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Montrose Voice, No. 139, June 24, 1983
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Montrose Voice, No. 139, June 24, 1983 - File 001. 1983-06-24. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1787/show/1754.

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(1983-06-24). Montrose Voice, No. 139, June 24, 1983 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1787/show/1754

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Montrose Voice, No. 139, June 24, 1983 - File 001, 1983-06-24, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/1787/show/1754.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Montrose Voice, No. 139, June 24, 1983
Contributor
  • McClurg, Henry
Publisher Community Publishing Company
Date June 24, 1983
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 22329406
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript Pride Week Continues Concert Saturday, Parade and Rally Sunday The Newspaper of Montrose June 24, 1983 Issue .. 139 Published Every Friday An Evening of Culture One of the annual events of Gay Pride Week is the Mon­da} night "An Evening of the Arts," held this year at the Swim Club on Peckham. Photo left: An ensem hie provided music at the Art Alliance gathering. Top right: Photos and drawings line the wall for public inspection Lower cent.er. the Court Players by the pool Lower right: Mitch Lundsford and his entry in the art competition Photos by Steve Cuniqertti A scene from this past week's "Clapshick", staged jointly by the Montrose Counseling Center, Montrose Clinic and Gay Switchboard. Steve Cuni­bertti and Jul Lowery prepare to take on "Montrose people" m the play Wednesday night.) 0~1v.ms~.:;.s~_ 1r..~:.Y_ ~_~_·_r• . _l___~.~ HOUSTON CJAY PftlDf: WHH 19&3 Budweiser LIGHT Dallas Gay Pride Week Begins Gay Pride Week in Dallas began the wee­kend of June 17-19 with its annual parade, concerts and contests. Approximately 150 people gathered ~·n· day at the Oak Lawn Library, where a candlelight march began. An arts and crafts fair on Cedar Springs at Throckmorton alongside the Cross· roads Market kicked off Saturday's activi· ties. Razz le Dazzle Dallas, one of the largest Gay Pride Week events in the state, high· lighted Saturday. Held in the Centennial Building at Fair Park, it included dancing, a laser·light show and numerous booths from many local groups and businesses. The Sunday parade was shadowed with controversy because the Gay Pride Associ- Oak Lawn Symphonic Band in Sunday's parade ation originalJy decided to exclude the Dallas Tavern Guild's float. Citing the Round-Up Saloon'• door pol· icy as the reason to refuse the Tavern Guild's participation, the Gay Pride Asso­ciation refused to alter their decision until Friday morning, June 17. When asked why the Gay Pride Aeeocia· tion changed its decision, its president Jim O'Connor responded that they had received pressure from several out.side sources to alter the judgement. O'Connor would not elaborate on who the "outside sources" were. According to Richard Montogomery, general manager of the Round·Up Saloons in Dallas and Austin, Don Baker, former president of the Dallas Gay A11iance, had "urged" the association to alter its decision. The rally held in Lee Park after the parade was started by music from the Oak Lawn Symphonic Band. Speakers included Dan Bradley, co-chair of the National Human Right• Campaign; Mariam Ben Shalom, a lesbian feminist from Wisconsin; and others. The Rally at Lee Park following the parade JUNE 24, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 3 Montrose Mouth Community Notes The Roman, 2602 Whitney, corner of Pacific and Whitney, cordially invites you to A Haircut for AIDS on Saturday, June 25 from Sam to 8pm. No appointment is necessary. The $10 requested donation for the haircut goes to benefit KS/AIDS research or victim services So make It more than a haircut. make 1t a con­tribution as well -a- The Gay Hispanic Organizations of Houston invite the gay community to a Hispanic Culture Evemng on June 24, Friday at the Memorial Park Motel. 50 Waugh Dr. at 8:00 p.m. •·ee1e­bracion NO. 1, 1983" will feature 18 Hispanic countries represented by Chelo y Su Tropical Yamayel. The Great Pretenders. female imper­sonators, Folkloric Dancers and Jamie Chapa It's semi-formal, $3 and there will be a dance following the performers -a- The Montrose Clinic must once again announce an hour change. The clinic will no longer be open during the day. but will resume regular hours from 6:00-9 30 p.m. Monday through Friday -a- Baja's will be closed for remodeling starting Monday and will reopen July 1-as an exciting new entertainment concept -a- Kindred Spirits announces a Monday Night Pool Toumament each week at 5245 Buffalo Speedway. It's a $2 entry and time •S 8:30- 1 lpm. Kindred also otters free C&Wdanceles­sons to women the first Monday of each month at8pm -a- Movmg Right Along Garage. a woman-owned and operated garage (a first for the city) is now open and ready to repair your vehicles They specialize in tune-ups and air conditioning work on most cars Right oow they are only there on Saturdays, but can be reached at 663- 7329 -a- VD screenings will be conducted at the Ranch. 6620'~ S. Main. this Sunday, June 25. 8pm­midnight. -a- Congrats to the Montrose Ck>ggers who were asked to perform at a special appearance for the cast party of Leonard Bemstem·s new opera. which premiered in Houston June 17 The party was at the Four Seasons Hotel; the western Cloggers added some class to the opera folks\ -a- "The Naked Civil Servant'" will be shown on Channel 8 at 9pm this Saturday. followed by an interview of Ouinten Crisp with Dick Ca\lett at 10:30 p.m. If you can't be home. set the VCR for this one -a- On June 28, this Tuesday, Integrity will have a chapter eucharist and a guest speaker from Gay Men with Straight W1ves at the Autry House, 6265 Main at 7:30 p.m. Also this will be Integrity's first year to have a float in the Gay Pnde Parade -a- For mformation on NOWs activities during and after Gay Pride Week. call 921-1175 -a- The Greater Montrose Busrness Guild is distri­buting maps of Montrose to aid out-of-towners are various spots in the area. Look for these -n- Monuments and Landscapes. a New Public Art has opened at the Mcintosh/Drysdale Gallery, 2008 Peden. Hours are 11am-5pm Tuesday thru Friday -a- A Place in the Sun at Grac1elynn Gallery. 704 Fairview, will host poets Anthony Bradley and Ken Oayringer in a program of thetr works on this Tuesday. June 28. at 7pm. Adm1ss1on 1s $1 -a- Visual Inventions will be featured at there's never e'nuH at 4309 Montrose on Saturday, June 25. all day. Party. party 4 MONTROSEV OICE I JUNE 24, 1983 Parade Scheduled for Sunday Sunday, June 26 at 5:30, Miss Westheimer will be wearing all the finery she puts on but once a year-the Gay Pride Week Parade. With more than 50 entries in this year's event, the floats promise to be more color­ful and flamboyant than in year's past. More groups will be represented, and it the weather holds, it should be an event to remember. The parade starts at Shepherd and Wes· theimer at 5:30, proceeding down Westhei­mer to Bagby. A reviewing stand will be set up in the 900 block of Westheimer. Memorial Concert Scheduled The annual Fred Paez Memorial Concert will be held June 2.5, Saturday, in Cullen Auditorium at 8:00 p.m. Featured on the program will be the Oak Lawn Symphonic Band, the MontroRe Symphonic Band, the MCCRChoir, Mont· rose Cloggers, Bayou B'lu and the Mont· rose Chorale. Admission is $5, or a ticket is in the Band's coupon book which may be pur­chased for $10. Coupon's are available at Mary's, Wild'n'Stein, Kindred Spirits, Union Jack and from the concert per­formers. Let us hear from you Letters to the Editor Montrose V01ce 3317 Montrose #306 Houston. TX 77006 Montrose Voice The Newspaper ol Montrose Published every Friday 3317 Montrose Boulevard #306 Houston, TX 77006 Phone (713) 529-8490 Contents copynght C1983 Office hours: 10am-5:30pm Henry MCCiurg ~IJIQ~t.O•tor Ace! Clari( gr•pltJet Sonny Davia •otoun/J/ttll Holhl Hood m•nagmg 9'11f0t Eddie Chavez 1port1 .Oifor Jon Cheetwood Joseph Lee contflbut•ng wrtt•r1 Bob Jonea, Mary Cadena. Julle Hothngsworth, John Cooper. Larry Popham COlllributmg phOtogr•PhWI lyt Ham• ~·l•fl(/d"«'O< Mark Drago ed..,.,,tlmg Jon Cheetwood CIN$Jf•e0 ad\-.nilmg Founding Ufmb.r G, .. ,., MontroN 8U11neta Guild Gay Preu Auoci.ltion '"-• Servlc:N lriternat1Qflat Ga,. N~ws Ag9"'Cy. Paci he N9Wa S."'k• A1,11t•n BurHi.r:. Capolot Newt S.V.ce Syf'ld•cat.O FH/ur• Servlt:H • w,,,.,. (San Fr•ncasco) ChfOf\ICle F .. 11.11M. Un•ttld F .. lure Syf\d1cate.Jeffrey W•leon. Ra11dy Allrtld. Stonewall Fe•turff Syndicate. B11•n McNaughl. Joe B1ke1 POSTM-'ITER Send tlddr ... CO<recl•Ofll 10 3317 Montrot• 1306. Houlton, TX 77008 SublCflption rate 1n US in u•i.O emlfk>pa · $C9 per ye1r (52 IHu .. ). $28 per101 month• (28-.U .. ). or$1 25perweek (Ifft th.an 29 IUu••) N1t1onlll 1<1~111ing r•fl'H•nl•I'"'• Joe 01Sa.1M1to. R1ven0e1t Mlrketong. e6661h A....nue. New York 10011. (21~ 2C2...e863 .A.d,v.e.<..t.,..i,n.g. dHd/Jne TvMd•y. 5 30pm. for 11.tue releaMd fn· Nol1U 10 «1vert1Htl LOC.1 1a-.ert•lll'IQ ,..,. 1et'leclule F1 ..... A w• attect•v• Oct 1. 1962 Local act.....i111ng rate actiedule lt•"l·A ••II be eflecl•v• July t, 1913 Rupo111tbitif)' MOf'llrOM VOl(:a. dOM not auvme rl9IP(IMI· bHity IOf ·~ertt .. ng Clallfts ReadeD &.hOuld •• .., MOl'llfOM VOIOI '° •nv dec9pt1ve •d'ver1111ng Women's AIDS Network Formed ~r. b!':1~!:'l .. ociation Wire Service DENVER-About 25 women joined together at the Fifth Lesbian and Gay Health Conference held in Denver June 9·12 to form the "Women'• AIDS Net· work." The women who joined are involved in providing care to persons with AIDS. In the group's founding statement, the Women's AIDS Network stated, "As women, lesbian and heterosexual, we have much to share, much of offer, much to teach, much to learn." The group also said that the group faces the personal issue of facing the diseases of their male friends as well as the social is~me of being isolated in the lesbian com­munity for working to fight AIDS. The statement also said, "As women working within predominantly male groups deal­ing with AIDS, we once again face invali­dation, invisibility and sexism." THe group plane to be involved in educa­tion, support and political action, includ­ing education about AIDS to the lesbian and feminist communities. Laurie Hauer, RN, a worker in San Francisco General Hospital's AIDS Clinic, convened the group's first meeting. Hauer pointed out that women have been working at all levels of the AIDS cri· sis since its beginning and deserve to be included as equal participants in policy, fund-raising and any ongoing work of organizations working on AIDS. Says Hauer, "I see this as a very important way of unifying the men's and women's com­munities, one of the positive aspects of this crisis." The Women's AIDS Network can be con­tacted by wri ting in care of Casade AIDS Project, 2702 N.E. Clackamas, Portland, OR 97232. MCC to Convene in Toronto B;r Steve Warren Vta Gay PreH AHocialion Wire Service After nearly 15 years, Metropolitan Com· JUNE 24, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 5 munity Church has grown too big for its organizational britches. Incorporated as the Universal