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Houston Voice, No. 934, September 18, 1998
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Houston Voice, No. 934, September 18, 1998 - File 001. 1998-09-18. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1829/show/1788.

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(1998-09-18). Houston Voice, No. 934, September 18, 1998 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1829/show/1788

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 934, September 18, 1998 - File 001, 1998-09-18, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1829/show/1788.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 934, September 18, 1998
Contributor
  • Hennie, Matthew A.
Publisher Window Media
Date September 18, 1998
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript One Community! One Voice!© ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~- SEPTE M BER 1 B. 1 998 www . h ousto n voice.com Growing old together Retirement communities under development for older gays by GIP PLAS rm E' crvont net ds soi:: \\hen• to retire, but 'or r.: ny gny nnd lcsbrnr sen10r the trnd1tional options simply don t "ork C'oupl<'s who have been bgt!her for ~ears could be forced to go 111to th• closet 1f tht'"y t "'lh r trnd1t1on.ll r tin nu nt commurut1cs and if nu mg home c.m• 1s needed for c1thc• of tlw part1wr• tht• couple could ht' forn·J to fl p 1r •h or lw nhout tht•tr ri•latwnsh1p. Smet• a baby boomer turns 50 cwry 7.6 scconrls, 11ccord­mg lo govt•rnment stnt1sticM, morP nnd mon• gay and lcs· l.1hlfl Jll' 1p)e fnct._• ugmg ISSUt'S cvl'ry day. Older g •Y• und l<'•lnnns fac1 chnlH nges that young1•r g.1ys don't have to face and gay nnd ksbinn emors fncr challenges that older strmght pt•op. don't fart e1th1 r Cny and k~brnn seniors arc findmg that SOCll'I} 1s ogl!111t, th.it tlwy havP fi.•w plact.•s to nu et cnch ot lwr und that "" they ag1" th<•re mav be no plac.:p for th t•m to go that und1·r•tands the vahll' of tlw1r n·l.1tion•h1ps und rcoJll'dS tlw1r d1·sire to still be part or the gay com· mun.ty. See RETIREJ page 4A Old lesbians: Houston residents Chmf<>tte Ave!}' and partner Arden Eversmeye' members of Old Lesb1.Jns Orgamzmg for Change. work to empower lesb1 ns to onfront ageism P/loto by Matthew A Henmo Working to empower aging lesbians by GIP PLASTER Houston's ArdPn ~;wrs­nwyer 1s an old lesbmn. Ev!'rsmcyn and hE·r p.1rt ncr C'h:irlotte A\E•ry, likP othor memb<'ro of Old l...c,:hmns Orgnruz1ng for Change (OLCll'l, prefer to Ix• ca.lied old rath1·r than older •·our concern 1s not 111,•mg, it's uge1sm." ~aid Evcrsmt•ycr th1• organizations co-coordi­nator 'Old hi" come to mean such rlrcadful thm!,'S." Through other Ol'J,'llmza t1on' like the National Gnv and uo;bmn 'fa.,k Foret• und th<' Presidmt's C'omnuSl'ion on •\;,0111:, OLOC work, to t'ln· front tgt 'l"'nt 111 t:ocil'tV. lt docs· n't han• nwf'tini..rs or S<x.:inl gathl'rllll,'"S, ulthc1ugh locnl groups of tlw llouston-bascd organizatmn t•x1~t m 1<irnd l , ~t'W York, ?\.hnne:-;ota, C 1hfomia and Texas, among other pince:;. The group says its goal is to empower old lesbians to confront ageism and to mak<' th1 m>elve,; a Vbible force w1th1n their own com· mu111ty and a shapmg force for women's issues :\!embers of OLOC hke to be called old beca.use they nre attempting to rccla11n the term m much the samt• way some have tned to recia11n the pmk triangle, once a symbol of Nazi opprcsswn, as a symbol for t lw lt•sb1an and gay commu­ruty, organiz('rs said "Soc1el} calls us old bl'l1ind our backs while it cull:; us older to our face1'i," See OLD/ page 4A Frances slants AIDS shelter Donations needed to reopen emergency shelter for HIV-positive men by MATTHEW A HENNIE Some $10,000 may h recd ed to rec.pen one of ttie city s only AIDS emerge cv shelters after henvy damage mfl1cted by Tropical Storm Fr nces caVl'd m the roof J ~lo,ed th fnc1hty la t week Hcav} rams collapsed part ofthl' root and rOO<! d much of the two-story housu early on Sept 11 as Frances pumml'led Houston, causmg scwre flood­ng and nn estimated 23 w. J. hon m damngc Ill Harn' Countv, officmls said. "The house was creaking and groanmg," sa d Matt Lockhn, exc utive director and ont ofth1• founders of the fac1l 1ty at lli Tuam. "We were up .lock m the mornmg \\Ith buckets tnmg to mm1· m.zc the d.J ~e • The fac1hty ca.n h~t. e 1x HIY-pos1livt• males for up to 90 days as II. uston's only same-dav-untry AIDS c·mc r­ger. cy shelter, Locklin aid But the storm mag h s forced him to c e the dot. for H \\U K Hem) r n flood~ a ccond· f' oor bcdroo , d ffice nd r med so furn t.irc and equ1pm nt Lock! n sa.d Ir ur.ince ma' pav some of the repair costs, "htch could ,trctch to 10,000, but the 'helter needs immediate 11ss1s­tance to rclocalP residents nnd begin repa rs, he smd A plastic tarp coH•rs the damaged roof while yello" caution tape 1s draped aero s μarts f the fnohty t \\Urn f the damage The ram ca ved tn a flat portion c.I the h~....,e See SHELTER/ page 6A Closed: Hoavy rams pounded the city's only same-day·entl}' AIDS emergency shelter, forr:mg execu/1ve dlfector.Matt Locklin to close the fac1/l/y until up to $10,000 m repalfs can be completed -Photo by Ma/thew A. Henme Tip cards to help police with hate crimes by MATTHEW A HENN!. Ilouston's f1 300 pohcc officers will oon b(' ~armt d \\1th blue rcsourcP cnrds 111 .mother st1·p •n th1• city's fight nga&nf't h .. 1tt1 cnnws, officials said Thur day Thl' four nch by two md1 c.1rd t1tl1•d Hutt• Cnnw How you been n v1thm''"' h~t th<' pohcl' dt.·1mrt mont's :l 1 hour Hult- Crnnes llothne INSIDE: nnd n•sources for ,·1ct11ns, suC'h as tht.. :\lontros<• Couns1•ling Center nnd Texas Human Rights Foundation Some 10.000 curds nrt' being dist rib· uted to police offil'crs. subst:itwns and l'ommunity outlets throughout Houston, inrludmg tlw pohco store­front on \Vt•!=;tht•Jml'r nc.lr ~tontrosc, said l.t :\lark Ei><'nmun. hnte cmnes coordinator for thl' Houston Police Domestic Viole n ce l'ohn• c/1ll'/ /ollou·~ t/Jro1.1(/II on 1111pro1 l(•n1, ·11ts. Page 7A Dl'l .. m ~m ... at '"We wanted offic<'rs to readily ha\'e access to re~uurces that \\ould be of 1mpor ti.once to thP •pecml nl'e<ls of hate cnm1• S tealth Strategy Avioduig tilt' G 1mrd111 /lauvm Page llA v1ct1ms,• Eisenman smd Thursday "Crime v1ct1ms nre certainly trau"Il:It'Zcd but the traumat1za­mcrcased w,th hate Better H ealth \\armu1g up key lO S!ICC('SS in workouts. Page lSA See HATEJ page 6A BRING YOUR GROUP OUTSIDE THE LOOP At the Sheratrn Houston Br.>rkhollo" )Ou'll lmd C\oC.,.)thing you need for su\..ccsslu: meetings and C\.cnts \\1th O\ er 14,000 s4uJrc lcet ol mcctmg. banquet >n<l funLllon space Sheraton Houston Broo~hollow 1' the 1Jc.il pla..c for )OUT next a"'>e1a 11on ga1henng. scr nar g'l"ou;\ fundra ''"ll event or pan) AnJ " th ( ur proXI II) t< the GJllcn and \1untrosc arc.'-'. geumg here l'i c~isy Our (.'.ouncuus ... talf \\Ill :i.~1~t \llU " th all )Our nccJ~ to ma~e ,·our C\cnl .m unforgcuahlc experience C.111 Jac~re .\1orcno today fo~ .1 wmpletc mfom1a11un JX!•~Jgc and J>L'l'Sonal !Our .\t She tor. ll•>US!cn Bmokh< llo". respect ts our busmcss. ~ .. fs~ \~J Sheraton Houston Brookhollow H 0 T E L 3000 North Loop West • Houston • 77092 713.688.0100 'lA1e24d1 ~::xas ~antJO °C:Ytfflival Wekends Thru Nov.15th Saturday & Sunday "YEAROFTHE ROYALGAMES" Discount Tickets At: Open 9am to Du~k Gi:oup Rates Call 1-800-458-3435 ~ Ptu • ~ RAu..d.. • ~ ~1nchd.• • ~ Out..k Foocl ur Dnal, fcsti"'11 Ground• Located on FM 1774 bct.,.'Ccn HWY 105 in Plantcnvillc & FM 1488 in Ma~1a. - 45 Minutes Nortk-..t of Howton For More Information: 1-800-458-3435 wv~"'·""!'texrenfest .com --=···=··•k ·----- P A G E L 0 C A L AIDS leaders to be honored Thre Houston leaders m the fight against AIDS will be honort•d by n Washington, D.C.-based advocacy and pohcy grcup on Sept 24. Businessman Jack>on Hicks, state Rep. Garnet Coleman ,md Chase Bank of Texas will be honored by AIDS ,\ct10n, a group that represents some 3,200 AIDS service providers H!TO>S the countrv. "As llo~ston has becoml' a trug1c n<'W epicenter of the AIDS Pptdl'mtc, local leadership responded swiftly and e'Tect1vcly, said Darucl Zmgale AIDS Action's executive director "We arc proud to honor these t hrce leaders not only for their fight against AIDS 111 Houston, but for setting a nat1011nl example for individual and corporate respons1b1hty." The AIDS Actwn Houston Leader.hip Awards will be held Sl'pl. 24 at the Houston Junior L<'agm', 1811 Bnar Oak Lane, at 8 p.11' Anniversary: Dozens of people were on hand for tho 10/h anniversary colebrar1on of The Assistance Fund. which helps guarantee medical care for HIV-pos1t1ve patients through its offices at 1116 Jackson Blvd A 10th anniversary gala is planned for Oct. 18. For more mforma­tron. call 713-529-4788. -Photo by DaltonDeHatt Local musicians host AIDS benefit for Berin~ Several live bands will perform dur­ing a benefit for th(• BPnng Commumty Service Foundation on Sept. :.!3 nt 8 p.m. Performers mcludc Chlormc. Rose Bud, Senator Gravity, Tr1ppstrokc and Shella :\lnrshnll Band The benefit will b<• held nt Instant K.irma, 1617 R1,hmond, Tickets nre '7. "This c\'l'nt is designed to takl' the prcvC'ntwn nwssagc where 1t io most needed - to young adults who thmk it Clifton Hazelwood Bradley Jr. can't happpn to them," ,;aid event organizer Samantha Wilcox ofSt•n.ltor Gravity. •with all the publicity sur­rounding treatment advanct•s, then• IS u very dangl'rous nnd growing P<'rcep­t10n that HIV 1s controllnbl!• and for some ('Ven curable We havl' to courter this perception or we stand to :ose !mother gt•rwrat10n to this dis­ease For mon 111form.1t10n, call 713 521 8494. Benefit: More than $4. 100 was raised for the Houston Buyers Club durrng a benefit at Bnck's II on Sept 6. orgamzers said Fred Walters (left), executive dtrector of the Buyers Club. accepts the proceeds from Don Giii of Don Gill Productions. which orgamzed the event, along wrth Buddy Buckley The Buyers Club pro­vides nutrrt1onal supplements at whole­sale prices to assist people with chrome illnesses. such as AIDS. Birthday bash planned for state House member Retired Army Col Margan•tht• Cammcrmcyer, om• of a handful of openly lesbian cund1datt•s for Conb'T('"s, is sch('dul<•d to appear at the annual birth­day hash for state Rc.p. Debra Dan burg (D Houston I !Ji strict 137 •ncludes part8 of hN1vtly gay :\lontrosc. State House 8peuk<•r Tom t.nncy 1s ulso scheduled to attend. The Sept 24 event will hi' held at Amazon 2050 AD., :J7.1!i Cammermeyer: Congressional can­didate to VIS/I Houston Sept. 24 Grc<•nbriar at 6: :JO p.m. For morn informatron. mll 71:!-523-3272. ' OBITUARY Clifton Bradley Hazelwood ,Jr, rlll'd on Sept. 12 from com­plicat1ons due to AIDS. lfo was 36 1 A nntive of Fort Dix, New ,Jersey, llazl'lwood, a thespian, art promot(·r and volunteer. hv<'d in Houston for 10 years. IIP was best known for his 111volvement in the nrts and Day Without ArVWorld AIDS Day. Chnon 1s surviwd by partner Robert Barber; grandmother Ethd G 'lbompson of Panama; father Clifton B. Hazelwood Sr ol San Antomo; and siblmi,'S the Rev. Carmen Sullemun-Stubbs of X cw York City, Js.uno A I fowlwood of Clear Lake. James n. Hazlewood of San Diego. and :\farin Wilhan1s of San Antonio. In heu of flowers, donat10ns arc accepted 'It The Center for AIDS, P 0. Ilox 66306. Houston. 'Ihas 77266. A memorwl scn•ice will he p/cinned at Rothko Chapel. For mor~ 111forma­tio11, call 7 l:J·.52?.1:1219. In This Issue Local News Voices & Echoes Book Review page 2A-7A pages 19A-20A page 28 NaUonal News Classlfleds Horoscope page 11A-14A pages 118-128, page 78 148 nexolouv Out on lhe Bavou Scene & Heard page 16A pages 18-98 page 108 2 A SEPTEIVIBEFI 1 1 1 9 9 0 treat ng Will what makes sense I t 0 d a y stm make sense It 0 m 0 rr 0 W? --=····----··•k •••••• As we enter a new era in the treatment of HIV infection, the focus is shifting toward managing the disease over the long term . While early, aggressive therapy with a combination of potent antiretrovirals makes sense virologically, it poses serious questions for patients living with the disease. Many who do well initially on combination therapy find themselves unable to tolerate treatment or adhere to rigorous schedules. Or the virus grows resistant to available drugs. Some answers will come from new, potent therapies that are more convenient to take, easier to tolerate, and can be readily combined with other antiretroviral drugs. But new therapies will raise other questions: Which drugs to use first? Which will give maximum response up front, yet still preserve future options? And will those future options be potent enough to give patients a "second" first chance? Glaxo Wellcome is committed to developing new long­term strategies, as well as new therapies, for clinicians and patients alike. Together, we can continue to change the way people think about treating HIV... today and tomorrow. Glaxo Wellcome HIV A d1v1, ,, ..11 G1axu Wt:n\.Ufllt'" 1ni.; Rt><"Jrcn lrranglt Park. NC 27709 Y\i('.b Sitt WW~ gliixowclk::ome..com C1998 Glaxo Wellcome Inc. PAGE 3A T All nghts reserved . HIV002RO June 1998 s E p T E · "" B E R ., B ., 61 a a RETIRE/ from page 1A Heterosexuals can turn to a variety of retirement communities - groups of houses, apartments and nursing home facilities that offer aging people the services they need as they grow older - but until recently, nothing like that has existed for older gays and lesbians. Traditional communities and their staffs may not be sensitive to gay and lc,bian issues, and they certainly aren't likely to encourage residents to be open and honest about their onen­tatJon. In addition, seniors, like every­one else, often want to be around oth­ers who arc like them. Several organizations are now work· ing to create retirement centers for our often-overlooked elders. Our own town "We've all sat with friends and talked about what we arc going to do when we get older," said Peter Lundberg, a San Francisco-based financial planner who is planning two communities called Our Town in California. Lundberg 1s also considering two options for the design of the community. One would be made up Lundberg: of urban residen· Planning two t1al buildings retlfement commu-w1th an incorpo· nit1es m Cahfom1a rated a.'sisted·liV· for gays. lesbians mg facility and would be either newly built or a renovation of an ex1"t­mg property. The other would be more of a resort· like community with a commercial core and a pedestrian-oriented square. Townhouses and detached homes would radiate from this central bus1· ness area. Balconies and patios would overlook the act1V1ty. But Lundberg said it could be five years or more before one of his project:; 1s ready for use. "The development process is a very lengthy and llme-consum1Dg one," he said. California regulations require zoning and environmental reviews, among other th1Dgs lfo said the pro· JCCt could be accelerated tf existing fac:ht1es are found that can be con­verted. Aging gays respond More than 1,200 people have responded to Lundberg's survey to detcrmlDe the exact needs withlD the community. From that 1Dput, he has developed some conclusions about what gays and lesbians considering retirement want. He 1s not surpnsed to find that although most want a community that is gay developed and gay managed, some don't want an exclusively gay retirement community - more than 90 percent of the people he surveyed do not want an exclusrvely gay com­munity. He says this is probably because of the "Stonewall factor.