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Montrose Voice, No. 139, June 24, 1983
File 019
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Montrose Voice, No. 139, June 24, 1983 - File 019. 1983-06-24. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1787/show/1772.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-06-24). Montrose Voice, No. 139, June 24, 1983 - File 019. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1787/show/1772

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 139, June 24, 1983 - File 019, 1983-06-24, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1787/show/1772.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 139, June 24, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date June 24, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 019
Transcript 18 MONTROSE VOICE/JUNE 24, 1983 The Law Working Together By Henry Walter Weiss Separatism is a pervasive and dangerous force in the gay male and lesbian community. A bi-coastal friend recently explained his refusal to become involved with his local gay elderly support group by saying that he didn't like lesbians and didn't want to have anything to do with them. Such a view diminishes both the person who holds it and also the gay male and lesbian community at large. My own favorite story about a separatist issue occurred some years ago at a time when lesbian separatism was riding a cresting wave: I had an embarrassed call from a lawyer-friend with whom I had worked on a number of matters. She had been asked, by a particularly ardent separatist, to prepare a trust. The trust was to contain some rather complex provisions. My friend felt that the provision were beyond the range of her competence, and asked for my assistance. The irony, of course, was that the entire job was to be top secret. I was to prepare the draft for my firend and she would submit it to the client as her own work. Above all else, the client was not to know that a man had been involved in the drafting process. I did the work requested, bemused and saddened by the situation. It was sad to think that the client felt so strongly on the issue; still I could not help but enjoy the reality that a man had actually drafted the trust. Of course the sexuality of the person who drafted the trust was irrelevant, and so the client's insistence on a woman as her lawyer was misplaced. Her insistence should have been on someone who could do the job she needed done: whether that person be man, woman or eunuch. My own experience working with women in an organization called SAGE (which is both inter-generational and actively concerned about sexual parity) has been wonderfully rewarding. SAGE volunteers, women and men, work together, planning support and assistance for gay elderly. Issues of sexism are diffused in an environment of cooperation, and in the process gay men and lesbian women learn about each other's concerns. Ridding oneself of sexist notions is an ongoing process, not unlike coming out itself. Sexism is ingrained in our patterns of speech and grammar. Constant vigilance is essential to shake free from it. Yet that vigilance pays dividends in the common bonds within the gay male and lesbian community. ±1983 rtERBTOUl GFtPHZE UHIT* TH.IOUGH- DlVERSITY HOUSTON OAT P(UD_ WEln W_3 1901 TAFT (AT WEBSTER) 523-2794 Co-sponsored by the Lesbian & Gay Resource Service. UofH
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