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Montrose Voice, No. 139, June 24, 1983
File 014
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Montrose Voice, No. 139, June 24, 1983 - File 014. 1983-06-24. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 23, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1787/show/1767.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1983-06-24). Montrose Voice, No. 139, June 24, 1983 - File 014. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1787/show/1767

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 139, June 24, 1983 - File 014, 1983-06-24, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 23, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1787/show/1767.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 139, June 24, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date June 24, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 014
Transcript June 24,1963 / Montrose Voice 13 Commentary Gay Pride: It Means Not Being a 'Toilet' By Joe Baker I attended my first Gay Pride parade nearly ten years ago in Detroit. I had just started—at the ripe old age of 24—going to gay bars. I can't remember who I went to the parade with, but I do recall that we spent most of the time hiding in the background—scared to death of newspaper photographers and television cameras. If I remember correctly, the parade wasn't much. But, there were thousands of people around—all standing on the sidewalks. Only a hundred or so brave gay souls had the courage—and pride—to march. Ten years ago Gay Pride parades were just starting out in major cities across the country. Gays in New York and San Francisco, of course, had been parading years earlier, but the movement had finally made its way to Middle America. The fact that homosexuals in Detroit and Michigan were taking to the streets was news. It was the beginning of a new era in the struggle for gay rights. I watched that first parade not giving much thought or care to the term "Gay Pride." Hell, I was having enough problems just trying to finally accept the fact that I was a homosexual, much less having to be proud of that fact. But, that was then—many years, many experiences and many miles ago. An older gay friend of mine said to me recently: "I just don't understand you young gays today. What's all this about gay pride? Why do you feel you have to march in the streets? I'm not ashamed of being gay, but I'm not proud about it either. I'm a male, but I wouldn't say that I'm proud to be one. I'm white, but I also wouldn't Bay that I am proud to be that color. I just am." I tried to explain to Brad why Gay Pride is so important to us today, but I don't think I did a very good job. For some reason, he just couldn't understand that if we as homosexuals don't like ourselves and take pride in our lives—then how can we expect others to understand and accept us? The most important persons we have to please are ourselves. When we like what we are—and accept who we are—then it becomes so much easier for others. It also makes it much easier foryoung homosexuals just coming to terms with their sexuality. They have nothing to be ashamed of. I'd like one more chance to explain Gay Pride to my friend, Brad. I think the task will be much easier now because of an experience I had recently. Several weeks ago I took part in the Experience Weekend, a 34-hour workshop aimed at transforming one's life experiences into fuller and richer meanings. The workshop was developed for gay men and women and helps them come to terms with their sexual identity and aids them in dealing with various types of relationships. Someday soon I want to talk more about the Experience Weekend, but now I just want to share with you a portion of one discussion from the workshop. I think it goes a long way towards explaining what Gay Pride is really all about. David Goodstein, one of the founders of the Experience Weedend and owner of The Advocate, discussed the fact that so many gay people treat themselves as "toilets." Relax, I'm not going to be talking about kinky sex. Goodstein has three definitions of "toilet." The first has to do with the fact that people are willing to accept second class status because of something about themselves. For instance, their being gay or black is thought of a limitation. Goodstein's second definition of "toilet" centers on "the prevalent pattern in many organizations or groups of non-action due to an inability to reach agreement on any specific purpose or goal. While many hours are spent nit-picking over procedural matters or debating the merits of irrelevant side issues, those most able to assist the organization in getting the job done get bored and leave, frequently never to return." The third definition of "toilet" according to Goodstein, "is the belief that people who are different from you in some way you believe is important—for instance, if you are gay and they are not—will not be interested in playing the game of life with you." All three of Goodstein's definitions zero in on one point: Don't put yourself down becuase of who or what you are. Don't think of yourself as a "toilet" or other people will treat you as a "toilet." To me, this is what Gay Pride is all about. It's realizing your self worth—and not letting anyone or anything impose "toilet" status on you. But it also means not imposing—and accepting—"toilet" status on yourself. You don't have to march in a parade to be proud of yourself as a person. You don't have to tell your parents and your boss you are gay. But to accept and understand the true meaning of Gay Pride, you have to tike yourself. That's what Gay Pride is really all about. We're open 6am-midnight Serving breakfast, daily hot lunches, beer & wine Breakfast Special 990 served 6-10am Bring in this ad tor a COMPLIMENTARY DRINK with any food purchase OLD HOUSTON DINER ^ DINER 914 W. Alabama ° 524-2318 Orders To Go A r Officers Qwb Happy Happy Hour Friday 5-8pm CENTS ALL WELL DRINKS Officers Cum Happy Happy Hour Friday 5-8pm Open for Dancing Friday • Saturday • Sunday No door charge Friday or Sunday Upper deck 2700 Albany HOUSTON mmmmmmmwmWmWmmmWmVtii'ieaimMMimMxmw.vi-M'iwnnM a Friday 11pm to ? Saturday 11pm to dawn Sunday 8pm to 12 ,</ ],0f3) 523-4084
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