Fellow­ship of Metropolitan Community Churches in 1971 after a handful of con· gregations had grown out of the founding group in Los Angeles, the church's Ger. eral Conference XI will vote this summer on a wholesale restructuring with an emphasis on decentralization proposed by its CommiBBion on Government Struc­tures and Systems. In recent years, UFMCC has been deal· ing with the complexity of adapting to the laws, languages and customs of many nations, as MCC's are now operating in nine countries, striving for a foothold in several others and keeping the lines of communication open with interested par­ties in dozens more. The first MCC outside the U.S. was formed in 1973 in Toronto, Canada, and church will mark its 10th anniversary by hosting the General Conference July 10- 17. With the theme "Many Gifts ... One Spirit," the conference will feature guest speaker Dr. VirginiaMollenkott, author of Women, Men and the Bible and Is the Homosexual My Neighbor? All·day seminars include "Church Growth in Good and Bad Times" and "Embodiment: Uniting the Spiritual and Sensual Self." In business meetings, the GSS propos­als to divide the North American churches into regions will be discussed. Each region would elect an elder to manage its affairs and represent it to the Board of Elders, which administers the business of the fel­lowship between general conferences. This would increase the size of the current board and assure that all elders were salaried for their work. In addition, the structure would allow for administrative help for the church's founder, Rev. Troy Perry, who has just returned from three months of travel, much of it devoted to raising money for the UFMCC TV special, God, Gays and the Go1pel: This Is OUR Story. Perry said he ie optimistic a bout the church's eventual acceptance into the National Council of Churches. That vote should come next year if NCC's Govern­ing Board, which met with UFMCC repre­sentatives in San Francisco in May, approve the application at their - November meeting. Should they delay their vote again, Rev. Perry won't be conoemed. "We feel like the longer they wait, the better off we are," be said. "To know us is to love us." Growth a Concern for Gay Fathers Coalition ~fa ~!';'t.'!!~1110Ciation Wire Service DENVER-Growth and strengethening of its organization are two big items on the 1983-1!4 agenda of the Gay Fathers Coali· tion which met for its annual convention in May in Denver. More than 100 gay fathers, some accompanied by their lov· ers, gathered to participate in workshops and to conduct the organization's busi­ness. The San Francisco chapter reportedly had an attendance of up to 50 people two years ago, but now hosts about 250, a 500 percent increase in two years. In New York City, six separate chapters operate and a separate organization called Gay Fathers Forum has sprung up. Organizers emphasize the importance of personal contact in gay fathers ' groups because for many fathers, it is there first contact with the organized gay community. Media attention is another important issue confronting the organized gay fathers' group. Because many members are unable to publicly disclose that they are gay, relatively few spokespeople have emerged. To facilitate greater access to and acceptance in the media, Stu Gross of the Gay Fathers' Forum in New York con­ducted a workshop in prt'8enting gay par­enting issues in the media. Other workshops during the weekend included information aDout custody decisions, a seminar on rela tionship systems and a forum for exchangi ng ideas and solving problems. The Gay Fathers' Coalition can be OCc~:.t P.O. Box 50360, Washington, ~f t! ,,i ·1 ~ i 6 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 24, 1983 " WE SUPPORT CELEBRATION 83" Sexy Ads Stop, But Don't Sell As anyone who's seen an ad for designer jeans can te11 you, sex seems to be taking over Madison A venue. But researchers are warning that too much steam in advertising can sometimes backfire, reports Advertising Age. They say sex may have "stopping power"-it'll grab your attention-but it doesn't necessarily sell anything. Former Miami-of-Ohio Professor Bruce Morrison tried out some seductive ads on test subjects, and found that when people were sexually aroused, ''a sort of shock set in-they looked at the ads but didn't remember them." Women were more able to recall brand names in highly sexy ads, but men often couldn't even describe the ad, much less the product. In fact, Morrison says, a graduate stu­dent who assisted him confessed that he'd had one sexy magazine ad posted in his apartment wall for two months, and still couldn't remember what it was for. Given such findings, Morrison says, it's not surprising that there are more ads with nudity and sex in women's maga­zines like Vogue and Cosmopolitan, than in male publications like Playboy. You've Gone Too Far, Baby It 8eems a man who kills his wife in Brazil can getaway with murder if he doesn't like the way she'H acting F.duardo Souza Rocha, according to Her Say News Service, shot his wife six times-allegedly h<>cause she was leaving him for another man. But there were other contributing fac· torH. Souza claimed his wife smoked, drove without a chaperone and wasn't always homt• to ~r('('t him when he got orr work. A Brazilian jury agreed with Souza that the killing was "a legitimatedefenseofhiEI honor," and gave him a two-year sus­pended i;entRnre. Rockets in Dallas? The m·wly-elccted mayor of Dalla1; has big pinna for the Big D. Millionaire business· man Starke Taylor wants to expand the country'R largest airport to open Dallas up to export markets in China, Europe and the Middle East. But that's not enough for Taylor. He wants his airport to be capable of serving space shuttles. "We're getting into the rocket ship era," he is quoted in the New York Timnes, explaining that the city has the room to build a spaceport big enough to handle traffic to and from the moon and beyond. Taylor wants Dallas to grab the oppor· tunity to "take one of those rockets and fly to Japan or some long distance in a hurry." Alcoholism: Any Treatment is Better than None A new Congressional study shows no one treatement for alcoholism is better than a nother, and that the most expensive treab:nents are boosting the cost of medi­cal care sky·high. The study, done for the ofticeofTechnol· ogy Assessment and reported in the New York Times, found that hoepitali zing alcoholics-the treatment most recom­mended by insurance companies-is "far more expeneive and not necessarily more effective" than outpatient care. Akohol abuse, the study notes, may be re n•i f9 p to 15 percent of the n altla cate bill. JUNE 24, 1963 I MONTROSE VOICE 7 ~ISl\l' 13USl~ISS - The Cabaret that Specializes in Live Musical Revues PROUDLY PRESENTS Thursda}. 8:30pm Fridav, 8:30 and II :00 pm Saturday, 8:30 and 11:00 pm Sunday, 8:30pm Coming July 14: "Swing" TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE DOOR 2700Albany~528-3611 WESTHEIMER TUAM FAIRVIEW 2700 II WELCH w > > en ID z 0 Cl <( I- a: LL I- <( ID <( z ID .<.J( I- 0 ::< Greanias to Attend Neartown City Councilman George Greanias, Dis­trict C, will speak on the sexually oriented business ordinance at the Neartown Civic Association meeting on June 28 at Bering Memorial Church. Neartown was instrumental in promot· ing interest in the SOB ordinance. AIDS No Threat to AYDS P•citlc New• Service What do you do if a dread disease surfaces with a name just like yours? Nothing if you're Jeffrey Martin, Inc., manufacturer of A YDS, the appetite supreuant candy. Company attorney Andrew Graham says 1ales have not been affected. "We've been absolutely unscathed," claims Graham. "No one is associating this product-which has been around since the 1940's-with Aquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. . . No more than they associated T-&S, Times Square Storee, with Toxic Shock." Computer Love Tb1!y really aren't writing songs like they used to. The Music Licensing Organiza­tion ASCAP now lists 89 songs with titles beginning with the word ''Computer"­including twelve called hComputer Love." But while computers are popular among songwriters, reports Psychowgy Today, they haven't won over the mu8ic-buying public l'ione of the songs has reached the Top Forty. W!Il'%Y..!. ~ . r!lllSYJ' !lr..EJJ:JSJll) 'Where the World Meets Houston" 106 Avondale Houston, TX 77006 713/520-9767 We're celebrating the opening of our newest store with an offer of ten beautiful gladioli foronly6.9S Come join the festivities at our second location next to Butera's on Montrose and pick from a garden of pixie, mini or fancy glads in over 15 colors! At Cut Flowers we keep prices modest, letting you design your own arrangements from our array of fresh cut and dried d _ - . flowers 1n an assortment of wonderful · • ) If, &l:Jl <M :rt'1 11 containers. Come browse at our new • >-'•·~i:,Ff: .p: ~· j European style flower market in the "~ "'-' .:(;;:_ \ heart of the museum area ... and have a • marvelous time I Open Monday through Saturday, 9:30 am. to 6:30 p.m .. Sunday. 11 :OO a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (TLC) THf lAf..\\\[Y(ORPORATION 1..01\\. ~>.tn\J The Village. 2513 Rice Blvd Phone 521-9653 5015 Montrose. next to Butera·s Phone 522-1775 Beach Mats, Picnic Baskets. Glasses. Party Invitations & Paper Goods ............ Ice Chests. Outdoor Candles. Sports Bags & T-Shirts TLC has everything you need for Summer F\J.n . Well. almost everything' JUNE; 24, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 9 Chocolate Donna 528-2259 2631 Richmond 10 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 24, 1983 Foot in Mouth By Randy Allred San Francisco city Supervisor Harry Britt spoke to the May 21 commemoration of the 1979 White Night Riots as dusk settled at City Hall. Britt opened inauspiciously, before he got to the isaue of the lenient five-year prison term assassin Dan White is serving for the 1978 slayfogs of Supervi­sor Harvey Milk (whom Britt succeeded) and Mayor George Moscone. (May 21 was the fourth anniversary of the manslaugh­ter verdict in the case.) "Right now I'm getting cold," Britt started. "So if you will all snuggle up a little closer together, I'm going to cut my thing quite short." front-page admonition: "The message is clear. auoid the direct exchange of bodily fluid.a." The word was already reaching many gay men through other media and/or their own physicians, for a study of 600 Bay Area gay men (singles and couples) revealed that 30 percent had reduced or stopped high-risk sexual behaviors. How· ever, the authors, psychologists Leon McKusick and William Horstman and psychiatrist Arthur Carfagni, noted that 62 percent have continued or increased. at "at least one high-risk behavior with new or anonymous contacts." They concluded: "Remedial and public-information efforts should be aimed at these groups of sexu-ally active gay men." No sooner than this report began to cir­culate, a group of gay leaders summoned bathhouse, bookstore, and theater owners to a meeting to discuss posting of notices and distribution of pamphlets and con· doms at those establishments. The aim is to reduce tram1mission of the unknown AIDS agent and to prevent its spread from San Franciaco in the wake of Lesbian­/ Gay Freedom Day. The day before the meeting, Roger Gross. president of the Golden Gate Busi· ness Association, told a Board of Supervi­sors' hearing that "the health scare and crisis" has already reduced local business Dateline S.F. in gay establishment.a and will soon cause "a subatantial decline" in tourist trade. At the meeting, bathhouse owners were cooperative but felt they were being singled out. Many, in fact, did not show up at all. Within the week, S.F. Chronicle colum­nist Herb Caen reported that doctors and nurses were patrolling the baths to kick out known AIDS sufferers who were still frequenting the places. Scareee. Alfred's column originates at the "Sen· tinel," a San Francisco gay newspaper. 