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Houston Voice, No. [1194], September 12, 2003
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Houston Voice, No. [1194], September 12, 2003 - File 001. 2003-09-12. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/18214/show/18185.

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(2003-09-12). Houston Voice, No. [1194], September 12, 2003 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/18214/show/18185

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. [1194], September 12, 2003 - File 001, 2003-09-12, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/18214/show/18185.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. [1194], September 12, 2003
Alternate Title Houston Voice, No. 1193, September 12, 2003
Contributor
  • Fleming, Mike
Publisher Window Media
Date September 12, 2003
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).; Incorrect issue number, 1193, printed on front page.
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript voice Autumnal release Fall is teaming with gay entertainment like TV's 'It's All Relative.' Pages 15-18 ISSUE 1193 WWW.HOUSTONVOICE.COM ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR LIFE. AND YOUR STYLE. SEPTEMBER 12, 2003 Democrats dominate Senate 'DOMA' hearing Senators, gay law professor rebuke anti-gay constitutional amendment By LOU CHIBBARO JR. WASHINGTON — Five Democratic senators joined forces with a gay Republican law professor at a Senate hearing last week to dispute the need for a constitutional amendment prohibiting gay marriage. “[A]n amendment banning same-sex marriage is a solution in search of a prob­lem,” said former Houstonian University of Minnesota Law School Professor Dale Carpenter, a member of the gay GOP group Log Cabin Republicans. Carpenter said “federal and state laws already prevent the court-ordered imposi­tion of nationwide same-sex marriage for the foreseeable future.” He said states should be allowed to adopt same-sex mar­riage if they choose to do so. Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas), chair of the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution, said he called the Sept. 4 hearing to discuss whether the anti-gay Defense of Marriage Act of 1996 could withstand a ruling by state or federal courts legalizing same-sex marriage. The hearing took place four days before gay rights leaders and their supporters from civil rights groups met Sept. 8 in Washington to discuss strategy for advancing the cause for civil marriage for same-sex couples and opposing a constitu­tional amendment. The meeting was closed to the press and the public. Gay civil rights attorney Evan Wolfson, who founded the New York-based group Freedom to Marry, declined to comment on what was said or who attended the meet- Please see DOMA on Page 9 U.S. Sen. Russell Feingold (D-Wis.) was one of five Democrats who attended the hearing on the Defense of Marriage Act. Only one Republican attended. (Photo by AP) Annual gay business expo set for Houston Coy Tow, executive director of the Greater Houston Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Chamber of Commerce, said Empower 2003 is less like a business expo and more like a family-friendly festival. More than 150 businesses, groups set for annual Empower By JOSEF MOLNAR Houston’s upcoming annual gay business and entertainment exposition, Empower 2003, will give gay consumers the opportuni­ty to shop around, network with various companies, and even enjoy live entertain­ment and dancing. The Empower theme, “Go Straight to the Gay Market,” is aimed at giving a variety of gay and gay-friendly businesses and organi­zations a chance to reach out, and a constant lineup of music and performance entertain­ment will create a festive atmosphere. Empower, set for Sept. 20-21, is hosted each year by the Greater Houston Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Chamber of Commerce. “It’s actually less like a business expo than any one I’ve been to,” said Coy Tow, the Chamber’s executive director. “It’s more like a festival, although there are things you can do to be educated on.” More than 150 business and social orga­nizations and individuals will showcase their products and expertise in areas such as the business development, health care, home and garden, pet care, spirituality and sports. Attendees can also enjoy product and service giveaways like massages, enter vacation and product drawings, and receive a visitor’s package complete with coupons for local businesses. Hungry visitors will be satisfied by a variety of vendors at food courts, and several cash bars will be open during the event. Diverse offerings Savvy candidates in the upcoming mayoral and city elections, such as Annise Parker, a City Council member and candidate for City Controller, will be present to campaign for votes and speak at a workshop. Political groups such as the Harris County Democratic Party, the Human Rights Campaign, and the Log Cabin Republicans, will also be present to speak with voters. Marla Dukler, a 17-year-old student from Klein High School who recently won a battle to establish a Gay-Straight Alliance in her school, will talk about her experience and offer advice to young people and adults about starting one in their schools. Although past Empower events provided networking opportunities between businesses, organizations and gay men and lesbians, Tow Please see GAY EXPO on Page 3 CASE DROPPED: Battery charges nixed against Southern Decadence protester. Page 8 HE'S OUT: U.S. Rep. Mark Foley (R-Fla.) avoided gay questions then dropped his Senate bid. Page 5 2 SEPTEMBER 12, 2003 www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE ’ HOW WE LIVE LAS VEGAS NICE PARIS POWDERS AND PILLS THE RETURN OF MOD NEW LOOKS FOR FALL UNCOMMON SCENTS MILITARY-INSPIRED FASHION HIRSUTE PURSUIT THE RUGGED FACE OF THE URBAN MALE 2GG3 - NQ 120 S4.95 / $6B5 CANADA gA^magaz^.com GET READY FOR EXTREME STYLE 07189649370209 O MORE INFO Empower 2003 Sept. 20-21 George R. Brown Convention Center Exhibit Hall A Tickets $5 713-523-7576 www.ghglcc.org/empower.htm HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com ? fesses®! ^Empower to deliver diverse weekend for participants GAY EXPO, continued from Page 1 said the focus widened to give gay con­sumers the chance to purchase products and services, as well. “We really tried to focus on being more interactive and consumer-driven instead of just networking,” he said. “We hope people will find things they want to take home with them.” That may happen in other ways, as well: two of Houston’s largest antique shows — the Houston Antique Dealer’s Association Fall Show and the Theta Charity Antiques Show — will be held the same weekend at the convention center. Although the chamber typically sees a profit of a few thousand dollars, Tow said Empower is meant to help business­es, companies and organizations to net­work with gay consumers. He expects the event to generate about $35,000 for the local community. “We are a fraction of their business, but we are still an important part of their business,” Tow said. “For them to want to invest in this event in particular said something.” And that something is a desire to reach what is increasingly being seen as a lucra­tive market. As with other minority groups, companies are slowly realizing they can profit from the gay market. “It’s easy to purchase an ad some­where and get a consumer who is in the process of buying something,” Tow said. “But Empower is about looking someone in the eyes and developing a relationship. We want to show that companies who invest in Empower are trying to reach out to the community.” Empower 2003, like past events, will offer a variety I ,)f vendor booths and companies reaching out to gay consumers. (Photo by Matthew A. Hennie) Organizers hope to attract a diverse crowd to Empower 2003, an event they are billing as 'family-friendly.' (Photo by Dalton DeHart) Chase Bank, for example, appears at Empower based on the return it sees from its investment. According to Jeff Wallace, a Chase vice president and treasurer of the Chamber, the company’s research shows that many people who visit the booth later become its clients. “The bank looks at this as making good business sense,” Wallace said. “This is a very good investment in the community.” By being sensitive to the differences between gay consumers and other mar­kets, Tow said a business will begin to gain trust. “We know when someone is just exploiting us versus actually wanting to be a part of the community,” he said. “People make choices about who they want to receive communications from, and they want’to know that an organization sup­ports them and is sensitive to their needs.” Gay professionals Having an interest in supporting gay consumers helps, but Empower also helps gay people professionally, as well. Some attendees come for the event’s professional development workshops, and job seekers can pick up a list of companies that are specifically looking to hire gay employees. Tow said Houston is not the only venue for these types of events, but it is the only one of its size to be hosted by a nonprofit group. “Their shows tend to be predominantly filled by businesses in the gay community, but we have more corporate support,” he said. “They are always impressed that we get such mainstream support.” Part of that reason, Tow said, is that Empower focuses on creating a business- Singer Christian Andr&son is one of several artists scheduled to appear at Empower 2003 next weekend. and family-friendly event. Although alco­hol is served at the event through the con­cessions, the Chamber does not seek spon­sorship from companies which may place a stigma on the event. “There’s a lot of other vendors we could get at this show, but we want the diversity within the community to be well-represented,” Tow said. “I think you could bring anyone to this event: gay, straight, your boss, your children. Anyone can come to this show.” SEPTEMBER 12, 2003 3 inside ISSUE 1194 LOCAL NEWS 3 NATIONAL NEWS 5 FORUM 10 OUT ON THE BAYOU 15 APPOINTMENTS 20 COMMUNITY CALENDAR 22 CLASSIFIEDS 23 HOROSCOPES 26 MARRIAGE BID: Gay couple Harold Donald Standhart and Tod Alan Keftner are suing to marry in Arizona, but they are having trouble gaining support from big-guns activists. Page 5 CRYING FOUL Lambda Legal Defense & Education Fund took the case of gay man Lorenzo Taylor, who is suing the U.S. State Department with claims of discrimination over his HIV positive status. Page 7 HOMO ALONE: Child star Macaulay Culkin grows up in 'Party Monster/ one of the most talked about independent films of the year. It’s just one gay offering in the fall arts lineup. Coverage begins on Page 15. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Houston Voice, 500 Lovett Blvd., Suite 200, Houston, TX 77006. Houston Voice is published weekly, on Friday, by Window Media LLC. Subscriptions are $92/year for 52 issues (only $1.77 per issue). 4 SEPTEMBER 12, 2003 www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE September 14 • “Come As A Little Child” Jerry Ann Cunningham, guest speaker Maranatha Fellowship Metropolitan Community Church "Building Community Through Compassion Visit Our New Improved & Larger Nursery/Children’s area Church Service begins at 10am and nursery is available for small children. Shepherd Groups meet during the week for prayer and bible study, contact church office for information. Please Join Us For Praise and Worship at our Sunday Morning Service And Experience the Love of God! 3333 Fannin, Suite 106, at 10AM Church office 713-528-6756 • E-mail maranatha@evl.net www. maranathamcc. com 2025 W. 11th St. @ T.C.Jester • 713-861-9149 www.resurrectionmcc.org METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH national news Mass. Senate leaders ready to back civil unions Robert E. Travaglini, president of the Massachusetts Senate, said he plans to back a move to establish civil unions for gays ■ and lesbians in the state. BOSTON — Leaders of the Massachusetts Senate will push to establish civil unions for gay couples, the Boston Globe reported. Senate President Robert E. Travaglini and others made the move-as the state’s highest court considers whether to legalize gay marriage. Senate leaders want to be prepared because they believe the court may direct the Legislature to address the question of the legal status of same-sex relationships, the Globe reported. “Being an advo­cate of civil rights and an advocate of fairness, and having supported domestic partnerships 20 years ago, it’s just a nat­ural progression for me,” Travaglini told the Globe. “I understand the concept of fairness and will be supportive of it.” Travaglini said he wants to bring civil union legislation to the floor of the Senate for a vote, but will wait until the Supreme Judicial Court case is decided. While many expect the court to issue its decision this fall, there is no formal deadline by which the court must act, the Globe reported. Massachusetts House Speaker Thomas M. Finneran, a socially conservative Democrat and opponent of legal recog­nition for same-sex couples, likely will battle Travaglini’s efforts. Gov. Mitt Romney also opposes civil unions. Gay conscientious objector found guilty of unauthorized absence NEW ORLEANS (AP) - A Marine reservist who was absent when his unit was activated in support of the war in Iraq was found innocent by a military jury of desertion, but guilty of a lesser charge of unauthorized absence. Lance Cpl. Stephen Funk, a native of Seattle, was sentenced to six months in prison and will receive a bad-conduct discharge, which results in his losing all military benefits, after he gets out of prison. Funk, 21, said he became a conscientious objector after sev­eral months of being trained to kill. There were 27 other Marines who declared them­selves conscientious objectors to the Iraq war. Like Funk, all were transferred to New Orleans for processing but none of the others were prosecuted because they still reported for duty on time, the Marines said. Funk, who while absent from the Marines attended anti-war rallies and later announced he was gay, has said in the past that the Marines were trying to make an example of him. Anti-gay protesters decry gay fans at Rangers game FORT WORTH, Texas — The Texas Rangers officially have not declared Sept. 14 as “Gay Day at the Ballpark,” but oth­ers have, the Fort Worth Star-Telegram reported. The Rangers battle the Oakland A’s, while gay attendees and protesters are expected to clash as well. Gil Flores of the Resource Center of Dallas organized a group ticket purchase for gay baseball fans as a fund-raiser. But protesters, powered by a Web site, www.protestgay-day. com, are gathering, momentum for a movement to discourage gay fans from displaying “the gay agenda of normaliza­tion,” Rick Warden, a protest organizer, Told the Star-Telegram. “This is a family event,” Warden said. The Web site is spe­cific. “The Texas Rangers should be ashamed,” it states. “This event legit­imizes the perverted g-ay and lesbian lifestyle in the eyes of the unsuspecting innocent child.” Mich, board OKs resolution opposing same-sex marriage PONTIAC, Mich. (AP) — The Oakland County Board of Commissioners approved a resolution to support a state constitutional amendment to ban same-sex marriages. The resolution, which is not