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Houston Voice, No. 1018, April 28, 2000
File 017
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Houston Voice, No. 1018, April 28, 2000 - File 017. 2000-04-28. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1889/show/1876.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-04-28). Houston Voice, No. 1018, April 28, 2000 - File 017. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1889/show/1876

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1018, April 28, 2000 - File 017, 2000-04-28, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1889/show/1876.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, No. 1018, April 28, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date April 28, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 017
Transcript ■r 16 OUT ON THE BAYOU APRIL 28, 2000 » HOUSTON VOICE SOCIETY FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS Bringing the World's Best to Houston presents David Campbell Cabaret Starring in off-Broadway's premiere of Sondheim's Saturday Night, 26-year-old David Campbell is an exciting young talent. With an ever-versatile tenor, this Australian heart-throb is captivating. Hear such favorites as Bridge Over Troubled Water, I Got Rhythm. Old Devil Moon, and more. Catch a rising star... Friday, May 5th Seating on Jones Hall Stage 7:00 pm & 9:30 pm vAvw.ticketrnaster.com ticKSTfnastar FIESTA • FOLEY'S - KR06ER 7I3-227-4SPA KUHF88.7FM £ American r „ ,. , s-, Continental General Aimnes Bank of Montreal I Financial Gro On Stage Melody on a lost path by D.L. GROOVER If you think you can't teach an old dog new tricks, think again. Carlisle Floyd, American opera's grand old man, has created COLD SASSY TREE, unveiled earlier this month at Houston Grand Opera in a most lyrical production. Aside from the physical beauty of the sets and costumes, whose realism could rival any Belasco presentation from the turn of last century, Floyd has decided to shun the melodic and embrace the ultra-modern. Bad dog. No longer does he charm us with melody as in "Susannah," his one opera for which he will be remembered, nor enmesh us with drama and significance as in "Of Mice and Men" or "Willie Stark." Instead he bows to the contemporary and creates a jagged, dissonant score to a piece of fairly tame passion where the most conflict seems to stem from whether the house gets indoor plumbing. Taking a slice of rural Americana from the corn-pone novel of Olive Ann Burns, Floyd has fashioned a bland opera. It is filled with all the sappy virtues of "The Waltons" and even an unintentional whiff of "The Music Man," although without its gift for music or sanctimonious parody. There's not a tune to be heard all evening except for the evangelical Doxology ("Praise God From Whom All Blessings Flow"). Tensions rise and dramatic situations occur throughout the evening, but not once do the characters really sing. For a few bars they get close to a sustained melodic line, but Floyd, in his curmudgeon mood, pulls back and withholds pleasure. It's no wonder people don't respond to contemporary operas: there's nothing in them to wrap your ears around. It's difficult to think of any recent work you'd want to sit through again. Directed in unobtrusive style by Bruce Beresford, "Cold Sassy" moves cinemati- cally and is performed without a false note, even if they are ill served by Floyd's music. Last seen in a riveting performance in "Mefistofele," Patricia Racette brings her dramatic gifts and voice to the role of Love Simpson. She is the young woman who marries the much older general store owner in a "business arrangement" that sets the tongues of the small town of Cold Sassy Tree wagging in disapproval. As Rucker Lattimore, Dean Peterson rounds out his idiosyncratic, cantankerous character with gently evolving shades of tenderness and wraps his luscious bass baritone around Floyd's zigzag tunes with more love than this music deserves. As narrator and John-Boy stand-in, Will Tweedy, who wants to be a writer Composer Carlisle Floyd was in Houston earlier this month during rehearsals of his 'Cold Sassy Tree,' his latest and perhaps final opera. and falls in love with a girl from the wrong side of the tracks, John McVeigh's tenor fills the house with dramatic insight and brings his character an ingratiating goodness. Margaret Lloyd, as Lightfoot McClendon, the mill worker who longs for "learning," sings and acts gloriously, although all her arias are way too brief and musically sketchy to be truly affecting. Although this subplot of mismatched lovers could take the story to a higher realm, Floyd, writing as his own dramatist, loses interest in them and settles their conflict too easily. The situations in this small rural Georgia town get settled with low-key concern, even the dramatic confessions of childhood rape or the problem of segregation. It's the fault of the music, because everything sounds the same. Hypocrisy is given the same tonal value as young love; playing checkers on the front porch sounds just like attempted murder. The story can't possibly move us because the music goes nowhere. Floyd is notorious for tinkering with his work, having edited "Jonathon Wade" for 25 years after its premiere, until he finally scuttled the original book and music almost entirely. Perhaps inspiration will strike with "Cold Sassy Tree," and instead of new tricks, he'll revert to the old one: melody as the path to drama. Cold Sassy Tree Houston Grand Opera Wortham Theater Center Through May 6 713-227-ARTS yvwvvhoustongrandopera.org
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