1983 Randy Alfred, all rights reserued. As the crowd snickered and hooted, he hastily added, "I hope Channel 7 has gone."' NAIL ON HEAD: Britt had some inter­esting obRervations when he recovered, however: ''Five years after that riot, when we thought the world had maybe caught some glimpse of the injustice done against lesbians and gay men, not only are the archbisop, the National Council of Churches, the Episcopal bishop, all of the JKH:alled moral leaders of the city still pro­tecting the world against queers, but the cops are wearing ga.s masks to protect against people who have AIDS, CBS is 1till portraying us as a sinister force out to destroy everything good about the United States of America, and I do not see the 1ame kind of outcry against Archbishop Quinn and his homophobic statements that I see against Dan White, even from our alleged best friends in city govern­ment_ Stanford Square "As black people have had to learn that just hating the Ku Klux Klan ain't enough, but that racism is everywhere and will be there until the black experience is expresHed so effectively that it goes away, we have got to learn that it's not enough to hate Dan White. We have got to deal with the mainstream homophobia in our media, in our church leadership, and in our government. or we are never going to be safe in this society." AIDS CONSPIRACY? "For the first time, the theory that has been bandied about baa appeared in print with some elaboration, and. in a non-gay news­paper," pioneer gay-right. activist Bob Buker wrote me when be forwarded an editorial from People's World, the Commu­nist Party newspaper. Writing in the May 7 issue, Carl Bloice noted the suspicion that AIDS is related to swine fever and reiterated the Cuban charge that the outbreak of the fever there a few years ago was a U.S. (and probably CIA) action . Since then, swine fever, though under control in Cuba, has broken out elsewhere in the Caribbean wherepu~ lie health and 1anitation levels are low One such place. Blice wrote, is Haiti. Haitian immigrant.a to the U.S. are an "at risk" group (or AIDS, and some epidemiol­ogists believe Haiti to be the Western Hem­isph~ re focus of AIDS. Bloice concluded, .. This rai~ee the very real Po&sibility that today's AIDS sufferers are victims of an act of horrendouit bacteriological war­fare." DEVELOPME:-O'TS: Last fall, the national Centers for Di&eatie Control released information that gay men with AIDS were more likely than gay men with­out the disease to have had more Rexual partners per year. more sexual partners in the year before onset of symptoms, and a higher porportion of lht"ir partners in bathhouses, bookstores and porno theat· ers. This spring, Bay Area Physkiani. for Human Rights published a pamphlet, "Guidelines for Risk Reductior: "W"'h the TOWNHOMES 'The twenty-four townhomes at Stanford Square afford the convenience of a near town location coupled with the serenity of a carefully-planned, secure environment. These one and two-bedroom traditional brick studio homes are within minutes of the downtown business and cultural di>tnct, Greenway Plaza, the medical center and the specialit) shops, galleries and fine restaurants of the Montrose, museum and River Oaks areas. Careful attention has been g1\e11 to securit) requirments. An automatic entry gate permits controlled access to the townhome community, while automatic garage doors and well-lighted parking areas ex1end security within the perime1er of the property. As an additional feature, each home has been pre-wired for its own security system. Stanford Square Townhomes offer a variety of amenities, including: • Woodbuming fireplaces • Private patios • Kitchen appliances (refrigerator & microwave oven) • Washers & dryers • Smoke detectors • Pre-wiring for cable TV Cathedral ceilings, skylights, attics, studies, porches and balconies also are included in many of the floor plans. A swimming pool and sun deck are located in the center of the courtyard. ~ ALLEN PARKWAY lil z 0 ~ oO W GRAY zt----­z ~ ~ ~ W-OIUW W ALABAMA UNIV Of T THOMAS OFFERED EXCLUSIVELY BY KIITRELL REALTY 529-5981 NOW OPEN UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP Linda "Lulu" Simpson JUNE 24, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 11 WILD BILL'S CORRAL SUNDAY-Free Buffet MONDAY-Steak Night WEDNESDAY­Spaghetti Night HAPPY HOUR-10am- 7pm, 7 days a week Hours 10am-2am Mon-Sat Noon-2am Sun. CORNER JACKSON & GRANT 522-7631 We will be open all day Sunday, June 26 HAPPY HOURS 7am-7pm 7DAYS A WEEK announces the opening of new offices 3815 Montrose suite 104 Houston Computerized Accounting and Bookkeeping Services Friday-Farewell to Jim & Eddie, June 24 Sunday-Gumbo Dinner, 3pm, June 26 Wednesday-Steak Night $3, 6pm TlJl"NffIlTO~lJ C. rl~ DIVfSITY (713) 529-3636 Malcolm Landry 109 TUAM 528-9128 HOUUON (JAY PNO[ W[[ft 1933 Rick Marton GYRO Sandwich Shop HOUSTON Try Our New Mexican Menu Carne Guisada Plate Pollo Guisada Plate Beef Taco Plate Fajita Plate with free Coke-$3.95 1536 Westheimer Come Watch the Gay Pride Parade from ourSundeck ~i~~~~ HOUSTON C.AT ~NO[ W[lll 1953 Gyros Supreme-$3.25 Mixture of lamb and beef, spices. brocoli, cheese. onions. tzatziki sauce on Pita Bread with French Fnes LUNCH SPECIALS OF .• THE WEEK _·,· ·, ... ·. 3 Bl?ef or Chicken Enchiladas J>late· topped · ~"r•:,· ;;with' melted cheese, including .rice, ;' · '~::, :>: •' .·· beans and salad . · ~ .' Shriiiip' Plate with fries, salad, tartar sauce' ' . . .., ... ·· wlth JFREE Co~e"".:'",$3.99 ~-··~ ~-_ ... ~!~-~~ ·:.: ~-..:.. - '~~~~;-:....:... :.~.· ·. _.-·It?.-.. ~~ Cobr• Product1ona1DGN. 215 Pasadena Plan. #199. Pasaden•, TX 77504 • ~ POSTER •t $5 each #_ & (5•7) PHOTOS -1 $5 set $ _ $ __ I have enclosed check or money order tor S--Charge my o Mas1erCard o Visa Account no ------­Exp date ------­lnterbenkno ------- Name _______ _ SIigIn"a"t_ur,e, ,-._,. -• .,. ----­,__....,• ona9dlturd) Addrr .. -------- Co .. __ _ QUALITY CARE, SERVICE AND SUPPLIES AT ONE LOCATION •Full Line Supply Store •Boarding •Grooming •Animal Hospital 1640 Westhelmer 521-9277 2327 Grant at Fairview-528-8342 Open 12pm-2am Every Day KRAZEE HOUR NITELY 9-10pm 75¢ Well Drinks KRAZEE TUESDAY 9pm-2am 75¢ Well Drinks & Beer HAPPY HOUR DAILY 12-7pm 75¢ Well Drinks A People's Place to RockeneRoll with your bartenders: Jack, Ronnie, Pewee, Andy, Morrie, Daniel Patio Bar Open Weekends UNIT Tli"Ol.IC.1+----t DIVE ..,S...,IT-..Y ___ ---= 110U.STON CJAY PAIDE WEE" 1983 Come Celebrate Gay Pride with us. BRING IN THIS AD this weekend and receive a Well Drink or Beer on your friends at Lola's JUNE 24, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 13 Commentary Gay Pride: It Means Not Being a 'Toilet' We're open Sam-midnight Serving breakfast, daily By J oe Baker hot lunches, beer & wine I attended my first Gay Pride parade nearly ten years ago in Detroil I had just started-at the ripe old ageof24-going to gay bars. I can't remember who I went to the parade with, but I do recall that we spent most of the time hiding in the background-scared to death of news­paper photographers and television came­ras. If I remember correctly, the parade wasn't much. But, there were thousands of people around-all standing on the side­walks. Only a hundred or so brave gay souls had the courage-and pride-to march. Ten years ago Gay Pride parades were just starting out in major cities across the country. Gays in New York and San Fran­cisco, of course, had been parading years earlier, but the movement had finally made its way to Middle America. The fact that homosexuals in Detroit and Michigan were taking to the streets was news. It was the beginning of a new era in the struggle for gay rights. I watched that first parade not giving much thought or care to the term "Gay Pride." Hell, I was having enough prob­lems just trying to finally accept the fact that I was a homosexual, much less hav· ing to be proud of that fact. But, that was then-many years, many experiences and many miles ago. An older gay friend of mine said to me recently: "I just don't understand you young gays today. What's all this about gay pride? Why do you feel you have to march in the streets? I'm not ashamed of being gay, but I'm not proud a bout it either. I'm a male, but I wouldn'tsaythat I'm proud to be one. I'm white, but I also wouldn't say that I am proud to be that color. I just am." I tried to explain to Brad why Gay Pride is so important to us today, but I don't think I did a very good job. For some rea­son, he just couldn't understand that if we as homosexuals don't like ourselves and take pride in our lives-then how can we expect others to understand and accept us? The most important persons we have to please are ourselves. When we like what we are-and accept who we are-then it becomes so much easier for others. It also makes it much easier for young homosexu­als just coming to terms with their sexua1- ity. They have nothing to be ashamed of. I'd like one more chance to explain Gay Pride to my friend, Brad. I think the task wiH be much easier now because of an experience I had recently. Several weeks ago I took part in the Experience Weekend, a 34-hour workshop aimed at transforming one's life experien· ces into fuller and richer meanings. The workshop was developed for gay men and women and helps them come to terms with their sexual identity and aids them in dealing with various types of relation­ships. Someday soon I want to talk more about the Experience Weekend, but now I just want to share with you a portion of one discussion from the workshop. I think it goes a long way towards explaining what Gay Pride is really all about. David Goodstein, one of the founders of the Experience Weeclend and owner of The Aduocate, discussed the fact that so many gay people treat themselves as "toilets." Relax, I'm not going to be talking about kinky sex. OmaRS CLUB Goodstein has three definitions of "toilet." The first has to do with the fact that people are willing to accept second class status because of something about th emselves. For instance, their being gay or black is thought of a limitation. Goodstein's second definition of"toilet" centers on °the prevalent pattern in many organizations or groups of non-action due to an inability to reach agreement on any specific purpose or goal. While many hours are spent nit-picking over procedu­ral matters or debatingthe merits of irrele­vant side issues, those most able to assist the organization in getting the job done get bored and leave, frequently never to return." The third definition of "toilet" accord­ing to Goodstein, "io the belief that people who are different from you in some way you believe is important-for instance, if you are gay and they are not-will not be interested in playing the game