binding, urges the state Legislature to put a constitutional amendment on the statewide ballot. State Sen. Alan Cropsey (R-Dewitt) said he plans to introduce the bill this year. Commissioner Tom McMillin (R-Auburn Hills) and a‘co­sponsor of the resolution, said that a “no” vote on the resolution would mean that a commissioner was against traditional fami­ly values. “This is needed because of what has happened in Canada,” he said. “The peo­ple that are caught in this lifestyle need help because it’s a very destructive lifestyle.” But Commissioner David Coulter, (D-Ferndale), said the resolution is unnecessary “There is no one in Lansing or Washington who is try­ing to overturn [marriage] laws,” he said. Vt. lawmaker welcomes Calif, domestic partner bill MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — State Rep. William Lippert is proud to have helped cre­ate Vermont’s first-in-the-nation law recog­nizing the relationships of same-sex cou­ples. And now he is happy to have California following Vermont’s lead, even if the bill it just adopted stops a little short of where he’d like it to be. The California Assembly gave final approval early this month to a law that would grant gay and lesbian couples nearly all of the rights, ben­efits and responsibilities of marriage. Gov. Gray Davis has said he would sign it into law. California’s action is “of tremendous significance for the gay and lesbian popula­tion in the country simply by the unique place that California holds in our national politics and in the politics of the national gay and lesbian community,” said Lippert, one of the authors of Vermont’s 2000 law. Lippert, a Democrat from the Burlington area, said he believes Vermont helped set the stage for California’s action. From staff and wire reports HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ | national news SEPTEMBER 12, 2003 5 Foley withdraws from Fla. Senate race Congressman tagged as gay cites family concerns By LOU CHIBBARO JR. WASHINGTON — U.S. Rep. Mark Foley (R-Fla.), who has declined to confirm or deny news reports that he is gay, withdrew from the race for a seat in the U.S. Senate last week, saying he wants to devote more time to care for his father, who was recent­ly diagnosed with cancer. Foley was considered the leading con­tender for the Republican nomination for the Florida Senate seat now held by Democrat Bob Graham, who is running for president. He has a mostly pro-gay voting record in the House of Representatives, although he emphasized his conservative positions on other issues while campaign­ing this year for the Senate. When news reports speculating about Foley’s sexual orientation surfaced in May political observers wondered whether his prospects for winning a Republican primary dominated by conservative voters would be diminished. Foley responded by calling a news conference for only straight media outlets and refusing to discuss his sexual orientation. • But some political activists in the state said the so-called “gay issue” did not appear to have hurt Foley as of the time he withdrew from the race. “He continued to break all records in the fund-raising department,” said Hastings Wyman, editor and publisher of the Southern Political Report, an authoritative newsletter on politics in Southern states. Wyman, who is gay, said Foley contin­ued to draw endorsements and retain his base of Republican moderates and some conservatives after a small weekly newspa­per in West Palm Beach published an arti­cle in May saying Foley is gay. The paper also reported that Foley lived with a long­time male companion. A weekly gay news­paper in Fort Lauderdale, the Express, also published stories saying Foley was gay. The speculation prompted Foley to invite a group of select reporters to participate in a telephone conference call in which Foley denounced rumors about his sexual orienta­tion and declined to say whether he is gay. “The fact that I am not married has allowed many people to speculate,” said Foley, who voted in 1996 in favor of the Defense of Marriage Act, which banned federal recognition of same-sex marriages. “I don’t care what they conclude. People can draw whatever conclusions they want.” Although Foley accused Democratic Party activists of spreading the rumors about his sexual orientation, Foley’s Republican adver­saries were also known to have circulated U.S. Rep. Mark Foley, a Republican, said he ended his bid for the U.S. Senate so that he and his sister could take care of their father, who was recently diagnosed with cancer. copies of the New Times article, according to news accounts in his district. Kirk Fordham, chief of staff for Foley’s congressional office in Washington, said Foley continued to garner support from all parts of the state following the press reports speculating about his sexual orientation. Fordham said contributions increased and endorsements continued from Republican Party movers and shakers. “Voters by and large were not focused on his private life,” Fordham said. “People either discarded the rumors or decided the issue was not a problem for them.” Fordham said Foley did not consider it hypocritical to demand that information about his sexual orientation remain off limits on grounds of personal privacy while revealing his father’s personal medi­cal condition as the reason for his with­drawal from the Senate race. “You can’t withdraw from a high profile political campaign without stating a rea­son,” Fordham said. “It wasn’t a feasible option not to say why. But we kept details of his father’s illness private.” The Palm Beach Post reported that Foley continued to lead his primary oppo­nents for the Republican nomination. The newspaper reported that the state’s politi­cal establishment was stunned to learn that Foley was withdrawing from the race. Foley said he would run for re-election to his seat in the House of Representatives, dis­placing at least two of his Republican sup­porters who planned to run for his House seat. He also said he would consider another Senate race in 2006,' when Democratic Senator Bill Nelson is up for re-election. The Palm Beach Post reported that Foley’s mother and father, both in their 80s, along with his sister, have played active roles in all of his political cam­paigns. His sister served as political direc­tor for his Senate campaign. “His parents, Foley said, insisted, ‘Please don’t give up the dream for us,’ the newspaper reported. “But Foley said he and his sister just could not go on now, knowing they were needed at home.” Lambda Legal, ACLU stay out of Arizona marriage case Officials fear individual cases may do more harm than good By LAUREL FAUST PHOENIX — The Lambda Legal Defense & Education Fund and the American Civil Liberties Union will not play a direct role in the case of two men who are suing the state ^f Arizona and the Maricopa County clerk P r the right to marry. Harold Donald Standhart, 34, and Tod Alan Keltner, 36, went before the clerk of the Superior Court on July 1 seeking a marriage license. The clerk refused to file the paperwork. Arizona state law stipu­lates that marriage between people of the same sex is illegal. Standhart and Keltner retained the ser­vices of attorney Michael S. Ryan, who filed a lawsuit in the Arizona Court of Appeals six days later. The three-member court heard the case in August, but it has not yet issued a decision. “It’s the right thing. It should be done. Gay people should have the same rights as anyone else,” Ryan said. Ryan said he relied heavily on the June 26 decision in Lawrence vs. Texas, in which the Supreme Court struck down as Harold Donald Standhart and Tod Alan Keltner are suing the state of Arizona for the right to marry and have criticized some gay rights groups as 'pretentious' and 'negative.' (Photo courtesy Phoenix New Times) unconstitutional the Texas sodomy law. Ryan also relied on cases where the courts struck down as unconstitutional laws prohibiting interracial marriages, and marriages of prisoners and poor people. “If the freedom to marry is a funda­mental right, then the freedom to choose whom to marry should be also,” Ryan said. Lambda Legal senior counsel Jon Davidson said that he flew to Phoenix and met with Ryan and his clients. Davidson said he provided extensive casework to assist in the case. He said he supports Standhart and Keltner and hopes they win, but that sometimes litigation is not the best avenue to pursue. “Litigation is only one of the tools that’s out there to win the freedom to marry. It’s a tool that shouldn’t be used in isolation,” Davidson said. He said that Lambda Legal has worked for a decade on the gay marriage issue and that it’s important to organize and educate people before pursuing legislation or litigation. “We learned in litigation in Hawaii and Alaska, that we can win in the courts and still lose, because the public doesn’t under­stand yet that we’re entitled to the rights,” Davidson said. In both Hawaii and Alaska, the highest courts in the state ruled that gay couples were entitled to full marriage rights, but the decision were thwarted by public ref­erendums. A 1998 state constitutional amendment in Hawaii permits the legisla­ture to restrict marriage to opposite-sex couples. An anti-gay marriage amendment was ratified in Alaska the same year. James Essex, litigation director for les­bian and gay rights for the ACLU, said that the Court of Appeals does not have jurisdic­tion over the Arizona case. He said that the case should have been filed in the trial court. “We fully support the rights of these two individuals and everyone in Arizona and the country to get married. We have rights in the federal Constitution and the state constitution to get married,” Essex said. He said that Ryan would have been able to present more evidence at the trial court level. Ryan had 20 minutes to make his case before the Appeals Court, the Arizona Republic reported. “The danger in all these cases is — can we hold onto the decision?” Essex said. Ryan said pursuing marriage rights is a matter of different strategies. He said there was no factual dispute in the case, only the matter of asking the court to com­pel the clerk to grant a marriage license. Lawyers should consider consequences of rulings Davidson said that careful considera­tion must be given to what will happen if a case is won or lost. If it is won — will there be a backlash of public opinion? If it is lost — how broad will the impact be? Ryan said that when a case is brought before the Appeals Court that it is more likely to set a precedent than if it goes to the trial court. Ryan said he is aware of the arguments and concerns raised by Lambda Legal and the ACLU, but that he disagrees. “The bottom line is that I have two clients who want to get married. Timing? When is the right time?” he said. “I think there’s a certain level of impa­tience among some members of the com­munity. It’s hard to live with this insult every day,” Davidson said. “But change takes time.” 6 SEPTEMBER 12,2003 Houston Gay Couple Welcomes Twins to the Family! On May ijth, 2003, Frank and Bob's life changed forever as they welcomed their children, Lucas and Leah, co their family. The Houston couple achieved their dreams of becoming parents through the assistance of Growing Generations, the nation’s oldest and largest surrogacy and egg donation agency serving the gay­community. "We had been trying for years to start a family," said Frank."With the help of Growing Generations, our dream has finally come true!" Growing Generations was founded in 1996 and has helped more than 500 members of the gay community create families through surrogacy and egg donation. A full-service agency with comprehensive case management services, Growing Generations is a gay and lesbian owned company and helps clients from across the United States and the world. Growing Generations Building Families oj Choice through Surrogacy for the Gay Community Worldwide For a free information package, call 1.800.877.4438 or visit: www.growinggenerations.com Celebrating 26 Years in the Community Catholic Mass Celebrated Saturdays at 7:30pm 1307'H Yale • 713'8802872 The KOLBE Project (Mering Peace & . Reconciliation to the Alienated 1030HeiglitsBhd. Houston, TN 77008 ph. 713.861.1800 wwu ikolbelmyfxtorg CALE Friday • September 12 Morning Prayer 10am Movie Night 7pm "The Transporter" Saturday • September 13 Breakfast 9:30am Monday • September 15 Eucharist 7:30pm N D A R Friday • September 19 Morning Prayer 10am Monday • September 22 Eucharist 7:30pm Friday • September 26 Morning Prayer 10am Movie Night 7pm "Chicago" _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE international news Canadian gay marriage foes hold nationwide protests MONTREAL, Canada — Opponents of same-sex marriage gathered in silent prayer across the coun­try this week to protest a proposed law legalizing gay unions, the Toronto Star reported. Most of the rallies took place in front of the constituency offices of gov­ernment lawmakers. Opponents want to convince politicians that they risk defeat in the next election if they support the legislation, the Star reported. More than 1,000 people attended a rally in Halifax, while more than 300 prayed outside Canadian Alliance MP Jason Kenney’s office in Calgary. In Edmonton, about 400 protesters at the offices of Health Minister Anne McLellan encountered about 40 people speak- Metropolitan Community Church founder Rev. Troy Perry (right) and his partner Phillip De Blieck show off their marriage certificate after being married in Toronto earlier this summer. (Photo by Frank Gunn/AP) ing out in favor of same-sex marriage. About 300 peo­ple gathered in front of Labour Minister Claudette Bradshaw’s office in Moncton, N.B., and hundreds more gathered in Ontario and Manitoba ridings. In Montreal, however, journalists outnumbered protesters, the Star reported. Brazil takes first step toward breaking patents on AIDS drugs SAO PAULO, Brazil (AP) — Brazil took the first formal step last week toward breaking patents with three pharmaceutical compa­nies selling AIDS drugs to South America’s largest country after talks failed to produce price reductions acceptable to the govern­ment. Negotiations are continuing with Abbott Laboratories, Merck & Co. and Roche, but Health Minister Humberto Costa announced a decree by President Luiz Inacio Lula da Silva that could lead to Brazilian production of generic versions, or imports of the cheap, copied drugs from other countries. Under the decree, Brazil could use a legal process to declare a national health emergency or public health need that would allow the country to break the drug companies’ patents, Costa’s office said in a statement. International agree­ments have allowed countries to break patents in times of national health emer­gencies, but that has been little help for countries with no pharmaceutical industry to make the medicines. Brazil, however, has a robust generic drug industry that can make its own drugs. Canadians split by generations over issue of same-sex marriage OTTAWA — A new public opinion poll found the debate over same-sex marriage continues to divide Canadians, especially along genera­tional lines, CBC News reported. Conducted by the firm NFOCF Group, the poll found Canadians younger than 35 are far more sup­portive of legalizing gay marriage than peo­ple of retirement age. But the results also suggest that Canadians