• Seniors who grew up before the not at Stonewall Inn that began the openness of the lesbian and gay nghts movement are less likely to be out than those who have grown up smce. L1v1Dg m an all gay retirement community would mean everyone would know they are gay. In addition, <ome older people who grew up in times when there was no gay community enjoy 1Dteract1on with straight people Surveys have also shown that many seniors would prefer a community that also 1Dcludes younger pt.'Ople. Lundberg said that while our com­munity, like society as a whole does COV E R STORY Home sweet home: Retlfed psychology professor 811/ Laing has invested some $650.000 ma Palmetto, Flonda retlfement community for gays and lesbians. The three­phase. 22 acre pro1ect already lf>eludes five homes. sometimes discriminate against its older members, gays and lesbians have a unique perspective on end-of­life issues. "Within the general population, there 1s a great deal of denial about the agmg and dying process," he said. "In contrast. the gay population has dealt with death. Many of us have been caretakers for friends in their dymg process." That means that, ID general, gays and lesbians have faced the issues of failing health and ag1Dg at an earlier age. "Younger gay populatioM - age 45 to 55 - overwhelmingly embrace hav1Dg assisted living and nursing home facilities. They're concerned about who wtll be there for them dur­ing this inevitable life process," he s1ud. Under construction Lundberg was inspired to begin worklDg to create Our Town about five years ago when he read a brief para­graph in the Wall Street Journal about Bill La1Dg, a Florida man who was already working to create a gay and lesbian retirement community. La1Dg, a retired psychology profes­sor. recently opened the Palms of Manasota. He has invested about $650,000 of his own money, partly inherited from an aunt. Work has now started on the fifth home of the three· phase project. Plans call for the com· munity to accommodate 240 people on 22 acres. "I had planned to have ten homes in by the first of the year, and so far we're on <chedule," Laing said. "We're just domg great. The sites are finished and ready for more homes." Phase one of Laing's project calls for 21 homes built upon purchase and designed pnmanly for younger retirees. Later, phase two will include 44 apartments, and phase three will be an assisted-living facility that can accommodate 45 people. Associating retiring gays In California, Veronica St. Claire and her partner Mary Thorndal began the Gay and Lesbian Association of Retiring Persons (GLARPJ two and a half years ago as the gay version of the American Association of Retired Persons, a powerful group that offers con­sumer discounts for older people and 1s a strong lob­bylDg force ID gov­ernment. GLARP now has more than 1,000 Thomdal: Helped start the Gay and Lesboan AssoaatJOn ol Rebnng Persons. wfllCh lllCludes more than 1.000 members members, and, ID response to its mem­bers, the organization is focusing on creating a retirement facility. St. Claire said that many people she has encountered since co-founding GLARP are people in their 40s and 50s who are con-cerned about growing older, especially given the current con­servative shift in the political cli­mate and the mix­ing of religious zealots with con­servative politi­cians. They also St. Claire: want a community Members of where thev can national group m feel safe. · G L A R p s Texas want thelf research, hkc own retlfement Lundberg's, shows community that the communi-ty should not be 100 percent gay. In addition, St. Claire said many gay and lesbian people are concerned about their future since they don't have children or relationships with their family. "The whole idea is that when mom starts to feel she can't take care of the house anymore, then the kids make the decisions about what will happ<•n to her," she said. But people with no children arc afraid no one will be there to make the decisions for them, and thev would rather be in control of their ow~ fate anyway, she said. St. Claire and Thorndal are consid­ering a project ID Cathedral City, near Palm Springs, among other locations m California. More options Other options for gay and lesbian retirees are developing, too. St. Claire says that while they are focusing on creating a community in California first, they have already been approached by a west Texas landowner. And most of the organiza· tion's Texas members say they are not planning to leave the Lone Star State when they retire. "We have a good number of Texan members and they all want to retire in Texas, so there will certainly be some­th1Dg happening there in the future smce there is that amount of interest," St. Claire said Other retirement communities are planned ID Boston, Prov1Dcetown and New York City, as well as add1t1~nal projects ID California and Florida Some lesbian seniors are finding a home in Apache Junction, Arizona. Amsterdam Holland has seven one­bedroom. c1t;-subsidized apartme!'ts for older gays and lesbians, accord1Dg to Lundberg, that adjOID an assisted. living facility. Those . apartments already have a long wrut1Dg hst. Other European options also exist. OLD/ from page 1A OLOC's brochure says. "We refute the lie that it is shameful to be an old les­bian." "We name ourselves old lesbians because we no longer will accommodate language that implic.; ID any way that old means inferior," the brochure contin­ues. "We call ourselves old with pride. In doing so, we challenge the stereotypes directly. Thus, we empower and change ourselves, each other and the world.• OLOC publishes a quarterly newslet­ter available by subscription. Membership is limited to lesbians age 60 and over, although they have supporters who are younger, Eversmeyer said. The group also publishes a book called "Facilitator's Handbook: Confronting AgeL'm for Lesbians 60 and Over" The group's next conforcnce is in San Francisco in the summer of 1999. Eversmeyer said the group wants to change the belief within the lesbian community that young is good and old is bad She says that might help soci­ety mirror others around the world. "We're the only c1v1lized culture ID the world that doesn't revere old peo­ple," Eversmeyer said. For more i11formatwn about Old Lesbians Organizing for Change, write P.O. Box 980422, Houston, Thxas 77089. Resources Our Town 415-566-4100 www.ourtownvillag1·s.com P alms of Ma na sota 941-722-5858 www.prideworks.com/palms.htm Gay a n d Lesbia n A~soc i ation of Retiring P e l"90n• 310-966-1500 www.glarp.org Ame rican Soci<'ty on Aging's Lesbia n and Gay Aging Issues Network www.asag1Dg org/lga1D.html Pride Senior Network www.pndcspmor.org Other communities Herl.and Ot•v<'lopment 212-989-3573 ( Planmng a commumty fo lesbian seniors ) Metroplitan Community Homes Betty Ped e r son P.O. Box 642153 San Francisco, Calif. 94109 (Non-profit organ1zat1011 planmng to build affordable senior housing 10 northern California.) Rainbow Garde n s Assis ted Living Homes 970-385-4090 www.rainbow-gardens.com (A planned assisted-living community.) The Resort on Car efree Boulevard Fort Meyers, Fla. 800-326-0364 www.resortoncb.com (A vacation and n·ltrement community for lesbians. Now open. Homes und RV sites for sale and rental. Clubhouse, tennis courts, putt1Dg greens and lakes.) Wo rld's Edge Springs Edneyv1lle, N C. 704-68.5-9673 A hundred wooded acres divided 1Dto 10 acre lots. Tennis court and sw1mnung pool.) --=····--------~ ...... P A G E 4 A SEPTEMBER 1 a 1 a a a --=··•••¥M•-•4' zfil TM abacavir sulfate ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Expanded Access Program A Special Announcemttnt If you have HIV disease and aro unable to tolerate for People with HIV or ar& fa1 1ng to r&spond to your current treatment, and Their Physicians you may be eligible for early access to Ziagen (formerly known as 1592). ···-- Zlagen is a new 1nvestigati0nal guanOSJne nucleoslde analogue for use in combination therapy for the treatment of HIV 1ntect10n Entry requirements: You must be over tho age of 13 and understand and prnVlde written informed consent If you are under age 18, a parent or legal guardian must a1so give wr tten informed consent A separate program for c:h1ldreP 13 years of ag£'1 or less 1-; also available For more infonnation about part1C1pating Hl this progrJITl, please contact your phyS1Clan or call the to& free number below. CALL 1-800-270-0425 or visit our Web site at www.treathlv.com/zlagen Expanded Access Program for Ziagen Glaxo Wellcome HIV P A G E 5 A S E P T c; IVI B E A "1 B "1 0 0 B L 0 C A L SHELTER/1rompage 1A roof. Some 300 residents have lived in the 3,500-square-foot shelter since 1t opened in August 1994, Locklin said. The AIDS Housing Coalition of Houston sponsors the house "This is three years of hard work down the tubes," Locklin said Media covemge of the damage has already brought in a $.~00 donation, which covered the cost of covering the exposed damage, he said The facility provides gay-positive trans1t1onal housing and helps resi­dents locate assistance and mentor· ing, Locklin said. "Everyone can come here and be comfortable. The alternative,; aren't very pretty," he said. "We are a helping hand, not a hand-out." The HIV-pos1t1ve residenL' are home­less and often face threats and discnm­ination in other city sheltcn;, Locklin said. ResidcnL' pay some cost.>, though much of the facility's operational tab is funded through pnvnte granL,, stn.oet fmn; nnd rummage sales. "We did this the hard way­w1th Jots of elbow grease," Lockl.:n said. It may take several weeks for the shelter to finish repairs and reopen, he s:ud. •our doors are shut for right now. Th<" bottom line is we are going to need money to fix this crisis,• Locklin said. For more informatwn about TLC H1Juse, call 7/:J-521·16/J. We care about your health and your financial health if you ore HIV+ and considering selling your life U insuronce policy, consider this .. M. lrya1 Free11a1 ,...,cwo .. - A:. one of the oldest and most knowledgeable V1o!icol settlement brokers, we hove the experience to get you the highest cash settlement possible for your life insurance through a proven competitive bidding process We work for you, not the buyer. We ore your advocate. ii' One quid, simple opplicolion. It No cost or obligation at any 6me. * Up to 85% of lace value. * Confidential1ty, nCYW and always *' Moy qualify up to 1,000 kells. * Mey be tax.free - ask us. Rttum your compl<ttd appiabon Ind ~c.,.. 1 fTtt VICkot.pe: Exercises for ~withHIV =-=.:- by~ WiUr HIY. * Free brochure 14 Questions You Must Ask Before Selling Your Life Insurance Policy 1t All policies: group (employer or association), individual (term, whole life, universoQ, FEGJ!,_ SGL . VGU and policies less tho1 two years old. =BENEFITS iie.~AMERICA 100-777-1171 www.benefitsamerica.com Always gay aumt'd and opera/rd llm>bn: Yim<"3I A.saacialion '" Amrnca --=·-·----·•f! ....... P A G E HATE/ from pago lA The cards como on the heels of a shght increase in reported hate crimes for the first six months of 1998, despite an eight perct•nt drop m over­all violent crime in Houston Police reported 20 cnmes motivated by race, religion, disability, ethnicity or sexual orientation during the first half of the year, compared to 16 during the same penod last year. Four of the 20 hat(' crimes targeted gays and lesbians, compared to five last year oflicmls said. Hut even with small numbers of reported hate crimes, nct1v1sts and counselors have said most go unreported. And violent attacks are still common in Houston, they said In Apnl • .\tayor Lee Brown opened a 24-hour hotline (713-308-87371, appointed a hate cnmes coordinator and pledged more training for the city's police force to mcn•ase aware· ness about hate crimes. Because of the effort and the hot­line reports of hate cnmes have increased 13 percent, Eisenman said "We arc trying to elevate that reporting," he said. Officials want pohce oflicers to refer to the blue card when they respond to calls and write incident reports, us well ns hand tht•m out to victims, Eisenman sa1Cl. The cards define a hate cnmc and list six tPlephonc num­bers as resourc<'S, Often, police or victims don't realize a cnme should be classified as a hnte cnmc or v1::t1ms nre afraid to rcvc:1l their sexual oncntat1on to nuthor1t1es, oflioals said. The blue card should help remedy that, Eisenman said. The tip card• arc .A.c..a.p ulco 'hOltlltclslhw#i;lrl Coalinllol Plaio "°'"*" ColiodoleodiAmidco fiesta Ar11ri<001 Cosio Club Acopulco Aw H 4e1 .. trn1 Ai''•tts 3 MIGHll $369 $349 S31S S3S9 Slit SJ79 $419 $369 S40S Fort Lauderdale Holiday Inn by !lw lea IOlllOdo lea Cluli lheniJon 'llnho (~ppor Boodi IHorl 'lmkM Trodor lto<h lt\orl A1111C .. li11t1110IA1tlilts 3 MIGHll 4 MIGHTI S32S S3SS $339 $369 $379 S42S S369 Sm Cozumel 3 MIGHrs 4 MIGHTs Fio!lo .lmric4l10 Conml Itel fies!QIM l'layoAill! Ployo !11 Glori• 1ur .. c111:t1t11111Airfiln American Expreu Travel Ct Town & Country Mall 713.365.6266 Braeswood Travel 713.721.4000 Uniglobe Ultomole Travel 713.669.1171 Trovelfesl 713.522.2828 Travel the World 713.682.4972 printed in English, Spanish, Chinese, Korean and Vietnamese. "This information can go to every· body. We want to get it in everybody's hands," Eisenman snid Victims of hate crimes or witness­es can anonymously rt•port informn· hon to police though the hotline, he said. "Underreporting of hate cnmt" tra­ditionally has been a problem that we are continuing to addres~. HPD has a 'zero tolerance' regarding all offonses which are mot1vakd by bias or pnju· dice," Eisenman said. The slight increase in hate cnmes comes as local activists and pohti· Clllns are nttl'mpting to jump·start grassroots support for the Hate Crimes Prevention Act, legislation stalled in Congress that would expand ft·dcral hate crimes statute to offenses based on sexual orientation and disability. Parker and Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee t-alled for passng<' of the measure during a ,July 2!) town hall meeting. Current f<·deral law applies only to cnmes mollvatt'd by race, color, rt•h· gion or natwnal ongin and instances in which the victim is taking part in one of six fodcrally-prott•fled 11ctiv1 tie:-;. such as voting. That sometimes ties the hnnds of federal prosecutors and kl'eps them from fighting some oft ht• most brutal hate crimes, officials said. In a July 9 hearing, Houston City Counolman Jew Don BonPy and state Sen. Rodney Ellis called on Texas leg 1slntors to strengthen stnte Jaw to include prolt•ct1on for gnys and tough<-r penalties for huh• cruncs when they rt'lurn to session in January. A;re1Ct1h1t111IA11l11tf Puerto Vallarta Conlinenlol Plozo Vollo110 $379 S41S V.los Yollorta sm S42S S41S S46S S42S S42S' 3 MIGHTS 4 NIGHTS S36S S40S S3S9 S40S S32S $349 11,... .. ,._ ...... _____ .... """'" .. .....i ....... -.-........ .....,.., ___ -v-.--1· ..... ...w...... .... 1..o..1....-.1..1.- --i.