of life with you." All three of Good.stein's definitions zero in on one point: Don't put yourself down becuase of who or what you are. Don't think of yourself as a "toilet" or other peo­ple will treat you as a "toilet." To me, this io what Gay Pride is all about. It's realizing your self worth-and not letting anyone or anything impose "toilet" status on you. But it also means not imposing-and accepting-"toilet" status on yourself. You don 't have to march in a parade to be proud of yourself as a person. You don't have to tell your parents and your boss you are gay. But to accept and understand the true meaning of Gay Pride, you have to like yourself. That's what Gay Pride is really all about. Breakfast Special 99C served 6-lOam Bring in this ad for a COMPLIMENTARY DRINK with any food purchase OLD HOUSTON DINER [[]} 914 W. Alabama 524-2318 Orders To Go OFFICERS CLUB Happy Happy Hour Friday 5-Spm CENTS Happy Happy Hour Friday 5-Spm ALL WELL DRINKS Open for Dancing Friday • Saturday • Sunday No door charge Friday or Sunday t.JPPER DECI( Friday 11pm to? Saturday 11pm to dawn Sunday 8pm to 12 (713) 523-4084 14 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 24, 1983 Commentary Let's Hear It For the People By Hollis Hood The recent defeat of MTA's bond referen­dum said much for a thinking public in Houston. It wasn't only Montrose that defeated the proposal 2 to 1, it was nearly citywide. It's odd. however, that a major concern such as the Committee for Bus and Rail with it's budget in excess of $100,000 and radio and TV spol8 couldn't fair better against a fledgling organization throw together in days with a budget of not even $14,000. Just goes to show you that you can fool some of the people some of the time but not all of the people all of the time. way for communters from inbetween. Metro is going to have to rethink it's attitudes. Houstonians are known for their cynicism, something like 46 per cent of them say they don't respect anybody. How could Metro have thought they would put anything over or inhibit these people into thinking there was only one solution to a problem. No way. Yes, everybody wants something done about traffic. Now maybe MTA will get it's head straight-stop wasting money over­paying a few engineers and consultants and get down to what's pragmatic to solve the problem this year-not ten years from now. Thanks Montro .. e, I love ya. Limousines d'Elegance This paper editorialized against the rail Call (713) 523-4352 VISll/MASlERCARD ACCEPTED for reaJ:i.Ons too numerous to mention now. but it could not have done so without the a&Hiatance and knowledgable input from concerned citizens. A special thanks to Barry Klein of the Neartown Transporta­tion Committee and chairman of the Citi­zens for ReMponsible Transit, and Mary Jane Smith who organized a grassroots effort to defeat the proposal. The only way to defeat a well-organized and well run campaign such as Metro waged to get the bond effort through (and despite what they may think, it was a very professional campaign), it takes countless hours of volunteer effort and dedication above and beyond. There are a few people who put in that extra effort and I wish we could name them all. Happy Hour Entertainment 6 to 8, Monday-Friday. Lindo Hefner at the Piano. Metro has gone back to square one, back to. the people for ideas. Monty Levine of Advanced Monorail Systems, Inc. has gone back to city council with a proposal to build one mile of monorail track to dem­onstrate how it can be used in mau transit and how cheaply it can be built. There is even the possibility of a monorail between Galveeton and Houston with stops on the NOTICE To offer his GAY clients the personalized service they deserve BRUCE WOOLLEY has left TravelTech. For personalized gay travel or all your travel needs, call Bruce Woolley (713) 524-7324 A P:frate U'a)' of life. From tht OJ ·.\font~ arta C'1nhunum" STRATFORD ~ .. llok!w> -- _, 2702 Kirby 524-6272 JUNE 24, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 15 in' • 1es. 16 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 24, 1983 , ----------1~~~-- -----=-=1 : ~- wi~~u~fahl~~~J~~aYoR1r~~r~~ue I . I i ~ ~gfn~~~ I J - HounoN c.AY PlllDf wm1 19&l I . I OPEN I 869-1796 24 HOURS srcanish Flower MEX CAN RESTAURANT I 3921 N. MAIN I in the Heights near 1-45 I GOOD THAU 7-24-83 [------- ---~~~~ ------- --- 1213 Richmond/ 527-9071 Jock Strap Dance Contest IOpm Tuesday lst Prize $50 cash le: a chane< to compete for $250 Grand Prize Steak Night 6pm Thursday EIJ's wishes all our friends a Happy and Safe GAY PRIDE WEEK See you at the Summit June 26 Happy Hour prices to all wearing GPW attire Protect your most valuable possession For glowing skin that looks Younger & Younger A complete skin care treatment formulated tor those special people who care about how they look 1. Cleanalng Miik Creame-Boz.-$8.25 The cleanser can be used on the most tender skin. 2. Honey & Almond Scrub-2oz.-$9.00 The treatment refreshes. unclogs pores, cleanses and bnghtens the texture of the skin 3. Skin Toning Lollon-8oz.-$8.00 This lotion improves the skin tone, closes the pores and stimulates the skin. 4. Solr De Fete Mask-2oz.-$15.00 The beautifying results of this mask are immediate-even on the most sensitive skin. It soothes as it renews tired complexions 5. Aloe JoJoba Creme with Vitamin E-2oz.-$10.00 .A creme that softens & helps prevent premature aging 6. Creme de Excellence-4oz.-$14.50 This special formula is enriched with collagen, tru ly a creme or excellence ~Y-oun-ger -& Y-oun-ger-. Ple-ase- sen-d m-e th-e -Ma-il -to Y-oun-ger- & -Yo-ung-er. -PO -Bo-x '· following 42809 dept 352, Houston. TX 77242 Name .-.ddr•s Crty Stare Pnono ITEM Z•p Sales Tax Postage & Handling Total Enclosed "'"CE Include $2.00 per order for pos1age and handJing Include 6~ sales tax tor Texas addresses Allow 2-3 weeks dehvery Visa & MasterCard accepted 0 Ch.ck er Money Order 0 VISA 1Xp. date 0 Mutercard &J!P dat1 Credit card • Signature UNION JACK T T-SHIRTS TANK TOPS MUSCLE SHIRTS DALLAS UNION HOUSTON .JACK SPOR TSWEA R/HAIRCUTTING (21 4) 528-9600 {713) 3918 CEDAR SPRINGS DALLAS, TX 1212 WESTHEIMER HOUSTON, TX MV Quality Dental Care. The Smile Store. At Quality Dental Core, we believe 1n living up to our name. And that means not only g1v1ng you quol1ty dental treatment, but prov1d1ng 1t at o price you con afford We'll customtZe your payment pion to your family budget Plus, you con save up to 20% of your costs with our Quoltdent membership pion, even 11 you hove dental insurance. Quality Dentol Core. Complete dental services al a price you con love with Now that's something to smile about Ouol ity De ntal Core Southwest 2315 Southwest Freeway at Korby 523-2328 8'1nq 1n 11i1s od ond get otooi,1e1e den1ol ct.ec.li •up cf-ogriOl t •·'°Y' oncl vour teefh d t:anl!'d fOf S25 00 Off~r t'•ptre\ July 5. 1983 JUNE 24, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 17 Delta Agent: A Scenario By Harvey Thompson, M.D. (Editor's Note: This month Dr. Thompson departs from a strictly factual column to indulge in a bit of medical science fiction. It's an intriguing connection of several bits of factual information that affect all of us which may raise important questions in your mind.) New York Gays had vactioned in Haiti for years. Creole Charlie always said it was because he and his fellow Haitians were French instead of Spanish like the Dominicans next door, or English like Jamaicans further south. Whatever the reason, it was common knowledge that you could pick up one of the easy-going Haitian hustlera off the beaches of Port· au-Prince for the cost of a drink and a U.S. $10 bill. By the late 701, it had become ouch a populor vaction spot that there were all­gay cruises to Haiti each winter. In 1977 there was an explosion at a top­secret Russian biological lab in Sverd­lovsk that contaminated the surrounding countryside. An epidemic of deadly anthrax broke out a few weeks later; the government of the United Stoles officially asked for an explanation. By 1978, the U. S. Department of Defense permitted its Biological Warefare Division to clone Pseudomonas exotoxin by recombinant DNA experiments. It was no secret that the United States was loos­ening up on its observance of the Biologi­cal Weapons Convention of 1975. In the Congressional Record of the next year, botulism, anthroox cholera, and diphthe­ria were listed as the bacterial toxins cur­rently under study. But the real interest was in viruses They were much more difficult to detect, and far easier to transmit. At any rate, the Biologi­cal Weapons Convention had never actu-ally barred research into possible agents, only development of new ones. From Brazil 1979 came reports of a mys­terious "Delta Agent" that turned ordi­nary viruses like hepatitis-B into dangerous killers. The combination was deadly; more than half the victims of the Brazilian epidemic died. Delta Agent was frightening; it had never been isolated, and could only be detected through a complex antibody test in research Jabs. It seems to be a tiny, subviral particle. But also in 1979, the U.S. Public Health Service opened an office in Port au-Prince to study the African Swine Fever virus that was decimating the entire pig popula­tion of Haiti. With Cuba only 20 miles away, the concern was that the U.S.S.R. was backing Castro with biological war­fare aimed at creating economic and social unrest in Haiti. Security was tightened when news came of the Brazilian "killer hepatitis." The Public Health Service began an investiga­tion of the second epidemic. When the Delta Agent was finally isolated, the infor­mation went straight to the Surgeon Gen· eral's office, stamped "TOP SECRET: EYES ONLY." C. Everett Koop was appointed Surgeon General by President Ronald Reagan in 1980. The appointee had made a famous statement the year before; he had warned that Gay Rights would lead to the produc­tion of "100,000 homosexual and lesbian test-tube babies to give the gay movement more political clout." A few gay leaders took him seriously enough to wonder about his mental stability, and began cal­ling him "Dr. Kook," worrying about what he had in mind for gay health. But the medical community had always learned from the gay community. Some bigoted investigators privately referred to gays as "giddy guinea pigs." The hepatitis-B vaccine had been developed only because of gay willingness to serve as test volunteers. Gay blood was teaching medical investi­gators a lot about viruses in general. One such virus-Cytomegalovirus-was ubiq­uitous in the gay community. It had long before been found incorporated into the DNA of a rare cancer called Kaposi's sar­coma, and was known to be a potent sup­pressor of the immune system. Yet generally, CMV was a relatively benign virus that at worst left the victim feeling tired for a few weeks, as if he had Mononucleosis. Still, it had long been thought that viruses had some link to cancer, possibly causing it. President Nixon badly wanted to prove this connec­tion and earn the title of "the President who had cured cancer." Meanwhile, Creole Charlie, like all the hustlers on the beaches of Haiti was feel­ing the effects of the slipping economy in the United Stoles. His friends used to call him "C.C." for his initials, but lately they had changed that to "G.C." because he was always getting the clap, and the Tetracycline