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Montrose Voice, No. 139, June 24, 1983
File 025
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Montrose Voice, No. 139, June 24, 1983 - File 025. 1983-06-24. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1787/show/1778.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-06-24). Montrose Voice, No. 139, June 24, 1983 - File 025. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1787/show/1778

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 139, June 24, 1983 - File 025, 1983-06-24, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1787/show/1778.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 139, June 24, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date June 24, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 025
Transcript 24 Montrose voice / June 24,1983 Texxas Music Festival Rocks Dome By David Giebert The Texxas World Music Festival at the Astrodome Sunday drew an almost capacity crowd. It came off with only a few disputes among the masses, with about the same amount of drug overdoses and people suffering from exhauston. Everyone else enjoyed the twelve hours of rock music, draft beer and dome food. (Well, two out of three ain't bad). Uriah Heep opened the show and almost went unnoticed with a fast 30 minute set. Unfortunately for them, their songs were an excellent blend of old and new Heep. But when you're the first band out of five, your set tends to be more of a sound check for the other bands. For this reason, Uriah Heep, a veteran band on the come-back road, received a moderate response. After a 40-minute equipment change, Ted Nugent walked on stage unseen and unannounced, picked up his guitar, blasted the crowd for a few seconds, stopped, yelled to the full house "So you mother —, you want to rock and roll?" Rock is what Ted does best as he cut loose with a blazing 60-minute show. Ted's music was selected in majority from his first live Gonzo LP. Well received, he came back for an encore and managed to set a high energy tempo for the rest ofthe evening. Another equipment change brought the Canadian band Triumph to the stage. Triumph picked up where Nugent left off with another hour set of their own, playing all their FM radio hits and some solid rock from their current LP. The high point was a well executed guitar solo by lead guitarist Rick Emmitt. He managed to merge classic with blues and rock to put a little extra touch in their show. In between Triumph and Sammy Hagar, the crowd was pumped up by KLOL's Col. St. James who announced their live broadcast and that attendance in the dome topped the Dallas show the day before. As he announced, "Here he is, the peoples' choice, Sammy Hagar," the dome roared to confirm the statement. Hagar was the high point for most ofthe younger fans. Sammy stroked the crowd with statements like, "Yesterday's show in Dallas was just a warm-up," and "In Dallas the fire marshall wouldn't let me use my special effects or break up any guitars, but tonight we're going to do it all." And do it all he did. Sammy's head set microphone allowed him mobility to run all over the stage while playing his guitar. But that wasn't enough for him. Throughout the set he was climbing on the 90 ft. sound scaffolding. He hung off it, jumped around on it, and rope swung to the stage from the lower levels of it. He also managed to get up on the overhead stage lighting where he rocked the dome with wild guitar solos. But still the Red Rocker wasn't done. Besides his own antics, he brought three large skylights with four individual pods apiece stationed at various positions on the floor, eight 12-ft. flame throwers in front of the stage, and a Red Rocker Firebird on stage to dance on which he finally blew up. After 60 minutes of this, the crowd was at a pandemonium level. Sammy came back on for a half hour encore where he topped his own spectacular show by bringing out Ted Nugent and Rick Emmitt to finish his set with a red hot version of Led Zepplin's classic "Whole Lotta Lovin." By this time of the night, the audience was showing definite signs of fatigue and the hour equipment change before Styx sent some ofthe people home early. For the brave who stuck it out, the wait was well worth it. Styx's music and productions had a classic professional touch. {Quite a relief from the twang and scream styles of all the previous artists.) The Kilroy extravaganza started with a short 10-minute movie about the banning of rock and roll by the dictator of a police state. This situation was a direct result of a concert where Kilroy's band (alias Styx) had allegedly killed a spectator. Rock and roll was declared the music of the devil and banned. After a daring escape, Kilroy meets up with devoid rock and roller Tommy Shaw, lead guitarist, and two of them reminisce over the night rock was blacklisted. The video shut off, the curtain opened and Styx began their set. There music is some of the best in the business right now, and they are extremely tight. Their two hour show included music from all stages of their career. Styx is the kind of band that blends a combination of hard rock material with a soft spoken ballad or can be jamming on guitar solo one time and play some classic piano work the next. This truly is the work of a polished, seasoned group. With the Styx version of the Jerry Lee Lewis song "All Shock Up," the curtain closed and with music still ringing