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Houston Voice, No. 1018, April 28, 2000
File 006
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Houston Voice, No. 1018, April 28, 2000 - File 006. 2000-04-28. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1889/show/1865.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2000-04-28). Houston Voice, No. 1018, April 28, 2000 - File 006. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1889/show/1865

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1018, April 28, 2000 - File 006, 2000-04-28, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1889/show/1865.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1018, April 28, 2000
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date April 28, 2000
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 006
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE • APRIL 28, 2000 NEWS INSIDE NEWS Thousands expected to march on National Mall Around Ihe South 6 Judge permits adoption challenge in Flo 6 Fired lesbian worker sues Baptist home 6 Around the Notion 7 NGLTF tops newly out NOW official 7 Military not 'testing ground' for gays, official soys 7 Health News 18 Tuberculosis outbreak among transgendered 18 Survey: Depression top gay health concern . 18 VOICES 8, ECHOES Editorial: Gays may ruin Traditional marriage' .8 Kubiok: Lifestyles of the vain, self-absorbed .9 OUT ON THE BAYOU Stand-up Girl Sandra Bernhard comes calling 15 GLAMA-rous! The goy Grammys 15 On Stage: Melody on o lost path 16 Out in Print: Memoirs of o hustler 20 Bestsellers 20 Ealing Oul: Daring dishes stand out 21 Community Calendar 22 Occasions 26 My Stars! 27 CLASSIFIEDS 24 Issue 1018 l,MINM,l voice All material in Houston Voice is protected by federal copyright law and may not be reproduced without the written consent of Houston Voice. The sexual orientation of advertisers, photographers, writers and cartoonists published herein is neither inferred or implied. The appearance of names or pictorial representation does not necessarily indicate the sexual orientation of that person or persons. Houston Voice accepts unsolicited editorial material but cannot take responsibility for its return. The editor reserves the right to accept, reject or edit any submission. All rights revert to authors upon publication. Guidelines for freelance contributors are available upon request. Houston Voice 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200 Houston, TX 77006 713-529-8490 WASHINGTON (AP)—There's nothing better than a march on the National Mall to build on the victory that gays and lesbians just won in Vermont, Diane Hardy-Garcia says. That's because every step forward gays and lesbians make—like the brand-new Vermont civil unions law—there is a step back, like the slaying of Pfc. Barry Winchell at Fort Campbell, Ky., after rumors surfaced that he was gay, said Hardy-Garcia, executive director of Sunday's Millennium March on Washington and the Lesbian Gay Rights Lobby of Texas. Organizers are expecting 300,000 people at the fourth rally for gay, lesbian and bisexual right on the Mall in the last 21 years. They have been planning for years, hoping the rally will mobilize supporters into an important voting bloc this presidential election year. But it is not without its critics. .And the most vocal ones are other gay and lesbian rights groups who claim the event has little grassroots support. "There's many things to celebrate and a lot of work to yet to do," Hardy-Garcia said. "One of the reasons we do marches on Washington is something that is important to the gay community—the real need to bring more people into this movement." To do that, they're staging a concert fea turing Garth Brooks and Melissa Etheridge, rallying between the Washington Monument and the Capitol and broadcasting the events over the Internet. Also scheduled to attend are the parents of Matthew Shepard, a 21-year-old gay University of Wyoming student who died in October 1998 after being beaten into a coma and tied to a fence, and Winchell's mother, Patricia Kutteles of Kansas City, Mo. Critics praise the intentions of the event but question how it has been organized. William Dobbs, member of a committee of activists formed to oppose the march, says decisions about the event were made by people in Washington who failed to garner enough support on the local level and from minority groups. "Celebrities draw attention but in the end it's supposed to be a civil rights march," Dobbs said. "It shouldn't be just a feel-good event. But those past marches came about when there was a real community consensus to march on the capital and push the government changes." New York City Councilwoman Christine Quinn, whose Manhattan district is home to a big portion of the city's gay and lesbian population, urged her constituents to stay away to concentrate on efforts closer to home instead. The National Association of Black and White Texas activist and Millennium March organizer Dianne Hardy-Garcia said despite criticism, Sunday's event will 'help celebrate gay victories' like the civil unions bill in Vermont. Men Together rescheduled a board meeting originally set for this weekend in Washington to show its opposition to the march. March supporters dismiss the criticism. "There have been disagreements, with every social justice movement and past marches," said David Smith, spokesman for Human Rights Campaign. "The controversy right now is not as important as the fact that we are all coming together to work for the common goal." Scouts' gay ban argued before high court WASHINGTON (AP)— Walking with his lawyer and parents, James Dale ignored the anti-gay activists who followed him across the Supreme Court's broad marble plaza. "Save yourself from this awful, horrible lifestyle!" yelled Philip Benham of Dallas, president of the anti-abortion group Operation Rescue. "Mr. Dale, Jesus will set you free!" Daniel Martino of Washington stood with a cross and a large sign declaring, "A homosexual Boy Scout leader is like asking a fox to guard the chickens." Dale has seen and heard such statements before and says they do not affect him. "The only person I am is me, and I've always been true to myself, and I think that's the most important thing," he said, addressing a mob of reporters and curious tourists after the court heard arguments in his case against the Boy Scouts of America. Expelled as a scouting supervisor in 1990 when the Boy Scouts learned he was gay, the Eagle Scout two years later launched a legal challenge to the scout's claim that gay people do not meet the organiza tion's standard of "morally straight." Without saying how they will ultimately vote, several justices voiced skepticism about how far the court could go to force open admissions upon private organizations. "In your view, a Catholic organization has to admit Jews'' and "a Jewish organization has to admit Catholics," Justice Stephen G. Breyer told Evan Wolfson, Dale's lawyer. Founded in 1910, the Scouts have an oath and law that long have required members to promise to be "clean" and "morally straight." But no written rule specifically addresses homosexuality. Wolfson said the Scouts are not primarily an "anti-gay organization" and therefore Dale's presence did not burden the group's message. New Jersey's highest court ruled that the Boy Scouts' ban on gay troop leaders violated a state prohibition on discrimination in public accommodations. But the Scouts say the state law violates the organization's rights of free speech and free association under the Constitution's First Amendment. Former Eagle Scout James Dale (center) talks to the press at the Supreme Court in Washington Wednesday after Supreme Court justices joined in a spirited debate over whether Boy Scouts can bar gays from serving as troop leaders. Justice John Paul Stevens asked George Davidson, the Scouts' lawyer, whether gays could be excluded if they did not publicly declare their sexual orientation, but it was discovered against their wishes. Yes, said Davidson, arguing that the organization had a right "to choose the moral leaders for the children in the program." Dale, 29, lives in New York City and is advertising director for a magazine for people who are HIV-positive.
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