-..1.o..o..1....,.......,. ..... .. .. ,r..i.... ._... ...... . - .... -Sll«lloll ....... .. ~ ... ----....... . -•"•"-""-....-:..,. B A SEPTE ivtBER 1 B 1 B B B L 0 C A L Police improve response to domestic violence case Killing of gay waiter in March prompted changes by MATTHEW A. HENNIE The appointment of Houston's first family violence coordinator this week completes a months-long push by city officials to improve its response to the 30,000 cases of domestic violence reported each year_ Arthuryne Dailey, a former manage­ment analyst in the Department of Health and Human Services, will help coordinate city efforts in domestic vio­lence and work with the Houston Police Department, which was severe­ly criticized earlier this year for its handling of a cas1• that 1•nd1•d in a murdcr-sui· c1de on Montrose Boulevard. In late March, th!' estranged boyfriend of Marc Daniel Kajs, a 28- year-old waiter, chased him down outside a trendy Montrose r1•stnu Bradford: New rant and shot him before com milting suicide. Hours before the killing, Kajs told police he was being threatened pos1t1on will provide comprehensive approach to police hand/mg of domes· lie violence cases Family members say he was turned away by oOicers; pohce argue they fil!'d a report and warn1•d Kajs to avoid his boyfrl(•nd. The murd<•r-suicide prompted an internal review by Police Chief C.O. Bradford, who later proposed decen­tralizing the family vwlence unit by opening substations, making officers available 24-hours-a-day, hiring a domestic violence coordinator and increasing sensitivity training. Dailey's appointment by Mayor Lee Brown on Monday completed the last step in revamping the police depart­ment's approach to domestic violence cases, which leads to about 60 homi­cides a year, some 20 percent of Houston's total. "There are many, many resources out there, but one of the problems is people don't know about them." Dailey said. Through the Harns County Domestic Violence Coordinating Council, comprised of law enforc1~ ment, pro~ecutors, victim advoca.tes and service provid(•rs, Dailey wants to better coordinate and increase com­munity outreach. Members of some communitws . such as gays and lesbians, may need better representation on the council, sh(1 said. About 1,900 of the city's 30,000 domes tic violl•nct• cases each year an• saml"-' sex, though that could mean a boyfr1md attacking his gay mate, a mother bt,at­ing her dau!(hter or a son striking his father. Police don't track domestic vio­lence by sexual orientation. "If then• is no repn•sentation from the gay and lesbian community, I will make every effort to ensure that then• 1s," Dailey said. The council may also boost its tics with religious groups, business sector and media to help increase awareness, she said. "I want to establish links betw1•en tho~u.· 1,rroups to makt• sure (•vt.·ryone knows what 1s available. We'll bt, trying Out IJ'f <Jhe Sea "A Unique Bed and Breakfast" HOSTS JERRY REITZ & JIM WINSLETI Fall & Winter Special 3 Days. 2 Nights 2 Breakfa\t.\ ancl an eleHcll11 clinne1 2 p<'r~on~ $200.00 For Reservations and Addilionol lnlormotion, Coll 1.888.522.5926 Visa and Moster Cord Accepted http://www.oulbytheseo.com 2134 VISTA DRIVE P.O.Box 2046• Crystal Beach, TX 77650 The best in history. Past Out tJ1rHJJJ(] ~111 aJJ iffili!l HOUSTON '3 VOIC'~ MM#M.MIM#MM.Mj#! ···-- P A G E 'There are many, many resources out there, but one of the problems is people don t know about them. I want to establish links between those groups to make sure everyone knows what is available. We 'fl be trying to involve more people. ' to involve more p<'<>plc," Dailey said. In decentralizing the policl' depart­ml'nt's family violt.•nce unit, victims can now go to three substations for help - Central at 1200 Travis, North at 9455 W. Montgomery and South at 8300 Mykawa. The Central substation will operate 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. daily; the other two substations are open 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. • It provides gr<'ater accessibility to v1ct11ns when they come in for service," smd Lt. Tum Roman, commander of the family violence unit. "I would hope we have more p<>ople coming in.• Op<·ning one of the substations seven days a week meets a pkodge Bradti>rd made in June wh1•n he announct.od the results of th<> int<•mat review to about thn'<'-dozen gays and lesbians during a me<•ting of the Houston Gay and Lesbian Political Caucus. The city's 5,300 police officers will also receive increaeed sensitivity training and will hear from domestic v1ol<•nce victims to h<>lp them better und<'rstand how to respond and write more thorough incident reports. Patrol officers are also provided . . . . . . . . . . . . . Smooth Sunday Brunch E njoy exquisilt culinary crealions at thr Adam's Mark Hotel including made-t!Hlrder omelets, homemade paslries, savory stafood, selections mouth-watering ins1a, stasonal salads. delectable entr~. plus an unbelim~ array of our finest desstrts. Then sit back. relax, sip champagne while listening to 10me of Houston's finest jazz musicians. Every Sunday, 10:30 am-2:00 pm Adults $22.50; Seniors $20.50 Children 5-11 $12.50; Under 5 free Reservations Recommended 713-978-3326 the hotel of houst.on ~ Bnarpark Drnt al ll'estheunu, HoUltoo,Tem77042 • (i13)978-7-100 -Arthuryne Dailey with mformat1on about shelters and counseling centers for domestic vio­lence victims, mcludmg ones designed for gays and lesb1arn<, Bradford said. Police officials srud in July that offi­cers sometimes don't und<>rstand how gay mal"" can become victims of domes­tic violence, though attitude- among rank and file officers are improving. "Ms. Dailey will be able to assist in providing a comprehensive approach in how we can better deal with domes­tic violence and come up with work­able solutions to reduce these types of acts," Bradford smd. The pohe<• chief has also added seven positions to th<> family violence unit, increasing personnel to 53. More staff could be added after offioals review changes to the unit in January, Roman said. If more v1ct1ms seek help and report violence, the department may need additional staff. he said. "We will look at getting three months under our belt so we can make an asses~menL That w11I g1ve us a good a bihty to a n a lyzt• what impad this ha.• had and what direction W<' need to go: Roman "llid. 7 A SEPTE IVI BEA '1 B '1998 CENTER CITY MEDICAL l CHURCH CALENDAR Cabe Michael Owens, M.D., Ph.D. Center City Medical is the newest Montrose-based General Practice offlce. We art' small enough to offer personalized service to our clients, and art' proud to serve our diverse community. I-if. art' open 9am lo 9pm AfoJJday through Friday. Coumelor available Thursdays 6pm to 9pm or by appoiJJlment. • General Practice Medicine • HIV Testing •Gay & Lesbian Health Maintenance • Well Woman/Well Man Exam • Pain Management • Sexual dysfunction & impotence counseling •Se habla espariol •ASL • Uninsured respected • Walk-Ins Welcome • House Calls available for established clients. • On call 24 Hours, 365 Days ~/sit our flt'W K t'b silt' at http:/J "*i+-<t'11terri~ymttlica/.com for mrdica/ information &· confidential VISA• M•sterCard" American Expre11• Pulse• Metropolitan Community Church of the Resurrection Experience God's Unconditional Love ..J.o.i.n. O..n.e. .o.f. O..u.r. H...O....M...E... G..r.o.u.p.s. H.O M.E Groups, Homes Open for Ministry and Encouragement) meet for prayer, discussion. and study, tn private homes and at the church. All groups are open to the community. Area Locations of Current Groups: East and West Houston Near Northwest Houston (290/Hollister Area) Magnolia/Tomball Old Sixth Ward (Decatur Street) Deer Park/Pasadena/Pearland Heights/Montrose Bellaire/Beltway Galveston/Clear Lake/Beaumont Some groups are open to specific individuals (female couples. male couples, the leather community, and Spanish speakers) For more information or to locate a group in your area, call Rev. Ralph Lasher at 713-861 -9149. Houston's Inclusive Community of Spirit! Spiritual Uplift Service: Wednesdays 7 PM Decatur St. H.0.:\1.E. Group: Wednesdays 7:30 PM Worship Services: Sundays 9 AM & 11 AM Visit our web page at www.mccr-ltou.com for the most current schedule of upcoming events! 713-861-9149 1919 Decatur, Houston, Texas 77007 Wasl1itigton ~ White St. (between Studemont and Houston Ave.) HOUSTON VOICE P A G C Friday, September 18 • Communion and Prayrr Sforv1ce- at 10:00 am: at the Kolbe Projt"ct. 713·522-8182. • Thr Churd1 of Good Life on the lntt-r11et. htt fW14W.syncretlsLoq,Vchurch.htm Saturday, September 19 • TI1t" Church of Good lJfr. on the Internet, http://v.."WWsyncretlst.org/church htm Sunday, September 20 • (hutch of the X1 Apostl"" Anj:llc.m Rite Old CalholJc Chu l.;h, ~·oly Comrm nlon IC 10 .1m at ~9 Westhelm 713/605 7903 • Jh. Jy Rite' Euchanst I J;t 00 un, Holy RJtc Euch.1rlst II 9.00 ;;un~ Chon! Eud1Misl 11 :00 am 01 St St("pht"rfs F.pisoopal Ch11rd1, I ROS \\ Alabama 713 528 {,(;65 • Ma a.1.1tha Ft"llowshlp Metropolll<m Church Service .. Pre:ichln~ the Cosper nt 11 am 713 528·67"'6 • MCC R Worship ~crs 'I 00 & 11 00 am 713 llGI 111·19 • Grace Luthrran Clrnrd1-5tmtfay sd10ol [or all ages nt 9:30 am Worship &rvlce at I 0:30 am 713 528 3269 • First Unitarian Unlvrrsaltst Church Sunday Services al 9 30 am nnd 11 lO am 713 526-5200 ces at 5.30 pm lJ1~nlty lfiur.. 7 lJ· H8)2J72 • Co11un111111y Gosp<"I Pr.1isc and Worship 'l""'-'h 11l 11 00 am Surnt.w Sc-11001 for chll ·r ... vt-nlng &n1cr .11 7 ·pm. 4305 Lillian 713-SHO 9235 Catch them H www.commu nUygospc org • Houston Mission Church Worshtr servttt ill 10 30 am 713.J'):l9 8225 • (~cnanl B:tptlst Churc..._ \Vorshlp SC'rvtC't' • 30 pm and educ.111011 horn 1t ,i:OO pm 71 1 G68 Rd:lO. • Ber1ng ~e-mor1al lnlted Methodist Chc:-ch Worshfp Sr'l"Vicc 10 -;o un. Seekt·rs cfass 9 15 •m 7 3526·1017 • MCCR >iandbcll Choir iu,hearsal •l 7{l() m 7 3 801 (Jl49 • Unltart in Fellowship of c .. 1Jveston <A>unty -102 Church St 111 Galveston S1111dav Scrvtces 1t 10:30 am wc<·kly 4(1.J 7fi5-8.:\30 • ... he C .. urch of Good L&fe on the lntrrnct. ~ KOLBE ~ - PROJECT Momb~. September '.!l Eucharist 7·-\0pm Tuesdav. September 23 lleahng Serv11 ·es • 8pm Fndav '>eptembcr 25 :O.lorning Prayer • I Oam .\lovie Nite • "'pm "The Lmng End' offtnn~ peace and ~c:om.:1 !.uion co tho'e ahtnoued from Chu rc.:h a.n<l/or famil) Kolbe Praver Line 713-861-1844 PH (71 ))!!61-1800 FX fll3) 861-"212 1030 Hraghts Blvd. • Howton. TX 7700~ http://v..ww _ ~ynC'r("tlst.orrJchurc·h .htm • F'atth and Hope Frllow~hlp Sf:-J'\1rc nt 11 :00 am 713·520~78·17 Monday, September 21 • Catholic M.1ss at 7· JO pm at the Kolbe Project. 713 861-1'300 Tuesday, September 22 • MCCR: Em1>owM mtnt for Lh111,L! sup1>0r' gro11p & J'Dt Jrn-k dinner at G:OO pm. Gloryla11d r;n.._wmble at 6 00 pm Orc-hcstra rehersa1al730 pm 713 86 <J149. • M :-an • a ~cllov.-shtp MCC h.1s ~roups th.at m~t in c.1ch rthe~ home fur 1 Ume of fcJlowshlp. sharing God's \!.'Ord 11nd prayer: C.111 for U1r loc,1Uon In your .u~ 713 528· 675U. • Tht" Churd1 or Coocl Life Oil tilt' lntt-nwf http·/ /W!Av,; synrrctlst rg/c hurc-11.111111 Wednesday, SePtember 23 •Hr.ht Eucharist Rilt· II 12 Noori 11 St Stc1;htn's F.p1sco1>.1I Churd1, 180!> W Alabama 11:1 !l2H-hG65. • MCCR Blhh· Study 7<\0 pm 71:\·R(i1 n 149 • \\orshlp &Mee 7 IQ pm at f,1Jth amt llupc Fellowship 713 ~20·7847 • The Church 0£ Good Ufc on the lntnnct http://www.syncrellst.orj!/ch\Jrch.htm • M.uan.atha Fd~htp MCC' has groups that meet In each 0U1e-r-s honll' £or ;:1 time of lf'llow­shtp. sharing CriM l's word. amt pr.tyN. C .. 111 tor U1e location 111 your .m~ 713-528 U75fi Thursday, September 24 • L:ibfc Study 7·00 pm at f"illh met llope ~ .. llowshlp 713 520 7847 • Choir Prac'lct• ii lo11111111nlly (iospC'l (LlO pm 71 J·880 ll:l.J5 or WW\\' c: 11111Hlllll\.' gospel.or~ - Choir Pr<1ctlce at G 10 pm M1dWttk SelV'ce at < onummt:y Gospel 7 JO pm 711 880 9235 or wv.-w communllygospcl org • TI1e Church of Good Ufc on the Jnl(·rnet http //www &yrcn•tlst.or~/rh11rrh ht111 I{ IJOU U'fHll {Ill ('l't·nt lht('(J Ill tltis ~w!"IIOll. please cull ( urr.Jh1n lfo//of.'Tts rlf 113 !>2'1-8 190 l>y J 2 Noon Momla11s. yod~v-e.r )'IJl//fl) ctJHU- rlrare­t/ te, Lo~ EJCfN!"'~ !;cn·i11g r/11 Lav, Lcsb1a11, 81 .\cxual CIJ11m111111ry <!fCatl1olia a11d Jrimd< Stmcts Saturdays "JO pm Tra.l111011a/ Mall ~ In the lreiglrts 1307 Yale, mite H • 713-880-2872 IMAGE C3 ! f!1 ~I J ;[3 HTEllllONI • IHOE IEPlll • llllHEI IUEOE "WE FIGHT DIRTY" MON - FRI 7 AM 7 PM · SAT · 8 AM 5 PM One Doy Service, Mon Sat in by 9:30am, ready by 4 :30pm All Cleaning Performed on Site 3407 Monlro .e Blvd., Sle B4 Houston 77006 713.527.0880 8 A SC P TE MB E A 1 a 1 a a a RESTORING LEAN BODY MASS JUST GOT A SHOT IN THE ARM SEROSTIM combats the loss of lean bo~ mass in WC!YS other treatments don't: I ROSTIM '' mdicakd for the trcJtment of .... II>S wa\tmg or ca1..hex1J. in wmb1nat1on with anti\·iral therapy, ha~L·d on analy ... 1 ... of mttrmeJiall" cfftds n studits up to 12 wctks duration. You mar know that WJ\ling rohs a per>on of lean musde and org.in mass, •nJ ph)-su:al pcrformanct But J1J you know that it ldn strike an)·onc with HI\? At ony 1imc1 Fven while )liur weight remains adding fat to inur body whik >till l"'ing k.in bodrmassol R~IJ. If you arc cxpenencmg wast :lg, d~uss with \OOr dtl("tor "'hcther SEROST I human &f'O"'lh ~c;-monr might be nght for )OU. ~ERO\ mt rebuilds l H~l and 1mprovr, phi~1cal p<rfornan« wlnle rtdu<1ng body fat Studi<> show that w11hout the I BM you nrol. rou could hei.:ome \\t-akc:r.gct ,jck more: vlten anJ Illa} not hw a ... long as people who arc not !ming kan body ma~!"; althou~h thr dinkal Mgruficancc of treatmc.11t mJu(nl \n·ight gain and inac:a'ling 1.R.\.I ha\'I." O(ll Pec:n t~l.ihlis,ht-<l. Physic JI pc:rforman(e muS4.:lc: pt:rformanct.' may Jt:dme, probably due to ini:rc.i~ed tiv,,ue fulln~.,. whlch soml·timts occur' with growth horm<me. Suhj«tivc:a~se,,mcnt of performance was mea5Ured in a nint-point queMionnam.· \EROSTIM showed '1gnifh.ant 1mpn.J\'ement~ on two pomts change m appca.ranci: and owraU benefit of therapy while roulb of the other mea.,urcs ¥it'rt inrorh1. . uc;.1w, Pati~t~ who contmue to lose weight m thdr fi"t two weeks of therapy >hould b.: reevaluatoo. (Serono) SI.RebilM b.n't a steroid. an a~Jtc stimulant or nurnt t0nal ... upplemerit It's a rompktcly """ anaboli< ( LBM building) and ant1catabolk ( nhib1ts LBM break down' titatment that incmi."" L~I and 1mpM'tS phj~ical J><-rlormance by mt<r­oKtmg" 1th a varirty of ccll types. Ont way 10 know for .sutt 1f your tre:nment has re-.tored LB~t 1> to ask \'OUT do<to,..bour BIA BK>cl"'-"trk:d ln~ Analpis. BIA mea<ur<> body comp<»1tion so manges in LB\! un b< monitor<d. I takes 1ust 5 nmutcs and " ,-ompl<tdy pamle.s. If your phi~1e:un <annot provide BL\ ttstmg, ask hun/lr to catl S<rono at 800-714-!437 and a fl"J'l<S<lllatl\T wul h<lp your phys•< ~n gam •«<SS to a BIA system on ioor behalf. Ptoplc on SIROST 'I may ohsa-ve •idc dl«-U. In cluu,al trials, p.ttl<tlts treat<d with IERO'T M not1<<d muscle and )Omt soreness (53 7% vs ~J.J'lb for pla<ebo) and swdling m th< hands and frtt (27 l% <<. !.~ lor plac<boJ. Phy'.'lidan!I ratcd thoe ~ymptoms as mdd·to--moderate. and m roo:-t ca.