the rafters, the 1983 Houston version of the Texxas World Music Festival ended. d Smathers At Place in Sun By Lynn Herrick Gay activist Dee Smathers went on record as "raising hell" during her presentation at A Place in the Sun June 21. "Just tell 'em I raise some shit," said the 42-year-old social worker. She sees her present role in the community as that of "gadfly," to "get people screaming at each other, and maybe one of these days they'll listen to each other." No one screamed at 704 Fairview, but she did get into a friendly disagreement with a gay man in the audience who felt that to "stop when I start offending" showed respect for self and others. "We'll be good Jews," said Dee, "and they won't put us in those ovens, right?" She said she considers an apt comparison to be "they burned 250,000 of us." Refusing to walk on eggs, she Baid "I'm not going to stop being things because it offends. I don't have to deal with somebody else's bigotry. "To me" said the controverisal "dyke" (which she defines as "political leader") "wrecking straights is a matter of gay pride." She explained that wrecking was "A pre-Stonewall term for making them uncomfortable in situations where they couldn't retaliate." She says understanding from straights is not the goal because "the straight world will never understand," and admitted that she doesn't understand transsexuals. But later she said, "You can't blame people who say 'be quiet' because they paid a tremendous price. I've seen people who paid desperate prices." She sees the present situation in the gay community as a generation gap between these veterans who went through the "wars" and now don't want to make waves because they've finally "got it good" and the young gays who demand their legal rights instead of pleading for acceptance. A young man exemplified this view saying, "When you segregate yourself, they don't see that you're people." A young woman, who identified herself as straight, defended Dee's recent shirtless gardening (which so wrecked the neighbors that they called the police) by pointing out the cultural relativism of dress. According to Dee, toplessness in one's own yard is legal for either sex if you're not "soliciting" or creating a traffic hazard. "I wouldn't swap anything for having been in the last 20 years of gay rights and seen the changes," said the veteran scrapper. In the 60s when she came out, gay leaders and publications were saying "we are sick—please accept our illness." When laws against "cross dressing" were interpreted to mean "no fly-front pants" for women, the "dyke bar" called the Roaring 60s where she hung out was raided, and Dee and all her friends who delighted in wearing fly-front jeans were arrested. Naturally, the gay community put on drag shows to raise the bail money! "The biggest gay rights step I ever took," she said, "was when I cutmy hair." It was her "emancipation" from gay stereotypes, saying "hey, I can cut my hair and be a dyke but I don't have to be a butch." In those days the "definition of a fluff was you went to the beauty shop twice a week—if you were a butch you went only once." Women, according to Samthers, had to prove their gayness by being "as butch as you could get away with without being a gym teacher," and men by "as nelly as you could get away with without being a band director." (Hey, Andy, what the hell does that mean?) Her most emotional step was at the International Women's Year where she was instrumental in getting the gay rights resolution passed. "We scream and shriek and fight each other," Bhe said of today's gay community herein Houston, but "we've got more political clout than you'd ever believe. We've elected a mayor. We've elected a majority of City Council." Still she says, "The shit going to come down again gang." She predicts things will get better before they get worse, but something will happen—war, plague, famine—"to make things worse for queers." Talking of AIDS, she said that nobody cared until "somebody besides niggers and queers" got it. "Knowing at least 2000 gay men," she said, "I know some of my friends are going to die. I don't like that at all." To young gays she said, "How you people will do it, I don't know. I probably won't be a part of it, I have no right to tell your generation what to do." "I'm not gonna make speeches. I'm not gonna stamp my feet. I'm not gonna organize any more," she claimed. From now on she plans to content herself with snipping at people, "making fun of pompous asses that we all make of ourselves. Sit back, stir up shit and hopefully make you think." Smathers praised A Place in the Sun for making people think. She is writing a contemporary gay history called Hide This Book. "It will be one woman's view of gay rights that's not gonna be nice to anybody." Her retiring words were: "We do not have equal rights for anybody until we have equal rights for all." Back to Basics Japan, the world's largest producer of electronic calculators, is having second thoughts about the hand-held marvels. And some of the country's largest banks, newspapers and other businesses have launched a campaign to bring back the Abacus, reports the Chronicle of Higher Education. Supporters of the ancient wire-and-bead counting device say it may be slower and more cumbersome, but it's less susceptible to human error. Ted Nugent Rick Emmitt of Triumph Sammy Hagar PHOTOS BV DAVID GIEBERT
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