lobs he bought at the phar­macy didn't work all that well any more. His doctor called him "Juan-pepitas-de­manzana"-" Johnny Appleseed." Char­lie didn't know the story of the man who spread apple trees all over the United States; he thought the name came from the fact that he had met the doctor while eating an apple. The husUers all knew that Americans had the best medicines. Their shots seemed especially good for the "maladies venerealea" that they often caught from Health Yankee tricks. So, when the American doc­tor in the expensive suite offered him $100 to participate in something he called "vac­cine t.Tails," Charlie was only too happy to accept. Charlie's arm was still sore as he walked away from the office of the U.S. Public Health Service in the new building just constructed for the Agency For Interna­tional Development, Sudamerica. All the people had been very nice, especially the doctor who had brought him to the nice big office behind a door marked "Project Delio." The doctor had unlocked his black leather bag and brought out the vaccine himself; he said it was a "new kindofpeni· cillin," and Charlie could tell it was expen- 1ive stuff because it was inside a special mets! cylinder with red labels all over it. Charlie was feeling great about the day. He was going to get well, he had $100 in his pocket, and there was a whole shipload of New York gays just pulling into port. BusineH was looking up, and he should be able to grab alargepartofitwhiletheshot was still working. Thank God for Amer­ica! And AIDS began in Haiti. EPILOGUE: Medical science fiction? Yet the follow­ing parts are true: Del18 Agent, Dr. Koop and his quote, the information on CMV. the African SYl--ine Fever epidemic, the por­tion on biological welfare, and the heaJth office in Haiti. The last section can't be proved: Creole Charlie died last year. Of Kaposi's sar­coma ~ 1983 Stonewall Features Syndicate 18 MONTROSE VOICE/ JUNE 24, 1983 The Law Working Together By Henry Walter Wei88 Sep~atism is a pervasive and dangerous force in the gay male and lesbian com­munity. A bi-coastal friend recently explained his refusal to become involved with his local gay elderly support group by saying that he didn't like lesbians and didn't want to have anything t.o do with them. Such a view diminishes both the person who holds it and also the gay male and lettbian community at large. My own favorite story about a separa· tist issue occurred some years ago at a time when lesbian separatism was riding a cresting wave: I had an embarra.stied call from a lawyer-friend with whom I had worked on a number of matters. She had been a!'ked , by a particularly ardent separ­atist, to prepare a trust. The trust was to contain some rather complex provisions. My friend felt that the provision were beyond the range of her competence, and asked for my assistance. The irony. of course, was that the entire job was to be top secret. I was to prepare the draft for my firend and she would sub­mit it to the client as her own work. Above all else, the client was not to know that a man had been involved in the drafting process. I did the work requested, bemused and saddened by the situation. It waa sad to think that the client felt so strongly on the issue; still I could not help but enjoy the reality that a man had actually drafted the trust. Of course the sexuality of the person who drafted the trust was irrelevant, and so the client's insistence on a woman as her lawyer was misplaced. Her insistence should have been on someone who could do the job she needed done: whether that person be man, woman or eunuch. My own experience working with New and unique, exciting recreational vacation con­cept. Opening soon. Call for more information (713) 522-3799 ~~~~rl~ HOUUOH CIA'f rNDf WU.ft 19&l 1901 TAFT (AT WEBSTER) 523-2794 women in an organization called SAGE (which is both inter-generational and actively concerned about sexual parity) has been wonderfully rewarding. SAGE volunteers, women and men, work together. planning support and assistance for gay elderly. Issues of sexism are dif­fused in an environment of cooperation, and in the process gay men and lesbian women learn about each other's concerns. Ridding oneself of sexist notions is an ongoing process, not unlike coming out itllelf. Sexism is ingrained in our patterns of speech and grammar. Constant vig­ilance is essential to shake free from it. Yet that vigilance pays dividends in the com· mon bonds within the gay male and le,. bian community. CJ983 • ---· SIDEWALK BEER SALE DURING GAY PRIDE PARADE 52()-0554 11·11 Sun-Thurs 11-12 Fri-Sat "THE UlTHIATE BAKED POTATO' JUNE 24, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 19 402 LOVETT-HOUSTON 527-9866 20 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 24, 1983 Montrose Glass & Mirror Company 1833 Richmond 524-6016 David Pace Specializing in custom mirrored walls ~~~rct.uc11rl~)\. DIVER..S...I..T....Y.... ... _______-___ _ HOUSTON CJAY Pl\10[ WEEI~ 1983 CREATIVE GLASS Stained Glass • Beveled Glass Specializing in Custom Etched Glass 1833 Richmond-Don Davidson 523-8802 GROOVIN' * CRLJISIN' * BOOZI N ' UNIT Tli.,OUC.1....__ .... DIVE SITY 110U.STO-N- C-J-A-Y -P-R-ID-E- -W-EE-I-~- --19-8-3- ~ WE INVITE YOU TO CELEBRATE WITH US ONE PRIDE, ONE FREEDOM, ONE PEOPLE JUNE 24, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 21 Montrose Live Playwright Pearson Describes 'Ancestor' By Lacy Cale He's a bright-eyed cowboy who uses the word "irrefutable" as easily as "ain't" in conversations. He saunders in and plops down like he just stepped down out of a semi or in from three days on the range. Not really what you would think would show up for an interview repreaenting a leading playwright in the urban Houston literary scene. The person described is Max Pearson, Houstonian of some 11 years, whose play, The Ancestor is currently at the Main Street Theater, 2540 Times Blvd. Ancestor is a "what ir' play, he said. "What if an anthropologist, say a decade after the evolution bombshell, found a fos­sil that irrefutably backed up Darwin's theory, he questioned. "There has always been contention between the creationists vs. the evoluntionists, but most people nowadays can accept at least parts of both theories. But at the turn of the century, when this play is set, it was a very volitale, really touchy subject and those people didn't want to hear anything about some· thing such as evolution." With this basic conflict in mind, Pear· son centers the action around three main characters: anthropologist Ralph Bingley (PhiBip Hafer), his companion and secre­tary Todd Jones (Joe Ponessa) and a creation-theory believer/journalist named Mavis Louise Eddington. "This one female journalist, who is a religios zealot, is a very strong woman," said Pearson. ''She writes for the National Lion (something like the National Enquirer). and intends to do everything she can to discredit the scientist's find after she wins his confidence and knows all about it." The play contains some "nifty confron· tations," Pearson said, and there are infer· ences to the untold story of the scientist and his assietnnt who are gay. "The fact that they are gay is not something that motivates the play," Pearson said. "It's just the personal relationship they have, but they are so involved with the project," this find of the missing link, "that action moves the play along." Pearson said he studied several months doing the re6earch to be able to write such as play as The Ancestor." Researching the techniques they used for such discoveries was difficult because not many books tell about the way things were in 1912. It's harder to find historical science books." But the research paid off and the play is a powerful drama dealing with people's thirst for discovery and enlightenment which is always hampered by the myopic view of others. This is only one of many plays Pearson has written, among them a one-act The Doodle Bug and a children's play which has been published. He also did a couple of radio plays at KPFT. He stuided drama and playwriting at the University of Houston, and other schools, and has been writing some eight years. "The payoff, because there isn't really any money in it unleSB the play is just fantastiC'ally popular, is in the audience reaction." he said. "] love just being there and hearing the whispers and watching the expressions. Jt really gives you a feel­ing inside. That's why I didn't care for radio. There was no interaction-no audience that 1 could see." Pearson said that Houston audiences are lucky to have what he termed a third alternative in theater. "Ten years ago the theater in Houston was just stagnant. Now it is looser and more interesting things are being done. People have a cho­ice with such places as Main Street, Stages and Chocolate Bayou, where before they had to choose between the Alley and com­munity theater. Now they have a third alternative." Thia third alternative ia the medium that Pearaon'a work_,,,, to fit beaL The Anceatorcurtain time ia 8:00 p.m. June 24, July l and 8, plus a 3:30 p.m. matinee on Sunday, June 26. An Arts for Everyone cast party follows the June 24 perfor­mance. For ticket information call 524· 6706. o Tina and Pam for a Hot Night at the Summit By Hollis Hood If the dancing before the show doesn't heat up the audience at the Gay Political Caucus Rally, Sunday, June 26 in the Summit at 7:00 p.m., then a pair of sizzling ladies will-Tina Turner and Pamela Stsnley. Tina, a veteran songtreSB and legendary mistress of rock/ soul, said during a phone interview from Canada that she is looking forward to performing in Houston again. She just finished a southern tour, with an out.standing engagement at Rockefeller's here. "I think it's going to be a lot offun," she said. 0 l've been performing up here and the crowds are a little stiffer. But when we get down with these folks it'll really get loose." Tina said she doesn'treally get involved in the politics of the event. "I'm an enter­tainer, and that's why I'll be there." And she has been there, come back, set trends, ahook things up and done it all for the past 20 years in show business. She started out as what she defined as a "country girl. I didn't know there was such a thing as traveling around singing and I wasn't into records, but I always sang in talent shows and all. It was only after I started going to movies that I wanted to be a 'star.' I would dream about it. Then when I went to St. Louis and met Ike (the show Pamela Stanley was previously the Ike and Tina Turner revue), I started singing with a band. "I sang with the band on the tapes and that'a how I gotstart.t>d. The dancing came from my own energy on stage and the min' dresses came out after that. I never reall) fit into those long sequended dresses, and the image just came." Variety is good for music, said Turner. Rock and roll has come further than in Elvis' day, and music is notcategorized as it once was. "What they do now is more universal, more unisex. They do what they want to do, and I like it." Some of the attitudes and fasiona of the punkers can be transpoeed into other people's think· ing, she said. "Some people are just look· ing for attention . .. aome things onJy belong on 1tage." And one peraon that certainly belon1• on •tare, becauae 1he ie a 1tar entertainer, Philip Hafer and Joe Pone3sa play the anthropologist and