on both sides of the issue do not want the issue to be left only to churches, CBC News reported. Those polled also report that they believe the courts in Canada have too much power. The poll sur­veyed 1,015 Canadian adults who were con­tacted by telephone between Aug. 25 and Aug. 30. It has a margin of error of 3.2 percentage points. Pollster Richard Jenkins said that few public policy issues have so clearly divided Canadians along generational lines as same-sex marriage. The poll found more than 60 percent of the respondents younger than 35 support same-sex marriages. An equal per­centage of seniors oppose it. 2006 Gay Games to be broadcast live MONTREAL, Canada — For the first time, the Gay Games will be broadcast live by a national television network, according to media reports. The Montreal organizing com­mittee for the 2006 games signed an agree­ment with Canada’s national broadcaster to show the opening and closing ceremonies live and to produce daily one-hour specials on the athletic events during the eight-day games. The broadcasts also will be made available on satellite around the world. “We are pleased to be partnering with the 2006 Gay Games,” said Daniel Gourd, executive vice president of CBC French Television. “Public television is a key vehicle for promoting openness to and raising awareness of the wider world.” The Montreal games, called Rendez-Vous Montreal 2006, also have received unprece­dented funding from the city the Quebec, and the Canadian governments, according to press reports. Gay Games VII will be held from July 29 to Aug. 5,2006, and will include 30 sporting events. Participants are expected from more than 100 countries. Mosques accused of ruining gay pupils' fund-raising pageant SAXONWOLD, South Africa — A school’s gay beauty pageant outraged local Muslim leaders, who dubbed the show morally “dubious,” the Sunday Times reported. Organizers of the Retreat pageant claim local mosques sabotaged the event because of homophobia and intolerance. Organizer Angelica Horne told the Times that pupils from the school asked her to arrange a pageant as a fund-raiser following the suc­cess of a similar event at a neighboring school. Greg Philander, a co-organizer of the pageant and part of a local gay charity group, said pupils had told him they wanted to take part, but had been instructed by their teachers not to do so. Principal Allan Liebenberg said homophobia was at the root of the dispute. Noor Willoughby, secre­tary of the Almunowara mosque in Retreat, confirmed that some teachers had asked the mosque to intervene. “We don’t approve of gay parades, as the morals within some of those communities are dubious.” From staff and wire reports HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.coni SEPTEMBER 12, 2003 7 Gay man with HIV sues State Dept. Denial of Foreign Service job allegedly based on HIV status By LOU CHIBBARO JR. WASHINGTON - A gay man with HIV has filed a lawsuit challenging the State Department’s policy of refusing to hire people with HIV for Foreign Service jobs, charging that the policy violates a federal law prohibiting disability discrimination. Lorenzo Taylor, 47, an Arlington, Va., resident and a longtime federal employee, charges that he was denied a Foreign Service job despite the fact that he has lived with HIV for 18 years and has never had long-term illnesses or opportunistic infections typical of AIDS. The suit, filed Sept. 3 in the United States District Court for the District of Columbia, notes that Taylor passed rigor­ous written and oral exams required by the U.S. Foreign Service program. The suit notes that he is fluent in three languages, holds a Foreign Service degree from Georgetown University, and has traveled extensively overseas for other jobs without adverse affects on his health. The gay legal lobby group Lambda Legal Defense & Education Fund of New York filed the suit on Taylor’s behalf. “By concluding that Mr. Taylor’s health is too poor to permit overseas work, the department has capitulated to an outdated and inaccurate generalization about peo­ple with HIV,” the suit states. The State Department has said it bars people with HIV from Foreign Service jobs because Foreign Service officers must be capable of being deployed worldwide. The U.S. Secretary of State Colin Powell once gave a speech asking American businesses not to discrimi­nate against employees who are HIV positive. His department has a policy that does not allow hiring any new employees to serve oversees who are HIV positive. (Photo by AP) ban is needed, State Department officials have said, because people with HIV may require medical treatment that is not avail­able in some less developed countries. However, the department allows Foreign Service officers who are diag­nosed with HIV while already on the job to remain in the Foreign Service if they show no signs of immune suppression. Under the policy, existing officers diagnosed with HIV remain eligible for limited overseas duties. Mindy Sofen, a State Department spokesperson, said the department never comments on pending litigation. Sofen said the Department’s Office of Medical Services considers individual applications for a medical approval for overseas posts on a case-by-case basis. The suit charges that the policy deny­ing jobs to new applicants with HIV vio­lates the federal Rehabilitation Act. The act prohibits the federal government from discriminating against job applicants with disabilities who are otherwise qualified to perform their duties with or without “rea­sonable accommodation.” HIV is consid­ered a disability under the act. Jonathan Givner, the Lambda attorney working on Taylor’s case, said applicants for Foreign Service jobs with HIV should be assessed on a case-by-case basis. “There’s no question that Taylor is extremely qualified to do this work and that he would do it well,” Givner said. “But because he has HIV, none of that matters to the federal government.” Givner added, “This policy prevents Lorenzo Taylor and other people like him from serving their country — all while there’s a severe shortage of Foreign Service applicants with these skills and qualifications.” HIV policy outdated: suit The lawsuit states that the State Department policy, which was issued in the early1980s, fails to take into considera­tion the advances in scientific knowledge about AIDS and the greatly improved med­ical treatment for the disease. “Today, thanks in part to significant medical breakthroughs, people living with HIV like Mr. Taylor often live long and healthy lives with few, if any, symptoms of HIV,” the suit says. “Nonetheless, the Department clings to the antiquated assumption that all people living with HIV, regardless of their actual physical condi­tion, are especially fragile and require near-constant monitoring and medical attention.” The suit notes that Taylor has traveled “without medical incident” to Brazil, China, Costa Rica, Germany, Russia, Senegal, South Africa, Turkey and Zimbabwe. It says the State Department recruited him for a Foreign Service job in July 2001, prompting him to take and pass the required written and oral exams. He received a conditional offer for a Foreign Service job in November 2001, the suit says. Lorenzo Taylor, who is gay, filed suit claiming the State Department refused to hire him because he is HIV positive. (Photo by Michael Wise) The following month, after reporting for a required physical exam, Taylor dis­closed he has HIV. It was at that time, the suit says, that a State Department doctor told him he would not be eligible for a Foreign Service job because of his HIV sta­tus. Taylor responded by applying for a medical waiver of the policy, asking the department to “conduct an individualized assessment of his application instead of relying on the department’s blanket policy against hiring HIV-positive candidates,” the suit says. A committee assigned to consider waivers denied his request in July 2002. “Being HIV positive has impacted my life in countless ways since I was diag­nosed, but it has never kept me from being able to do a job,” Taylor said in a state­ment. “I’ve always wanted to be a Foreign Service Officer. I’m still hopeful that I can be judged based on the skills and experi­ences I bring, along with my overall long­term health status, rather than just on whether I have HIV,” Taylor said. The suit points to a June 2002 speech by Secretary of State Colin Powell urging the nation’s business leaders not to engage in AIDS discrimination. “Corporate leaders can see to it that their managers implement fair employ­ment practices to ensure there is no dis­crimination related to a person’s HIV sta­tus — no stigmatization,” Powell said in his speech. “This is one of those lessons we have to get to all employers and nations around the world, that they must not stig­matize people who are ill.” “The Secretary of State recognizes that HIV discrimination in the workplace is a problem around the country and the world, and today’s lawsuit shows that it’s a problem in his own workplace,” Givner said. “With one stroke of his pen, he can end HIV discrimination in the Foreign Service, bring the government into com­pliance with the law and follow through on his own promise of fairness,” Givner said. The suit calls on the court to grant Taylor a Class I medical clearance or waiv­er, which would allow him to work as a Foreign Service officer with unlimited duties in any overseas assignment, or a Class II waiver or clearance, which would authorize limited access to certain assign­ments abroad. The suit also calls on the court to permanently enjoin the State Department from enforcing its policy of refusing to hire Taylor and other HIV-posi­tive people for Foreign Service jobs. In addition, It asks the court to order the State Department to pay Taylor the value of his lost wages and benefits as well as compensatory and punitive damages as specified by the Rehabilitation Act. 8 SEPTEMBER 12, 2003 www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE BEFORE THE CATEGORY WAS CALLED SUV, IT WAS SIMPLY CALLED LAND ROVER. 2003 Discovery S Service Loaner STARTING AT $28,995 $6,000 Off MSRP Right now we have a great selection of Land Rover Service Loaners very attractively priced. All vehicles have never been titled, are low mileage, and have the remaining balance of a 4 year/50,000 mile factory warranty. LAND ROVER HOUSTON 7019 Old Katy Road • 713-293-6100 www.landroverhouston.com Mon - Fri 9am-7pm • Sat 9am-6pm DX/ZMSTTZKOE AUTOMOTIVE GROUP The Southwest’s Largest Land Rover Centre Case dropped against minister who protested gay festival NEW ORLELANS — City prosecutors will nbf pursue a battery case against Rev. Grant Storms, who*led protests against the gay-popular Southern‘-Decadence festival and received a court summons after he allegedly got irito a shoving match with a security guard from a French Quarter gay bar, the Times-Picayune reported. The security guard, Mark Counts, had also received a sum­mons, and city officials elected to drop that case'also, Tanzie Jones, a spokesperson for Mayor Ray Nagin, told the Times-Picayune. Police cited both men after -hearing conflicting accounts of what took place. Storms alleged that the summons was part of a larger effort to “discredit the movement [against Decadence] and defame my character,” the newspaper reported. Among other examples, Storms cited news accounts that said he planned to try to block the Decadence parade. He never had any such plans, he said. Storms, who leads a group called Christian Conservatives for Reform, created a firestorm by denouncing the annual gay festival, characterizing it as a lewd and public cel- ■ ebration of a repugnant lifestyle. New Orleans prosecutors have dropped charges against Rev. Grant Storms in the wake of the minister's outspoken protests of Southern Decadence, an annual Crescent City festival popular among gays. Mich, gay man alleged serial killer of young men GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (AP) - A 63-year-old truck driver is accused of luring a young man into his truck with the promise of work and then drugging and sexually assaulting him. James Moore of LeRoy is charged with kidnapping, first-degree sexual assault, gross indecency between males and being a sexually delinquent person, police said. Moore faces up to life in prison if convicted. A 19-year-old man told police that Moore picked him up and later sedated him before sexually assaulting him. Authorities say they suspect Moore also was involved in the death of Justin Bogdanik, who died in July of apparent complications from pneumonia two weeks after he was found lying face down in a ditch with glue in his eyes and on his groin. Moore allegedly has drugged and raped an undetermined number of young men, according to media accounts. Police in Grand Rapids said Moore confessed to the attack on Bogdanik and has told them he assaulted other teens he picked up on the streets of the city, but he has not given any indication of the number. Inmate accused of killing Boston priest returned to prison BOSTON (AP) — The convicted murderer accused of killing former priest John Geoghan was returned to prison after being hospitalized for swallowing something in his cell, a spokesperson for the state Department of Correction said. Joseph Druce swallowed ’ an object in his cell and was taken to an out­side hospital for treatment for non-life threat­ening injuries. Druce allegedly beat and strangled Geoghan, 68, in the defrocked priest’s cell on Aug. 23. Geoghan, who has never said he is gay, was serving a nine- to 10- year sentence for groping a 10-year-old boy and was accused of molesting nearly 150 boys over three decades. Druce, 37, was serv­ing a life sentence for the 1988 murder of a gay man. Authorities have said he hates gays, Jews, blacks and other minorities. He unsuccessfully used an insanity defense dur­ing his 1989 trial in the killing of George Rollo, 51, who allegedly made a sexual advance toward Druce after picking him up while hitchhiking. Man says Akron police move too slowly on male rape AKRON, Ohio—A gay Cuyahoga Falls man is concerned that his rape is being treated differently by Akron police because he is male, the Gay People’s Chronicle reported. The 34-year-old University of Akron stu­dent says he was attacked, kidnapped and raped early in the morning on Aug. 8 in his alleged assailant’s apartment after leaving a bar near the university with the suspect and another man. But police have not yet filed charges or arrested his assailant, although the suspect’s name and address are known, the Chronicle reported. The vic­tim said the accused perpetrator tried to force him to have sex, then physically beat him when he refused. Photos taken at St. Thomas Hospital show the victim’s face severely bruised. Akron Chief Assistant Prosecutor Thomas DiCaudo, who also pro­vides legal counsel to the police depart­ment, said no charges have been filed because the case is under investigation. Attorney: Clemency justified for gay man on N.C. death row RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The attorney for a death row inmate scheduled to be execut­ed next month said she will argue several reasons why he should be granted clemen­cy, including mention of his sexual orien­tation during the trial. Edward Hartman, 38, was convicted Oct. 20,1994, for the 1993 murder of Herman Smith