar A~ CARS AND BIKES 1972 Cad1 •ac. 4 door_ rur-~ g( xt needs tires. $1500 firm 52J.221 .. SELL YOUR CAR lhrough a Montro: V4 '"• 1 1!1ed ad Call 529---8490 CHURCHES KtNGDOM COMMUNITY CHURCH 614 E 19th. 880-3527 351-4217 Sff OUR DISPLAY AO CENTER FOR A POSITIVE LIFESTYLE. 531-6600 SE£ OUR OISPlAY AO CLEANERS MONARCH PRCiFES~10NAL CLEANERS 281$ S s1 pti-4 rd 522-5101 SEEOUROtlPl.A'IA{ CLEANING SVCS SERVICE PLUS A Ouatlty CIHnlng Sanlca R"kt~llal • ComtMrcl• I e BONDED e Jett Cunningham 522-3451 CONSTRUCTION. CONTRACTING HSK CONTRACTING. 520-9064 SEE Of.JR DHPlAY AC DA TING SERVICE LAMBDA'S UNLIMITED DATING SERVICE. PO Box 7418_ Hous111n 77248. 496-3371. 528-2236 SE£ OUR OISAAY AD DENTIST RONALD M BUTLER. DD s 427 Westheimer. 524-0538 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO RONALD A -PETERS. DDS-62(,--W Ala­bama 523-221 1 DWELLINGS. RDDMMA TES. HDUSES/APTS. FDR SALE. RENT. LEASE 2 bedrooms Hollywood bath fully equipped kitchen with washer and dryer '1v1ng room. d1n1ng room. greenhouse patio. CH/A. carpet. w11ter paid 705 Pac11tc. $550 monlly. 523-2213 RIVER OAKS TOWNHOME 2-1'4. w'd. covered parking 961-2732 after 7pm. $575Jmo. plus electr1c1ty Beautiful 2 bedroom duple•. Heights area 772-5497 H1l1Crotv t-59 GHM seeks roommate plus (fun) to share 2·2 condo (large master bedroom yours) $2951 mo Alt bills paid (Serious inquiries only) 772-4568 GHM looking lor responsible roommate 2-2 townhouse. SW Houston $177 50 plus bdls CaU Jerry at 661-3873 Room tor rent, pri~8te home. Montrose 528-5454 Garage apt -w.1d, fenced yard. 699-9191 Leave message David Montrose ioWnhome. 2·1'. mirrored walls in d1n1ng room and master bed­room. wid. quiet convenient klcation. secunty. $650 mo. b+llS pard 521·1335 Roommate needed to share 3 br apt Close to UTMB in Galveston SlSG'mo plus hall ut1l1hes No deposit Cal: Liz 1409} 763-1407 VICTORIAN DUPLEX Montrose: midtown! mea1ca1 Cet'ter. 1700 sq It . ceiling fans ev•ry room, 10" ceil· mgs. 3 bedrooms. formal living and dining room. carpeting and hardwOOd f1oors. 1 baHl. laundry. off stree1 parking Can serve as office and home $450/ mo 526- 8634. 654-7766 306 Stratford.at Tait 1 bedroom. central ;~:;s.1 r~~&s 1=~~~~e!1~~11~8~~t~~'::i~ri pet OK $315 plus S150depos1t 523-6109 Professional e•ecuhve GWM seeks same 28-38 yrs old to share nu::e home Wes· 1he1mer1 Gessner area Must be sincerely interested 1n home shanng and discrete ~1e~~:i·~erTh:r1:r:J:;!~P~gt~n1t~c'.,o~ 7728f.7. Houston 77215 Heights 2-1 updated. central air. nice street. close in. $525 monthly. $250 dep­O! l1I 392-5200 or 952-3202 Mr Green Montrose one bedroom apt 1n small Quiet comple• with poor, security gates. laundry fac1!1t1es. cable ava•labte Adults Nopets.$100dep S265plusefectrc 713- 5~8178 MONTROSE Large 2-1 duple•. lots of wmdows and closets OH street parking S4501mo 861·134l Must rent attracirve okter one bedroom garage apartment HardwOOdS. applian­ces. air Needs minor work but livable Rent deposit negot1ab~. ptus bills 523- 7646 Roommate wanted Montrose nice 2 bed­room house with prtvale pallo $2001 mo bills paid 523-3814 1960-1-45 area GWM seeks roommate to share 2 bedroom. 2 bath apartment S250Jmo bills included Must be employed and stable 583-1739 TOWNE PLAZA APARTMENTS. 4655 Wild Indigo, 621-7880 SfF ()()If OISPlAY AO GREENWAY PLACE. 3333 Cummins 623-203' SEE OUR DISPLAY AO VOICE ADVERTISING WORKS Rent that house or apartment through a Voice Class1!1ed Call 529---8490 And ~~:r3fu1~~~!