his assistant. respectil'ely, in Max Pearson's play "The Ance ·tor," currently at Main Street Theater will share the spotlights with Tina on Sunday-Pamela Stanley. In a recent interview with this Philadel­phia native turned Texaan (she lives in Dallas now), she aaid she is excited about sharing the bill with Tina Turner, and about riding on the Officer's Club float in the Gay Pride Parade. Stanley learned music at her grandfath­er's knee, she said. She and her brother and sisters would all sing harmony to gui· tsr accompaniment. "I tell people that I learned to sing through the S&M method. If we didn't do it right, he would tske my hand and bend it back. He didn't mean to hurt us, but we learned to sing harmony real quick." From that time on, she knew she wanted to be a professional singer, Reared on the classic folk music of the Kingston Trio, Brothers Four and Simon and Garfunkle, she studied her craft and headed off to New York to make a name for herself. While singing in a piano bar one night, a German producer came in heard her and ultimately offered her a record contract. "I was like a storybook," she said. "They flew me to Germany first class, and I had never been out of the U.S. I stayed in a hotel that was a castle. I thought I was Cinderella." Grateful for the experience and the excellence the Germans demanded of her, she was glad to get back to United Ststes soil. "You don't know how to appreciate America until you go to another country," 1he aaid. "We would be recording and there was a window in the studio and you'd look out over the land mines and the wall, but even so, Berlin waa beautiful." She aaid they record thing• differently there. Instead of bringing in a '""' violiru to cut the record, they brought in an entire symphony. "They could get their takes done in just a couple of shots, and it would take me more; it was wild.'' During her year stay, she toured Hol· land, France, England and Germany and has since appeared in South America and Mexico as well taking audiences by storm with her high-energy disco dance music. Her current hit is "I Don't Want to Talk About It," which she will be performing among others at the Summit. "My brother, James Lee Stsnley and Seberin Browne, wrote it. When I first heard it I wasn't impressed, but in changing this beat dis· covered this would be fabulous for disco." Stsnley and her husband, Frank Man­daro, have their own recording label now, Komander, out of Dallas. "Even the doctor that delivered my baby invested. in the company. We wanted it to be a Texas company-record in Texas; we even press our own records "We had no idea it would take off like it has. WewerejustgoingtoselJthealbumat shows, but it's been out a week and we've already sold out of 10,000 copies. (Don't despair, they have reordered.) "I'm more confident now. I feel myvoice is stronger now. We're very excited about the future. It's bigger than I expected." She expressed special thanks to the Officer's Club for their sponsorship at the Summit. "We are really going to have a good act. We have new dances, new costumes-it's really going to be great." So be there. Tickets are still on sale for $9.65 at Ticketmaater and Ticketron outlete as well aa Montroee Hair Deaicn and selected ban. Other guests include Virginia Appuzo of the National Gay Teak Force and atateand local poliliciana. NOW OPEN Regular Daily Hours 10am-2am After Hours 2am-4am Happy Hours 4pm-7pm Join Us Sunday & Watch the Gay Pride Parade-Best Location on the Parade Route ~~~'cruc11rir.:S\ Dl\/Eft.S..I..T...Y.. _ __ .., ..,;;. ___ HOUSTON uAY PRIDE WHl1 19&3 1318 Westheimer 521-3475 Rally and celebrate gay pride, good per­formances, springtime, dancing and frol­lic king to culminate a week of festivities-for whatever reason, come be a part of the Sunday Summit Experience. cabaret-burlesque hybrid. However, you may classify it, it's one of a kind, full. throttle entertainment. Now we're not talking about some kids getting together to put on "the local show." Th.is is a professional enterprise in every aspect. Some of the talent was imported, but most of the cast was selected from the near 300 who auditioned for the present show. Houston can be proud of the caliber of talent it has produced. Directors Andrea Modisette and Jay Matino should be commended for their cleverness, origi· nality and enterprise in seeing their vision through. o Montrose C/.oggers Put a Big Stomp on Opera Buffs By Hollis Hood Toes were c]acking with heels in the air when the Montrose Cloggt!rs went through their high stepping routines at a private party given by Leonard Bernstein, composer of the opera A Quiet Place which premiered here last week. The audience was a bit skeptical about who and what was going to be done when Clogger Rusty announced the presenta­tion. But, after the performance started and the Cloggers did their routine to the "Texas National Anthem" (Cotton Eyed Joe), everyone began to shout and sing along. (And nobody sings along like the cast members of an opera.) They finished with "Yellow Rose of Texas" and presented Bernstein with a bouquet of yellow roses and both he and Stephen Wadsworth, his assistant, with Clogger T·shirts. "These guys (and one girl) are really great," exclaimed Bernstein. "I think they should go on national TV. They would be an overnight success. They demonstrate a lot of training and excellent self discipline in their performance. They're just wonder· ful." He suggested that they be used to raise money for AIDS. "That's such a terrible thing. People are dying. Something must be done. Like those nurses who won't attend AIDS patients anymore. And did you know that morticians in New York are refusing to embalm the bodies of persons who have died from AIDS? It's just ridicu · lous." Bernstein conducted the national anthem at the Men's Health Crisis circus benefit in April at Madison Square Garden and said that he was over­whelmed by the unity and deep sense of conviction exhibited by the people who attended the performance. "I have per­formed all over the world," the composer/ conductor said, "and I have never felt anything like what was in that building. It brought tears to your eyes." The Cloggers performed via special invi­tation froll) Bernstein. o Entering This Place Is No Risk By Jon Cheetwood If you're ready for something different and totally refreshing in entertainment, check out Risky Business at 2700 Albany, adjacent to the Officer's Club. The new club opened last Friday, filling a void Houston was not aware it had. I'm not certain there's a real category to put Risky Business into; it's sort of a The ('ltJgli(f'Tll clog for Leonard /J,•rnsU'm The club itself has an audience-aware comfortable layout with no bad view in sight. If has a proper balance of perform­ing and audience space, cozy but not at all cramped, allowing 12 performers to work the whole club with ease. The raised bar area provides more seating for those who might want to drop in alone. Thisclubwas built from scratch for performing; live entertainment was not an afterthought here, but it's prime concern. Risky Busi­ness has an unpretentious ambience with a soft cJassiness, comfortable in all respects. The handsome cast of the present show, From Blues to Broadway,defi.nately aims to please. Among the many highlights in the evening, Dolores Garcia is armed with three of them and a show·stopping voice. Her blues number and Cabaret's .. Maybe This Time" in the first half could only be paled by her saucy delivery of "Hard Hearted Hanna" in the second act. Work­ing with the audience during "Hanna," she doesn't miss an opportunity to play off an unsuspecting but delighted male patron. This girl has the aplomb and instincts to raise blood pressures with her theatrical savvy. Poppy Ann Champlin will win your heart and take control of your funny bone. Floating through both acts as a screen test reject of Scarlet O'Hara, she too has such a natural audience rapport as to invite hec­kling, firing back with a charming quick wit. Miss Champlin also writes her own material. Her fishschick monologue keeps the audience laughing in tuna. Tim Forrester has a minor tour de force with his wimpy perfection in "Nobody," and Frank Vega is constantly charming, particularly in a smoldering °Fever." Director Andrea Modisette does stop the show with "Tarara Boom De Ay." The number simply could not be better. I wouldn't want to see it without Miss Modisette; there's talent in every easy ges­ture she makes. Of particular note also is the clever cho­reography by Lea Geaslin and Terrence Kam, and the costuming by Johnny V. Oh, I could go on and on. Eadl and every one of the performers are soloists, and together they have a deli­cious sound. I could carry on about each of their numbers and qualities, but you really have to see this for yourself. Risky Busi· ness is different and provides you with a totally entertaining evening. Believe me folks. Go. JUNE 24, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 23 LAZY J LOUNGE presents The Annual BARTENDERS SHOW* Monday, July 4th, 6pm 1st Prize $100 2nd Prize $50 \ MC/Miss Gay ) Nothing Ron Sioux Call Lazy J to Register ·sartenders only Good Booze. Good Music. Good Men and Good ( Times! I Open 10am-midnight Monday-Thursday 10am-2am Fri. & Sat. Noon-Midnight & then some on Sundays Happy Hour Daily 10am-noon & 5-7pm 312 Tuam, 528-9343 24 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 24, 1983 Texxas Music Festival Rocks Dome By David Giebert The Texxas World Music Festival at the Astrodome Sunday drew an almostcapac· ity crowd. It came off with only a few dis· putes among the maSRes, with about the same amount of drug overdoses and peo­ple suffering from exhauston. Everyone else enjoyed the twelve hours of rock music, draft beer and dome food. (Well. two out of three ain't bad). Uriah Heep opened the show and almost went unnoticed with a fast 30 minute set. Unfortunately for them, their songs were an excellent blend of old and new Heep. But when you're the first band out of five, your set tends to be more of a sound check for the other bands. For this reason, Uriah Heep, a veteran band on the come-back road, received a moderate response. After a 40-minute equipment change, Ted Nugent walked on stage unseen and unannounced, picked up his guitar, blasted the crowd for a few seconds, stopped, yelled to the full house "So you mother--, you want to rock and roll?" Rock is what Ted does best as he cut loose with a blazing 60-minute show. Ted's music was selected in majority from his first live Gonzo LP. WeH received, he came back for an encore and managed to set a high energy tempo for the rest of the even­ing. Anothe-r equipment change brought the Canadian band Triumph to the stage. Tri· umph picked up where Nugent left off with another hour set of their own, playing all their FM radio hits and some solid rock from their current LP. The high point was a well executed guitar solo by lead guita­rist Rick EmmitL He managed to merge cfa .. 1c with blues and rock to put a little extra touch in their show. In between Triumph and Sammy Hagar, the crowd was pumped up by KLOL s Col. St. Jame.-;: who announced their live broadcast and that attendance In the dome topped the Dallas show the day before.