Jr. Although a date for a clemency hearing before GovJ Mike Easley has not been set, attorney Heather Wells of Wilmington said she expected it to be held Oct. 1. Hartman’s lawyers presented no evidence before his conviction. During sentencing, the defense presented evidence Hartman had psychiatric problems including depres­sion, anxiety and a history of alcohol abuse. At the trial, defense attorneys argued Hartman was the victim of sexual abuse, Wells said. She said former District Attorney David Beard diminished the impact of the sexual abuse, pointing out that because Hartman is gay, the sexual abuse was not meaningful. From staff and wire reports HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ | national news SEPTEMBER 12, 2003 9 Experts say GOP no-shows hurt amendment momentum crimination against gay couples. “What in the world are we doing here twnsidering this constitutional amend­ment?” he asked. Cornyn said the hearing was needed to GOP witness fear DOMA is at risk The two conservative attorneys cited the 1996 case of Roemer vs. Evans, in which the high court overturned an anti-gay ballot measure in Colorado on grounds i intend, or be overturned by activist courts,” Cornyn said. “I believe it is our duty to carefully consider what steps are needed to safeguard the traditional under­standing of marriage, and to defend the Defense of Marriage Act.” The freshman Texas senator said the nt U.S. Supreme Court decision over-ning state sodomy laws based on ds of privacy rights might be cited V courts to strike down state marriage ws that ban same-sex marriage. Cornyn 'said he intended to limit the hearing to assessing the status of DOMA rather than consider a constitutional amendment ban- ' ning same-sex marriage. However, nearly all of the Democratic senators, including Sen. Russell Feingold (D-Wis.), the ranking Democrat on the sub­committee, said any hearing on the poten­tial failure of DOMA could not avoid con­sideration of a constitutional amendment. Gay rights attorneys say the broadly worded amendment, which would forbid states from legalizing same-sex marriage, also would likely be interpreted by courts to repeal existing domestic partner laws and prohibit new ones. Some legal experts say the proposed amendment would also overturn Vermont’s landmark gay civil unions law. The witnesses invited by Cornyn spoke in favor of the amendment, saying DOMA was certain to be overturned by “activist” courts. Attorneys Gregory S. Coleman, the for­mer solicitor general for the state of Texas, and Michael P. Farris, a fundamen­talist Christian who ran unsuccessfully for the post of lieutenant governor of Virginia, said recent court rulings pertain­ing to gay rights indicate DOMA would be declared unconstitutional. Democrats question purpose of hearing Sen. Edward Kennedy of Massachusetts, one of the Democratic members of the panel, criticized the deci­sion to hold the hearing, saying the Senate was consumed with work on other, “more important” issues such as the war in Iraq, problems with the nation’s electric power grid and air pollution regulations. Kennedy called the proposed amendment unnecessary and a form of blatant dis- FJMA, continued from Page 1 ing, saying the conclave was a “rout gathering of those committed to advancing the cause of protecting gay families. ___________________ _ ____________ Sources famUiar with the hearing h€ip the Senate assess whether further which was held at the offices of the HumamJ action is necessary to “protect” the institu- Rights Campaign, said among the topic#Iffion of marriage through the Defense of discussed was an assessment of how mud^ Marriage Act, known as DOMA. support a constitutional amendment ha#>* DOMA defines marriage under federal among members of Congress and stqjB’y law as a union between a man and a woman civil rights activists can take to oppose th< and allows states to refuse to recognize amendment. y same-sex marriages approved by other HRC held a news conference on Sept W* states. Congress passed the act by a lopsid-prior to the start of Cornyn’s hearing, W ed margin and President Clinton signed it. That law’s lead sponsor, former Congressman Bob Barr (R-Ga.), has pub­licly lobbied against passage of a constitu­tional amendment, arguing that the issue ought to be left up to individual states, which have always adopted marriage and present several lesbian and gay male cow­pies, who described the problems they face by not being able to secure legal recogni­tion of their relationships. Gay activists had expressed concern that Cornyn, an opponent of gay marriage, ___________ would stack the hearing with witnesses who^ divorce laws in the past oppose gay rights and support the Federal, j “The question before us now is whether Marriage Amendment, a proposed constitiithe popular and bipartisan legislation will tional amendment that would forbid states remain the law of the land as the people from adopting same-sex marriage. ; But Cornyn was the only one of fjw subcommittee’s five-member Republic contingent to show up for the heart Each of the panel’s four Democrats Senator Patrick Leahy (D-Vt), the rankifii Democrat on the full Senate Judici Committee, attended and spoke against the constitutional amendment. Although each of Cornyn’s four inv witnesses — a minister, two lawyers conservative columnist — said such a stitutional amendment was needed, Democratic senators and their two invi witnesses each called for equal rights same-sex relationships. In addition to Carpenter, the other « ness invited by Democrats was Keith Bradkowski, a California resident whose domestic partner died in the Sept. 11 ter­rorist attacks, who gave an account of how not having a legally sanctioned relation­ship added to his suffering. Bradkowski’s partner, flight attendant Jeff Collman, was among those killed when one of two jetlin­ers crashed into the World Trade Center. “After his death, I was faced not only with my grief over losing Jeff — who was indeed juy better half — but with the painful task of F oving the authenticity of our relationship over and over again,” Bradkowski told the panel. “With no marriage license to prove our relationship existed, even something as fundamental as obtaining his death certifi­cate became a monumental task.” A former Houston resident, Minnesota Law School Professor Dale Carpenter was called by Democrat Russ Feingold to testify it was unnecessary to amend the constitution to block states from being forced to recognize gay marriages from other states. that the law violated the 14th Amendment’s equal protection clause and exhibited “animus” toward homosexuals. The attorneys also pointed to this year’s Supreme Court decision of Lawrence vs. Texas, which overturned state laws that made same-sex sodomy a crime. The Lawrence decision held that such laws vio­late constitutionally protected privacy rights and must be motivated by some legit­imate governmental interest other than moral disapproval of homosexuality That holding by the majority in Lawrence provoked conservative Justice Antonin Scalia to write in dissent that laws limiting marriage to heterosexual couples were justified only by moral disap­proval of gay relationships and were now constitutionally suspect. “As things currently stand, given the out­comes and rationales in Romer and Lawrence, it is likely, though not inevitable, that DOMA itself and prohibitions on same-sex marriage more generally will be held to be unconstitutional in the relatively near future,” Coleman said in his testimony “It is my professional opinion that, in the absence of some intervening event, the Supreme Court’s evolving standards of lib­erty and privacy will result in constitu­tional protection for same-sex marriages within the next five to 15 years,” he said Farris said he believes DOMA is consti­tutional -and can be justified under the Constitution’s full faith and credit clause, a provision that gay rights attorneys cited in the past as grounds for overturning DOMA. But similar to Coleman, Farris cited current trends in legal scholarship and writings, along with the Romer and Lawrence cases, as evidence that DOMA will be overturned. Farris pointed to Yale University law professor William Eskridge, a gay rights supporter, who wrote in a 2000 law review article that DOMA would become “consti­tutionally vulnerable” over a period of time, as more states adopt Vermont-style civil union laws. Maggie Gallagher, an author and columnist who specializes in marriage and family issues, told the subcommittee that legalization of gay marriage would severe-ly damage the institution of marriage as a “child-rearing institution.” Rev Ray Hammond, a Boston physician and pastor of the Bethel African Methodist Episcopal Church, said legalizing gay mar­riage would “erase the legal road map to mar­riage and the family from American law” The two said they oppose other forms of discrimination against gays but could not back the concept of same-sex marriage, which they said would unravel the nation’s fundamental cultural and social institu­tion of the family unit. Carpenter called the proposed constitu­tional amendment a form of “overkill,” say­ing it would destroy the nation’s longstanding principle of leaving it up to states to decide family-related law. He noted that such an amendment would prevent elected state legis­latures from adopting gay marriage laws at a time when the public supports such laws. “Whatever one thinks of same-sex marriage as a matter of policy, certainly no person who cares about our Constitution should support this unneces­sary, radical, anti-democratic, and overly broad departure from the nation’s tradi­tions and history,” Carpenter said. Full faith and credit could protect DOMA Carpenter disputed the assertions of Coleman and Farris that the Romer and Lawrence decisions would prompt the Supreme Court to overturn DOMA. Carpenter, who described himself as a con­servative who supports states’ rights, argued that the Constitution’s full faith and.credit clause would most likely not be found to be in conflict with DOMA. At the time Congress passed DOMA, many gay rights attorneys took the oppo­site view, saying the full faith and credit clause would force all states to recognize gay marriages approved in any single state. The clause in question, which is part of Article 4, Section 1 of the U.S. Constitution, states, “Full faith and credit shall be given in each state to the public acts, records,and judicial proceedings of every other state.” The clause adds, “And the Congress may by general laws pre­scribe the manner in which such acts, records, and proceedings shall be proved^ and the effect thereof.” Carpenter said the language giving Congress a role in establishing ground rules for the clause as well as a long estab­lished legal precedent for giving states an exemption to the clause on matters per­taining to “public policy” indicates that DOMA is not in jeopardy any time soon. 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Guidelines for freelance contributors are available upon request Issue 1194 HOUSTON VOICE SEPTEMBER 12, 2003 PAGE 10 Tina can't just be a friend, but instead insists on lec­turing you. He’s obviously just trying to put you back in place below him. So you’ll mouth the words of understanding. If being right is so important to him, let him have his feeling of superiority. You’ll cra­dle the phone, and feel sad that the friend­ship has ended. But in a strange way, you’ll also feel liberated. be tamed From one-time thrill to life-threatening addiction, crystal meth slowly lures users into a habit that kills friendships, destroys the person you once were. By STEPHEN FALLON ETME DESCRIBE HOW things will go when you start using crystal methamphetamines (also known as “Tina,” “crank,” and “ice”). Somebody will give it to you free at a nightclub or a party. They’ll say that it’s not exactly healthy, but that it’s a fun and low-risk indulgence for an occasional weekend, just like any other club drug: ecstasy, or Special K, or GHB. You’ll try it, and you’ll feel invigorat­ed, more alive than you’ve felt in ages, and, well, horny. You probably won’t hook up with anyone, because you’re aware that you’re not really thinking normally with this stuff churning through your brain. You’ll decide that you handled your first experience quite responsibly. A friend of yours, someone like me, will seem a little distant on the phone the next day or the next week. No, you hadn’t realized that you’d ignored your friend, or kept him waiting for you for four hours at the club. You’ll feel a little insulted that your friend is making such a big deal of one night’s schedule, but you’ll remember that he is your friend, and probably means well. You won’t use Tina again for a long time, or at least it will seem like a long time. Then something will happen. Maybe you’ll have a tough week at work, and just want an energetic escape from your wor­ries. Maybe you’ll see some guy you like dancing with the same group that had offered you Tina the last time. This time you’ll excuse yourself from your friend, just so there are no misunderstandings the next day. This night will be even better than the first one. You’ll enjoy Tina’s boost with none of the first-timer’s anxieties damp­ening the mood. You’ll stay out all night, spilling out from the club to an after hours party. You’ll feel happy and free. Guys will be drawn to you (and why shouldn’t they be? Everyone wants to be around happy people.) You’ll hug, kiss, dance and flirt. The next night, one of your new friends will call you while you’re pacing anxiously, still trying to get to sleep. You’re worried that Monday morning is approaching. What if you finally get tired just when you need to be at work? Fortunately, he’ll explain that a little hit of Tina can help. Of course, you won’t take enough to get “high,” just enough to carry you through the day. Then you can catch back up to your sleep schedule that night. AT THE OFFICE THE NEXT DAY, THE staff meeting will seem monotonous. Everyone is plodding along in baby steps, when the solutions to the business’ chal­lenges are all laying themselves out in your mind. Why can’t other people see how simple this all is? When you get home that evening, you’ll call me, or a friend like me, bubbling over with enthu­siasm about these new ideas. Why had you been such a follower all those years at the office? Your ideas could propel the company to new heights. You’ll be disgusted to hear a negative tone in your friend’s response. He’ll say that you’re oversimplifying matters, and that you’re not being realistic. You’ll hold the phone in your hand, mouth agape, in shock. Your friend is jealous of you! Of course! He sees you moving ahead, with new friends and new career prospects, and he’s feeling left behind. You’ll pity him in a way. Now you’ll buy Tina every weekend, and maybe a few times each week just to keep the creative juices flowing. One time you’ll take too much (hey, you can admit when you make a mistake). Sleep will evade you for three nights in a row. You’ll feel like you’re going crazy, bored beyond belief, as the stale nights roll by. One afternoon, crashing with fatigue but still too antsy to sleep, you’ll call that old friend, out of boredom. He’ll sound as weary as you feel. He’ll explain that he doesn’t want anything to happen to you, and that people on Tina often end up