~~r ti~ne;~nJai:!~slr~·~~ Visa EMPLOYMENT. JOBS WANTED ATTENTION MONTROSE CABBIES Tired ol missing personals. mes5ages. ~~~~nr~~;d,c:;axi~i~~A~UE~B~A~~? Build your personal business with LIB· ERTY CAB co Call Winni 522-2269 EXERCISE TAI CHI CH'UAN Gentle e•erctse promotes bodily har­mony. peace ol mind. increases energy alleviates effects ot chronic ailments ~~~:~Y 52~~~n~s53f_'~;:s Jack FLORIST BRANCHES-FLOwEAS-. 14U8 West· he1mer. 521-0848 Sff OUR OISPLAY AC> !MISC.I FDR SALE Sunmate.8~ tanning lamp. excellenl con· d1flon. cost $1200. make offer 14K gold plated mont blanc fountain pen & pencil. excellent cond111on. retail $495. make offer Contact Chris 999-6700 or 221 5135 FOR YARD SALES See ads under "Yard Sales' at the end o l the Voice Class1heds FUNERAL DIRECTORS S:OurHwE:-sT FuNERAL DIRECTORS. 1218 Welch. 528-3851 SE£ OuR OISPtAY AO CREMATiON-SERVICE INTERNATIONAL. 3400 Montra&e, 529-6666 SEE OUR DlSPl.AY AO GIFTS TRIBES. 2501 S Shepherd. 529-1714 Elll.R --.'iP'AYAf' HOME AIR CONDITIONING MIDTOWN AIR. 521-9009. 521-9999 Sff("Jfl tAYAl HOROSCOPES OR P COOPER ASTRO-REFLECTIONS. 2470 0 1ry Ashford •170. 77077 1-800-824-/Sl operator 837 INVESTMENTS Investor wanted 1n intern 111 >nal com· pany Small investment. big returns and tax shelters Call 528· 7639 alt8f' 6. ask for Tom LAWN CARE BEfrERl>.WNS &-GARDENS, 52~ LAWN SU OUROISPl...AYAO LEATHER LEATHER BY BOOTS. 711 Fairview 526-2fi68 SEE OUR OtSPLAY AO LIQUOR WAUGH DRIVE LIQUOR. 1402 Welch. 529-9964 Sff OUR DISPl.AY AO MEDICAL CARE STEvE_O_MAAT1N EZ. M D. 12 Oaks Tower. 4126 SW Fwy #1000. 621-7771 FABRECL1NIC. 5503Craw-t0rd.-52~ 2320 $ff OUR OtSPf.AY AO ROBERT CHIROPAACTICCitNIC. !~~·~,it~ ~::.521-2003 MODELS. ESCORTS. MASSEURS Rx: RELAX! Massage bX Bill O'Rourke. MST 86~2298 St1mulatmg body rubs Out calls 529· 3970 THE RELIEVER lntu1t1ve body rub. secret oils 526-3711 Thom of Ho0lton., 523-6577. Houston. handsome. healthy. honest and masculine. (713) 988-0402 THOM -OF HOUSTON 523-6577 Begin lhe new year w1lh an exc1tmg !un­filled body rub Call Peter 464-8781 THE.CADILLAC OF MASSAGE by David D ol Et. (713) 520-8232 A toytut rub by a nice person e8n 270- 1828 Deep muscie. sensuouSb ody rub. even­ings and weekends. Leave message Steve 640-6690 ~!~~2-~9..9/ubbed the wrong way Call Stimulating body rubs by ....h. andsome GWM 5~3970 Leave message on recorder 11 no answer SensuouS massage in or out 529-3970 MOVERS Professional movers Flat rats 662-6674 520-9715 MOVEMASTERS Bo•es. 10011 Visa. MC. Ame• welcome 1925 Westht 1mer 63CH>555 PERSONALS ATTRACTIVE GWM 5·10· 1501bs 32. en1oysa goodt1mew1n someone who cares Loves to cuddle and share intimate moments together. Look· mg tor a professional GWM 27-37. 140- 180 who en1oys lhe same. Ad 327A, c/o Voice Drug free urine samples. 583-2710 Attrtlct1ve European male. -5·9·•. 145. col­lege student. d1sl1ke bars & drugs Look· 1ng for monogamous relationship Interests. museums. movies. music and traveling Reply bltnd Box 326-K c/o Voice HUtry men/ hatr fans adlist lnfop1•pak SJ 00 Hair. 59 West 10th. NYC 10011 There are .. Talkers· And there are Doers." Talkers have beaulllul smiles and dial 976 numbers Doers have 29" waist or ktH and dial 529-3983 Bottoms only DON'T DO IT ALONE Join ong1nal 24·hour sex lrnk Unmh~ blted. discrete No bill to phone e•cept tong d1s1ance One--on-one. man-to-man. low·cost connecffons 1.oocrs of horny guys waiting for calls (415) 346-8747 - PLAY ... safely at J 0 E. Meetings 5 mghts a week And 11's fun Michael Lee Singles. DOB 04-05=49. SSN 363-48-6268 I am aware ot possible changes in your Ille, but thal does not maner Please contact Penny Jo (Sin· &11~~) ~~~~~~~I ~~::-:, ei7.