~ he announced, "Here he is, the peoples' choice, Sammy Hagar," the dome roared to confirm the statement. Hagar was the high point for most of the younger fans. Sammy stroked the crowd with statements like. "Yesterday's show in DaHas was just a warm-up," and "In DaUaa the fire marshall wouldn't let me use my special effects or break up any gui· tars. but tonight we're going to do it all." T..J. NU/lent And do it all he did. Sammy's head set microphone allowed him mobility to run all over the stage while playing his guitar. But that wasn't enough for him. Throughout the set he was climbing on the 90 ft. sound scaffold­ing. He hung off it, jumped around on it, and rope swung to the stage from the lower levels of it. He also managed to get up on the overhead stage lighting where he rocked the dome with wild guitar solos. But still the Red Rocker wasn't done. Besides his own antics, he brought three large skylights with four individual pods apiece stationed at various positions on the floor, eight 12-ft. flame throwers in front of the stage, and a Red Rocker Fire­bird on stage to dance on which he finally blew up. After 60 minutes of this, the crowd was at a pandemonium level. Sammy came back on for a half hour encore where he topped his own spectacu­lar show by bringing out Ted Nugent and Rick Emmitt to finish his set with a red hot version of Led Zepplin's classic "Whole Lotta Lovin." By this time of the night, the audience was showing definite signs of fatigue and the hour equipment change before Styx sent some of the people home early. For the brave who stuck it out, the wait was well worth it. Styx's music and productions had a classic professional touch. (Quite a relief from the twang and scream styles of all the previous artists.) The Kilroy extravaganza started y,rith a short 10-minute movie about the banning of rock end roll by the dictator of a police state. This situation wai-; a direct result of a concert where Kilroy's band (alias Styx had allegedly killed a spectator. Rock and roll was declared the music of the devil and banned. After a daring escape, Kilroy meets up with devoid rock and roller Tommy Shaw, lead guitarist, and two of them reminisce over the night rock was blacklisted. The video shut off, the curtain opened and Styx began their set. There music is some of the best in the business right now, and they are extremely tight. Their two hour show included music from all stages of their career. Styx is the kind of band that blends a combination of hard rock mate­rial with a soft spoken ballad or can be jamming on guitar solo one time and play some classic piano work the next. This Ru:li Emmitt of Triumph truly is the work of a polished, seasoned group. With the Styx version of the Jerry Lee Lewis song "All Shock Up," the curtain clo1:1ed and with music still ringing the raf­ters, the 1983 Houston version of the Texxas World Music Festival ended. o Smathers At Place in Sun By Lynn Herrick Gay activist Dee Smathers went on record as "raising hell" during her presentation at A Place in the Sun June 21. "Just tell 'em I raise some shit," said the 42-year-old social worker. She sees her present role in the community as that of "gadfly," to "get people screaming at each other, and maybe one of these days they'Jl listen to each other." No one screamed at 704 Fairview, but she did get into a friendly disagreement with a gay man in the audience who felt that to "stop when I start offending" showed respect for self and others. "We'll be good Jews," said Dee, "and they won't put us in those ovens, right?" She said she considers an apt compari­son to be "they burned 250,000 of us." Ref· using to walk on eggs, she said "I'm not going to stop being things because it offends. I don't have to deal with some­body else's bigotry. 'To me" said the controverisal "dyke" (which she defines a~ "political leader .. ) •·wrecking straight.B is a matter of gay pride." She explained that wr~king waA "'A pre-Stonewall term for making them uncomfortable in :-iituations where they couldn't retaliate." She says understanding from straights is not the goal because "the straight world will never understand." and admitted that she doesn't understand transsexuals. But latt"r Mhe said, "'You can't blame peo­ple who say 'be quiet' becau.se they paid a tremendous price. I've seen people who paid desperate prices." She sees t~e pres­ent situation in the gay community as a generation gap between these veterans who went through the "wars" and now don't want to make waves because they've finally "got it good" and the young gays who demand their legal rights instead of pleading for acceptance. A young man exemplified this view saying, "When you Sammy Hagar PHOTOS BY OAVIO G1EBEAT segregate yourself, they don't see that you're people." A young woman, who identified herself as straight, defended Dee's recent shirt­less gardening {which so wrecked the neighbors that they called the police) by pointing out the cultural relativism of dress. According to Dee, toplessness in one's own yard is legal for either sex if you're not "soliciting" or creating a traffic hazard . "I wouldn't swap anything for having been in the last 20 years of gay rights and seen the changes," said the veteran scrapper. In the 60s when she came out, gay leaders and publicatioins were saying "we are sick-please accept our illness." When laws against "cross dressing" were interpreted to mean "no fly.front pants" for women, the "dyke bar" called the Roar­ing 60s where she hung out was raided, and Dee and all her friends who delighted in wearing fly.front jeans were arrested. Naturally, the gay community put on drag shows to raise the bail money! 0 The biggest gay rights step I ever took," she said, "was when I cut my hair." It was her "emancipation" from gay ste­reotypes, saying "hey, I can cut my hair and be a dyke but I don't have to be a butch." In those days the "definition of a fluff was you went to the beauty shop twice a week-if you were a butch you went only once." Women, according to Samthers, had to prove their gayness by being "as butch as you could get away with without being a gym teacher," and men by "asnelly as you could gC>t away with without being a band director." (Hey. Andy what the hell does that mean?) Her most emotional t;lep was at the International Women's Year where she was instrumental in getting the gay rights resolution pass(>d. 'We srream and shriek and fight eat'h other," Rhe said of today's gay community here in Houston, but "we've got more polit· ical clout than you'd ever believe. We've elected a mayor. We've elected a majority of City Council." Still she says, "The shit going to come down again gang." She predicts things will get better before they get worse, but something will happen-war, plague, famine-"to make things worse for que­ers." Talking of AIDS, she said that nobody cared until "somebody besides niggers and queers" got it. "Knowing at least2000 gay men," she said, "I know some of my friends are going to die. I don't like that at all." To young gays she said, "How you peo­ple will do it, I don't know. I probably won't be a part of it, I have no right to tell your generation what to do." "I'm not gonna make speeches. I'm not gonna stamp my feet. I'm not gonna organize any more," she claimed. From now on she plans to content herself with snipping at people, "making fun of pom­pous asses that we all make of ourselves. Sit back, stir up shit and hopefully make you think." Smathers praised A Place in the Sun for making people think. She is writing a con· temporary gay history called Hide ThlB Book. "It will be one woman'sviewof gay rights that's not gonna be nice to anyb­ody." Her retiring words were: "We do not have equal rights for anybody until we have equal rights for all." Back to Basics Japan, the world's largest producer of elec­tronic calculators, is having second thoughts about the hand-held marvels. And some of the country's largest banks, newspapers and other businei.;ses have launched a campaign to bring back the Abacus, reports the Chronicle of Higher EduC'ation. Supporters of the ancient wire·and·bead counting device say it may be slower and more cumbersome, but it's less susceptible to human error. NOW SHOWING Dedicated Service to the Texas Gay Community The Montrose Voice Publishing Company r~·1 • M~SE • •TRAVEL CLUB• •Located in the heart of Montros1' • at 1506 W. Alabama serving all I • the community's travel needs • •• AM ONTR°s%S:S°o'i/S ASSOC. •• • SPRING AND • : SUMMER SPECIALS: • • Sunny Jamaica. 8 days .• • 7 nights, air, hontel . . . • from $259 per person, • double occupancy • • • Southern California. 5 • • days/4 Nights, aire fare, • • hotel and rental car . . . • • from $359 per person • • double occupancy • • ••Tlll'fNl\IOTl~lC .. rl~~~, •DIVESITY .. • HOUSTON C.AY PftlD[ WH" 193l • • • Located in Travel • • Innovations Bldg. • : 523-3051 : ••••••••••••• JUNE 24, 1983 / MONTROSE VOICE 25 -----COUPON ----1 ~~Jl I YMA,~ l DAILY LUNCHEON SPECIAL I Beef or Chicken Kabob. $3.95 (fries included) 1/2 pound burger. $2 95 (fries included) Served 11am-2pm , Visit our new Sweet Shop ~ .ljtuw/ ./;,,,,.A,.°' ~; ly.:!f-h ~l Special Occasion Cakes ~ Party Mmts & Catering 2047 Marshall across from Alabama Theater ____ C52O1U-9P5O16N ___ _ Register Now for Your FREE LISTING in the 7th edition of the Gay Areas Business Directory Houston/Montrose Section now m preparation SPECIAL OFFER: A custom trademark ad is FREE to the first business that takes our a 1/3 page or larger ad in each class1f1cat1on Call tor details at 7131757-7093 Or write us at Gak~e~~n~':!~~~~~~~ry Houston, TX 77006 402 Lovt!lt 527-9866 Last Big Weekend This Friday and Saturday Luisa Amaral-Smith and Geoff Allen SEE OUR FULL PAGE AD IN THIS ISSUE FOR INFROMATION ON BAJA'S NEW CONCEPT In ordn to all0tt' u.s to maintain lhe high qualih of n1ltTtainmt'nl that )OU npect. Baja'j noU' ha\ a SI door charge per penon m1 FRID.I> 6' .\.4 TC "RDA. 1· .\"JGHTS o.,·1\ Happy Hour 4-8pm 26 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 24, 1983 4131 Eighteenth Strttt San Franc-isco, CA 94114 (4151861-3905 TELEPHONE DIRECTORY ''THE WORLD'S FIRST GAY PHONE DIRECTORY" -'~17 Montrose, \UJlr IO IO How1ton, TX 77006 (713) 757-7093 Open leuer to Montrose/Houston business community-from Gay Areas Telephone Directory. The following is a leuer or introduclion that is sent to businesses in each local community we serve as well as to businesses throughout tht nation. To introduce you to Gay International, Inc., a publicly-held corporation, the undertaking of this corporation is to publish a national and international volume of Yellow Pages entitled "Gay Areas." This is not to be another "g-dy guide" but rather is to be a guide for the gay community to business and professionals where they may go without their lifestyle being an issue. The publication has acquired Gay Internauonal, Inc., and was at the time in its 6th edition on the Pacific Coast and has neen enthu•iatically received in the past. The board of directors of Gay International, Inc., are now expanding the directory to include Salt Lake City, Denver, Housion, Dallas, San Antonio, Austin, New Orleam, !'outhern Florida, New York, Philadelphia, Boston, Provincetown, Montreal and Vancouver in its 7th edition. Further plans are to include Europe, the Carribean, Mexico and other major gay areas of the world. There will be no suggestive material contained and no drug-oriented or related material advertised a\ this ii, to be a businec;;s directory done with such \Ophistiration and good taste that one need not be concerned alx:>ut thl' scx-ial reprocuss1ons from the J>OS..C\ion 0£. or association with the Gay Arro:1s Dir<·<tol)·. It will indude, howt·\·<·r, bu~int·\s<:' \uch as bars and bathr.;, 3\ the~ ('(-.,tablishments are part or tht· ga~ S(('Jl(' and ('\l'l)' fac-e1 or gay life and bur.;inl'\\ will be.