mak­ing bad choices. You’ll be disappointed that he can’t LATE THAT NIGHT, ONE OF THE PARTY guys will invite you over. It will seem refreshing to be around another person with positive energy You’ll stay up with him all night, sharing philosophies and passions. You’ll feel a special bond with him, and you won’t be surprised when he impulsively kisses you on the balcony at sunrise. The kisses, and the sex that fol­lows in the hot tub, are just a testament to the spiritual connection you feel with him. There won’t be any condoms around, but one night certainly isn’t going to matter when the world is giving you gifts of understanding and connection. You’ll make love over and over again, all morning long. Your body has become a refined machine. You don’t need food or sleep. Hope and happiness provide all the sustenance you’d ever needed. You’ll be late for work that day. No problem: you’ll stay late to make up the time. That night, you’ll visit your friend again, apologizing for your late arrival. He’ll say that he understands, and explain that he quit his own job recently. Offices and retail stores are places for small people with small ideas. He’s going to open a non-profit agency, and really put his time on earth to good use, help­ing people. You’ll feel a lump of joy in your throat, because you feel exactly the same way. You won’t mind so much the next week when your own boss says that he has to let you go. You don’t need an office to make a difference out there. And what does it matter that they repos­sessed your car? This is the electronic age; you’ll just take your business ideas online. You have ideas, and energy that the world needs. Weeks later, you’ll bump into your friend leaving the nightclub just as you’re heading in. He’ll say that you seem to have lost weight, and you’ll accept what you assume is a compliment, looking down at your rock-hard, defined abdominals. You’ll be glad that you shared a moment with that old friend; apparently he’s come to accept the new you. He’ll linger, staring into your eyes with a sad sort of love for you. As a gesture, you’ll invite him to have a drink with you, but he’ll decline. And you’ll turn away, absorbed into the welcoming black­ness of the club. 3k Stephen Fallon, Ph.D., X? runs a Florida-based consulting firm and can be reached at sfallon@skills4.org. HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com SEPTEMBER 12, 2003 11 PAULA MARTINAC | Living outside the gay ghetto, we make a difference by living our lives, telling the plumber to stop calling me 'Mrs. Martinac.’ Don't call me Mrs. Martinac AFTER MANY YEARS OF LIVING IN Manhattan, my partner and I recently moved to a much smaller and less expen­sive city so that she could accept a new academic position. The reaction of one of my best friends, who has been passionately involved in the New York gay activist scene for almost 20 years, was fear that I would be “lost” to the gay movement, no longer playing a role in LGBT politics even though I had, in his view, “so much to offer.” But what I’ve learned in just a few weeks is something that’s often not under­stood by big-city queers: that much of the day-to-day living of out lesbian and gay couples in smaller cities and suburbs is a vital form of activism. When you reside in a large urban area with a heavy concentration of gays, it’s easy to forget that those of us in other places have a totally different living expe­rience. Indeed, the 2000 census — in which, for the first time, same-sex couples could identify themselves — showed that we live in virtually every county in the United States. My partner and I based our decision to leave New York in large part on eco­nomics: We wanted a house, but were forced by the outrageously priced New York real estate market to live in a tiny one-bedroom apartment. NOW, INHABITING A THREE-BEDROOM house in an urban neighborhood, we find ourselves having to think about things we never considered as Manhattan apartment dwellers. A question likely to face me today isn’t, “Should I go to the forum on antigay violence at the lesbian and gay community center?” but “Should I take the seminar at Home Depot on how to install a ceiling fan?” And that, my activist friend would say, is why I am already “lost” to the movement. But at the same time, I now find myself intricately involved in a totally different kind of gay activism, one that I knew about from interviewing same-sex couples several years ago for a book about lesbian and gay relation­ships and families across the country So many couples, particularly those with children, told me that because they lived in cities and neighborhoods with rel­atively small concentrations of gay peo­ple, they were constantly coming out: to everyone from their neighbors to their school officials to the appliance-repair guy. While some said they had encoun­tered outright homophobia, more often they faced heterosexism. Hearing this in interviews, though, is dif­ferent from actually living it. Recently, a home-security saleswoman with whom I had made an appointment on the phone asked for my husband’s name. I replied that I did­n’t have a husband, but my partner’s name was Katie Hogan and we owned the house together. She hesitated, but then wrote it down and moved on to the next question. And our plumber stopped calling me “Mrs. Martinac” when it was clear that Katie and I shared the decision-making on the work to be done on our pipes. THAT’S NOT EXACTLY “WE’RE HERE, we’re queer, get used to it!” — or is it? In a way, whenever gay people make the choice to be out within their mostly straight neighborhoods and cities, they are saying “get used to it.” And in doing so, they take on an important kind of activism that backs up the more visible work of the larger gay-rights movement. For example, same-sex marriage rights, the hottest issue on our national move­ment’s plate right now, will never be achieved through court cases alone. Within weeks of the landmark Lawrence vs. Texas decision, when many gay activists were proclaiming that marriage rights were just around the corner, a national poll indicated that support among Americans for same-sex relation­ships had dropped precipitously. Politicians from both major parties rushed to oppose gay marriage. This example suggests that much of the nitty-gritty work on behalf of mar­riage rights will be accomplished in smaller cities, towns and suburbs by les­bian and gay couples who in the course of their daily lives just keep coming out to their fellow Americans. They do this by going to straight religious services or PTA meetings together; buying a home that’s not in a gay ghetto and putting both partners’ names on the title; correcting the handyman who thinks they’re “sisters.” And although such efforts go largely unnoticed by gay activists in Washington, New York, Atlanta and San Francisco, they make an invaluable contribution to our movement. I Paula Martinac is an author and syndicat- I V*? ed writer and can be reached at PMcolumn@aol.com. DykeS ‘TpVZiafch. Ou^or by Alison BecJidel Queer Eyes p 404^ THIS WEEK, A MAKEOVER FOR THE BUSH administration? for the Bush Guys THEY'RE AN ELITE TEAM OF LESBIANS WHO HAVE DEDICATED THEIR LIVES TO EXTOLLING THE SIMPLE VIRTUES OF PEACE, JUSTICE, AND BEEP’ING COMMON SENSE. ©2003 By ALISON BeCHDEL TONI ON POLITICAL KARL WHAT’S WITH THESE BULLBEEP! POWER GRABS? YOU need to Believe in YOURSELF? ITS ALL ABOUT SELF-CONFI­DENCE, repeat AFTER ME: THE GOP CAN WIN INA FREE AND FAIR \ ELECTION. strategy 12 SEPTEMBER 12, 2003 www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE IiiiCTHMn voiceJ PLACE YOUR FREE AD NOW! CALL 877 863 1885 1 OR PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE AT WWW.HOUSTONVOICE.COM p Here come the brides on same-sex unions By RYAN LEE tfieir ouest IN THE 704 PAGES OF THE SEPT-ember- October issue of Bride’s maga­zine, there are nine paragraphs un­like any others that appear in the pub­lication devoted to holy matrimony In the article “Outward Bound: Same-sex weddings step into the limelight,” freelance journalist David Toussaint writes about the wedded bliss shared by Daniel and Steven, and Leslie and Marita — two gay couples who “are just like other couples in love.” The one-page article represents the first of its kind to appear in a top-selling bridal magazine. It includes a paragraph warning folks invited to same-sex ceremonies “Not to panic: same-sex affairs can be nearly as tradi­tional as heterosexual ones.” Marking a first for a wedding-themed magazine, Bride's Magazine features a story on same-sex marriages in its September-October issue. Wedding magazine features first-ever article . » - Csastto&M I outward bound Covering same-sex marriages contin­ues the evolution of bridal magazines, which used to treat topics like premari­tal sex or interracial marriages as taboo, Toussaint said. “The time was right for someone to cover this,” Toussaint said. “It was a question of being responsible journal­ists — this is now happening and get­ting a lot of attention.” • The article, which primarily focuses on the legal issues gay couples face when trying to solidify their partnerships, is an important feature for Bride’s to run because it can educate straight readers and motivate gays, said Chalee Snorton, southeastern media manager for the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation. “The point is it increases under­standing all around, in a cultural, not political way,” Snorton said. Wedding industry professionals often are perplexed by gay marriage, said Ann Nola, director of the Association of Certi­fied Professional Wedding Consultants. “It’s because we’re so ignorant as to what protocol is, what’s legal and what’s illegal,” Nola said. “[Wedding planners] need to know more about it, so of course this article is going to be of interest to them.” Officials at Conde Nast, which pub­lishes Bride’s, along with Vogue and Glamour magazines, declined to discuss the article with Southern Voice, saying it speaks for itself. But the magazine’s editor in chief, Millie Martini Bratten, told the New York Times in July that the Bride’s article was in response to growing chatter about gay marriage within the wedding industry. “We were hearing from various retailers that same-sex couples had become an important part of their gift registries,” Bratten told the newspaper. “And we were answering more readers’ questions: ‘If two women were getting married, what’s the appropriate attire?”’ IN YET ANOTHER SIGN THAT corporate America is beginning to rec­ognize the buying power of gay con­sumers, Del Monte is targeting gay pet owners with a series of advertisements and promotions for its Pounce and Pup-peroni pet treats. Ads for the dog treats appear in gay publications and Web sites with the slogan “Your Pride, His Joy” Del Monte also set up booths at gay events in Los Angeles, New York and San Francisco, according to Mike Wilke, founder of the Commercial Closet, a gay advertising watch group. Besides dog treats, the Del Monte cor­poration also manufactures baby food, tuna fish and fruit. Officials at the company did not return calls seeking comment, but they reportedly told Wilke that the relation­ship between gays and their pets war­ranted more attention from the company. “Gay people have a very emotional connection with their pets, stronger than the general population,” Jeff Watters, Del Monte’s vice president of pet snacks marketing, said, according to Wilke. © ACTION! INFO Bride's Magazine 4 Times Square New York, NY 10036 212-286-2860 Del Monte Foods The Landmark @ One Market P.O. Box 193575 San Francisco, CA 94119 415-247-3000 HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com SEPTEMBER 12, 2002 13 “Are you in the habit of paying attention to that fool? Fm not. That’s on the record. ” Conservative activist Lou Sheldon, founder of the Traditional Values Coalition, on gay Congressman Barney Frank (D-Mass.), who had said the odds of passage for a federal anti-gay marriage amendment are “slender” (San Francisco Chronicle, Aug. 13) “[Harvey] fought for integration and accep­tance of the gay community and other minorities into mainstream society. If you want to honor the man, fine. But make it equal for everyone. Segregation is not what he stood for. He was for equal rights for everyone. ” Andy Milk, nephew of Harvey Milk, a San Francisco city supervisor assassinated in 1978, on the New York City public school named after the country’s first openly gay elected official, which is intended for gay and transgen­der students (New York Post, Aug. 11) “It’s about people who get concussions and develop these specific sex fetishes, so you have characters wearing diapers, humping trees, stuff like that. It’s like one of the old John Waters films. It’s insane. ” Actor Paul Giametti on the next film from gay director John Waters (Salon.com, Aug. 13) “I didn’t agree with the decision, but I didn’t intend to reject you. We weren’t ready to go there. God loves every one of us. We’re all broken. We’re all sinners. Ours is a church big enough to love all of God’s chil­dren. ” West Tennessee Episcopal Bishop Don Johnson, in a tear-filled apology to gay parishioners made from the pulpit, for his vote to oppose confirmation of the denom­ination’s first openly gay bishop (Associated Press, Aug. 11) “In a secular democracy, this is a legal question, not a religious question. The debate over gay marriage should not be on religious grounds. ” Gay playwright Tony Kushner, who won a Pulitzer Prize for “Angels in America” (New York Times, Aug. 10) “I’ve been writing for a long time about how tolerant Americans are, and how the cul­ture has changed, yet gay marriage is the line. Marriage is the one institution that touch­es on everything that Americans really care deeply about. ” Alan Wolfe, a Boston College professor of political science and an authority on cul­tural and religious issues in American politics, on resistance to gay marriage (New York Times, Aug. 10) “When people can view gay people as somehow underprivileged, woeful and in need of social work, it’s just easier to feel a kind of regal sympathy for them. But when you’re actually dealing with the two guys or the women next door planning a wedding just like your daughter, and expecting gifts, that’s another matter entirely. ” Gay playwright and screenwriter Paul Rudnick (“Jeffrey,” “In & Out,” “The First Wives Club”) on resistance to same-sex mar­riage (New York Times, Aug. 10) “Look, if you don’t call it marriage, you’ll get more support. ” CNN political commentator William Schneider (New York Times, Aug. 10) “The flamboyance of gay images in popu­lar culture looks more and more like a beard for the consolidation of lavender bourgeoisifi-cation. What, after all, do gays want these days? To flounce? Come on — that battle was won long ago. What they want is to settle down, get married, move to the suburbs, adopt a couple of kids, and get into some serious fel­lowshipping at the local Episcopal church. ” Former Talk and Vanity Fair editor Tina Brown (Salon.com, Aug. 14) The New Lakes of Jersey Village (281) 469-1661 (713) 542-5324 New Sales Team! • New Prices! • New Floor Plans! 