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Montrose Voice, No. 139, June 24, 1983
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Montrose Voice, No. 139, June 24, 1983 - File 022. 1983-06-24. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 5, 2021. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1787/show/1775.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-06-24). Montrose Voice, No. 139, June 24, 1983 - File 022. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1787/show/1775

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 139, June 24, 1983 - File 022, 1983-06-24, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 5, 2021, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1787/show/1775.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 139, June 24, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date June 24, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 022
Transcript June 24,1983 / Montrose Voice 21 Montrose Live Playwright Pearson Describes 'Ancestor' By Lacy Cale He's a bright-eyed cowboy who uses the word "irrefutable" as easily as "ain't" in conversations. He saunders in and plops down like he just stepped down out of a semi or in from three days on the range. Not really what you would think would show up for an interview representing a leading playwright in the urban Houston literary scene. The person described is Max Pearson, Houstonian of some 11 years, whose play, The Ancestor is currently at the Main Street Theater, 2540 Times Blvd. Ancestor is a "what if play, he said. "What if an anthropologist, say a decade after the evolution bombshell, found a fossil that irrefutably backed up Darwin's theory, he questioned. "There has always been contention between the creationists vs. the evoluntionists, but most people nowadays can accept at least parts of both theories. But at the turn of the century, when this play is set, it was a very volitale, really touchy subject and those people didn't want to hear anything about something such as evolution." With this basic conflict in mind, Pearson centers the action around three main characters: anthropologist Ralph Bingley (Phillip Hafer), his companion and secretary Todd Jones (Joe Ponessa) and a creation-theory believer/journalist named Mavis Louise Eddinjjton. "This one female journalist, who is a religios zealot, is a very strong woman," said Pearson. "She writes for the National Lion (something like the National Enquirer), and intends to do everything she can to discredit the scientist's find after she wins his confidence and knows all about it." The play contains some "nifty confrontations," Pearson said, and there are inferences to the untold story of the scientist and his assistant who are gay. "The fact that they are gay is not something that motivates the play," Pearson said. "It's just the personal relationship they have, but they are so involved with the project," this find of the missing link, "that action moves the play along." Pearson said he studied several months doing the research to be able to write such as play as The Ancestor. "Researching the techniques they used for such discoveries was difficult because not many books tell about the way things were in 1912, It's harder to find historical science books." But the research paid off and the play is a powerful drama dealing with people's thirst for discovery and enlightenment which is always hampered by the myopic view of others. This is only one of many plays Pearson has written, among them a one-act The Doodle Bug and a children's play which has been published. He also did a couple of radio plays at KPFT. He stuided drama and playwriting at the University of Houston, and other schools, and has been writing some eight years. "The payoff, because there isn't really any money in it unless the play is just fantastically popular, is in the audience reaction," he said. "I love just being there and hearing the whispers and watching the expressions. It really gives you a feeling inside. That's why I didn't care for radio. There was no interaction—no audience that I could see." Pearson said that Houston audiences are lucky to have what he termed a third alternative in theater. "Ten years ago the theater in Houston was just stagnant. Now it is looser and more interesting things are being done. People have a choice with such places as Main Street, Stages and Chocolate Bayou, where before they had to choose between the Alley and community theater. Now they have a third alternative." ThiB third alternative is the medium that Pearson's work seems to fit best. The Ancestor curtain time is 8:00 p.m. June 24, July 1 and 8, plus a 3:30 p.m. matinee on Sunday, June 26. An Arts for Everyone cast party follows the June 24 performance. For ticket information call 524- 6706. n Tina and Pam for a Hot Night at the Summit By Hollis Hood If the dancing before the show doesn't heat up the audience at the Gay Political Caucus Rally, Sunday, June 26 in the Summit at 7:00 p.m., then a pair of sizzling ladies will—Tina Turner and Pamela Stanley. Tina, a veteran songtress and legendary mistress of rock/soul, said during a phone interview from Canada that she