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Houston Voice, No. 1018, April 28, 2000
File 016
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Houston Voice, No. 1018, April 28, 2000 - File 016. 2000-04-28. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 15, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1889/show/1875.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-04-28). Houston Voice, No. 1018, April 28, 2000 - File 016. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1889/show/1875

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1018, April 28, 2000 - File 016, 2000-04-28, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 15, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1889/show/1875.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1018, April 28, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date April 28, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 016
Transcript 0___—__|■■■■IBiI atontteoft HOUSTON VOICE • APRIL 28, 2000 A GUIDE FOR YOUR LEISURE TIME w Sandra Bernl style, sometl when she stop in ne says gay fans tan relate to her . they'll have the chante lo do forms in Houston, her Itrsr Texas six years. Stand-up GIRL Comedienne Sandra Bernhard is, surprisingly, a modest person who doesn't relish celebrity status. But her new found mellowness doesn't affect her on stage raunch. by EARL DITTMAN What do you call a woman who is an actress, stand-up comedienne, novelist, recording artist, feminist, gay and a single mom? \ Critics have labeled her "brilliant and one of a kind"; some members of the gay community proclaim her their patron saint; legions of devoted fans simply call her "divine." But Sandra Bernhard, the woman and the per- jm former, is much more than all that. /Her obvious talents aside, she's an incredibly intelligent, funny, sweet-natured and surprisingly modest lady who is fearless in her quest to speak out on the world's injustices. But don't say that to her face, because she'll set you straight in a New York minute. "I'm just a loud, big-mouthed broad with an attitude and you're making me sound like Mother Teresa," the multi-talented performer said jokingly from her home in the Big Apple. "Do you want to know what to call me? How about a woman who has been given some really great chances to have herself heard through entertaining people? Because that's all I really am, and I'm going to keep doing it until people get tired of me and tell me to shut-up." There's little chance of that any time soon. As her upcoming one- woman show in Houston will show, her fans haven't had their fill yet. "I haven't been to Texas in about six years; I'm glad that people haven't forgotten me," she said with a laugh. "1 really have to say that 1 love Texas and the South. I think it is kinda true about what they say about the hospitality of the South. I've always felt that people go out of their way to make you feel at home down there." Bernhard is one performer who doesn't buy into the notion that Southerners are culturally-challenged hillbillies. "In fact, I think people from the South are probably more aware and more into the arts than a lot of the culture vultures from LA. or New York," Bernhard said. "When people want to 5- Continued on Page 19 GL MA-^W More than two-dozen gay Grammys were doled out to gay artists Monday during ceremonies that called attention to the growing influence of queer-tinged music by MARK J. HUISMAN NEW YORK—In his program letter to the 4th Annual Gay and Lesbian American Music Awards, which were held here on Monday, GLAMA co-founder and executive director Michael Mitchell urged fans to "be brave and explore new territory" by purchasing some new music. By supporting the work of artists both familiar and new, and for rewarding work in more categories than ever, the 2000 GLAMAs were indeed brave, even if they occasionally treaded in familiar awards show territory. The show overcame early snafus—including traffic gridlock caused by President Clinton's motorcade, who was in town for a fund-raiser, missing awards and technical glitches—but was hampered with no-show nominees. Of 26 GLAMAs awarded, eight winners skipped the ceremony. Absentees included Suzanne Westenhoefer, Melissa Etheridge, Lee Lessack and The Butchies. It was particularly disappointing that four of the eight GLAMAs in new categories were not picked up: Gretchen Lee of Curve Magazine (Music Reporting/Criticism), Susan Morabito (DJ), Indigo Girls and John Reynolds (Producer of the Year) and Hentges and Jude O'Nym (Song of the Year). The most graceful, elegant moments undoubtedly belonged to the classical and choral winners, including Classical Performance GLAMA winner Theresa Bogard ("Alleluia In A Form of Toccata"; Music of Louise Talma; CR1). "I'm from Ijramine, Wyoming," said the clearly choked-up Bogard, who teaches at the University of Wyoming. "And if I can be out and you can be out, we should all be able to be out." 5- Continued on Page 17
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