-.es they will ~ub~ide \\·1th lOnllnlk-d tm.ttment. Hypcrglylmtia m~· occur in HI\' mfectcd individuals Jul' to a variety of reason. ... 1.il ROST1M use \'ia .... av·•octated \\-1th a min· imal increa..., of mean bhxl glucose: concentrallon. Al>O. SEROSTl~t must b< u>ed along w11h an11-HI\' drug therarr. Data relatoo to mteractK>ns betwttn SEROSTL\.t and ;mu-HI\' treatment\ art not yet avaib.bl(', Wastuig is treatabl<. St't your doctor or call the SEROSTL\I Acee<> Lin< at 800-714·2437 to find out about S£ROSTIM\ solutlOll. • Th• """"" of natu,.. is th• sama of Snostim. l rostlll'l .s iln a. -'lhtM and 111nticatabobc agtnl Iha! works by lflllt1Clin0 wilh spec1ltt rectptt>rS on ii vanety of eel types For addt!lOnill intormabon about Sernst1m, P'-' 1cfttr to the bfiel IUIMQf)' on me ne~ P1Qe su1i-.a Serostim 1-..1r1111A""'"'tor-.i --=··••*¥••-•.:! ·----- P A G E 9 A s er P T e rvi e e A 1 a , 1 s s a Serostim [somatropin (rDNA origin) for injection] BRIEF SUMMARY. SEE FULL PRESCRIBING INFORMATION BEFORE PRESCRIBING. Ille lreatment al AIDS ? Serostim [somatropin (rONA origin) for in1ection] Helps Make It Po.1.1ihle (Serono) ~ Af SEROM. GI t')VP • J98 Seiono ...1borator Inc Sll 98-8113 HO U STO N V O I CE P A G E Table 2: Controlled Trials Adverse Events Ml Event SerOSI m.. ( .?05 Mw;;.; JSke •ta d!SCO lort 531 Fever 312 Increased tissue tu, gar 27 3 Diarrhea 259 Neuropathy 259 Na.~ 259 Headache 19.0 Alxlom na1 pam 171 Fatigue 171 leukopen:a 151 Albuminuna •51 Granulocylope<'. '4 Lymp.'1adenopathy '4. ~we it ng ' 4. Ar:;rexia '22 ~! 121 \'olr:' lJ 117 ~1c- rncreased 111 ia 11 l Tacllyc<oJ ! 11l Hyperglycem 102 SGPT :teased 102 OVERDOSAGE DOSAGE ANO ADMINISTRATION STABILITY AND STORAGE .......... __ __,Ser Weight Range Dose' p be n. 150) !3 l l'l3 27 .200 173 160 20.7 181 160 24 7 9 3 213 160 81 g l 81 UC 60 q3 60 60 5J ed j be storec under C A d lor In l in ~P rap n tmamma1 ce • lh <;t Wal lor lniect1on 'IDC 44007 0006-1 I ebruary 19')8 1 0 A SEPTEIVIBEA 1 a 1 a a a • Stealth agenda in Hawaii Activists avoid 'gay' to defend state's consti­tution against change by KAREN M. GOULART The nation's largt'sl gay political organization is raising more than $1 million to win the biggest gay rights victory l·v<•r, but thl• stratl'gy is to de­emphasiw homosexuality Th<' hattl1•ground is the beautiful stntl' of Hawaii, and the fight ts over a :-:ovpmber n·fon·ndum that would omc·nd that st:1lt 's mnst1tution to pn~ n·nt tht• Supreme' Court of Hawaii from forttng till' r·ccognition of same­scx mnrnai::t.·s. But tlw Human Rights Cnmpnii;n JOinl•cl by a coalitton of national and Hawaiian organtzatwns has looked at the polls and dl•cidl•d that a head· to-head fight on the issue of gay mar­riag<• ts a losing proposition. Instead, IIRC and its alli1•s an• urging Hawaii votl•rs to "prot1•ct th1•1r constitution" from ame•ndnwnt. IIRC officials maintain this unlikely strute•gy will work. Rt•cl'nt poll results SC'Cll'I to confirm that tlw organiza­tion's .. stt>alth., campaign appeals to the vot1•rs' instincts. When asked nbout snrnl'-st>x marriage. a majority of Hawaiian vott•rs showed disap­proval. But wh1·n llawa11nns were asked if they would want to change their con­st1tutton - tlw sll'p n·quin·d to ban smrn.•·scx marriage a majority said no. "Tlw polls show that voters arp opposc•d to sanw·!'l'X marriagt•," said David M. Smith, IIRC communica­twns director "Wht•n we start talking about Uw tSl">Ut• in lt•rms of what it dot's to llw constitution, it create~ a dtffrn•nl response ... So we are going to focus like• a last•r b<•am on those issues. So. we an• focusc·d very tightly on the messag1• of prokcting the con­stitution. That 1s stratt•gic and pur· post·ful." Smith, who's ovcrsPPing HRC's efiorts in llawa11. arknowll·dgcs the Hawaiian strate•gy is unique. •rhis ts d1·finit<•ly a ve•ry focused, vt•ry ambitious l'ffort, and it i!-> proba· bly not sonll'thrng that HRC has engag1•d in th!' past. nnd I'm not t•ntirl'i\' ,;urt• would c>ngagc m, in the futun·:· h<• S.'ltd. "I think ti ts a n•sult of th1• llRC board and staff under· standing th1• imr~•rtanct• of this issu1• and what 1s nt ~tnkt•." IA1wrn• ll!>mon·•t. an Atlanta attor­lll'Y and gay rights ndvocate who st•rvps as i;outlwrn n•gwnal co·chair of l!HC's board of governors, "'"d sh1• supports I IRC's dP<is10n to fram<• the llawn1i isstw in tPrrns of protPctmg Foley: Attorney for plamt11fs agrees with HRC strategy -Photo by Tony Cheng the state conslttutton instead of as a direct appl'tli for gay rights. "I think w1• need to b1• pragmatic about 11,· she said. "Who 1•lse ts gomg to run this campaign? Who elst• but an organization intc1 n•stt•d in assuring civil rights for gay and lesbian people is going to inVl'st the resourc1•s, both human nnd fiscal, to do it? So I'm not sure what would be• thl• alternative. "I absolutdy think 1t ts a very well researched campaign 111 terms of the polling data and diffen•nt demograph· ic groups that nrc bt'ing marhted to with difii•n•nt me:'sagl'S that wtll n»­onatc with th1•m." If th1• reforendum amendml•nt pass· 1·s. the state's legislature will have the power to make moot any decision by the Hawu11 Supn•mt1 Court in Baehr vs. Milk<'. the historic lawsuit filt>d 111 1990 by thn·1• gay couples "''eking licenses to marry. The state's high court has already lwld thnt <•xd uchng gay couples vao· lat1•s the guarantee of Pquul protection, unless tht• statl• can prove a compelling Justification for domg so. In a 1996 trial, the stat<• fml1·d. That lower court verdict in favor of the gay plamltffs is now on appeal back be•forc the Hawaii Supreme Court, which has not even •chedul1·d ornl arguments on the mat­t1• r, though 1t docs not always do so. "Obviously. saml'-Sl'X relationship!'.> should be rt-cognizC'd in tht.- saml' way oppos1h.'"-scx n•lntionship:-- nru - th<·rc is no question about that," said HRC's Smith. "But the•re is som1·thmg dsc at stakP h1•re: Changing the cons!Jtution to 1•xclud1• us ts quill• fnghtenmg ... The wholl• notwn of chnngmg a conslt· tution to 1•xclud1• rights 1s som1•th111g we an• gmng to rnakl' CV(lry pffort to stop." HRC ts w1llmg to commit $1.1 mil· lion to l'nsurp that Hawaiians won't chang1· th1•ir constttutton to pn·cmpt the Hawaii Suprem1• Court Protect Our Const1tut10n/Iluman Rights See HAWAIV pago 12A itv (tlt62~1f0tv Ot---. Houston tnduslllas· Power of Houston '98 presented at the Gre•t Tastes of Houston P2tttJK 10 lttt P0w(2 Four Course Dinner in Romantic Spindletop $65 per person • Including tax & gratuity • V1lld Saturday, September 12, 1998 For Reservations, please call 713•654•6999 fMe61Zt at our ptwQ 1¥1VltiON and recharge with the Great Tastes of Bavaria. 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P A G E NATIONAL Plaintiffs: Genora Dancel and Nin1a Baeher were one of three gay couples seeking licenses to marry in Hawa11. an idea that sparked a h1stonc lawswt fifed in 1990 that is now pending before /he state's Supreme Court. -Photo by Dennis Oda HAWAII/ from page 11A Campa.~n. <in HRC group forml'd m January, 1s working clo~ely with Protect Our Constitution a Hawaiian alliance of community lead ers, clergy, c1vil·rights acllv1sts and citizens to fund grass-roots votl'r educallon, and wage a hlow-for-blow med111 battle with far-nght Chnstian orgamznt1ons rntsmg funds to cnm p:ugn for the amC'ndmC'nt Opponents of gay marnage mcludmg the SnvP Trnditional .\tnrriagl' '91< the All1:mce for Trad1t1nnal l\larrmg1•, and the R<'v. .James I>obson·s Focus on tlw Pmnily have initiated a mult1-1nedia advC'r­t1smg campaign to promote the anti­gay marriagP constitution'-11 nrnt•nd· ment. HRC had alreadv rmsc<l more th~11 $700,000 for the 1iawn11 bnttl<·; and a coalition of civ1l-nghts groups led by HRC, Lambda Legal Defense and Educatwn Fund nnd the nntionnl American C1v1l Liberties l'mon 1s attemptmg to rn1s the re. ,_mmg $400,000 by late Septe!!!ber Dan Pole), the llawau attorney rep· resentmg the three couples m Baehr vs . .\1nkc, has no questrnn that llR(' has selected the best strategy He hns been with the case from the bPgin n1ng. "\Ve would consider a 'ves' volt.• a deva"tating defeat." ~'oley said. "We didn't start this looking for sccond· class citizenship .... A 'no' vote IS the only way there will bt• Pqual protection and equal opportunity." Evan Wolfson, the staff uttornt•y at Lnmbda Legal who has lt•d the Freedom to Marry Project, a coalition of gay nghts organization, 1s also working with Foley on tht• Hawaii case, and said the most important goal of HRC"s Protect Our Const1tut10n campaign 1s to "beat back this d<Scnmmatory stab nt our movement." "This 1s n C1v1l nghts advance bemg attacked by a broad coalition of oppo­sition. If thev succeed, then• is much more at st~ke thnn tht• right to marry People need to help at this critical penod." Wolfson s:ud Another natwnnl advocacy group, the National Gay und Lesbian Tu'k Force, endor•es this approach •we·rc not gomg to Sl'cond-gupss the people on thc front hne," said Trncy Conaty, t11>k force media d1rcctor. "The mo't important thing that all people coordinating campaigns have to be mmdful of 1s there 1s the battle and there 1s the war. Sometimes winnmg or losing the particular vote isn't the most important thmg The most important thmg in theSt' campaigns is if we as a gay and lesbian community come out strong1.•r and more orga­nized But must gay nghts advocates stop talkmg about the frt•Pdom to marry ,n order to win 1t? Activi,;t and author .\lichPlangt•lo Signorile, who nnalyzt•d the ll11wa11 ~ituntion early on, says no, daimmg the rush for nctwn now could have been nvo1dccl . •·one thing I will say is llRC WM very late commg to this 1ssut'." he smd Early on, they didn't SCP 11 us somP­thing 'winnable.' It wusn't until a grnss-roots movt.·mcnt of marriugt• activists and thl' media really camt• into 1t-but, you can't cry ovt•r ~pillt•d milk, and I wish tht•mwt•ll." Signorile believes n strongl·r focus on VI .bility might have made 11 s1g· mfinnt d11Ter­encc m the cvolu· t1on of II aw au s cast.• for snmc-sex marriage. "What we could have done early on was a visibili­ty campaign nnd Signorile: Show real gay people to sway public opinion m Hawmi could haw frnmt•d this as ll nm•c'\8 p('ople·s lives, 1woplt.•'s fan11liPs," Signorile said. '"IIawai1 1s a vt.1ry fomil­ial culture. Wt> n('(•dPd to appl'lll to pc·ople that way, show pl'oplt• that tlwy know gay peoph• who would b<• afil·ct· ed by this. That n•ally nct•dt-<l to be dont• early on, before the religious right's campaignmg." \Vhile polls show a n•sistanct• among Hawaiian voters to changing the state·s constitution. S1gnorilt• says too much faith could bt> placl'd in poll respon:-;f.!s. S1gnonle s:ud that, unlike other stntes, Hawaii is still dt•veloping polit· ically. He notes that thl' natum's youngest state has mndc chang1•s to its constitution Ill the past 30 year•, and that amending 1t again may not be as unthinkable as many portray 1l to be. "A better stratei,'Y would bt• to have n•ally visible and vocal pt>oplt• show. mg who they are," Si1,'I10nlt• snicl. "I think they renlly have to clwlh•ngc people's ideas about gay n•l11tionsh1ps and gay families and really try to change peoplc's minds." A decision 1s expected soon, and despite what could have or should have been done, attt-ntion must bt• given to the issue, and money must be rai,;c<l, Conaty said 1 2 A SEPTE M BE R 1 B 1 e e e State agency pulls AIDS conference money COLUMBIA. S C An annual conference on sexually transmitted diseases and AIDS prevention will have a high-profile speaker, but 1t will go on wit hout $40,000 in state money. T he head of the Department of Health and Environml'nta l Control says t he state cannot approve of for· mer Surgl'On G ll n e r a I ,Joycelyn Elders' participation in nl1xt month's c o n ft• r e n c e . Elders' contra· vcrsial views on Elders: V1s1t by for­disC" ase prcvt•n- mer Surgeon t10n nnd sexual General causes practin•s might controversy m South do South Caro/ma Carol inn's efforts more harm than good, Commissioner Doug Bryant said All1•n Wutzdor ff, chairman of the committ1•1• thnt 1n v it1•d Elders, said organizers initially \\'l're surprisl•d and frustrnl!•d that DHEC pulled its sponsorship, but they quickly recov1•rpd and proc1•t•dPd with the plann111g ~tabbing of retired gay educator be\\ ilders police :\llA!\11 Tht• stabbing of a rct1n.·d nss1stant princ1pal 1n h1~ South Be.1th apartnwnt has puzzlt•d ~11am1 B<•ach dct1•ct1vcs according to a report in the :'lliami Hnald Kt•nncth Swgt•I, 71, had no appar­t> nt NH'm1t•s or f1nnncin l proLlems. Su•gcl was found on tlw afll'rnoon of St•pt !i after his nP1ghbon; contact· etl t ht..•ir condo board about un odor com111g from lus apartmt·nt The BnyviPW Tt•rru<·t• condominium association called police who found Sll'gcl stabbed s1•vcral tim1•s. Ile hud bt•en dt•nd for up to two dnys . ... lie ''us a Vl'f}' nice guy. lie mad<• a po111t to soy hPllo to everybody," David l horlro\\ 1d ":'\obody m th1•1r right mmd would do that to him 'J\m deadbolt I ck, wen• lockt•d so if 1t wns a strangrr, 1t wasn't 11 complct< stro:ingcr" S <'gl'l's d1•ath bnng> to three the numh<·r of unsoh·<•d murdt•rs of gny m1~n 111 :\1iam1 lleal'h Appeals court overturns ·Jenny Jones' murder conviction IH:TROIT - A slat!• app1•als court ha~ ovPrturrwd tht• murd<•r conv1ct1on of a man who :;hot anotht.•r man who n·vt•a)pc) a '!'Cr!'t crush on him during a tapmg of "Tlw ,/(•nny .Jones Show." Thi• M1ch1gan Court of Ap1wals said .Jonathan Sthm1tz should han• bt•cn allowed to n·mov1• a JUror b!'forc the Schmitz: M1ch1gan murder conv1ct1on overturned by state appeals court trial began. Tht• threl~Judgt• panp) s.1id tht• t•rror was harmful enough to \\.'Hr· rant nvt•rturning his conv1d ton on SHO!ld·dcgr1•1· m u r d !' r . ProFiPCulors must now d1•cid!' wh!'llwr to n•try Schmitz, who was accust•d of ~hooting Srntt Anwdurt•, a gay man, Ill Marl'h 199!i afll'r Anwdurc n•v1•al1•d on th!' show that h1• was attract!'d to him. Schmitz, who has said he 1s heterosex­ual, uppt•art'd on the show, believing a woman was j!'Oinj?' to rt·v<>al n crush on him. He later told police he was humil­iatt• d by the surprise on-camera announcement. He was convicted m 1996 ofsecond-dcgn•e murder and was sentenced to 25 to 50 years. Amedure's family has a lso sued Jones and dis­tributor Warner Bros. for $50 million, claiming they were at least partly responsible for Amedure's death. Red Lobster ordered to pay in discrimination case CHICAGO - The Cook County Commission on Human Rights awarded a gay man who sued Red Lobster a $95.000 victory, according to a report in the Ch1wgo Tribune. Thi· six-member pan1•l unammously agret-d Sept. 10 that R!'d Lobsl!