is looking forward to performing in Houston again. She just finished a southern tour, with an outstanding engagement at Rockefeller's here. "I think it's going to be a lot of fun," she said. "I've been performing up here and the crowds are a little stiffer. But when we get down with these folks it'll really get loose." Tina said she doesn'treally get involved in the politics of the event. "I'm an entertainer, and that's why I'll be there." And she has been there, come back, set trends, shook things up and done it all for the past 20 years in show business. She started out as what she defined as a "country girl. I didn't know there was such a thing as traveling around singing and I wasn't into records, but I always sang in talent shows and all. It was only after I started going to movies that I wanted to be a 'star.' I would dream about it. Then when I went to St. Louis and met Ike (the show Pamela Stanley was previously the Ike and Tina Turner revue), I started singing with a band. "I sang with the band on the tapes and that's how I got started. The dancing came from my own energy on stage and the min dresses came out after that. I never realls fit into those long sequended dresses, and the image just came." Variety is good for music, said Turner. Rock and roll has come further than in Elvis' day, and music is not categorized as it once was. "What they do now is more universal, more unisex. They do what they want to do, and I like it." Some of the attitudes and fasions of the punkers can be transposed into other people's thinking, she said. "Some people are just looking for attention ... some things only belong on stage." And one person that certainly belongs on stage, because she is a star entertainer, Philip Hafer and Joe Ponessa play the anthropologist and his assistant, respectively, in Max Pearson's play "The Ancestor," currently at Main Street Theater. will share the spotlights with Tina on Sunday—Pamela Stanley. In a recent interview with this Philadelphia native turned Texaan (she lives in Dallas now), she said she is excited about sharing the bill with Tina Turner, and about riding on the Officer's Club float in the Gay Pride Parade. Stanley learned music at her grandfather's knee, she said. She and her brother and sisters would all sing harmony to guitar accompaniment. "I tell people that I learned to sing through the S&M method. If we didn't do it right, he would take my hand and bend it back. He didn't mean to hurt us, but we learned to sing harmony real quick." From that time on, she knew she wanted to be a professional singer. Reared on the classic folk music of the Kingston Trio, Brothers Four and Simon and Garfunkle, she studied her craft and headed off to New York to make a name for herself. While singing in a piano bar one night, a German producer came in heard her and ultimately offered her a record contract. "I was like a storybook," she said. "They flew me to Germany first class, and I had never been out of the U.S. I Btayed in a hotel that was a castle. I thought I was Cinderella." Grateful for the experience and the excellence the Germans demanded of her, she was glad to get back to United States soil. "You don't know how to appreciate America until you go to another country," she said. "We would be recording and there was a window in the studio and you'd look out over the land mines and the wall, but even so, Berlin was beautiful." She said they record things differently there. Instead of bringing in a few violins to cut the record, they brought in an entire symphony. "They could get their takes done in just a couple of shots, and it would take me more; it was wild." During her year stay, she toured Holland, France, England and Germany and has since appeared in South America and Mexico as well taking audiences by storm with her high-energy disco dance music. Her current hit is "I Don't Want to Talk About It," which she will be performing among others at the Summit. "My brother, James Lee Stanley and Seberin Browne, wrote it. When I first heard it I wasn't impressed, but in changing this beat discovered this would be fabulous for disco." Stanley and her husband, Frank Man- daro, have their own recording label now, Komander, out of Dallas. "Even the doctor that delivered my baby invested in the company. We wanted it to be a Texas company—record in Texas; we even press our own records. "We had no idea it would take off like it has. We were just going to sell the album at shows, but it's been out a week and we've already sold out of 10,000 copies. (Don't despair, they have reordered.) "I'm more confident now. I feel my voice is stronger now. We're very excited about the future. It's bigger than I expected." She expressed special thanks to the Officer's Club for their sponsorship at the Summit. "We are really going to have a good act. We have new dances, new costumes—it's really going to be great." So be there. Tickets are still on sale for $9.65 at Ticketmaster and Ticketron outlets as well as Montrose Hair Design and selected bars. Other guests include Virginia Appuzo of the National Gay Task Force and state and local politicians.
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