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Houston Voice, No. 1018, April 28, 2000
File 018
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Houston Voice, No. 1018, April 28, 2000 - File 018. 2000-04-28. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 18, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1889/show/1877.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-04-28). Houston Voice, No. 1018, April 28, 2000 - File 018. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1889/show/1877

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1018, April 28, 2000 - File 018, 2000-04-28, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 18, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1889/show/1877.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1018, April 28, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date April 28, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 018
Transcript T HOUSTON VOICE • APRIL 28, 2000 OUT ON THE BAYOU 17 GL MA-^W >■ Continued from Page 15 As Kristina Boerger accepted her Contemporary Classical Composer GLAMA ("Dream of ■ Snow Covered Bridges," Amasong, AMAI/Amasong), she was resplendent in black tuxedo tails, starched white-shirt and bright baby blue bow tie. And the evening's first genuine surprise occurred moments later when presenter Kate Clinton announced the Choral GLAMA, which tied and went to Boerger for her second award, and to Dallas-based Turtle Creek Chorale for "In This Heart of Mine" (The Best of Turtle Creek Chorale; TCC). Two GLAMAs helped point out how forcibly queer music is forcing the major labels to re-write industry rules. After rocking the crowd with her winning track, Joi Cardwell won the Dance Music GLAMA for "Last Chance for Love," from her album Deliverance (Nomad Records), which was produced by her own label. "This means so much to me because Deliverance is my first album on my very own label," Cardwell said. "I'm free from the record companies." GAYBC Radio's Charlie Dyer won the first-ever GLAMA for Live Radio Broadcast. "The GLAMAs are about music, not about radio," Dyer said. "Thanks for supporting us because we don't exist without you." Christian Andreason took the nod for For a list of GLAMA winners, visit www.houstonvoice.com Contemporary Spiritual Music, a new category. "When the subject of spirituality came up, papers started rustling, conversations began and people got up to get drinks," Andreason said. "But everyone in this room, whether you write or sing music or listen to it, does so from a place of spiritual honesty." In a perfect sign of queer serendipity, GLAMA's two special honorees, jazz pianist Fred Hersch and singer/songwriter Meshell Ndgeocello, were each honored beyond those prizes. Hersch earned a standing ovation while accepting the Michael Callen Medal, awarded to an individual, group, organization or business committed to furthering gay music and whose spirit embodies that of the late activist and musician. Revealing their similar background— Callen was raised in Cincinnati, Hersch a half an hour away—Hersch recalled meeting and working with Callen on the landmark album Legacy. Hersch also collected the Male Artist GLAMA, for "Fred Hersch Live at Jordan Hall: Let Yourself Go." Meshell Ndgeocello received the I GLAMA co-lounders Michael Mitchell (left) and Tom McCormick added several new categories to the annual gay music awards, which—despite some minor glitches—showed the growing influence of queer music. evening's second standing ovation while accepting GLAMA's Outmusic Award, presented to a recording artist, group or musician who has advanced gay music through their work as an out musician. "It's really hard to come here and see that I'm only one of a handful of people of color. I just wish we could all love each other. Just love each other," Ndgeocello said. "Thank you so much for this. It inspires me to keep working, to go back to my label and push the envelope a little bit more." In an interview after the awards ceremony, Ndgeocello laughed at her statements about pushing her music label—it is, after all, owned by Madonna. "You can always push the envelope a lit- Propecia (finasteride) Ask your doctor about this pill from Merck. For more information, call 1-888-MERCK-74. tie more," Ndgeocello said. "I think my next thing to do is to impregnate Madonna. Maybe I can get some, you know, something real happening that way." But the three-time GLAMA winner also reiterated her belief that the gay community has racial barriers to break down. "The community is so racially diverse, so economically diverse, so artistically diverse. It's just really difficult. Because I deal with that in my every day life. I even remember going to coming out meetings in New York and there was racism then. There is racism in the gay community today. But we can fix that. We can all broaden our minds. We really can all love each other. We at least have to try," Ndgeocello said. I www.propecia.com
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