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Montrose Voice, No. 318, November 27, 1986
File 007
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Montrose Voice, No. 318, November 27, 1986 - File 007. 1986-11-27. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/189/show/170.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1986-11-27). Montrose Voice, No. 318, November 27, 1986 - File 007. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/189/show/170

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 318, November 27, 1986 - File 007, 1986-11-27, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/189/show/170.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 318, November 27, 1986
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
  • Wyche, Linda
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date November 27, 1986
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript 6 MONTROSE VOICE/NOVEMBER 27, 1986 U.S. Caught in Crossfire of Bitter Iranian Power Struggle By William O. Beeman Pacific News Service Special to the Montrose Voice The United States could not have picked a more dangerous time to enter negotiations with Iran than the present. Indications are that a bitter power struggle has been underway in Tehran for some time and Washington —knowingly and unknowingly—has found itself caught in the crossfire. Iran has made great strides toward establishing the trappings of a stable nation. It has a parliament, elections and a set of officials who have managed to stay in office for at least five years. It has been able to conduct its war with Iraq steadily yet without incurring huge international debts. Nevertheless, beneath the surface bubbles a monumental struggle for suc- In a recent sermon he (Khomeini) declared that participating in the war was more important than Islamic prayers and other religious observances cession to national leadership once the seemingly immortal Ayatullah Khomeini leaves the scene. Khomeini picked as his successor Ayatollah Sayyid Hussein Ali Montazari whom most Iranians regard as a lightweight and openly ridicule. Indeed, many political commentators speculate that Khomeini picked Montazari exactly because he would give him very little trouble. Hut Iranians themselves have sometimes failed to understand that a weak figure with a great deal of power can be a cat's paw for other ambitious persons. Ayatollah Montazari's extended family is full of such persons. His son—one of the original zealots of the Islamic Revolution abroad —led the first groups of volunteers to Lebanon from Iran. His son-in-law's brother, Mehdi Hashemi, was leader of the Office of Liberation Movements, the organization responsible tor support of militant groups outside Iran. The group surrounding Montazari— which also includes President Ali Khamenei—constitutes the most fervent supporters of Iranian adventurism abroad and Islamic social reform at Wed: Strip Contest with M.C. Maude 10pm Fri: Montrose Men 10 & 12pm Sat: Muscles in Action 10 & 12pm Casino Night 8pm-2am Everyday 428 Westheimer — 529-2506 home, including appropriating the property of the wealthy and arresting women who violate Islamic dress codes. The chief rival faction, identified with Prime Minister Mir Hussein Mousavi and Parliament speaker Ali Akbar Hashemi—Rafsanjani. has favored renewing ties with Western nations, patching up differences with Saudi Arabia, and winding down the war with Iraq. Though also supporting clients among Shiite communities abroad, these individuals are less ideological in I£N3«SNr- directly, he was reportedly fuming In a private meeting on Nov, ll, Iranian sources reported that he told a group of supporters that "Khomeini would be sorry for these actions." President Khamenei, who is clearly implicated is laying low, and making no comment whatsoever on the arrests. What convinced Khomeini to tilt to the side of Rafsanjani and the pragma- lists? It is hard to know for sure, but it is likely they were able to convince him that the Montazari faction was soft on WUHClIMflKntUSHf. NEVEfcT TOUCH STCtttt PWNK W/MJMTUJliJTaiSrAE NEVERT" KISS ON TH' FIKST TATt AND W UNOE PCH TEIAS ME NEVERT WN.WTTH TE-WRPft-"- would he no more than Iran's own goods purchased before the revolution and embargoed by the U.S. Thus Iran would merely be claiming its own property, not dealing with the Great Satan. Meanwhile, chagrined supporters of Hashemi and other arrested officials leaked news ofthe McKarlane mission to the pro-Syrian I_ebanese press, hoping to blackmail their political enemies into curbing the political purge already underway. Rafsanjani, to protect himself, then made his own public revelations of McFarlane's trip before accusations could be made against him in Tehran. He ridiculed the envoy by making up a silly story of his arrival with a Bible signed by President Reagan and a cake in the shape of a key to signify the opening of a new relationship between the U.S. and Iran. Rafsanjani appears to have carried the day, but the struggle is not over. The last time such a power struggle occurred, at the ouster of former President Abul Hassan Bani Sadr, political affairs in Tehran did not settle for nearly six months. Needless to say, this is no time forthe U.S. to think that it can make inroads in improving relations with Iran, where U.S. officials are political poison for those they contact. Nor is it a time to feel that bargaining can have any reliable | outcome. William O Beeman an anthropologist at Brown University specializing in the Middle East, lived and worked tor close to a decade in Iran their outlook. Their political philosophy is pragmatic: maintain power at any cost. In the past, Khomeini has doled his favors out equally to both the revolutionaries and the pragmatists — balancing one off against the other. Recently, however, the balance has shifted. The pragmatics have begun to gain some success in discrediting the Montazari group in Khomeini's eves. The clearest sign of this is the arrest of Mehdi Hashemi on charges of murder and treason. Though nothing less than an attack on Montazari himself, the arrest was suported by Khomeini. Between Nov I and Nov. 10, a host of other individuals were also arrested — including parliament members. Revolutionary Guard officers and the Army Chief of Intelligence. Although Montazari himself could not he touched the war with Iraq. This accusation is utterly cynical, since Rafsanjani himself is reported to favor ending the war at an early date. given growing public dissatisfaction with it. The war has become an "idee fixe" for Khomeini. In a recent sermon he declared that participating in the war was more important than Islamic prayers and other religious observances. This is the point where Washington enters. Iran needed war material, and the White Hosue needed to free hostages in Lebanon to satisfy growing domestic pressures that something he done. Iranian pragmatist officials were apprantelv able to convince Khomeini that the greater good of the conduct of the war warranted an exchange. Moreover, the spare parts to be sent 1 Signs of BALDING? 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