•r violated th!' countv's civil nghts lnws when, in 1996, it di~missed Dale Hall bctnuse ofh1s sexual orienta· hon from its outlt•t in Lincolnwood. In a first und1·r the 1993 ordmance extending employment pr olt)ction to gays and )psbmns, the panel ordered th1• company to reinstate Hall as an nssocint(• manngPr. fu•d Lobster, which withdr<•w an m1trnl challenge to the • legality of the civil rights onlinance, was also ordered to conduct diversity training at all six of its Cook County restaurants. Manslaughter plea in 'gay panic' murder case SAN FRANCISCO JO>ihua Puckett, an 18-year-old model accused of killing a San Francisco busi n essman, pleaded guilty to involuntary manslaughter in a plea bargain reached Sept. 11, acconlmg to a report in the San Francisco Examiner. The case had bt'<'n clO>iely watched Puckett: Teenager oc'C8usc Puckett pleaded gwlty m said he had kilk-d death of man who the business- made unwanted man, 29-ycar-old sexual advances Vitaly Poliakov, toward him bccaui;e the vic-tim had made unwanted homoS<·xual advances toward him. &uni• ft·an-d that Puckett would rely on a "i;..1y pamc" defense, mearung that he struck Poliakov out of panic to prewnt what h<' found to be a repugnant act. Puckett, a model who once appeared on the cov!'r of XY maga­zine for young gays, told police that he wa:; fending off Poliakov"s sc·xual advances during an Aug. 31, 1997, party at an Orinda home whE·n he baohl'<l Poliakov m the head with a glass cdcr bottle. Puckett was sentenced to 13 years and 8 months m state prison, said his attom<•y, llfark Llss. New drugs may offer help in AIDS fight WEST CONSHOHOCKE!'\, Pa. - 1\rn new drugs may be entl'nng the bat· tie against AIDS in the near future. lI S. B10sciencc, Inc. announced .Sept. 10 that the company's drug lodenosine has been cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to proceed to climcal tn· als. Lodeno:->inc is n prot.ease 1nh1bitor rl'porlt-d to haw an encourai:mg re.-is­lance profile. :lledical D1scovenes, Inc announced the same dav that add1tional testing of its Novel Drug MDI·P has con· finned and extended Its ont1·HI\• acm·1· ty. Expt.•rimt.•nts using a mon.' cone<.·n· tratcd version of the drug resultl'<l in up to 90-pcrcent killing of the HIV virus m cell culture with no toxic1t~· to th!' cells. In HIV/ AIDS THIS IS YOUR APPETITE THIS IS YOUR APPETITE ON MARINOL SUNIMED & ..... ec ARE YOU GITTING ENOUGH TO EAT? .\ lainrammg a he 11th, PP'' '1elp, ) ou get the numenh l ou riced to 'ta\ health). It ) ou 'tart to lo,c appt'mc, 2-d wc1!.'ht, 1r car. be a sign rh;n ) nur m trail condition 1' dctenoranng. Clinkal 'rudit, haw 'hmm that .\IARl:\Ol t•earcd parrrnrs ha' w'r" ned, long term .1pperne :iprnn·'llcnt Srud\' rc,ulb abo 'uggest that \IARl'.\Ol 1. c l'C mmor 1mpro\en•cnh (o• trends! ,n body \mghr and mood. and decreaSl'S 1:i nausea. Howcl'er. thc>e hcnefi,1al tC'ulb did not m1ch the Jr,el of "stan,ncar '1gmfica!ICC seen \\1th appetite •:-iprmcmenr \o don t '' a11 If w11 'l'e experienced appetite los> assoetated with tl'Ct!:ht l'l>S, a$k )''lllr d'lctor about i\lt\RIXOI • \ l.\Rl\'OL •can cau'c ,idc effect> m 'omc pJnenh mdudmg d12zmc", confu,1on, ,k-cpmc"· p.1r:mo1d rt:ic11on,, or a it-cling of heing .. high·· (l'<1'y laughing. rlanon, and htighrened awarenc"l. Somt patient' may also rxpenencc nausea, ,·omirmg, or 'ton.1,h pam . .\Ian) of rhe\C rcaL11on' di,app..-;ir '' 1thm I to J days of continuous do,agc or cm he dinunarcd by lowering the do<oe. You should nor dme, operate nuchtne11. or engage m .my hazardou' acrn 11y unnl 1t 1s c-rahJi,hed that you are able to tolerate .\IARl:-\OL • anJ perform '>UCh task> safely. Ask your doctor about MARINOLGI (dronabinor) capsules 2 .5 mg A HEALTHY APPETITE FOR A HEALTHIER OUTLOOK Visit Roxane @ www.Marinol.com w.MiCl.. I .... bdelmr\ •Ullmed ~ - .......... 11mnn .. ~Pllmtq~011--.. Dlft!I~~- --=····w..~•-•k ...... P A G E 1 3 A SE PT J: IVIB E A 1 B 1 9 9 B Research shows hov,· AIDS 'erupts' after years of lurking DE:-;VER - Molecular biologists may have d. •covered how AIDS can suddenly erupt into a catastrophic ill­ness after lurking for years as a low­grade infection. New research by a nationwide team of scientists sug­ge8ts that HIV eventually attacks a class of disease fighting cells pro­duced by the immune system that were thought to be impervious to attack bv the v1rus The results, which have been l.m1ted so far to test­tube expcnmerts, could provide drug makers with a new target for drugs designed to keep tr. ' '1rus in check, as well as \'accmes mml'd at preventing infection. R<'Sl'arch<•rs said the attack on this different group of immune cells, known as CD8 T cells, triggers an exploswn of cell death that exh_.ust:-> the •mmunc sygtcm ond leaves the body vulnerable to pneu moma and other secondary infecttons that typically kill most AIDS patients. Exactly how AIDS affects thl' CD8 cells remains unclear though. The cell death process 1s complex. and quickly involvPs an array of other c<·ll types that soon may subvert the NATIONAL entire immune system and lead to full-blown AIDS symptoms, said lead author Georges Herbein of the P1cower Institute for Medical Research in ~lanhasset, N.Y. "Because CDS cells are thought to limit the spread of the infection, the failure of CDS function could con­tribute to the development of AIDS," he said. Push on for Hormel vote WASHI:-;GTO:'\ - Secretarv of State :.ladeleine Albright urged the Senate last week to schedule a vut" on ,Jnmcs Hormel as ambassador to Luxembourg. Senate R<•pubhcnn lead­ers have blxked a votp to protest what some have ca led Hormel's promotion of a "gay lifestyle " •Jim has served his coun· try well and wil, be nn oul•tand ing nmhassador,• Albright said in a statement accom- Hormel: Vote for pan1ed by a pie- ambassador stlll lure of her with stalled m Senate Hormel, both of them smiling. "He is entitled to an up-or-down vote on his nomination . I urge the Senate to schedule a vote as soon as possible" Hormel has been part of the U.S. delegation to the U.N. Human Rights Commii-;s1on in Geneva and was con· firmed by the Senate last year to 8erve on the U.S. delegation to the U.N. General Assembly session. Tht- Senate Foreign Relations Committee recom­mended Hormel's nomination to the full Senate Inst October, but four sen­ators have placed •holds" on it, block­ing action Feds may charge bombing suspect ASHE\'ILLE, N.C. - hch•ral 1nvpst1gators b<•lieve they haV<' enough evidence to charge abortion clinic bombing suspect Eric Rudolph with th!' d<•adly blast at the 1996 Olymp1cs, The Asheville C1t1ze11 Times reported. The m·wspaper, which c1tt•d sev<·r­al anonvmous law enforcem<•nt sources, ·said investigators have found morn evidence linking Rudolph to thr<•<• bombings in Atlanta - including the one at Centennial Olympic Park Investigators have Advertisements do nol include all the 1ntormat1on about a prescnplion mediation. Onty your ptrys1c1an 1s qualified to decide 11 a prucnption medication is right for you. ~~ ~w.$. h~QI'\ n io.rar.,.,-....dlnUhll lhlftllll...,~..,,.......,...11~'11111ACIS~~dnellWlllSIMMI !!.O::::'~=~~~~~r:::=-~=..,. --- P'llQUllY CAUSAUY RRATtD . ..._ ....... ,,._ R-.s--lrOfll~rillS.,.AA'.:IS-ftadnWD9Pl-151') R~ltlll(IDisG WITI Rm!-.~lllf-·"'~ - lgilrenltPlfdn's) .,..,.., ... Asll'lenla. ,,.,_,..,_,,, __ _ ~Abdlmnl!C*I' ~· "°"*'O' =:"~~-===~cm.·~· D:ldll'ael..-ts3"!1.I010'r. l'llOIMlY CAUSAUY Rf.lATtD ....._lea._,..._ .-f..-.-.W!-li·dlr -Mdftm-dn-alrull1·t~.-. :rm,..15 dldu1dlac illtMldwftl-,'17) --.... .....-.. AlllnGm'~~~.-=tl~--. St.il!llWl~f\lsbng' !;pecJ1I SM$!S """" 1flCUh9 'tltldlfp c1..t1Dl"!ll t, I'° CAUSAi. flll.ATIOISHW' UNOOWN .._. ....... 1'\. wr.dr!d liPante ot .. moallllM ti ........ ,..,. .unld. ir.tn;rMl. lld by .. ~ -~~'°' .. ~ -1Di:t-1:s1l-lf'lr-'*Olls-~-- -~-- Sbn ... __ ~ ..... ,. CRUt• t.tl lul.I RX Zl448Nt 119 been trying to learn if Rudolph was in Atlanta when bombs exploded at Centennial Park in July 1996, at an abortion clinic in • January 1997 ~------~ and at a gay nightclub in February 1997 Agents hypoth<•· size that th<• same person or people were behind all three. Rudolph, a 31- year-old part-t1me carpPntcr, Rudolph: May bo is a fugitive chargedw1thbomb­crarged with th<' mg Atlanta gay club ,Jan 29 bombing of Birmingham. Ala., women's clinu· that kill<•d an off~duty police offie<•1 who was working there as n security guard. Ther<• 1s a $1 million reward for information l<•ading to Rudolph's capture. He is one of the FBI's 10 most wanted StL p(•cts. Lesbian takes Democratic Congressional primary SEATTLE R<•tired Col Margarethe Camnwrmeycr, who made national h!'adlinPs when she was kicked out of the military for admit­ting to b<•ing a lesbian, is challenging Rep. Jack Ml'tcalf, R-Wash., for his congressional seat in Nov(•rnbt..•r after winning the Democratic spot 1n Tuesday's state primary. Cammermeyer a 31 year mih tary veteran and mother of four, easily won tht• primary and the Shindle: Miss right to chollt•nge Amenca used crown the 7l-year-old to talk AIDS preven­!\ frtcalf, om• of lion across country the state's senior congrl'ssmt•n A mov1l' sturrmg actress Glenn Clostl was made ubout Cammermeyer's legal battle to n•main as chll'f nurse of th" Washington National Guard after telling a security ollic1al that sht• wns homosexunl. Metcalf was crihclZl'd for a letter sent to his constitu<•nts during the campaign that condemn<•d Cammermey<•r's homos<•xual hfostyh', but the two camps w<·re scheduled to meet earh<·r this we<·k to sign a pl<·dg<' to run c1C'an campa1gnl-'" in thl" ~ovembcr eledion. Miss America's reign ending ATLANTIC' CITY, N .. J. - Miss Am<•nca Kate Shrndle took a lot of h<•at for her controvPrs111l AIDS pr<'­vention mt·ssagP. !-itill, as lwr reign nears its end, Shindle h11s no regrets. •1 wc-uldn't hm·c handled "nything d1ffrr t•ntly, espPc1111ly with regards to th<• IllV-AII>S platform," she said last week •controversy 1s something thnt Shindle: Miss gets peopl<• tnlk- Amenca used crown mg, 1f nothing to talk AIDS preven­l'lsc. And om• of /Ion across country the bt•st ml'thods we can <•mploy to combat th<· AllJS l'!Hd<•m1c IS dia­log- ue." The 21-yt•nr-old Panll'd both prais<• and cntlc1sm for IH'r blunt advocacy for condom d1stributwn nnd needle exchanges to pn•vcnt AIDS. :.11ss Anwncn 19·11 VPnus Ramey called Shindle's plntform •lunacv." The l\11ss America p~geant will crown a nt•w winnPr on St>pt 19. HOUSTON VOICE P A G E 1 4 A SEPTEIVIBEA 1 e 1 a e e QUOTE UNQUOTE "I don·t know 1f I'll ever have the intensity for sex with women that the average man on the street has I had no sexual interest m women at all But when you begin a rela­llonsh1p with a woman that you believe God has led you to. then you develop attraction to that person To say that we've arrived at this place of total heterosexuality - that we·re totally healed - 1s misleading. "Ex gay" μosier bay John Paulk, in a 1993 interview w1lh lhe Wall Street Journal. "(Anne Paulk) conceded that her ties to women 1n college were 'more emotional than sexual.'" From a Time magazine story. July 27 ed1l1on. afler "ex gay" Anne Paulk refused lo name a single les­bian lover from her past "He seems to be more obsessed with homosexuality than most homosexuals • Rep. Barney Frank (0-Mass. (left), n a Sept. 9 iloslOn Globe story about a state­ment by P.ep. Rar;y Duke" CoM1r~~am (R Ca 1f.), who t d group of prostate cancer pa tie" •. n oc en~ ng a •ectal procedure r uMJngham underwent. "That's ::st not nat."al. i:: ess '11aybe yo</re Barney f'aJlk. • 'President Clinton, telev1s1on. abortion and homosexuality- all (have) contributed to the moral decline of people • rev ~le;Mn Thursi::n 1• a Sept. 8 speech 10 the Nat1ona1 8apt1t~ Conver>! 1 ol Amenca. a 4 5 m I hon member hurch and l"e C'lUfltry , second ;::gest group ol African American Baptists ·1 believe that personal conduct and integrity does matter Dan?" Where do you stand, Con·,aw,~ve Rep ~efen Chenoweth 'R Idaho) (nghlJ, 1n a campaign adve· hsement challenging her Jemocra11c opponent, Jan W1ll1ams.10 respcnd 10 the Clinton sex •candal "Fourteen years ago, when I was a private citizen and a single woman. I was involved in a relationship that I came to regret. that I'm not proud of I've asked for God's forgiveness. and I've received 1!" Rep Chentmeth. less than a week ater. after "'le Idaho Statesmo., "Maled !hal •"e earned on a ~1x ye r affair with a named man in the 1980s. The man's wife cal ed the newspape: after seeing ChellO"et"'s campaign ad. "I will come out in support of recognized re!ationsh1ps But no. I'm sorry. I will tonight come out 1n favor of DOMA • C raid ne ~e r three Democrats COIT'pel1ng lor l'le "~"t to rhallenge Sen Al :l'Amalo (R NY) n Novembt•, !I a torun1 pon: .:1l bv •toe Gay. esb.an R. & Transgender Coalition cl New YOO. r 1ty Jespite q ~ n rJ di<" ei-•• , ~ "'l l lhe 1.ap !al H1 -;paper Re I Cal. 1'1e c•'lWd 0tned lhe 'Tioderat in Singl '\J "Happy 81 ihday' •o Ferraro, wru •urned 63 Ille day belc e "Odious lectures by Stephen Jay Gould on evolution at the Amencan Museum of Natural History will lead to cherub-size hail in the early evening 1n New York City Continued homosexual act1v1ty in the large cities of the E:ast Coast and, of course. San Francisco, w1ll 1nit1ate a severe low-pressure front with associated torent1ally heavy rains late in the day Look for heavy flooding. especially in theater districts Because of some isolated pockets of freethinking. the Midwest will see a 90 percent chance of frogs this afternoon with vermin, especially m low-lying regions. so please drove with the low beans on Frogs d1min1shing toward dusk, followed by scattered murain. Putting the map 1n motion now. we see that general sinfulness across the country will bnng darkness after sundown A s.;;igested Pal f«Jbertson eft) wealher lo<e- t. s nee the te1ev;:nge1 st r cted • m :>es would hll Orlando rw- Ille cit{• detis • fly gay p def ags n June, as hypol,,_, zed by Steve Mir <t 1n the September issue d Scie:-'.1f1c Ame<"can. "The bi-level. the regulation lesbian hairciut, 1s the ultimate non-do This hairciut was not designed to be flattenng It was designed lo make the following statement 'We don·t conform to whole wh1te-male-dom1naled ideal of beauty ' This 1s an offshoot of the ·we are a bitter people' philosophy that many lesbians have These are the women who think people like me are too happy to be gay· Chryss Cada wr111ng n the Washington Posl, Aug. 9. "That's iust angry queens I should only play flamboyant gay roles? I have no desire to be a role model for anybody But in a sense I feel hke I have been because I've played a wide vanety of gay characters There are two gay characters on (NBC's "Will & Grace/ - plenty for one network They don't need me prancing around• At;• Nathan Lane ("The Bordcage"J (rghl), v.no recenlly ac).n(:w!edged that he's aay, 10 r nter .11nment Neekly, ove cntic1sm that " s new ole on NBC's "Ent'.' 1 Enc 1• •eatur~ l as a v:~'led up opera nger ~ho 1. a v.omar zer 'Right now I can't see how a gay kid can feel safe 1n sports I think they re terrified of their teammates. they're terrified of their opponents and they· re ternf1ed at what could hap­pen to them 1f someone finds out And the vast maionty of gay student athletes on the male side are def1n1tely closeted because they iust don·1 feel safe• M11<e Muska, athletic d1r&'or for Oberlin {Ol\10) College, Jn NCAA Oov.s100 IU sehool. 