~dJ;ewood $500 REWARD For any information which would help me ~~~:a~!.-~~:fa~1;;:a~a~~(~i ~~~~~ or write Tony or Coleman 521 Apt 204 St Louis Street. New Orleans. LA 70130 GWM, 37. 5'10", 160, moustache, affec­honate, cuddly, lookmg for similar man for sale sex buddy, non-smoker please Describe yourself 1n reply to ad Reply Bhnd Box 325-J c/o Voice Al1-tet1sh ~redadi1st1ngs -e-.•-s- ~l~;;k ~;~er+~~~~~~~rw:ii;c~~·Ne~i HXl11 RULES FOR THE-PERSONA~ als (and other advertising) should not describe or imply a descrrpt1on ol sexual organs or acts No Personals shOuld be directed to minors Advertising must be "positive," not "negative." (If you have certain preferences m other people, list the qualities you desire_ Please don't be negative by listing the kinds of people or quahhes you don't desire) Thank you, and happy hunting ATTENTION J.O.E. MEMBERS J 0 E. has a new home and new hours AIDS cond1t1on is believed usually trans­mitted from one person to another from blood or semen Those whO are "recep­tive" are especially at nsk Do condoms protect? They cartamly help But con­doms MUST be used with a water-based lubricant (the new product Lubrasept1c is especially recommended). Petroleum or vegetable-based lubr1canl5 will actually dissolve the condom and ehm1nate the protection. Please " Pl~y Safe_" __ _ PEST CONTROL RESULTS HOME CHEMICAL & PEST CONTROL, 2513'h Elmen. 524-9415, 223-4000 SEE OUR DISPl..AY AD PETS Meetmgs are Tuesday & Thursday ANGELS TO ZEBRAS (admission 8-9pm), Sunday (adm1sston Petworld. 11725 Eastex Freeway at East 6-9pm). and Friday & Saturday (edmis- Ml Houston. 590-0'471 st0n 11pm-2am). at the Cottage Play­house, 611 Pacific. JO E. helps you !;J:,'::,~J~u(~~~y :e~e1:a1)9f1!':h:~na _ PHOTO FINISHING ~ff~!~~f1~~a~~~~1~::i~~~~~:~ WE oJ 1~~~~1i~~t~~~a~~~~op1ng lot Entrance 1s at the rear of the house enlargements. 1umbo prints, him. Kodak CONFIDENTIAL PHOTO FINISHING paper. 2615 Waugh Or 520-1010. Whoat Don't take those pictures of your HENRY'S 1 HOUR PHOTO~ i28' Wesl­boyfrtend or girlfriend to the drug store he1mer. 529-0869 ~~o~'.g~~:i:.b~~~~a~~s~n~~: ei:!~~ SEE OUR DISPLAY AD somethrng wrong with your camera·· Bal­oney They 1ust d1dn·1 want to print your PRINTING ~~C::~ci. B!23·X0~~~~h1~1'!e:,rv·~b~~~nu~ SPEEDY PRINTING, 5400 Bellaire Blvd. Michaels). tor confidential photo devel- 661-1•11 ~~ll;~t ::: B~!~~~~f Pr~fs ~r~:d~,:~gd SEC OUR DISPLAY AD sharp as possible - SAFE SEX? PSYCHOLOGISTS ~~~~~~a~:~~~:~~hiths~~==~ ~~~!~~; oR. NICHOLAS EDD. 21-28 Welch. is where there are no bodily fluids 527-8680 exchanged The virus which leads to an SEf OUR OISPt.AY AD RECORDS. TAPES INFINITE RECORDS. 528 we$1-he1mer, 521-0187 SEE OUR OISPt.AY AD REMODELING 26 years remodeling and repair expe­nence_ 772-5497 RESTAURANTS CAFE EDI, w Alabama at Shepherd, 52(r5221 SEE OUR OISPl..AY AD CHAPUL TEPEC, 813°-RiChmond, 522-2365 SEE OUR OISPt.AY AO r-------., fAI 2for1 Anytime Open 24 Hours Dine in Only. One Coupon per table. I Expires 2-17-87 C),0!~~_9.eC Wherethe 81l1ultful People Meet &.. .!!_3 R~m~ •~II!_• 5_!!-2~ .I Voice Comics l 'I \ UMUSUi\l. SPORTS : I ON 'fi.US DA'/ 1111 HISTORY: \162- Bf.II AIM\lt..11-1 DISCCNERS ElASTICITY .. JANUARY 27, 1987 I MONTROSE VOICE 11 c=~HA~R~L~IE~'S~. -,,-02~W-es-th-e-imer. 522-3332 SEE OUR CHSPLA Y AD CHICAGO PIZZA. '4100 Mandell. 