100% Financing Available Locationl Location!! Location!!! Off of Northwest Freeway at Jones Road. Red tile roofs, Stucco front elevations, Sprinkler systems, Energy Star package, lake, and much more! Peter Estevez □ •R®Horton Homes 20 Cherry Hills Jersey Village, TX 77065 Affordable Luxury Living Just a Step Away! 713.523.6905 • 415 Westheimer, Suite 210 • Houston, TX 77006 . mis journey, « L we Offer • • color Mention this ad and receive 15% off and 10% off retail products on your 1” time visit.* “Excludes other jromoitons Reward yourself. Featuring these professional p if our to Aid in ' massage • facials • make-up • waxing this highlights . haircuts . coior Specials: 1 hour massage for $45 • Facial for $40 Welcomes 14 SEPTEMBER 12, 2003 www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE Rebates up to $4000. 0% APR available up to 60 months www.davidlewisimages.com m ALL THE NEWS FOR YOUR Watch for Us at Empower 2003 For Sales or Service. Call Will or Linda at 281.548-6152 for an appointment! PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD NOW! CALL 877 863 1885 OR PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE AT WWW.HOUSTONVOICE.COM Randall Reed Ford 1900 Eastex Freeway Humble, Texas 77338 Randall Reed People... Really Make the Difference! am proud to provide quality service to the GBLT Houston/ Montrose community, and try to create a comfortable environ­ment for everyone to be who they are. 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Extending Fleet Prices to Houston V_oice Readers fin SEASONAL FARE: Gay books coming out this fall offer new I FALL BACK: Season's music releases include queer artists voices and established writers with a queer sensibility. Page 18 I Rufus Wainwright, Meshell Ndgeocello and Kevin Avjance. Page 17 HOUSTON VOICE SEPTEMBER 12, 2003 PAGE 15 Fall films By STEVE WARREN Oct 3: Gallucci, this comedy has a young gay man trying to move in with his boyfriend while remaining closeted to his Italian immigrant parents. HERE ARE THE TITLES CURRENTLY scheduled for fall release. The dates, sub­ject to change, are the U.S. premieres, which usually means New York and maybe Los Angeles, tentatively following in other cities on a staggered schedule. Some are already scheduled to go wider, but the first weekend’s gross deter­mines the future of many others. SEVERAL SUMMER RELEASES OF queer interest are still making their way around the country, one city at a time. If you haven’t had a chance to see these yet, you still may: “Dracula: Pages from a Virgin’s Diary” Guy Maddin turns a Canadian ballet into something resembling the original “Nosferatu.” “Gasoline” Two lesbians are on the run after one accidentally kills the other’s homophobic mother in this Italian drama. “Km. 0” A dozen or so people of vari­ous persuasions are searching for love on a hot August day in the center of Madrid in this Spanish ensemble dramedy. “Madame Sata” The true story of a Brazilian folk hero, a drag star who spent most of his life in prison, sometimes for real crimes. “OnJLine” Five New Yorkers — including a gay man and a bisexual woman — and a gay youth in Ohio look for love on all the wrong Web sites. “Suddenly” In Argentina, two young women who call themselves “lovers but not lesbians” kidnap a third, and their road trip creates a kind of family. After TV's summer affair with gays, queers are back on the big screen for autumn three years, there will be no screen biog­raphy of a queer Latin artist (“Before Night Falls,” “Pinero,” “Frida”) opening to qualify for Academy Awards. Sept 24: “Yossi & Jagger” Eytan Fox’s drama tells the true story of two Israeli army officers who fall in love and face homo­phobia, even without a “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” policy. Sept 26: “Prey for Rock & Roll” It goes without saying that Gina Gershon kicks ass. Here she does it as the lead singer of an all-girl (but, sadly, not all-lesbian) band including Lori Petty, Drea de Matteo and Shelly Cole. The group faces problems, including Gina wanting to quit if they don’t make it by the time she’s 40, and the band’s already rehears­ing “Happy Birthday.” ‘Boys Life 4: Four Play” This pack­age of gay shorts includes Alan Brown’s excellent “0 Beautiful.” “Confusion of Genders” A bisexual lawyer gets a partner in his firm pregnant and gets involved with, among others, a male client on trial for murder in this French film. UMMER MOVIES GAVE GAY film buffs little other than J.Lo’s lesbian-in- transition in “Gigli” and the boys from “Camp,” but we had an amazing season on television. Now things are returning to normal with small-screen queers reduced to eunuchs, buddies and tokens — at least until the net­works can develop clones of “Queer Eye for the Straight Guy” Fortunately, there are plenty of queer films in the pipeline for the rest of the year — not a lot from the major studios, but promising independent titles, many of which debuted on the festival circuit. First the bad news. Unlike the last The biggest news in gay film this fall is 'Party Monster,' starring MaCauley Culkin (right) as real-life gay club kid turned convicted murderer Michael Alig. (Photo courtesy Strand Releasing) Sept 5: “Party Monster” Macaulay Culkin returns to the screen as Michael Alig, the party promot­er who was “king of the club kids” until he murdered his drug-dealer roommate (Wilson Cruz) in 1996. Seth Green plays James St. James, Alig’s friend who wrote the book about the true story. It’s the first non-docu­mentary for filmmakers Fenton Bailey and Randy Barbato. Sept 12: “Luster” Everett Lewis’ dramedy about a weekend in the life of several, mostly gay Los Angelenos and a visiting Midwesterner, some of whom get punk’d by love. Sept 19: “Mambo Italiano” Based on a play by gay Canadian Steve “The Event” Parker Posey investi­gates a series of mysterious deaths in the gay community and finds the men had AIDS and their friends gathered to cele­brate their leaving on their own terms. Olympia Dukakis is memorable as the mother of one of the deceased in this drama by Thom Fitzgerald (“The Hanging Garden,” “Beefcake”). Oct 10: “Girls Will Be Girls” Drag Divas Jack Plotnick, Clinton Leupp and Jeffery Roberson play their alter (oversized) egos, Evie Harris, Coco Peru and Varla Jean Merman, in a campfest about three Hollywood actresses who will do any­thing to get — or stay — on top. “Porn Theatre” Jacques Nolot’s French film concerns a triangular pur­suit among people who frequent or work in the eponymous venue: the (female) cashier is after a middle-aged (male) cus­tomer who has his eyes on the young (male) projectionist. Please see FALL FILMS on Page 21 16 SEPTEMBER 12, 2003 www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE O MORE INFO 'It's All Relative' Premieres Oct. 1,7:30 p.m. ABC Two and a Half Men' Premieres Sept. 22,8:30 p.m. CBS 'A Minute with Stan Hooper' Wednesdays, 7:30 p.m. Fox "Carnivale" Premieres Sept. 14,8:30 p.m. HBO > Talk To Your Partner About HIV. It's Preventable. 713-794-9020 HIV/STD INFO-HOTLINE Dig HoVo Restaurant Review Houston Department of* ’ ’ Health and Human Services BRIAN MOYLAN New season on network television: ’It's All Relative'-ly stale, even upcoming shows with gay characters. No changing colors for fall TV FOR YEARS, THE PREDOMINANT ideology in Hollywood in both televi­sion and movies has been to take a suc­cessful formula and just repeat and tweak it in small ways until everyone in America is sick of it. This practice explains the current glut of reality programming and “Friends” rip-offs that clutter the airwaves. With each new fall season, there’s a slight hope that this will be the year of fresh, intelligent programming. This year, as with most, that hope is quickly dashed, especially with the networks’ new gay-inclusive shows. The most prominent is ABC’s “It’s All Relative,” a sitcom about a Harvard-educated girl who plans to marry an Irish working-class boy The drama (and hopefully the comedy) ensues when the couple’s families clash. The groom was raised by an Archie Bunker-wannabe, and the bride has two fathers: Philip (Christopher Sieber) and Simon (John Benjamin Hickey). At least America will finally get to see a long-term gay rela­tionship on primetime televi­sion. Will and Jack on “Will & Grace” still don’t even have boyfriends. SPEAKING OF “FRIENDS” rip-offs, the new CBS sitcom “Two and a Half Men” is taking a page right out of the “Friends” playbook. Here, Alan (Jon Cryer) leaves his wife, takes his young son and moves in with his brother (Charlie Sheen). He moves because his wife is a lesbian, just like Ross’ first wife on “Friends.” In “A Minute with Stan Hooper,” the title character (Norm Macdonald) takes his wife and moves from the big city to Wisconsin searching for a more authen­tic “American” life. There, they hang out in a picturesque diner run by gay “mar­ried” couple, Lou and Pete Peterson (Garret Dillahunt and Daniel Roebuck). On cable, offerings are always a bit different. HBO’s new show Christopher Sieber (left) and John Benjamin Hickey play gay dads and foils for a working class family on ABC's new fall sitcom ’It's All Relative.' (photo courtesy of ABC) GAY CHARACTERS ON “Will & Grace,” “E.R.,” and “NYPD Blue” return this sea­son, but gay viewers have to wait for winter for some other favorites. On HBO, “Six Feet Under” tentatively returns in March, and “Sex and the City” returns with its final eight episodes in January. Also this winter, HBO trots out its all-star, two-part version of Tony Kushner’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play “Angels in America.” Showtime’s “Queer As Folk” is set to return sometime this winter, and the channel has yet to set a date for its return. The channel sets a January pre­miere for “The L Word,” which is “QAF” for lesbians, starring blaxploita-tion diva Pam Grier and “Flashdancer” Jennifer Beals. “Carnivale” starts this Sunday. The show, which is a bit like “Twin Peaks” but certainly not a rip off, pits good versus evil in a Depression era traveling carnival and freak show. Full of characters with weird powers and enigmatic storylines, the show should keep viewers amazed and guessing for its 13 episode run. One of the freaks in the show is Gecko (gay actor John Fleck), who has an ambiguous sexual orientation and the skin of a lizard. HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com SEPTEMBER 12, 2003 17 ARJAN TIMMERMANS Musicians popular with gay fans release broad slate of new albums this season, hit road with live performance schedules. Fall is for favorites AUTUMN PROMISES TO BE AN EXCIT-ing season for new music, with a sched­ule filled with album releases from sea­soned artists, chart-topping youngsters and longtime gay favorites. After her much-exposed smooch with Madonna at the 2003 MTV Music Awards, Britney Spears is to release a new album in November. Produced by hip hop mogul P. Diddy, the album includes an edgier, more self-confident sound and even one track that has the former Mouseketeer rapping. After Pink went rock with the help of lesbian singer/songwriter Linda Perry on her 2001 album “Misundaztood,” she estab­lished herself as a viable new voice in pop­rock. She once again presents her catchy tunes and no nonsense attitude on the new album “Try This,” which hits stores Nov. 17. Canadian singer Nelly Furtado never fit a mold, and her upcoming album “Folklore” is no different. She teams again with duo Track and Field (Brian West and Gerald Eaton) but departs from her trip-hop roots on “Whoa, Nelly!” to create a more acoustic folk vibe. The album is slated for a Nov. 25 release, pre­ceded by the single “Powerless.” “SACRED LOVE” IS STING’S SEVENTH studio album in almost 18 years. The new record shows off the singer playing adult rock and singing about love, relationships and religion. A surprise here is a duet with Mary J. Blige on the track “Whenever I Say Your Name.” Eight years after his Grammy-winning smash hit “Kiss From A Rose,” Seal is back with a new album enti­tled simply “Seal” this month. The British artist reunites with long-time production partner Trevor Horn to create an instant classic. Also notable is new work by Grammy­winning country crooner Shelby Lynne. Her eighth album “Identity Crisis” is scheduled for a Sept. 16 release. The album is said to be Lynne’s most personal work to date, featur­ing the singer writing as well as performing the vocals and guitars on the record. Gay favorite Meshell Ndgeocello comes out Oct. 14 with “Comfort Woman.” The bisexual artist hits the road to promote the new album at the end of October. The album counts 10 tracks, includ­ing the ambiguous “Come Smoke My Herb,” “Andromeda & The Milky Way” and “Body.” A new batch of heartfelt songs from gay singer Rufus Wainwright is set for release this month, kicking off a season chock full of new music. (Photo courtesy DreamWorks Records) GAY SINGER RUFUS WAINWRIGHT’S unique combination of dreamy pop, cabaret- and opera is featured on his upcoming third album, “Want One,” which makes its mark on Sept. 23. Highly respect­ed producer Marius deVries headed Wainwright’s “Want One,” which chroni­cles the performer’s struggle with depres­sion invoked by the horror of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks. Sugar Hill Records releases “Just Because I’m A Woman” Oct. 14, marking the 35th anniversary of Dolly Parton’s first solo album of the same name. The new collec­tion pays homage to her rich cata­log of songs, featuring perfor­mances by Norah Jones, Alison Krauss & Union Station, Shania Twain and Allison Moorer. The title track is performed by Parton herself. Circuit king Kevin Aviance is sched­uled to release his highly anticipated sec­ond album “Entity” on Sept. 23. The fash­ionable singer already boasts five top 10 Billboard hits, including 2002’s post mil­lennial gay anthem, “Alive.” Other noteworthy dance productions are from Paul van Dyk (‘Reflections” - Oct. 7), bond (“Remixed” - Sept. 16) and DJ/Producer Tony Moran (“Global Groove” - late September). Also set for releases this fall are new albums by Atlanta-based gay composer/ pianist George K^roulis (“Second Nature” - Sept. 22), Elvis Costello (“North” - Sept. 23), Dido (“Life For Rent” - Sept. 30),-Bette Midler (“Sings The Rosemary Clooney Songbook” - Sept. 30) and Barbra Streisand (“The Movie Album” - Oct. 14). 