10 the Aug . .28 issue t USA l'Jday Mu;.ka 1s the fi ~-ever openly CflY athlellc director at any lJ S. COiiege or umvers.ty iJ "George doesn t want to let his fans down, but he iust cant cope with tounng at the moment • A fnend of George M1!ilaef (left). quoted 1n lhe Sept. 4 tal:l0td lhe Sun, on M1chae 's dec1~ on 10 cancel a v.orld tour planned lor next year becJuse f'e s Sli• try 1ng to eope with a stnng of recent traumas, 1ncludlng his cos Angeles 'est •or le>\d behavior n a put11c t0tlet. his dec1s100 io come out ol the closet, and L'e deaths OI tus molher -t year and his Braz•lian tove• n 'J!l4 --=·-··=·•-•k ·----- P A G E HOlllWOOD PORTRAIT STUDIO 2643 Richmond @ Kirby Houston, Texas 77098 (713) 523-9683 J<>ln our Club Plan and l'l'Cl'l\'e 3 days 2 nights holl'l .Krnrnrnodations in Las Vegas .md lhn'<' 8x 10 beautiful color portra1b m our studio for onlv $18.35. Call Now To Reserve Your Sitting (713) 523-9683 Ga) Owned and Operall'd ~lllf 11011 Sfli(' it i11 tire llo11sto11 \Diet' Who Said a Good l.a~er is Hard to Find? 1 5 A ATTORNEY Handsome, charming and witty, seeks a male counterpart (31-35) attractive and intell1gent. Friendship and possible relationship 1f 0123 Looking to sustain a relationship with an appealing person? We won't object. Beginning this May, Houston Voice personals will have a whole new look, lots of great new features and all kinds of new ads from single people who'd love lo meet you. So file your brief. Call 1-800-985-4666 and place your FREE personal ad today! ·- SE P TE MB C A 1 B 1 a a a TRY IT. LOVE IT. LIVE IT. Get a jump on fitness with the "Healthy St,ut Program." This unbelievably affordable plan s!Mts you with a detailed fitne·» e\·aluation, a one week nutritional progr.1m, and two personal tram.mg sessions in our fully equipped pm·ate facility' Once you've tried it, we're sure you'll love it. We'll even prove it by applying the cost toward any other fitness pack.1ge we offer! From health maintenance to fat loss and body shaping, Muscle Mechanics makes it easy to begin \~ith the "Healthy Start Program." Call now and give it a try. MUSCLE MECHANICS 713.523.5 3 30 4316 YUPON Annual Membership ONLY $248! HO~DUES. AWESOME llm EQUIPMENT IMMACULATELY CLEAN IMPECCABLE SERVICE 4040 MILAM 77006 - (713) 524-9932 Mm-Fn.5am-10pm •Sal&Sln8am-8pm Tour dub for details Some restnct1ons apply Houston Voice has a new home New address effective Sept. 14 flll)'ll..S?Wpotta , 1"" Th. ,-----------------, Thr Holutai1 "*" has Houltan \\WI' ha 11iowd •llO IUGWd •tlO a rww hc»w ~w •- t..ar 1br llai.e&ml Hou.aon'tblcTt.a.n.-.d•*' ~ ._ RDoTd •ito"' •- ,._ to ... 'ltll' Hous1011 hcmr'nlf' Ho&dlan \t:ikfo h;la ~ ..... ""'""" lnlo Oii ·- tllOWd lllllO • ·- hDnw- 'tlW' ho11r thr Housron \'oll:r bu Houstoo \blrr "ta rnowd Ir*' "IOW'd 111110 .I ·-....... ,,W' •WW hou• nir HouMon H1x.,an \tlk"'1' h¥ 11MM'd llllO Vorr l1;1a 1ng,,rd anto o1 11l"\W iww homr 1br Hoi...ron .xtw ~w Houttor1 Vok"t' has \blcf' I IUO\Td llllO 1WW .hOWd •.to a •- hot• TIW' ........ 11wHot.-an"*"'t.. Hallllorl~hllill..-...flntO 500 Lovett, Suite 200 Houston, TX 77006 Mike fltmmg - Assoetatt l'ub/isher Matthew A. Hmnit - Editor --=·-····---~ ...... P A G E • • Warming up to exercise The importance of pre-exercise routines by JOHN AARON There 1s probably no doubt that you·ve been told by your instructor, personal trainer or even your favorite TV pernonality that it 1s unportant to warm up before you exercise. Although you may have reluctantly followed their orders, you still might not be to sure why you really need to warm-up in the first place. But pre-exercise routines are important. A proper warm-up increases the body's core temperature. During the gradual process of warming up, your body's muscle temperature may rise by up to four degrees. It's created because your muscles are producing more energy and releasing more heat than they do at rest (this is also known as muscle friction ), hence the term to "burn calories." on syutems that produce anaerobic enNgy. A gradually progressing warm-up involves all of the body's energy producing systems, which decreases perceived exertion. That allows a comfortable workout for a • longer pt>r1od of llm!' b!•fore reaching muscle fatigue. Another benefit to warmmg-up 1s that 1t heightens h!•at loss. The warm up allows your body's heat dis· s1pation mechanisms to kick into action (you heat up, you sweat, the sweat evaporates, then you cool down because of the evaporation l. This is an important step in prevent· ing overheating. Fundamentally, warming-up prior to exercise will no doubt improve heart function. Thanks to the warm up, the heart muscle receives greater blood flow and oxygen supply. Warming-up can also help prevent inJuries A proper warm up serves as the ideal tran· sit1on from your pre-activ· ity state to your workout. The warm-up rncreases the elasticity of muscles and connective tis· sues and pre· pares for the upcoming physical chal­lenges. It also enhances mus­cle contraction. Warm muscles can move more efficiently. You Warming-up can definitely The heart is therefore pre­pared for the increased out· put demands 1t will sustain as workout intensity builds. A prop· er warm·up also reduce~ the risk of el!'ctrical abnormalities occurring 1n th!• heart as a result of rush· ing into the workout from a previously sedentary state. enhance calorie burning. When your core body temperature rises, the muscle cells more efficiently metabolize glucose and fatty acids. The warm-up increases the activity of glucose and fat-burning enzymes, hormones and reactions. There arc can contract them faster and with greater inten· sity. This increased activ11) then continues throughout the rest of the workout. generally two phases of warming-up to exercise . active and ~pe-c1fic phases. Th!! uctive Oxygen sup­ply to the mus· cles is also enhanced by warming·up. Due to the body's challenged cardio· vascular output, normal blood flow to the muscles increases. Consequently, the working muscles receive more oxygen and nutrients and can more efficiently use glucose and fatty acids to produce energy for the workout. The muscles can also remove waste products and carbon dioxide more rapidly. A proper warm-up can also lead to a speed up in nerve messages and a shortening of reaction times. During the warm-up, your body's complex neural message pathway to the mus· cles undergoes an increase in speed and sensitivity. You experience more control and can respond more quick­ly. It 1s also important to know that warming-up can definitely enhance calorie burning. When your core body temperature rises, the muscle cells more efficiently metabolize glucose and fatty acids. The warm-up increas­es the activity of glucose and fat-burn­ing enzymes, hormone• and reactions. This increased act1v1ty then continue• throughout the rest of the workout. Warming-up can also reduce per­ceived exertion, which is the level of intensity you may feel given a partic· ular exercise, or the level of energy you have to complete a particular number of sets or number of repell· lions. For example, 1f you rush into a workout without warming up, you may find that you fatigue sooner. This is because the body has to r..Jy phas<' of the warm-up con· SJSls of full body, rhythmic, continuous activ1· ties. Low to moderate intensity swimming, cycling, walking and aer­obics are examples of active-phase activities. The purpose of this active phase is to increase the body's core temperature and meets other bene· fits of warming-up. The specific phase consists of activ· ities that include movement patterns performed in the main port of the workout. In step classes, for exam· pie, instructors often take their stu· dents through range·of·motion move· ments similar to those that will be performed at a greater intensity later in the workout. In resistance training, personal trainers often have their clients perform a light warm-up set before the heavier sets. Combining these two phases will produce the most significant benefits. Don't neglect to account for your fit· ness level, workout experience, goals and ensuing workout. Warming·up to exercise, often ignored is part of obtaining optimum fitness. With the facts now clearly in your hand, you have no excuse to omit 1t from your exercise routine. The next time your personal trainer says it's time to warm·up, do it with the knowledge that you're doing something good for your body. John Aaron is a certified personal trainer and member of tlw lntenwtwnal Assocwtw11 of F1t11ess Profe.•.•wnal.•. lie ou·11s Muscle Mechanics, <t persu11<tl fitru·ss tra111· ing <tnd riutritio11a/ g1wla11e<• {ac1Lity. 1 B A SEPTCrvtBC!A 1 B 1 e e e --=··--.. ··•¢! +•-·-- your combination therapy 1Wo proven HIV therapies are In one tablet •Comb1vir can make ft easier for you to stay on your medication schedule •One Combivir Tablet morning and night. wfth or without food •Helps you live a longer, healthier life The safety profile of Combivir should be the same as that of Fp1v1r (lam1vudine; 3TC) + Retrov1r~ (zidovudine; AZ7). The most frequent side effects associated with Epivir + Retrovir taken together are headache, upset stomach. malaise or fatigue, and runny nose. A buildup of lactic acid and an enlarged liver, including fatal cases, have been reported rarely with some HIV drugs, including AZTand3TC. N you are taking Eplvir + Retrovir ask your doctor tor Combivir·M lamivudineniw/zidovudine~ ONE TABLET TWICE A DA Y .......... tnt••"'"·OOflt Call 1•888 • TREAT HIV ext. 116 for more , c: tion PAGE 17A T SEPTE IVI BEA 18 1BBB BRIEF SUMMARY COMBIVIR"' Tablets (lamivudine/zidovudine tablets) lllel:lllcwn)s•bndt WARNING ZIDOVUOINE. ONE OF THE TWO ACTIVE INGREDIENTS IN COMBIVlR, HAS BEEN ASSOCIATED WITH HEMATOLOGIC TOXICITY INCLUDING NEUTROPfNIA AND SEVERE ANEMIA. PARTICULAllLY IN PATIENTS WITH ADVANCED HIV DISEASE !SEE WARNINGS). PROLONGED USE OF ZJDOVUDINE HAS BEEN ASSOCIATED WITH SYMPTOMATIC llYDPATHY. LACTIC ACIDOSIS AND SEVERE HEPATDMfGAlY WITH STEATOSIS. INCLUDING FATAL CASH. HAVE IEfJI REPOlflID WITH THE USE OF ANTIRETROVlRAL NUCLEOSIDE ANALOGUES ALONE DR IN COMBINATION, INCLUDING ZIDOVUDIHE AND LAMIVUDINE !SEE WARNINGS). INDICATIONS AND USAGE COMBMR is IMicalld IDr 1111 Ire-II HIV -- ~al Climcal SWes: COlllBIVlll: Thete nave - no CllllCal Ir& c:ooduded willl w.18MR See Ct.NICAI. PHAAMACrulGY for Ronna!!lll Dltll llio!qtMlera (ft COMBMR Wet ""'1 1wiCe a dry s ll1 lllenlilliw l'!lflll'll b EPMR lalllels 150 "'l IWU a day pkJS RfTR(MR 600"'lperday11- doses. Llml"'111Jf PlllS l-:llle Nucml7 !CAESAR) sllJlfy wascooducted USllQ EPMR 15().mg Tatiets 1150 "'l bLO.)and RHRO'llR 100il10~ (2 x 100"'ll•d) CAESAR was a ~-bir<I. placdic><ontrolled stull/ comp;mg catt:nued amnt lf1'!3llY (2idowli1e alone \62% ol pa!JenlS) or - with dld;l10Sile or - {38'1ool~)(blflenl!lrlnolEPMllorEPMRpkJSlll~~IM!Se~mbolDI landorlmcl12'1 Allialol1.816HIV--willl25W>250(.-,122)C04celMnm' at""*>ewerelflroled: memnogewas36yoars.87'1.wererrale 64'l.were~and16'lowere~"""" The medal dur.l!Jononstu111was12'TQ'lllls ResullsareSIJllVl13ri2!d11Tilhle1 DHIeVa ptir ogressm or - Tlble1 Nomllerol- (".)Wl!ll AILnstOne HIV _,.,..,__m_.i or_D_alll ___- ;,fPM=R,-pkJS,--a-- ~ (196'1.) 27(5.9'11.) EPMRplts Current Therapy In=&$) 86(9.6"4) 23(26'1.) NNRTI" pkJS Current Therapy (11• 460) 41 (8.9'11.) 14(10'lo) Dogesllvl fP1VIR iWS RHROVIR (n a 251) 35'1. 27'1. 10'lo 33'lo 18'1. 13'4 10'lo 9'11. 6'lo S'l. 12'1. 11'1. 10'lo 9'11. 20'lo 18'1. Pn:rea!lllSwas-11ttreeollfle656ad!ApallillCS(<115'lo)wll000!""'1EPMRlnCOl"llOlla!CllllCalllials. Selected laboraby alJnormalilies ObseMd dwi1g lherapy .. isled 11 Tallie 3 Talllt3 F-aotSe-~Allnannalltla.lmollgAlllllts II Fis Caohlllll a..c.t Tnals II EPMR •-.'DJ .... RETROVll 1111 "'I/UY" Tasl EPMR pkJS R£TROWl (Abnormal I.Ml) 'lo (n) Neulropcnla (ANC<75Mnm'} - (Hgb<8.0 W!l.l ~~ ~>5.Dxl)Uj1 AST >5 0 ' UlNJ \ >25xULN'J Amylase >2.0 'Ml 0~4~'1.~ 44~0 37'1. 41 17'1. 41 D.8'1.(241) 41% (72) P"-1 r;; '.041.407. 4 1[ .538. 4.828.838. 4.724,Zl2; 4.833. l:n and 4.837,2(B 6/axoWellcome Gl1xi0W• "" h Pt f1 P'arti:. NC 1 '109 lll1wlJCll1e B mntlciind inler agreemenl ~om Biodwn Plmna Inc Laval. Oue!>oc. !alada .BuMy 19'.lll'Rl ~ HOUSTON VOIC E P A G E 1 B A 6EPTE IV1B C:A 1 B 1 0 B B HOUSTON VOI~E One Community! One Voice!. ISSUE 934 SEPTEMOC R 1 6. 1 998 Established 1974 as the Monlrose Star, reestablished 1980as the Houston Montrose Star, Changed name to Tho Houston Vcxe'" 1991 llCOfPOrallflQ the Nt~ Ofteans Crescem C•y Star, Reestablished as the Houston VOtCe by Thomas Nelsen In 1993 500 Lovett Blvd , Suito 200 Houston, Tew.as n006 (713) 529-8490 (800) 729.9490 Fax (713) 529·9531 Email editorOhoustonvoice com feedbackOhouslonvok:e com COntants copyright 1998 Office hours. 9.00 am 10 5 30 p rn weekdays aswclltl hbllsur ...... Fletftng rRkeOhOus:tonY06ce com Eftlr Matthew A Henr.e ed1torOhou&1onvoice com rn•ucu11 John R s ..... ney St. C11t~lt lllllllf CootVe Marmolejo • ln•.ic lllllltr leedbackO houstOl'lYOiCe com C11blD1t1rs Jenn Aarof\ Manana M Acosta, Rd1 Arenschleld1. Earl Dittman, JoHrey L Dorrell, Ctv-r Graham. Rober1 B. Henderson. Mauroen O'Aellty, Jerry 0. Parra, Carolyn Roberts, (Ila Tyter PblhUl'lllbtr Oatton OcHar1 MVlrllSIN Slllli Carolyn_.,,., A Blame Wllltlord CllSSlneds an• Pll'SIHIS Marshal Rainwalcr M•tlull 111verus1na 1eprase111uve R1vendeD Marketing Coq>any, Inc 212·242·6863 P1bllsllers Chns Crain Ack EIMS$Cr To submit a letter Letters to the editor should be fewer than 400 words.. We reserve the nght 10 edtl fOf contefl( and length We will w1thhotd names upon request. but you musl inc:tude your name and phOne number IOf venhcahon Ptease send mad to Houston Votee, 500 Lovett Blvd , Suite 200. Houston, Texas 77006, lax (713) 529-9531 or e-mail to edltorOhouston volce.com ~ erpt"essftd lherem do not refleet those of the Houslon V0tee Nobco IO Advertesefs ~r-.IChlcUlitSwa~Sept 1997 •Partial«CIJ"1*rkt~d.,.,.~ N..W..S.•.r1.d.l.«.a . ..l.l.y.. C_Cb!Pyr 'Of~_lro mlhe~ • ~ 9lq)fH9ld by~ cw ca~.,. l'llO( ~llOMcllhefhdton ~Oflbsld-1d-. asuNmbbMybh~MnptftSfldOl~d Aid Md9t Of llkeneSs d pelSOnl IMng Ill' dud. ,.. Of k­WJ'W 1r1 h cai10ol\I. • P\dcation d lhrl nmne « phoklgniph cit any .,.,._.. or organilat!On wi •rtidn or •M"*'G lf1 h Houskwt VOiJQf le fkJt 10 be ClDnllNed n any l1lic:atJCln of N •• , ... OM'nla· lion of said~ or OfOlnilltion. • Tht ~ d .-!we~ Of opnlDnl ..,,..ect ~donoccor.-. an~«ptanleebyfl& tb..91onVaa.cwcsltd POST MASTCR Send addrnl COMC1IOM IO 111 W--- Sud• 105. HDut1on. Taus 71006 ~,.,.,,us tDyum«OIUSlllilitt-Sl15per week CS.C-. 50 per 6 mane. or $91 per yeel) Ortplay~~ReM<'v•spat:9nolater,.... NQCl'I TIU'sday. eigti1 dliyt prior ION kk>Wlng fnd.ly pub· lcaDor1 Copy and mateftllS 1or • proilleed by"' Houstm _~ . n..u.t •mv• ,no l ia.IM Nn_ f nc»y e~o mp me. ...s .e..w..n, ,d .a.ys. muat '""" no a.1., ..,.. ~ pm. ~y. ku dllys pnor to Nk:Jlo,...ngfn!My~ CllSllillHMMlfMtQ ....... NoatCST MlRlty ~w.oonoi.......,fllw"8!~b ca--br'N~~~.,.dl9dtollCM!Mh ~°'""~°'~~ Qaf1tW ~ Grea111r HoustOn Gay & L...-. Own'tl9t ol ec:nm.c:.. Nlitional Gly Nt~ Ouicf.rneM:ler. Gay Md L.-.n Pr9A A.-.~~ Ptn&- - - VOICES & ECHOES See:fane r I had +hi<:. weircl dream ... --tha.t my ei ·mvi+e.d 1'\C. over- .\-o ~ a\\ -tre. ne.w ~mi\-ure. s~ \>cu~nt··· See more Jane, VtSrt: http://www.pb9.conV Stealth Strategv Effort to beat Hawaii ref erendum isn 't hoiv to win Birch: HRC's leader wants to raise $I mlll1on tor Hawa11 media campaign The folks who run the natwn'ti largest gay political organization nn• a particularly savvy bunch. Som<'l1mes they're too savvy for their oWh good, or the good of the movement. In Ilnwa1i, th<• Human Rights Cumpaagn has committed to rnismg mon· than $1 million to fund a media campaign then• The aim is to prevent passag<' of a ballot referendum thnt would am<•nd the Aloha State's const1 tut10n to prevent the state supreme court from recoi:nizing gay marriage. (Story, Page llAI The llRC-ll>d fund-raising effort 1s an enormous and laudable undcrtak. 