526-9780 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD HUNAN VILLAGE. 1722 Cahfornia 528-6699, 528-4651 SEE OUR DISPt.AY AD THE HUNT ROOM.34~ - 521-9838 SCE OUR DISPLAY AO MISSOURI STREET CAFE, 1117 Missouri. 528-126'4 SEf OUR OISPt.AY AO NICKY'S PLACE, 2109 Dunlavy. 520-8039 SEE OUR OISPf..AY AD PIZZA INN, 3105 S Shepherd. 522-5676 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD POT PIE, 1525 Westhe1mer. 52a.-.t350 SEE OUR OISPt.AY AO SEWING SPECIAL LADY DESIGN Costumes and general sewing !or adults Call Jan or Wanda 957-8102 SPAS. POOLS SPA TO GO. 5816 SW Fwy 772-8646 SEE OUR DtsP'tAY AD SPORTSWEAR BASIC BROTHERS. 1220 Westhe1mer 522-1626 SEE OUR OISPlA Y AD STORES (MISC. ITEMSI THE EAGLE, 1544 wEi:sthe1mer, 52'4-7383 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD KILROv·S: ·11~2~3 w~.u-g,.-h -=o,~s2~s-~2""a1a SEE OUR DISPLAY AO WHoLE EARr~H~P~R~o~v~,s~,o~N~co-2934 ~EEs~~~~~!t,3883 SUPERMARKETS KROGER. 3300 Montrose UNtTED CAB co ' 6~0000 $EE OUR OISPl.AY AO /, TAXI TIRES THE TIRE PLACE. 1307 Fairview, 529-1'41'4 SEE 01.JROISPt.AYAO TRAVEL Professional executive GWM, 33 years old. wants 11milar to share vacation trav­els II yDlire serious and want to en1oy a weekend or week. write P 0 Box 772867, Houston 77215 San Francisco 1987 Bed-Breakfast Pri­vate Homes. Comfort, Friendship Details BayHosts. 1155 Bosworth 94131 '415-337-9632 FRANKLIN GUEST HOUSE. 1620 Frankhn. Denver. Co (303) 331-9106 SEE OUR DISPLAY AO TYPESETTING SAME DAY TYPESETTERS. 408 Avondale. 529-08490 SEE OUR DISPLAY AD UPHOLSTERY. REFINISHING FURNITURE STRIPPING SHOP In the heart of Montrose Relintshing repairs. upholstery 5&7833 ALLEN WA0Sw0RTH co INC 9830 Sweetwater. 445-'41'41 -u OVR OISKAY AO VIDEO YARO & GARAGE SALES GARAGE SALE Inside Fn 23. Sat 24_ Sun 25 4104 Gar­rC"' lt. 9-5 Yard Si'1e. Sat Jan 31 1420 W 15th Street at Durham. 8am-t• HAVING A YARD SALE? Announce 11 here tnen stand back for the-crowd Call5~90orv1SittheV0tce 111t 40A Avond '"' tn olace your yard salft .,nc 'N ADS BY THE INCH In addition to our regular classified rates of paying "by the word," you can purchase space here ··by the inch" Since these are considered ··01splay Ads," not ··c1assif1ed Ads." you can include special art. logos or fancy typestyles REGULAR RATE 1" $34 2" $44 3" $54 1 AD PER WEEK for 4 WEEKS RATE 1" $29 2" $39 3" $49 1 AD PER WEEK for 13 WEEKS RATE 1" $24 2· $34 3" $44 1 AD PER WEEK for 26 WEEKS RATE , • $19 2' $29 3" $39 Above rates apply to Weekend Edition Rates for Midweek Edition are 1 2 above rates I @I .. Maybe It's not me, y'know? ... Maybe trs the rest of the herd that's gone Insane." We're Houston's largest Gay Atllieoce. We're the readers of the Montrose around $7,000,000 wee~ly on the things The MOnfroSe Vo1·ce Voice. we buy-clothes, partying .at mght, apartments, cars and repair, hmr care, serious things and silly things. (Yes, that's $7 million weekly.) We're the people you reach when you advertise in the Montrose Voice. We're about 40,000 readers weekly. (There's still another 39,870 of us not pictured above.) You know what else? We, the readers of the Voice, spend somewhere Got something to sell next week? We've got the money to buy it. Maybe all you have to do is ask-by advertising to us through our newspaper. THE NEWSPAPER OF MONTROSE OIAL 529-8490 for AOVERTISING or HOME DELIVERY
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