'VIVA AMOR! A light-footed comedy that suggests that love is just around the corner." -Jack Matthews, NEW YORK DAILY NEWS "A SUNNY IBERIAN ROMP." -Dave Kehr, The NEW YORK TIMES GENUINE, PLEASING, UPLIRING. A very humanistic comeay!" -Jack Matthews, NEW YORK DAILY NEWS EXCLUSIVE ENGAGEMENT NOW PLAYING! For Showtimes visit www.LandmarkTheatres.com GREENWAY 5 Greenway Plaza • (713) 866-8881 "WINNING... ZESTY SPANISH FARCE SPREADS THE MAGIC." -Nicole Keeter, TIME OUT NEW YORK AN EXUBERANT SEX FARCE! PREPARE TO GET HOT AND BOTHERED!" -GENRE MAGAZINE / WINNER, AUDIENCE AWARD at Gay & Lesbian Film Festivals in J/ LANDMARK'S voice i Seeking Editor Houston Voice, the area’s leading gay publication, seeks an experienced journalist to lead its editing team. Ideal candidate will be highly organized and have excellent writing and editing skills. Job also includes significant writing and reporting responsibilities. Competitive pay and benefits, generous vacation package. Reply via e-mail to: editor@houstonvoice.com 18 SEPTEMBER 12, 2003 www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE For Adam and Steve For Anna and Eve Because in the beginning, they only had one choice. UlE Galaxie Jewelers We Create the Unusual 2511 Sunset Blvd, (near Kirby) 713.521.2511 2001 MCAF Diamond Star Award Member Jewelers of America KEVIN RIORDAN Roundup of new gay books for fall includes tried-and-true favorites, new queer voices, comic strips. Autumnal releases GAY-OWNED PUBLISHING companies as well as independ­ent and mainstream houses offer gay readers a promising mix of new fiction and non-fic­tion this fall. In October, Alyson Books brings out “Dykes and Sundry Other Carbon Based Life Forms to Watch Out For,” by Alison Bechdel. It’s the 20th anniver­sary of Bechdel’s indelible cartoons about lesbian lives, “and when you read her work in a collection, it’s absolutely phenomenal, a fantastic nar­rative story,” says Dan Cullinane, publicist for the nation’s largest and best-known gay-owned publish­ing firm. Speaking of cartoons, “Chelsea Boys,” by Glen Hanson and Allan Neuwirth (September, Alyson), chroni­cles the lives of three gay guys who live and love in the famed neighborhood in Manhattan. Alyson also publishes in October “They Say She Tastes Like Honey,” a debut novel by Michelle Sawyer. A sort of “Sex and the City” meets “Divine Secrets of the Ya- Ya Sisterhood,” the book focuses on a single young Manhattan lesbian infatuat­ed with a gorgeous young woman on rollerblades. Joel Perry’s “That’s Why They’re in Cages, People” (November) is a humor collection from the co-author of “Going Down,” the male oral sex manual. CLEIS PRESS, THE LESBIAN-OWNED San Francisco house with a well-earned reputation for publishing politically and erotically adventurous material, is cur­rently showcasing “Time on Two Crosses,” the collected writings of Bayard Rustin. Edited by Devon W. Carbado and Donald Weise, the book, which includes several heretofore unpublished essays, offers an intimate look at the soul of the openly gay African American who made history as the key organizer of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s 1963 March on Washington. Cleis also brings out two books of interest to gay readers: “The Ultimate Guide to Adult Videos” and “The Ultimate Guide to Sex and Disability.” Cleis also publishes the lat­est annual editions of its essen­tial “Best Lesbian Erotica” and “Best Gay Erotica” collections. OTHER INDEPENDENTS offering titles aimed at gay readers this fall include Kensington Books. The house is excited about “The Actor’s Guide to Murder” by Rick Copp, says John Scognamiglio, Kensington’s edito­rial director. Kensington also releases “He’s the One,” a romantic, comic novel from Timothy James Beck, and “P-Town Summer,” a first novel by Lisa Stocker. Also of interest from Kensington this fall: “The Night We Met” by Rob Byrnes and “The Way Things Out to Be,” the latest from Gregory Hinton. Graywolf Press con­tinues to feature “Open House: Writers Define Home,” a collection of essays about the places we inhabit, edited by gay poet Mark Doty. Graywolf also presents “Famous Builder,” a memoir of the quintes-sentially suburban gay boyhood of Doty’s partner, novelist Paul Lisicky. The Canadian-based Arsenal Pulp Press publishes “Quickies 3: Short Short Fiction on Gay Male Desire;” “Hot and Bothered 4: Short Short Fiction on Lesbian Desire;” and the intriguingly titled “Outbursts: A Queer Erotic Thesaurus.” Offerings of gay interest this fall from mainstream publishers include “Ordinary Girl,” a memoir by disco icon Donna Summer (Villard) and “Intertwined Lives — Margaret Mead, Ruth Benedict, and Their Circle,” by Lois Banner (Knopf). Also look for “Normal: Transsexual CEOs, Crossdressing Cops and Hermaphrodites With Attitude,” by Amy Bloom (Vintage) and “Far From Heaven, Safe, and Superstar,” three screenplays by gay filmmaker Todd Haynes (Grove Press and Atlantic Monthly Press). Alyson Books continues to top the heap of gay publishers with fall releases including comic compila­tions 'Dykes and Sundry Other Carbon Based Life Forms to Watch Out For' and 'Chelsea Boys,' as well as a Michelle Sawyer's debut novel, ’They Say She Tastes Like Honey.' HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com SEPTEMBER 12, 2003 19 There's a Fine Line Between Telling the Truth and Talking Trash Creative computer experts leave distinctive mark on Web site against Gay Day in the Lone Star State. Hackers protect Gay Day GAY COMPUTER GEEKS MIGHT NOT be the hottest in the dating pool, but at least they know how to step up and defend Gay Day at a Texas ballpark. GAY HACKERS damaged the site, according to a written statement issued by Rick Warden, the founder and opera­tor of ProtestGayDaycom, the Web site circulating a petition to stop Gay Day The event is scheduled to take place Sept. 14 at The Ballpark in Arlington, Texas, where the TEXAS RANGERS play. “When Brothers and Sisters in Christ where [sic] signing the petition, by the hundreds, gay porno Web sites were loading up on the screen instead of their signatures,” Warden writes, apparently without the benefit of a good grammatical guide. The site was later fixed. Warden seems convinced that it was someone of the homosexual persuasion who tried to sabotage his effort, though there’s real­ly no way to know. Along with his press release, Warden sent copies of e-mails he received from people who support and oppose fixing what the hackers did. “You’re getting your ignorance and childishness spewed right back into your face, no pun intended,” read one unsigned e-mail. Regardless of this messy matter, Warden claims to love gays. “Although the sodomites put their filth in our unsuspecting faces, we still care enough about them to pray that they would get saved and delivered from the bondage of sodomy,” he writes. AFTER BARELY MAKING RENEWAL for a second season, the critically acclaimed but tepidly rated NBC crime drama “Boomtown” finally found the ingredient its creators believe it needs for success: lesbian jewel thieves. Always sure to be a ratings boost, the show’s Sept. 26 season premiere fea­tures some steamy girl-on-girl action between REBECCA DeMORNAY and KELLY HU from the “X-Men” sequel. TV Guide reports that the two play a pair of crooks on the run from the law who share a steamy shower scene, maybe a kiss and possibly a three-way with new “Boomtown” co-star VANES­SA WILLIAMS. The kiss might not make it on the air, TV Guide notes. TO SOME PEOPLE, WINTER MEANS hockey. Now the gentlemen at the New York City GAY HOCKEY ASSOCIA­TION are offering something to make hockey fun for everyone. The group published it’s annual fund-raising cal- Actresses Kelly Hu (left) and Rebecca DeMomay are coming out... of a subway train in this publicity photo. The two are scheduled to get Sapphic on the small screen this month. (Photo courtesy NBC) endar, which features plenty of almost-naked jocks who actually play in the league. The $15 calendar and other fun things are on sale at the group’s Web site, www.nycgayhockey.org. The Web site also features plenty of hot pictures of guys in the league who aren’t in the calendar. Alas, the players are not for sale. WE’VE BEEN SINGING ABOUT Rudolph the red-nosed reindeer for years, but now another Rudolph has a song of his own. The Associated Press reports that gospel singer Gene Collett wrote a song about ERIC ROBERT RUDOLPH, who recently was arrest­ed in connection with bombings in Birmingham and Atlanta, including the lesbian Otherside Lounge. Collett says the song, “The Ballads of Eric Robert Rudolph,” is a gift from God that came to him while he was praying for new songs for his album. He sent copies of it to 1,270 gospel and country radio stations across the country. I© Send comments, suggestions to Dish@sovo.com. “Been Bear-fnded? Ife Can Assist fou!” FREE ESTIMATES We support the Gay & Lesbian Community Highline Body Repair & Collision Service Call us at 713.520.9696 or visit us at 106 W. Gray in Houston www.suddenimpactcollision.net COUUISION Enters State of the Art Technology 20 SEPTEMBER 12,2003 www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE appts MONDAY SEPT. 15 The Montrose Counseling Center hosts its first meeting of a new afternoon support group for gay men with a focus on fiving wel with HIV from 1:15 p.m. to 2:45 p.m. at Resurrection MCC, 2025 W. 11th St 713- 529-OO37,ext.322 TUESDAY SEPT. 16 Breast cancer is a leading illness among les­bians, and education is limited among Hispanics. The 3rd annual Hispanic Breast Cancer Forum is conducted entirely in Spanish for women to learn about the ill­ness and available support systems from 5 pjn. to 8 pirn, at Crown Plaza Medical Center, 5701S. Main. 713-266-2877. WEDNESDAY SEPT. 17 The Houston LGBT Community Center hosts its Back on Track Relationship Success Training dedicated to stomping out the myth that gays cannot have longterm rela­tionships, from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. at the Center, 3400 Montrose Blvd., Suite 207. 713-463-9449. THURSDAY SEPT. 18 A gay quilting group called Mending & Stitching meets at 2 p.m. to quilt and chat at the Houston GLBT Community Center, 3400 Montrose, Suite 207.713-524-3818. www.houstonglbtcenter.org SATURDAY SEPT. 20 In addition to booths and presentations from gay-friendly businesses in the Houston area, EMPOWER 2003 features the 25th anniversary concert from the Houston Pride Band, www.houstonprideband.org, 713- 862-949 Houston Area Bears presents 'A Totally Twisted Testosterone Talent Extravaganza’ to benefit the PWA Holiday Charities at 9:30pm at Mary's... Naturally, 1022 Westheimer Road. 713-527-9669 Big Men's Club of Houston celebrates its first anniversary with a party from 6:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. at the Houston GLBT Community Center, 3400 Montrose, Suite 207.713-524-3818. www.houstonbigmen-sclub. com HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com SEPTEMBER 12, 2003 21 Autumn movies pave way for Oscar contenders FALL FILMS, continued from Page 15 Oct 17: “Fairy Tales: Straight Men and the Men Who Love Them” There’s not much information about this collection of short films, but the title, seems to say it all. “Nine Dead Gay Guys” A pair of Irish lads try to make ’it in London, even if they . have to go the “Midnight Cowboy” route and prostitute themselves with men, in what’s been described — boastfully — as the most politically incorrect comedy ever made. Oct 31: “Die, Mommie, Die” Forget “Psycho Beach Party,” and give Charles Busch another chance. He wrote this satire and of course plays the female lead, a has-been diva who may have killed her hus­band. Jason Priestley appears as a gigolo who seduces most of the family, and the cast includes Natasha Lyonne and “Six Feet Under’s” Frances Conroy. Nov. 7: falls inlove witha man who turns out to be bisexual, in a drama about obsession. Nov. 14: “The Singiiag Forest’* Male lovers are killed in the Holocaust but are reincarnat­ed and fall in love;iri their jiew bodies hi Jorge Ameer’S drama thaf.could be described asa g§j“‘Ghbst” Nov. 21: “Gypsy 83” Sara Rue’s (TV’s “Less than Perfect”) favorite people in-the world are her gay best friend:(Kett Turton) and Stevie Nicks, in the second part of Todd Stephens’ (writer of “Edge of Seventeen”) “Sandusky Trilogy” When they hear about the “Night of 1000 Stevies” in New York... road trip! Karen Black has a serious supporting role. Dec. 5: “Junked” Thomas Jane stars as a bisexual hustler in a drama of survival among the lowlifes. “Love Forbidden” A Frenchman (writer­director- star Rodolphe Marconi) goes to Italy to study and learns about himself when he THERE ARE ABOUT A HUNDRED other films opening before the end of the year, including most of the Oscar con- Jack Black teaches his class, including a pre-pubescent flamer, about Rock & Roll in 'The School of Rock,' set for release Oct. 3. (Photo courtesy Paramount Pictures) tenders. We won’t know about the queer content of most until we see them, but “Scary Movie 3” (Oct. 24) probably has as much queer humor as the first two, and Robert Altman’s “The Company” (Dec. 25) is about a ballet company, so someone’s got to be gay One of the students in “The School of Rock” (Oct. 3) is a prepubescent flamer. In “Under the Tuscan Sun” (Sept. 26), Diane Lane’s best friend (Sandra Oh) is a les­bian. As for “Stuck on You” (Dec. 12), one word: Cher. Among gay directors, there’s no queer content in Joel Schumacher’s “Veronica Guerin” (Oct. 17), but Gus Van Sant’s “Elephant” (Oct. 24) pins a Columbine­like school shooting on gay lovers. Time out in Tahiti All Gay All Inclusive PRIVATE ISLAND PARADISE WITH DJ BRYAN PFEIFER November 22 - 28, 2003 5 NIGHTS MANIHI PEARL BEACH Resort / 1 night Papeete / RT Air from lax / meals and more CALL YOUR TRAVEL AGENT OR Tahitibound (888)672-7476 EXTENSION 228 OR 234 TAHITIBOUND.COM/GAY _________ CST2021293 WE'RE HERE TO WHATEVER HEEO..« VI YOU 8 HOUSTON \ CLASSIFIEDS C FINO THE JOB sea UEfEES PLACE YOUR CLASSIFIED AD NOW! CALL 877 863 1885 voice OR PLACE YOUR AD ONLINE AT WWW.HOUSTONVOICE.COM 22 SEPTEMBER 12,2003 THIS WEEK IN ECLIPSE PAD PARTIES Matt; Maranfan’s how-to guide on how to make you the host with a little more than most. BEHIND THE SCENE Jerry Atwood’s fingers do all of his talking. ‘QUEER EYE’ Production team Widelife is the duo behind the theme song to ‘Queer Eye for the Straight Guy.’ PLUS Nightlife photos, news blips that need to be on your Gaydar, Bitch Session, Need Wood and comics "Troy” and “Chelsea Boys.” SATURDAY SEPT. 13 AlbSpanish Worship Service/Noche Espirtual 7 p.m. Resurrection Metropolitan Community Church, 2026 W. 11th. 713-861-9149. After Hours. KPFT 90.1 FM-1-4 a.m. Dignity mass. 7:30 p.m. for gay Catholics. 713-880-2872. Free HIV Testing. Montrose Clinic. 11 p.m.-2 a.m. at Viviana's. 713-830-3000. Gay & Lesbian Breakfast Club. 9:30 a.m. 281-437-0636. Lambda Center. Alcoholics Anonymous. 11:30 a.m. Eye Opener Group, 8 p.m. Saturday Night Live, 9:30 p.m. Willing Ones Group. 1201W. Clay. 713-521-1243 or 713-528-9772. www.lambdahouston.org. Montrose Soccer Club. 10 a.m. practice. Woodrow Wilson School, Fairview and Yupon. New players welcome, but begin­ners not currently being admitted. 713-862-9491. http://geoci-ties. com/montrosesoccer. E-mail: montrosesoccer@yahoo.com. Q-Patrol. Volunteers walk the streets to help prevent hate crimes. 9:30 p.m. Convene at community center. 713-528- SAFE E-mail: qpatrolinc@aol.com St Stephen's Episcopal Church. Rosary 8 a.m. 1805 W. Alabama. 713-528-6665. Houston GLBT Community Center. Drop-in, noon-5 p.m. • CATS (Community Awareness for Transgender Support) board meet­ing, 2 p.m. • TATS (Texas Association for Transsexual Support) meeting, 6 p.m. • 3400 Montrose, Suite 207.713-524-3818. www.houstonglbtcenter.org. SUNDAY SEPT. 14 LOAF. Lesbians Over Age Fifty meets every second Sunday of the month from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. at the Houston GLBT Community Center, 3400 Montrose, Suite 207.713-524-3818. SJ.S.T.LR.S. Sharing Inner Strength Through Encouragement and Realistic Support is an African-American lesbian support group that meets every second Sunday "of the month from 3:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. at the Houston GLBT Community Center, 3400 Montrose, Suite 207.713-524-3818. No-HATE. Planning meeting of educational program at the Houston GLBT Community Center facilitated by local educator Michael DeVoll. 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Center, 3400 Montrose, Suite 207.713-524-3818. Bering Memorial United Methodist Church. Services at 8:30 & 10:50 a.m. Sunday school 9:45 a.m. 713-526-1017. Center for Spiritual Living. Services at 11 a.m., for children at 10:50 a.m. 6610 Harwin. 