1n v,, nn<l wor thy of the gny rom mumty's support. TlH'~ are fow pt• r::;tmal frt•t•dom~ more ct•ntrttl thun the fret•dom to marry, and lfawai1 offrrs an historic opportunity thl' first hul npt thc1 last - to guarantc-e that freedom for our· selves and those who follow. Always politically astute, the llRC has conducted polling on the referendum and learn<'<! an 1mportant lesson that has bt•come central to its Hawaii strategy. The voters in llawa1i nn·n't ready for gay mnrriage, but they don't like the id<•a of changing their state constitution. The n •su lting HRC strall·gy is som<•thing like the stealth "gay agenda" that conscrvativt1 groupH a re alway8 conj ur­ing up. The pro-gay groups have names like "Protect Our Constitution." while the anti-gay coalitions have names lik<• "Savl' Traditional Ma rriage." Our stealth strategy may appear more practical, but 1t"s actually quite danger-ous. The Hawaii Supreme Court has already d<•monstrnt<'<I that it's unwilling to move too far a head of the public on th<• issue of gay marriage. It's been five yenn; s incp that court decided that denying gays the freedom to marry each oth!•r violates the con· stituloon's promise of l'qual protection. But <'V<'n two yt•a rs after th<• stall' failed to prove a compl•lling justifies· lion for t rPuting gays d1ffcn•ntly, the high court hasn't acted on th<• app!•al The first priority must he to tell our stories and educate the public ahout our /fres. Ei·en toda)~ most Amencans haven! taken the time to consider.fairly our case for marriage A civil rights mm·emellf ha.\ to be about makmg a case for equality to the public and the courts. When we look for shortcuts that hide our real agenda, we 're too clever for our own good. D.C. The U.S. Supreme Court will likely decide once and for all whether it is constitutional for statl'S to allow het­erosexuals, but not gays, to marry. The- ntnP justices on that court may be sworn to uphold the Constitution. but gays know all too well that they arc humans with preJU· dices first. That means, in Hawaii and Texas and Washinb<ton, D.C the first priority must be to tell our stories and educate the public about our live;;. Even today, most Americans haven't taken the time to consider fn1rlv our case for mnrnait.'. A c1v1I rights move­ment has to be about making a case for equality to the public and the courts. When we look for shortcuts that hide our real agenda, we're too clever for our own good. The Hawaii Supreme Court isn't alone. In more than 30 states, laws have bl'cn enacted to prohibi t the recogni· lion of gay marriages, from Hawaii or any­Plaintiffs: Genora Dancel and Nmia Baeher were one of throe gay couples seeking licenses to marry m Hawa11, an idea that sparked a h1stonc lawswt fifed 1n 1990 that 1s now pending before the state's Supreme Court. -Photo by Dennis Oda In our mo,·cment, there should be no such a thmg as a battle not worth fightmg - whether it's public hC'.artngs on rC'moving the statt•'s sodomy law whl'n the votes aren't there to pass it, or whether n's educatmg voters m Hawaii about where else. Tu win recognition, gays in many of those states will be going to court one day, and those judges, pre· sent<•d with a "public policy exception" that permits one s ta te to ignore a nother state's law, will also be hard· prcss<•d to move too far ahead of public opinion. The same could be said for the Big Court in Wash ington, the fundamental fair· ness of allowmg gay couples to pursue their own happiness as married couples. The Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. didn't allow Gallup surveys and focus groups to determine the basic claim to fairness be so eloquently advocated, and neither should our leaders. --=·--·s..--•-•'=' ·----- PA GE 1 9 A S E PT E "" BER 1 B 1 9 9 B VOICES & ECHOES .. Plant Lile Trendy container garden proves to be urban therapy by DREW PLAN' It started during the four­and- a-half years I worked at home. My home otfice - my former dining room - backed up to a wall of windows, and I wanted something green on the balcony outside. So I hit Homo Depot and sev· eral nurseries and came home to plant a nice, big evergreen bush with various herbs scat· and wntchrng things grow before. but I've been yard less for all of my 10 years back rn Atlanta. I nearly bought a yard - oh, yeah, a house would have come with it - earlier this year but post­poned, with a nod toward a new job. But with a new, get-out-of-the-house JOb and the realization that a new job and a new house in the same, short time period were too much, I opted for three more large containers and no mortgage. In went Mexican heather, lantana, more herbs, through the addition of some all-important missing t.'lement. I know my neighbors must wondt•r what body I am burying at midnight or beyond. At lt•ast one noc· turnal neighbor has glimpsed me gardening in my underwear Well, he should have been in bed any· way. Luckily, the pitfalls of my new hobby are few. The all-day exposure to the sun was my first and seemed to be my biggest challenge. Not many plants can adapt to life in a container and near-constant daytime sun. Then tered about the base. The combinatwn of permanent greenery and good­smelling, utilitarian tiny things seemed to make my real work go easier. :'.\"ot long after, my apartment complex manager was perplexed when another resident (a kindred soul, no less) moved out, leaving behrnd a huge concrete con­tarner. I asked if I could have it, assum­ing I was able to move the bronzed and antiqued I no kidding) monstrosity to my own balcony; she readily agreed. Before company comes, I fuss over my container garden like a parent trying to get the kids in just the right outfit. When I couldn i figure out why my came the wasps. I didn't know why my dianthus was dying. After all, it was one of the oldest and best-established plants in my gar­den. It was with great angst that I started cutting out the dead spots one day. Out flew many, many, many wasps. dianthus was dying, I started cutting out the dead I screamed like a girl, which I know will surprise no one. As I struggled to get the door open and fall into the din· ing room, three wasps found their tar· get - unfortunately, two of those tar­The container garden bug had hit. I get!r were up my pants. was on a roll that would alternately delight and bewilder my friends and clients. I went along for two-plus years spots and out flew many, many wasps. I screamed like a girl, which I know will surprise no one. One wasp got the inside of my thigh; another got the base of my pristine backside. Needless to say, I'm just happy I was wearing tighter-fitting briefs with my baggy shorts. (The third sting was on my less·excit· ing, less-enticing upper arm.) obsessively over-protecting my urban gardens. I learned more than I wanted to about aphids, fungus, watering schedules and appropriate fertil· izers. I also learned where to go to find answers to questrons like, "Why do the leaves look perforated?" When I left town on business, it wasn't JUSt my cat that would need a sitter Who would tend Stately Pinnt Gardens? Unw1ttmgly, I had become part of a trend. Every publication or cable show II can't watch movies and profiles on Lifetime - "Television for Women• - all of the time) seemed to feature rooftop gardens, urban green houses and containered frurt trees that would support ;\lrs. Smith's apple pie factory. More than that, I had discovered a new form of therapy. I've known the JOY of digging in the dirt Cigar Alicionado cannas, Carolina jasmrne and a huge butterfly bush that has become my pride and JOY. I am so proud of my little row of mismatched contarners, sitting one floor up from a parking garage and spilling over carelessly with different heights, textures, colors, smells, diseases and bugs. Before company comes, I fuss over these contain· ers like a parent trying to get the krds rn Just thi> right outfit. Last night I proudly served guests a meal that included several of my fresh herbs We ate looking out over my little patches of moveable earth. It's not cruising I'm up to when I hit the 24-hour Home Depot now IOK, I do put on fresh cologne and fix the hair J. No, occasionally stress can only be erast•d hy late-night clipping, digging or maybe The swelling has long sinrn faded and now sum· mer is as well. I'm in the midst of planting the fall garden and wondering how my containers will weather the move to a house. In the meantime, I'm eyeing a corner in my office and wondering how much greenery I can install before my boss notices the loamy odor and increas· ing water bilk Couldn't we Just include the cost in our employee wellness plan? Drew Plant is an Atlanta-based writer who had to use a dictionary to spell the names of hrs beloved plants. His column takes a lrunu111·1nterest forns and oftl'n .'ihan•s hrn obs~ssions Effect of scandal may harm Clinton s push for gay tolerance y "AREN SHOFFNl:R I have learned more about President Clinton's ilhc1t sex hfo than I have wanted to. With the release of Independent Counsel Kenneth Starr's n•port on the Clinton-Lewinsky affair on the Internet, the details of the president's furtive sexual hmson with the then 21-ycar· old White House intern arc available N-.. I'd le '" to b• fly on tht" 111 when aL mrrep d nnd srnct'rc parent endeavors tv cxplarn to his or her rapt seven· year-old the uses of n cigar in clandt•strne sexual encounter:;. I wonder how many parents seized the opportum· ty to talk honestly with their cluldren about homo­se. xuahty when Ellen DeGcneres came out or about the options nva1lable to lesbians who want to bear children when the news of :\1elissa Etheridge's part ner's pregnancy broke. I don't rccnll anyone in the Starr\ irre ;p msibihty and zr.,Jousnuss, we ore now ex1wriencmg the Rcpublrcnn ideal of less govern· ment. ;\!y friend Emily said thnt politicians are so pn•occup1ed with Starrs report nnd its mrrnficnt1ons that they have ct'ased to govt•rn. Russian, Asian and South Amerrcan econon11es arn on the wrg(• of col· lapse. Yet our fearless lenders ure mutt• und <·xtraor· dmarily rnactive on th(• world stag<•. And forg1•t about ony discussion of domestic issues lrke t•clucation, cnme and poverty. But that's th1• hard stun~ :\luch easier to moralize nnd contemplat(• oral sex. lies and cignrs. to anyone in the world who has a com· puter nnd a modem. It's rather absurd. I've read enough of Starr's report to know that I don't want to know anymorl• The report, while purporting to show that Clinton committed 11 impeachable offenses, 1s actually state-sanctwned soft core pornography. Starr was apporntcd by the attorney general orrginally to investigate the Whitewater land deal and n Repubhcan·controlled Congress voted overwhelmingly to allow the report to be made available online. At one time, (Clinton) did deserve kudos for being the It's not JUSt politicians, though. A friend who lives rn southern Cnliforma said that the day ufll'r lht• n•port Wl'nt onlrne, the ent1n• front page of tlw Los Angeles Times, along with a ~pl'tutl sec­tion, was devot<·d to the scandal. I Of course, I'm no better really sinn• I'm writing about it.) first [; S. president who could say the words /e\bian and gay without it being visibly painful for him. But that isn ~enough. While many Americans might be able to tolerate Clinton in all his weakness, I doubt Because he can't run for rc-ch.·cllon, Clinton was a lame duck unyway. But even if he isn't imp1•adll'd or doesn't resign, I'm afraid his effectiveness as a leader will be greatly d1mrnished. At one time, he did desnve kudos for b(•tng the first U.S. pres1dl·nt who could say the words lesbian and gay without it being visibly painful for him. But that isn't While conservative, family values types, some of them members of Congress, get the vapor.< at the thought of pornography - soft, hard and any· thing in between - they seemed to have they 'II allow him to push for tolerance. even affirmation of us, after the dust has sell led. little difficulty unleashing the narrative of the Chnton·Lewrnsky assignations. The same peo­ple who are revolted at not Just the sight, but also the thought of lesbians and gays being the least bit affec· t1onate towards each other will probably be jostling therr way into the web sites where the report is avail· able JUSt like the rest of us. They won't have difficul· ty finding 1t srnce the report is accessible from any number of local, regional and national newspaper web Sites. When the information about what went on between Bill and Monica had only been leaked to the press, the author of a column I read somewhere sug­gested that the entanglement could be a good oppor· turuty to talk honestly with one's child about sex. HOUSTON VOIC E moinstream media suggesting parents should do so. If any parents did, they were on their own. Cigars have been very popular in recent years At almost uny newsstand, one can ogle copies of "Cigar Aficionado," a pretentious glossy magazine devoted to stogies and their appurtenances. A celebrity with thrs phallus·shaped symbol of power adorns pract1· cally every cover of the magazine. Now that Monica's escnpade with Bill's cigar is widespread knowledge, will straight, middle class couples eager to spice up their sex lives rush to buy a Cohiba or Davidoff' The prospect of a Monica-inspired rise in cigar sales is undoubtedly a tobacconist's wet dream, so to speak Thanks to Clinton's stupidity and n.-cklessness and enough. Speaking nt a national lesbr~'lly organization's dinner or invit111g orwnly gay celebrities 1s useful symbolically, I suppo•e, but 1t effects httle real change. Yes, Clinton is a womanizer, o liar, o scoundn•l, but we're all imperfect and I believe h(>'s b(•ing tarn•d and feathered unnecessarily. But hey, there's noth· ing quite like the spectacle of th(• self-rightt•ous cost· ing those first stones, right? While many Americans might be able to tolerate Clinton in nil his weakness, I doubt they'll allow him to push for tolerance, even affirmation of us, after the dust has settled. That's JUSt one of the sorry things about thrs tawdry little >Candal. Karen Shoffner <.• a freelance u•ni<'r rn Northampton, Mass. P A G E 2 0 A SC:PTEIVIBER 1 B 1 8 B B WHAT YOUR PROTEASE INHIBITOR CAN BE: VIRACEPT IS POWERFUL It's tough on HIV. In many people, VIRAC£PT lowered the clinical tnals. VIRACEPT WORKS It ndicated for the treatrent of HIV nfectJon amount of HIV in the blood to levels below the limit of detection of the test used, when anti-HIV drug longer or reduce the number of infedions or ot'ier llnesses and substantially increased CD4 cell counts after 24 weeks of tnple combination that can occur with HIV. Some common medications and some HIV 1elated therapy. (The clinical significance of changes medications should not be taken with VIRACEPT For some people, protease p nelfinavir mesylate in viral RNA levels in blood has not been established. The virus may still be present in 1nh1b1tors have been assooated with the other organ systems.) VIRACEPT IS EASY TO LIVE WITH Take It three times a day onset or worsening of diabetes me1l1tus and hyperglycemia, and wtth increased with your normal meals or light snacks. VIRACEPT IS GENERALLY WELL bleeding in patients with hemophilia Ask your doctor. For more information, call TOLERATED People treated with VIRACEPT may experience some side effects; the toll free 1-888-VIRACEPT 01 v1s1t www.agouron.com most common is diarrhea of moderare or g1eate1 intensity 111 20% of people i: Agcuon Pf•• ..,.h::.. --=····w.--•·•k !•··-- P A GE 2 1 A T SEPTE IVIB E A 1 a 1 a a a VIRACEPT nelfinavir mesylate Information for Patients About VIRACEPT (Vl-ra-cept) Generic Name: nelfinavir (nel·FIN-na-veer) mesylate For the Treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection Please read this lnfc 1ati refully before taking VI RACE PT Also, please read this leaflet each lime you renew the prescription, 1ust in case anything has changed. This is a summary and not a replacement for a careful d1scuss1on wrth your doctor. You and your doctor should d<SCuss VIRACEPTwhen you start taking this medication and at regular checkups. You should remain under a doctor's care when taking VIRACEPT and should not change or stop treatment without first talking with your doctor WHAT IS VIRACEPT AND HOW DOES IT WORK? VIRACEPT IS used m the treatment of people wrth ~uman immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. Infection with HIV leads to the destruction of CD4 T cells whieh are important to the immune system After a large number of CD4 cells have been destroyed, the infected person develops acquired mmune deht1ency syndrome (AIDS). VIRACEPi works by block:ng HIV protease ca protein-cutting enzyme1, which IS required for HIV to multiply VIRACEPT has been shown to s1gmflcant1y reduce the amount of HIV m the blood. You should be aware however that the effect of VIRACEPT on HIV In the blood has not been correlated with tong· term ~ealth benefits. Patients who tock VIRACEPT also had s1gmficant increases 1n their CD4 cell count. VIRACEPT 1s usually taken together with other anhretroviral drugs such as Retrovi .. (zidoV1Jdine, AZTJ, EpM .. (lam1V1Jdme. 3TC), or Zent (staV1Jd1ne. d4T) Taking VIRACEPT in combination with other antiretrowal drugs reduces the amount of HIV 1n Ille body (Ylral load) and raises C04 counts. VIRACEPT may be taken by adults. adolescents, and children 2 years of age or older. Studies Jn nfants younger than 2 years of age are ~ow taking place. DOES VIRACEPT CURE HIV OR AIDS? VIRACEPT IS not a cure for HIV 1nfechon or AIDS The long-term effects of VIRACEPT are not known at this time People 1Jk1ng VIRACEPT mar still develop opportunistic mfect1ons or other cond1t1ons associated with HIV infection. Some o th.ese cond111ons are pneumonia. herpes virus 1nfect1ons. Mycobactenum avium complex (MAC) mfect1ons. and Kaposi's sarcoma It IS not known whether VIRACEPT will help you Jive longer or reduce the number of mfections or other illnesses that may occur There IS no proof that VIRACEPT can reduce the nsk of transmmmg HIV to others through sexual contact or blood contamination WHO SHOULD OR SHOULD NOT TAKE VIRACEPT? Together with your doctor. you need to deCJde whether VIRACEPT IS appropriate for you. In '!laking your dec1S1on. the folJowmg should be considered Allergies· ff you have had a serious allergic reaction to VIRACEPT. you must not take VfRACEPT. You should also •nform your doctor. nurse, or pharmacist of any known a11erg1es to substances such as other medicmes, foods. preservatives. or dyes. ff you are pregnant: The effects of VIRACEPT on pregnant women or their unborn babies are not ~~t!ryou are pregnant or plan to become pregnant. you should tell your doctor before taking ff you are breast-feeding: You should discuss with your doctor the best way to feed your baby. You should be aware tha.t H your baby does not already have HIV. there is a chance that 1t can be transmitted through breasMeed1r19 Women should not breast-feed if they have HIV. Children: VI RACE PT IS available for the treatment of children 2 through 13 years of age w1Jh HIV There Is a powder form of VIRACEPT that can be mixed with milk, baby formula or foods hke pudding 1nstruc110ns on how to take VIRACEPT powder can be found in a J.Jter section that discusses how VIRACEPT Oral Powder should be prepared ff you have liver disease: VIRACEPT has not been studied 1n people with hverd1sease. If you have fiver disease, you should tell your doctor before taking VIRACEPT. Other medical problems: Certain medical problems may affect the use of VIRACEPT. Some people taking protease inhibitors have developed new or more serious diabetes or high blood sugar. Some people with hemophilia have had increased bleeding. It is not known whether the protease 1nhib1tors caused these problems. Be sure to tell your doctor If you have hemophilia types A and B. diabetes mell1tus. or an increase in thirst and/or frequent unnat1on CAN VIRACEPT BE TAKEN WITH OTHER MEDICATIONS? VIRACEPT may interact with other drugs, including those you take without a prescription. You must discuss with your doctor any drugs that you are taking or are planning to take before you take VI RACE PT. Drugs you should pol take with VIRACEPT: • Sekl<lne" lterfenadme. for allergies) • Hismanaf' (astem11ole. for allergies) • Propulsid" (CJSapride, for heartburn) • Cordarone"(amiodarone, for irregular heartbeat) • Ou1md1ne (for irregular heartbeat), also known as Ou1naglute~Gard1oqu1~0u1mdex. and others • Ergot denvatNes (Gafergot and others, for m1gra1ne headache) • Haitian" (triazobm) • Versed" (midazolam) Taking the above drugs with VI RACE PT may cause serious and/or hfe-threatemng adVerse events. • R1fampin (for tuberculosis). also known as R1mactane", R1fad1n", R1fate ... or R1famate• ThlS drug reduces blood levels of VIRACEPT Dose reduction required if you take VIRACEPTw1th Mycobutin• (nfabubn, for MAC); you wil' need to take a low !r do,,e of Mycobutm. A change of therapy should be considered If you are taking VIRACEPT with: • Phenobarbital • Phenyto1n f D1lant1n" and others) • Garbamazep1ne (Tegretol" and others) These agents may reduce the amount of VI RACE PT in your blood and make 1t less effective • Oral contraceptives ("the p11r1 It you are taking the pill to prevent pregnancy. you should use a different type of contraception since VIRACEPT may reduce the effectiveness of oral conlraceptNes. HOW SHOULD VIRACEPT BE TAKEN WITH OTHER ANTI-HIV DRUGS? taking VIRACEPT together with other anh·HIV drugs increases their ability to fight lhe virus. It also reduces Ille opportunity for resistant VJruses to grow. Based on your history of taking other ant•HIV medicine, your doctor will direct you on how to take VIRACEPT and other anh·HIV medicines. These drugs shOUld be taken ma certain order or at specHic ~mes. ThlS wlll depend on how many times a day each medicme should be taken. It win also depend on whether tt should be taken with or without food Nucleos1de analogues: No drug "1teract10n problems were seen when VIAACEPT was given with: • Retrow (zidovudme. AZT) • EpMr (lam1V1Jdine 3TC) • Zent (stavud ne. d4T) • Videx9(didanosine, ddll ff you are taking both Videx (ddl) and VIRACEPT: V1dex should be taken without food. on an empty stomach. Therefore, you should take VIRACEPT with food one hour atter or '!lore than two hours before you take V1dex Nonnucleos1de reverse lranscriptase inhibitors (NNRTls): When VIRACEPT IS taken together with: • Viramune (nevirap1ne) The amount of VIRACEPT in your blood may be reduced Studies are now taking place to learn about the safety of combining VIRACEPT with Viramune • Other NNATls VIRACEPT has not been studied wrth other NNRTls HOUSTON VOICE P A G E Other protease inhib1Jors: When VIRACEPT IS taken together with: • Cr1xivan (md1naV1r) The amount of both drugs 1n your blood may be increased. Currently. there are no safety and efficacy data available from the use of t111s comb1nat1on. • Norvir'" (ntonaV1r) The amount of VIRACEPT In your blood may be increased Currently. there are no safety and efficacy data available from the use of this combination. • lnvirase (saquinaVJr) The amount of saqu1naV1r 1n your blood may be mcreased. If used 1n comb1nat1on with saQuinavir hard gelatin capsules at 600 mo three times daily, no dose ad1ustments are needed. Currently, there are no safety and eff1c cy data available from the use of this comb1nat1on. WHAT ARE THE SIDE EFFECTS OF VIRACEPP Like all med1c1nes. VIRACEPT can cause side effecls. Most of the side effects experienced with VIRACEPT have been mild to moderate. Diarrhea 1s the most common side effect m people taking VIRACEPT and most adult patients had at least mild diarrhea at some point during treatment. In clinical studies. about 20% of patients rece1v1ng VIRACEPT 750 mg (three tablets) three times daily had four or more loose stools a day. In most cases. diarrhea can be controlled using ant1d1arrheal med1cmes, such as lmod1um A·D (loperam1de) and others, which are available w1.thout a prescription Other side effects lhat occurred m 2% or more of patients rece1V1ng VIRACEPT include abdominal pain. asthema nausea. flatulence and rash. There were other side eHects noted 1n cl1mcal studies that occurred in less than 2% of pal1ents receMng VIRACEPT. However, these side effects may have been due to other drugs that patients were taking or to the illness nsett. Except for diarrllea. there were not many differences in side effects Jn patients who took VIRACEPT along with other drugs compared with those who tock only the other drugs For a complete list of side effects. ask your doctor, ~urse or pharmaciSI. HOW SHOULD I TAKE VIRACEPT? VIRACEPT 1s available only with your doctor's prescnphon. The light blue VI RACE PT Tablets should be taken three times a day. VIRACEf>T should always be taken with a meal or a light snack You do not have to take VIRACEPT exactly every 8 hours instead. you can take 1t at normal times when you are eating Take VIRACEPT eucffy as directed by your doctor. Do not increase or decrease any dose or the number of doses per day. Also. take this med1c1ne for the exact period of time Jhat your doctor has mstructed Do not stop taking VIRACEPT without first consulting with your doctor, even if you are feelmg better. Only take medicine that has been prescribed spec1f1cally for you. Do not give VIRACEPT to others or take medicine prescribed for someone else The dosing of VIRACEPT may be different for you than for other pal1ents. Follow the directions from your doctor, eiacffy as wriffen on the label. The amounl of VIRACEPT 1n the blood should remain somewhat consistent over time. Missing doses will cause the concenlrahon of VIRACEPT to decrease. therefore, you should not miss any doses. However. 11 you miss a dose, you should take the dose as soon as possible and then take your next scheduled dose and future doses as originally scheduled Dosing 1n adults (Including children 14{ ears of age and older) The recommended adult dose of VIRAC PT 1s 750 mg (three tablets) taken three limes a day. Each dose should be taken wrth a meal or hght snack Dosing 1n children 2 through 13 years ol age The VIRACEPT dose in chllaren depends on their we19ht. The recommended dose Is 20 to 30 mg/kg (or 9 to 14 mg/pound) per dose. taken three times daily with a meal or hght snack. This can be adm1n1stered erther tn tablet form or, In children unable to take tablets. as VIRACEPT Oral Powder. Dose Instructions will be provided by the child's doctor. The dose will be given three times daily ustng the measunng scoo~ provided. a measuring teaspoon, or one or more tablets depending on the weight and ageofthec/'kf. ~ lt • r- · irt •tstrbegirentoa .t'ld sdescribed'nth-:hartbelow. Pt·dialrk Dose to He \dminlslert•d 'fhrt•t• 'l'lmt·s Dail) Body Weight f\umber I'. umber Number of le.el of l l"\.t>I of kg Lb Scoo~· Tta"-poon~1 Tahiti< 7 to < 8,5 t<5 IO<IH.5 8 5 lo <10.5 185lo<ll I'• '0510<12 23 lo <26.5 111> 2 to <14 2b 5 10 <31 ~ . •4 to <lb JI to <j) 8 'b to <18 JS 10 <Jq,5 9 21, '8 to <'3 Jq ~ to <50.5 10 2' ~J .?50 5 15 l • In measuring oral powder. the scoop or teaspoon should be level. • 1 level scoop contains 50 mg of VIRACEPT. Use only the scoop provided with your VIRACEPT bottle. • 1 level teaspoon contains 200 mg of VIRACEP r. Note A measunng teaspoon used for dispensing medication should be used for measunng VIRACEPT Oral Powder Ask your pharmacist to make sure you have a medication dispensing teaspoon How should VIRACEPT Oral Powder be prepared? The oral powder may be mixed w1Jh a small amounl of water. milk. formula, soy formula. soy milk, dietary supplements. or dairy foods such as pudding or ice cream. Once mixed, the entire amount must be taken to obla1n the full dose Do not mix the powder with any ac1d1c food or 1u1ce. such as orange or grapefruit ru1ce, apple ru1ce. or apple sauce. because this may create a bitter Jaste Once the powder is mixed, 1t may be stored at room temperature or refrigerated for up to 6 hours Do not heat the mixed dose once 1t has been prepared Do not add water to bottles of oral powder. VI RACE PT powder 1s supplied with a scoop for measuring For help 1n determm1ng the exact dose of powder for your child, please ask your doclor. nurse. or pharmacist VIRACEPT Oral Powder contains aspartame. a low-calorie sweetener, and therefore should not be taken by children with phenylketonuria (PKU) HOW SHOULD VIRACEPT BE STORED? Keep VIRACEPT and all other med1c1nes out of the reach of children. Keep bottle closed and store at room temperature lbetween 59°F and 86'FI away from sources of moisture such as a sink or other damp place Heat and moisture may reduce the effectiveness of VIRACEPT. Do not keep,med1c1ne that is out of date or that you no longer need Be sure that 11 you throw any medicine away, It IS out al the reach of children. Discuss all quesuons about your health with your doctor II you have quesl1ons aboul VIRACEPT or any other med1cat10n you are taking, ask your doctor. nurse, or pharmacist You can also call 1.888 VIRACEPT ( 1 888 84 7 2237) toll free. The following are registered trademarks ol their respective manufacturers: Retrovir. Ep1vir/Glaxo Wellcome Oncology/HIV, Zent, V1de~lflnsto~Myers Squibb Oncology: lnvirase. VersedlAoche Laboratories Inc: Seldane, R1fadin, R1famale. R1fater/Hoechst Manon Roussel: H1smanal, Propuls1d/Janssen Pharmaceut1ca Inc: Halc1on. Mycobutu\/Pharmacia & Up1ohn Co: R1mactane. TegretoVC1baGeneva Pharmaceuticals: Viramune/Roxane Laboratories, Inc; D1lant1n/Parke-Davis: Cnx1van1Merck & Co. Inc. lmod1umA·D1McNe1I Consumer Products Co; Cordarone!Wyeth·Ayerst Laboratories. Ou1naglute1Berlex Laboratories; Card10QumfThe Purdue Frederick Co: Ouin1dex/A.H. Robms Co, Inc; CafergoVNovart1s Pharmaceuticals Corp. Norvir 1s a trademark of Abbott Laboratories lit.. Issued 11113197 Iii' CALL 1.888.VIRACEPT VIRACEPT t . a reg1•,ttrld trart,.1nar11; ol Aoouron Pharmaceuticals, Inc Copyoght 1998 Ag41 ifon P""- rmateutals, Inc All nghts reserved 2 2 A SE PT E IVIB E A Agcx.ron _ ..... 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