713-339-1808. The center also has commitment ceremonies, metaphysical bookstore and classes. Community Gospel. Service at 11 am. & 7 p.m. Sunday School for children 10 am. 713-880-9235 or www.communitygospel.org. Community of Kindred Spirits in Beaumont Worship at 6 p.m. 1575 Spindietop Ave., Beaumont, Texas. 409-813-2055. E-mail: cksrev3@netzero.net Covenant Church, Ecumenical, Liberal Baptist Service 9:30 am. & education hour 11 am. 713-668-8830. Emerson Unitarian Church. Adult education, 10 am. Service, 11 am. Lunch at noon, www.emersonhou.org. First Congregational Church (Memorial). Service at 10 am. Christian Education, 1130 am. 713-468-9543 or fcc-houston.org. First Unitarian Universalist Church. Services at 9:30 & 11:30 am. Brunch at 1030 a.m. 713-526-5200. church@firstuu.org. Free HIV Testing. Montrose Clinic. 9 p.m.-midnight at Club Inergy. 713-830-3000. Gay Bowling Leagues. 7 p.m. Palace Lanes, 4191 Bellaire Blvd. 713-861-1187 Gay Catholics of St Anne's-Houston. 5 p.m. worship service. Dinner and social. alexcam@wtnet 713-623-0930. GLOBAL Gay Lesbian Or Bisexual Alliance. University of Houston GLBT student group meeting. 2 p.m. at the Houston Lesbian & Gay Community Center, 3400 Montrose, Suite 207.713-524-3818. www.uh.edu/-global. E-mail: global@bayou.uh.edu. Grace Assembly Church. Gay/gay-affirming congregation. 11 a.m. service. 567 Cedar Grove, Livingston, Texas, 77351.936- 646-7214. E-mail: leol@easttex.net Grace Lutheran Church. Sunday school for all ages 9 a.m. Service 10:30 a.m. 713-528-3269. HATCH Houston Area Teen Coalition of Homosexuals meets 6-9 p.m. For meeting information, call 713-529-3590. wwwliatchyouth.org. Houston Tennis Club. 9 a.m.-noon. Memorial Park at the Tennis Center, houstontennisclb@aol.com Lambda Center. Alcoholics Anonymous. 9:30 a.m. Came to Believe Group. 1201W. Clay. 713-521-1243 or 713-528-9772. www.lambdahouston.org. Maranatha Fellowship Metropolitan Church. 10 a.m. service. 3333 Fannin, Suite 106.713-528-6756. Northwoods Unitarian Universalist Church. Services at 9:45 & 11:15 a.m. Sunday school 9:45 a.m. 281-298-2780. Resurrection MCC. Services, 9 and 11 am. Children and Youth Sunday School, 10 a.m. Children's service, 11 am. 713-861-9149. St Patrick's Reformed Catholic Mission. Sunday Mass at noon. Holy Unions available. Group meets at the Hair Express, 3310 Delaware, Beaumont, Texas TTlQii. 409-781-8152. E-mail: bwat-sonl@ gtRR.com. St Stephen's Episcopal Church. Holy Eucharist, Rite 1,7:45 am.; Holy Eucharist, Rite II, 8:55 am.; Education hour, 10 am.; Choral Eucharist 11 a.m. 713-528-6665. Sunday Brunch. For HIV-positive men. 11 am. Riva's, 1117 Missouri St Paul, 713-880-0690. e-mail: PoznBuff@aol.com. The Women's froup. Meeting and discussion. 10:45 am. 7I3-529-857L Thoreau Unitarian Universalist Congregation. Adult discussion, 9 am. Service, 11:15 am. 281-277-8882. www.tuuc.org. Unitarian Fellowship of Galveston County. 502 Church St. Service, 10:30 am. 409-765-8330. Unitarian Fellowship of Houston. Adult forum, 10 am. Service, 11 am. 713-686-5876. Houston GLBT Community Center. Drop-in, 2-6 p.m. • GLBT Community Church with Rev. Melissa Wood: Bible study, 10- 10:4£ am., worship 11 am. www.geocities.com/glbtcc • tGLOB-AL meeting, 6 p.m. • 3400 Montrose, Suite 207 713-524-3818. , www.houstonglbtcenter.org. MONDAY SEPT. 15 Center for Spiritual Living. Meditation (drop-in),11:30 a.m.-l p.m. 6610 Harwin. 713-339-1808. Free HIV Testing. 4-8 p.m. at All Star News, 3415 Katy Freeway. Health clinic with free testing for HIV and syphilis. 713-869-7878. Free HIV Testing. Houston Area Community Services. 9 a.m.- noon at Joseph-Hines Clinic, 1710 West 25™ St 713-526- 0555, ext 231,227 or 226. Free HIV Testing. Montrose Clinic. 4-8 p.m. at Bricks, 617 Fairview. 713-830-3000. Frost Eye Clinic Free eye exams for people with HIV. 713-830-3000. Gay Bowling Leagues. Women's league. 6:45 p.m. Dynamic Lanes, 6121 Tarnef Drive. 713-861-1187. Gay Fathers/Fathers First Support group. 8-9:30 p.m. Bering Memorial United Methodist Church. Tom, 713-726-8736. www.geocities.com/gaydadshouston/ Grace Assembly Church. Gay/gay-affirming congregation. 7 p.m. aerobics class. 567 Cedar Grove, Livingston, Texas, 7735L 936-646-7214. E-mail: leol@easttex.net Grief & Divorce Support Groups. 7 p.m. Bering. 713-526-1017, ext 208. Kolbe Project Eucharist 7:30 p.m. 713-861-1800. Lambda Center. Alcoholics Anonymous 8 pm. Beginners' Group. 1201 W. Clay. 713-521-1243 or 713-528-9772 wwwJambdahouston.org. Montrose Clinic. Offers weekly peer support groups for gay and bisexual men with HIV. Spanish speaking group meets, 630 p.m. 215 Westheimer. 713-830-3050. Grupo de Apoyo para Latinos gay y bisexuales VIH positivos Lunes 630. Para mas informacion llama al 713-830-3025. Queer Voices Radio Show. 8-10 p.m. KPFT 90.1 Houston GLBT Community Center. Drop-in 2-9 p.m. • 3400 Montrose, Suite 207 713-524-3818. www.houstonglbtcenter.org. TUESDAY SEPT. 16 Bering Support Network. Lunch Bunch Gang, 11 am. 713-526-1017 Center for Spiritual Living. Meditation (drop-in),11:30 a.m.-l pm. 6610 Harwin. 713-339-1808. Free HIV Testing. Houston Area Community Services. 10 a.m.- 2 pm. at Joseph-Hines Clinic, 1710 West 25th St 713-526- 0555, ext 231,227 or 226. Free HIV Testing. Montrose Clinic. 8 p.m.-midnight at Club Houston. Also 4-8 pm. at 611 Club, 611 Hyde Park. 713-830-3000. GLBT Pentecostals. Bible study, prayer, 7 p.m. in the Heights. For info: 936-931-3761; e-mail: www.Wgbl947@cs.com. Houston Roughneck Rugby. Practice from 6:30 - 830 p.m. For more information, log on to www.roughnecksrugby.org. Houston Women's Rugby Team. No experience necessary. Practice, 6:30-8:30. Westland YMCA. Kay, 713-208-1529. Introduction to Buddhism. All welcome at 634 W. Temple in the Heights. 7 p.m. Carlton, 713-862-8129. Rainbow Ranglers. Free C&W dance lessons. Brazos River Bottom. No partner needed. Beginner 2 Step, Waltz, Shuffle & Swing. 830 p.m. 713-528-9192. Houston GLBT Community Center. Drop-in 2-9 p.m. • Lesbian Coming Out Group, 7 p.m. • 3400 Montrose, Suite 207.713- 524-3818. www.houstonglbtcenter.org. WEDNESDAY SEPT 17 Center for Spiritual Living. Meditation (drop-in),1130 am.-l pm.; SOM Discussion & Exploration, 7 p.m. 6610 Harwin. 713-339-1808. Crystal Meth Anonymous (CMA). 8:15 p.m. meeting. Montrose Counseling Center, 701 Richmond Ave., Room 15. Bering Memorial United Methodist Church. Support Network Pot Luck Dinner, 630 pm Various support groups, 7 pm. 713-526-1017 Bible Study. Noon & 630 pm St Stephen's Episcopal. 713-526-6665. Free HIV Testing. Montrose Clinic. 4-8 p.m. at Mary's, 1100 Westheimer; 9 p.m.-midnight at Ripcord, 715 Fairview; 10 p.m.- 1 am. at EJ's, 2517 Ralph; 10 p.m.-l am. at Midtowne Spa, 3100 Fannin. 713-830-3000. Free HIV Testing. Thomas Street Clinic. 9 am.-l pm. 2015 Thomas St OraSure method. Call for appointment Sharon, 713-873-4157 Gay Bowling Leagues. 6:30 p.m. Palace Lanes, 4191 Bellaire Blvd. 713-861-1187. www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE Grace Assembly Church. Gay/gay-affirming congregation. 7 p.m. aerobics class. 567 Cedar Grove, Livingston, Texas, 77351. 936-646-7214. E-mail: leol@easttex.net. Houston Pride Band. Open rehearsal, 7:30-9:30 p.m. 1307 Yale. 713-862-1488. Houston Tennis Club. 7-9 p.m. Memorial Park at the Tennis Center, houstontennisclb@aol.com Spiritual Uplift service. 7 p.m. Resurrection MCC. 713-861-9149. Houston GLBT Community Center. Drop-in, 2-9 pm • Free HIV testing, counseling, 7-9 pm • Houston Pride Band rehearsal, 730 pm • 3400 Montrose, Suite 207 713-524-3818. www.houstonglbtcenter.org THURSDAY SEPT. 18 Center for Spiritual Living. Meditation (drop-in),11:30 a.m.-l p.m. 6610 Harwin. 713-339-1808. Community Gospel. Service. 730 p.m. 713-880-9235. www.communitygospel.org. Free HIV Testing Houston Area Community Services. 10 am-2 pm at Joseph-Hines Clinic, 1710 West 25™ St Also 11 am-330 p.m. at Gallery Medical Clinic, 5900 North Freeway, and Club Toyz from 9 p.m.-midnight 713-526-0555, ext 231,227 or 226. Free HIV Testing. Montrose Clinic. 8 p.m.- midnight at Brazos River Bottom (BRB), 2400 Brazos, and Cousins, 817 Fairview. 713-830-3000. Free HIV Testing. 4-8 p.m. at All Star News, 3415 Katy Freeway. Health clinic with free testing for HIV and syphilis. 713-869-7878. FrontRunners. Running club. 6:30 p.m. 713-522-8021. Web site: http://home.swbell.net/larathon/houfr.htm. E-mail: larathon@swbell.net. Gay Bowling Leagues. Luci Duos. 9 p.m. Dynamic Lanes, 6121 Tarnef Drive. 713-861-1187. GLOBAL Gay, Lesbian or Bisexual Alliance at the University of Houston-Central Campus. Weekly meeting, 6 p.m. e-mail: nguyen0023@hotmail.com. Hep C Recovery. Support group. 6:30 p.m. Bering. 713-526- 1017, Ext. 211. Houston Roughneck Rugby. Practice from 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. For more information, log on to www.roughnecksrugby.org. Houston Women's Rugby Team. No experience necessary. Practice, 6:30-830. Westland YMCA. Kay, 713-208-1529. Lake Livingston GLBT Support Group. 7 p.m. dinner and dis­cussion. Grace Assembly Church, 567 Cedar Grove, Livingston, Texas, 77351.936-646-7214. E-mail: leol@easttex.net. Lambda Skating Club. 8 p.m. Tradewinds Skating Rink. www.neosoft.com/~lrsc. 713-523-9620. Montrose Clinic. Offers weekly peer support groups for gay and bisexual men with HIV. English speaking group meets, 6:30 p.m. 215 Westheimer 713-830-3050. Rainbow Ranglers. Free C&W dance lessons. No partner required. Brazos River Bottom. 8:30 p.m. 713-528-9192. Recovery From Food Addiction (RFA). Meeting for 12-step program open to all. Noon-1 p.m. St. Stephen's Episcopal Church, 1805 W. Alabama St. RFA: 713-673-2848. www.gepci-ties. com/rfa77235/. E-mail: rfaworldservice@aol.com. Spanish Charla Conversation Group. Cafe Agora, 7 p.m. E-mail charlahouston@msn.com. 713-416-7203. Women's Clinic. Montrose Clinic. 713-830-3000. Houston GLBT Community Center. Drop in 2-9 p.m. • "Mending and Stitching," 2 p.m. • 3400 Montrose, Suite 207.713-524- 3818. www.houstonglbtcenter.org. FRIDAY SEPT. 19 Center for Spiritual Living. Meditation (drop-in),11:30 a.m.-l p.m. 6610 Harwin. 713-339-1808. Free HIV Testing. Montrose Clinic. 10 p.m.-2 a.m. at The Meatrack, 2915 San Jacinto; 10 p.m.-l a.m. at EJ's and at Midtowne Spa. 713-830-3000. Free HIV Testing. Thomas Street Clinic. 9 a.m.-l p.m. 2015 Thomas St. OraSure method. Call for appointment. Sharon 713-873-4157. Frost Eye Clinic. Free eye exams for people with HIV. 713-830-3000. Grace Assembly Church. Gay/gay-affirming congregation. 7 p.m. aerobics class. 567 Cedar Grove, Livingston, Texas, 77351. 936-646-7214. E-mail: leol@easttex.net HAT.C.H. Houston Area Teen Coalition of Homosexuals meets 7-10 p.m. For meeting information, call 713-529-3590. www.hatchyouth.org. Houston Tennis Club. 7-9 p.m. Memorial Park at the Tennis Center. Houstontennisclub.org Kolbe Project Morning prayer, 10 a.m. 713-861-1800. Q-Patrol. Volunteers walk the streets to help prevent hate crimes. 9:30 p.m. Convene at community center. 713-528- SAFE. E-mail: qpatrolinc@aol.com Houston GLBT Community Center. Drop-in 2-9 p.m • 3400 Montrose, Suite 207.713-524-3818. (Ck To list an event, call 713-529-8490, fax at 713-529-9531, or e-mail editor@ houstonvoice.com. Deadline is Monday at 5 p.m. HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com I CLASSIFIEDS SEPTEMBER 12,2003 23 Call toll-free 1.877.863.1885 to place your ad. Up to 25 words only $12.50 per week. 50$ each additional word. Fax toll-free 1.888.409.6768, or visit houstonvoice.com. STAND OUT FROM THE CROWD Is your home special? Tell our readers about it. Guarantee they will see it with our new features. Bold or box your ad for added attraction. Contact our customer service reps for more details. (877) 863-1885. SALE/HOtlSTON WESTBURY I PRICE REDUCED! 2 BR, 1.5 BA TH w/ patio. Painted in decorator colors. Located in lushly landscaped court­yard. $69,900. Call David @ (713) 283-0843. Agent RENT/HOUSTON HEIGHTS 2 BR, Irg upstairs 7 rm apt. Quiet, hdwd firs, WD, gated entry, priv yard access. $1,000/mo incl water. (713) 861- 0297. HEIGHTS AREA 2 BR, 1 BA garage apt. Very priv w/pool priv­ileges. Water incl. $700/mo + sec dep. Call (713) 498-9921. MONTROSE ✓Renov 2 BR, 1 BA. $800/mo ✓Loft style 1 BR, 1 BA. $650/mo Convenient to Rail & Bus lines, UST, Rice & MedCenter. Call David @(713) 283-0843. Agent RENT IT FAST with our new features. Draw attention to your ad by using our bold or box feature. Contact our cus­tomer service reps for more details. (877) 863-1885. STUDIO I GARAGE APT HEIGHTS / GARDEN OAKS Great location, convenient. Upgraded efficiency style. CAC/heat. WD. Large yard. $475/mo. Small deposit. (713) 476-9313. WESTBURY Just outside loop. 1 BR, 1 BA, WD, faces quiet courtyard. $550/mo + elec & dep. Call (713) 721-0763. For the month of September, place a share ad for the special rate of $10 for 25 words or less. Call (877) 863-1885 ext 224 or 247. NORTHWEST I HOUSTON GF, NS/no drugs. Shr House, priv BR, BA, many amens. $400/mo + 1/2 utils. (281) 970-7912. WESTHEIMER? OLD FARM GWM, late 30s, NS, no drugs, shr furn 2 BR, 2 BA apt. Many amens. $585/mo incl utils. (713) 789-0974. CEREMONIES ANNOUNCE YOUR UNION The Houston Voice is proud to announce the addition of a "Commitment Ceremonies cate­gory to our Classified listings. When making arrangements for your Union, don't forget to include the most important aspect of all...announcing the date. Publishing your union is easy & simple. Call (877) 863-1885 ext 223 to put the finishing touch­es on your ceremony. EMPLOYMENT BARBER I HAIRSTYLIST in the Montrose Aiea to lease chair at very reasonable rate. Frank (713) 522-2263. Change for the new year. FILMGENRE - MOTION PICTURE COMPANY Seeks salesmen for soliciting digital film making work­shops. (713) 942-8320 www.filmgenre.com. FT I PT OUTREACH WORKER NEEDED Must be able to work nights. Will be recruiting participants for an HIV study on the streets of Montrose, (713) 520-8928. RELIABLE P/T BOOKKEEPER Requires Quickbooks-Exp. Nonprofits a +. Contact Mary Jean @ (713) 355-6559 with GMCH. SOUTHERN VOICE seeks a FT graphic designer. The position requires skill in Macintosh systems, Quark 4.0, Photoshop 6.0 and Illustrator. Experience with newspaper/magazine page layout preferred. Must be self-motivated and comfortable with strict deadlines. Southern Voice is an equal opportunity employer. Send resume (no phone calls, please) to: Southern Voice, Human Resources; 1075 Zonolite Road, Suite 1-D Atlanta, GA 30306. Fax: 404-876-2709/ e-mail: employment@win-dow- media.com LOCAL ftCCOMMOOIfflOlilS MONTROSE INN On your next visit to Houston stay w/ us! We offer a 7 room B&B incl queen beds, CATV & phone. Con­venient to 15 gay bars. (713) 520-0206 or (800) 357-1228. Visit our website @ www.montrose.com. THE LOVETT INN Distinctive lodging & catering accommoda­tions. Corporate meeting rooms, banquet facilities, Jacuzzi suites, pool & hot tubs. Near downtown, museums & medical center. (713) 522-5224 or (800) 779-5224. View our website at www.lovettinn.com. TRAVEL/INTERNATIONAL HANS EBENSTEN TRAVEL Great European hikes!! ✓ALPINE ODDYSSEY 8/22-9/6 - See the stunning vistas of the Austrian Alps, then relax in Venice w/ friends! ✓MYKONOS & MONASTERIES 9/4-9/15 (Mykonos exten­sion to 9/18) - Hike through history on Mount Athos alo
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