· listed. \\'e will also ha\'e plumlx·r~. doc1or,, attorneyr.;, l'tc, who reali1t· tht: gay market is \'iable. In th<· pac,t thi' markt"t has bec·n exploited but nt'\l"l \f''I ,.ed. Caution:\\'(" h;ne 11111L.llor-, fhc·re are JX'f'4'.)nS w11h <-opit'\ or G.l\ .\rr:1' (Olll.ilOing bu,lllC'l,(''I pu1por11ng to rq>lt''l(•ll( Ga\ International, hK ~md -.dling ~d\'nlising for the Yellow P;1g~'· rlu:re j, onl~ onr Gay lntt·11utional, hH .. ;md onh one Ga\· .. \rt"<h Directon and our reprt·-.emativt·, han· .ttkquatt· ickntirication. \\·e can a\,UITit' no rt·.,ponsihilit\ Im other' m1,repr<·,entation. On \Ln IX. 198;,, C.a\' lnternauonal. Inc •• md Th(' Exclu,I\'l' ('ll(t·l(:d IIHO a \lgne<l .1gn.·t·ment wlwn:by nw Fx( hl'iin· and all ron1ract., prt\·iousl\· wld tn The Fxclusin· would lx·comt· tlw prop(·tl\ o( C;.1y Imr1national, Int ·1-ht· 1n11110\t· was an<l is to proddr the Montrose Houswn area wuh onl' diu·rtor) con1a111ing 1i,11ng., and adn·rti'it'llH'llh of thl' busme.,sh within the• gay community Othl'r U'idul <·omnnmity m£ormation will al"io tX' rornairH·d within 1h1' "'·1111 annual "Yellow Pagt'·• format. At 1he time of lht"' acqm-,iuon b'r Ga) Ir11rrna11onal, Inc, 11 war.; ag1et·d upon to it-tam lh<' fonnt·t ow no Kim \\'r igh1, 1 offu"t· manager and hfT salN>man. R1d1ard Johnson, a\ 'ale,person working frn G:1v \rt"a., Tdtphont• D11t·, lOJ) Howe\f"f nr•her tire emplo\:ed ;m\ longtT by Gay lntl'1na1icmal lrn. \\·r. ;1polo,gi1t• Im .lll) 111n>11\'t·111t·nct· and wr wi'h lo Tf'a.">">llfl' all lmsines ... f''I who ha\r 1akl'r Ollt tit ad in C'ither rhr Fxdtt\IH" or G~I) .. .\J(';IS that full <rt·dit will he• gl\t.'tl t•Jw ud the adH·ru~mg purcha-.ed.. Ple"J~e inforn1 om Hou,ion ofrice and or our rn;1in oHi<l' in '-,;111 h.111c1,<11 11·ga1di11g­detail' \0 wr may J,e" H'rtain lo inc ludi· you in our Dl'<t-ml,cr puhh<-allorL \\'hen hlm \\"right ht,t cunta<ted u' (pnor to the .\fa~ 18 dgH'('nH·nt), .,tw a~kt'tl fm our .1ch ict· r<'garding 1i;tlt.·, and approac-hes to buslll('\\C'I, .t.., 1h1s \\a) her hr.,l \t:nlure in the ga\ dut·c tory bu ... 1m·,s \\'ht·n askt'(I h<w .. ,tw <~urn• 10 kncm of th a1 Ga\ Art. .. l'lo, w<· wnr mfonnt-d th.al r.;he was ui;ing on<· or om pu·\1ou1:i t'diuon\ as an t·xampk that <ould ht' 11,td for .\tontro"t' Houston. As it was bemg used without om ix-rmiss1on or con'il'nt, and \\'t· already wt·t<• hl'ginnmg sales in I lou\IOn a\ pa1 t of our expansion program, It war.; mutually agreed to work together under ont· name wholly owned and 01x·rau·d hy Gay International, Inc. Gay lnter:nauonal, Inc., did not and does not wish there to be a division within the gay community with two directories serving the same area. Since we not only serve the local communi1y bur the collective nauonal gay communities as well. it w~ mutually agreed our's was a more complNe fonnat. Ac, part or the agreement, Gay International, Inc, took over The Exdusiw~·s known liabiliti('\ (as well a'> the as\Cts) (fontracts) which have lx·<'n paid by Gay International directh or through Ktm Wright as office manag«r. Thts will be our '>t'H·nth and bf-,t eduion of Gay Areas and our only objN.ll\-e i1i to produce a busin<·~., dir<·oory of the highest calibre that will reOect farnrabli on the gay bminess community as a whole-without sexually relatr<l, politically moti\ated, drug oriented advertisements as part or our ith edition revenues. If necessary. a copy of the agreement is available upon written request. It is simple and straightforward and .elf explanatory Our new sales and office manager for Texas is J. Lawrence Hord, who we feel IS the properly q ualified person to represent us in Houston . You may contact him at our new office number, (713) 757-7093 for your adverusing needs or to answer q ues tions. Sincerely ~,!:,~,-.• ~· (,a\ 1111('lna1ional Tnc Division Clincher Saturday By Eddie Chavez The North Division for the MSA Greater Houston Softball League is up for grabs this weekend as Dirty Sally's prepares to clinch the division title against the Brazos River Bottom. Surely the Brazos River Bottom has a lot to say about that. Last week's game with the Galleon proved two things to the team. One, the team is able to not only win, but, two, they are displaying teamwork and endurance even when errors are allowed. Mathematics and probabilities play an important role in predictions. But, I am certainly no math major especially after Murphy's Law prevailed over my recent predictions. Facts are facts and here are some that bring us to Saturday's game of the even· ing. Dirty Sally's earlier beat the Brazos River Bottom; the River Bottom defeated the Galleon; and the Galleon put Sally's away. If A is greater than B; Bis greater than C and C breaks the rule being greater than A; then B (BRB) can follow that precedent over A (Dirty Sally's). Sounds mathematicaJly unsound but probab.le a~d realistic. Just ask Mu;phy. Gamebme is 8:00 p.m.; Levy Field marks the spot for a game that will be hot or a g~me that will be a blowout as before. The winner, undefeated for the remainder of the season, will clinch the top spot. Now, in other games, Catch One meets the Galleon at 5:00 p.m., while the Mont­rose Voice and the Briar Patch should pro­vide fans with a good ballgame at 6:00 p.m. The Barn team meets Charlotte's in an evenly paired card beginning at 7:00 p.m. . The league will not hold games Sunday m order to participate in the Gay Pride Week parade and ra1ly. o Women Win, Men All-Stars Split An overflow crowd of men and women demonstrated "Unity Through Diversity" as the MSA men and women's leagues played the Gay Pride Week's traditional games Saturday. A filpur of the moment invitation to a barbeque for the Dallas All·Stars spon­sored by Sports Coverage Unlimited pro­vided interaction away from the field prior to the game. Both Dallas teams filled my apartment. "I believe I never hosted as many women in my life at any gathering." They met the MSA Women Allstare as Dallas' High Country were swarmed by Houston to a 24-0 game. The later game featured the Women's champions, the Briar Patch Renegades, in another high ~:~:sgU~~:~~ ~ouston Renegades 16; The North Division from the men's league overpowered the Dallas Alletars 13-3. Ken Bailey was 3 for 4, two doubles, a homerun, and scored four runs. Mano Marchena had a perfect game batting 4 for 4, two doubles, one triple and four RB!s­whew! Six rune scored in the sixth inning sealed the game for the North Allstars. Dallas scored all three runs in the third inning. Three hits and a walk in that inning were the only hits seen by DaHas. Carl Fires, "Precious," as most people known him, was the winning pitcher. The South Division had their hands full. Six runs in the third inning put Dallas ahead but the South rallied to tie in the sixth on singles by Bill Fike and Bob James. A homerun by Dallas' Alvoy Tatum in the bottom of that inning broke the tie and won the game as the South Allstars were retired in their half of the seventh. Barry Pirkey was 4 for4; Danny Webber 2 for 2 and a triple; and Tim Boates 2 for 4 loo Houston. Dallas' Jesse Vallego's 3 for 4 · and Terry Bruton, Gene Cross, Ken Gray and Steve Walker shared two hits apiece. MSA Greater Housum Softball League LAST WEEK'S RESULTS Saturday, June 18 (MSA Women's All·Stars 24 Dallas Women's All· Stars 0) MSA Men's North All-Stars 13 Dallas Men·s All· Stars 3 Dallas Men·s AU-Stars 9 MSA Men·s South All­Stars 8 (Briar Patch Renegades 16 Dallas Unicorn 0) Dirty Sany·s Brazos Riv Bot Briar Patch Montrose Voice Sunday, Jun• 19 17 Jim's Gym 15 Galleon 3 Charlotte's 14 Mont Mine/JR's STANDINGS 1 10 2 • w~ '"' Pd G8 South Oiv1s1on Galleon 10 2 Montrose Voice 9 • Briar Patch • 7 J1m'1Gym 3 9 Catch One 0 13 North DfvlSIOn Dirty Sally's 12 1 Brazos River Bottom s 3 Charlotte's 5 7 Montrose Mlne/JRs 5 7 Barn 5 s BATTING LEADERS throuph Jun• 19 S33 692 3 .. 250 000 923 .727 417 .417 385 bas&d on at feast 21 times at bat .11.1• 7 1011 .•3.... 7 ABRHAVG 1 8111 Schmidt OS 39 23 23 590 2 Jerry DeSale os 31 13 111 5111 3 Bob JlmM MV 39 14 21 538 4 Mano Marchenn DS 36 22 19 528 5 Sammy Ramirez JG 25 5 13 520 6 Scotty Paulus MV 29 17 15 517 7 Harry Goldberg OS 33 10 17 515 8 Robert Arnaga BRB 37 16 19 514 9 Ryan Mayne Char 30 10 15 500 10 Tony Popper BARN 38 13 19 500 THIS WEEK"S GAMES rG-•IL"'YF..id Fromt.lor>tl'QMgo OUI Rdlmond. pqt Kirby. i.tl on Eub~) Saturday. June 25 Catch One vs Galleon, 5pm Montrose Voice vs Bnar Patch, 6pm Barn vs Charlotte's. 7pm Dirty Sally"s vs Brazos River Bottom, 8pm Sunday. June 26 No games scheduled MSA Monday Night Bowling STANDINGS Following June 6 compet1t1on A DIVISION C DIVISION 1 Tush Ticklers 1 Barnyard 2 Hole 2 Plus A 3 #2 Oust Rollers 3 E/J"s Men B DIVISION 1 Dirty Sally"s Strokers 2 5 Easy Pieces 3 Five Esses Montrose Tennis Club Challenge Ladder Following recent competition A LADDER 1 Rich Ryan 6 John Ryan 2 Jan Mauldin 7 David Roblche1ux 3 David Robichtaux 8 Jon Colber1 • Tim Calhoun 9 David Garza 5 Ron Landrum 10 Randy Dickerson MSA Thursday Night Mixed Bowling STANDINGS Following recent competition 1 Calamity Lane 2 KS Overdnvea 3 Thursday Knight Tricks o A Precious Win for Precious If anyone could have pitched a finer game last Sunday, it was Carl "Precious" Fries from the Brazos River Bottom. The two-time pitching allstar allowed Barry Pirkey 2 for 3, scoring two runs Gary Campbell shared action as he wa~ also 2 for 3 and scored three runs for the Galleon. With only two extra base hits, Carl allowed no walks as he left the mound. Teamwork prevailed for the BRB as Robert Arriaga was 4 for 4 scoring three JUNE 24, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 27 Women's competition last Satu.,rday runs. Bill Goetz was 2 for 3 and scored three runs while Ferrell Bivins added more batting 2 for 3, a walk, and 2 RBis. Randy Whitaker's 3 for 4 and Ken McGaughy's 2 for 3 and 2 RBis provided seven runs in the sixth inning to solidly defeat the Galleon 15-10. The team also drew four walks and scored in every inning. In other action last Sunday, the Briar Patch and Charlotte's held their game to 0-0 after three innings. The Briar Patch scored on back to back hits by Joey Hol­ton, Dennis Owens and Bill Sansom. The 1-0 score stayed until the seventh when Charlotte's struck for two runs on hits by David Stacy and Benny Beck and three Briar Patch errors. In the bottom of the seventh the Briar Patch scored two runs. The winning one was aocred by Rick New­man when Marian Kadlecek singled. The Briar Patch 3; Charlotte's 2. The Montrose Voice was initially held to a close game with the Montrose Mining Co.1 JR's. But a splurge of runs mid-way in the game pushed the Voice way ahead. Bob James. despite a bad cold, placed 3 out of 4. Bob Fleisher was 2 for 2. while Dave Pace batted 3 RBis along with Chuck Meredith's 4 RBis. The Mine had seven hits with Phil Love­land and Freddy Sims batting two hits each. Final score, the Voice 14, the Mining Co. 4. In the other game Sunday, Sally's bat­ting brigade was led by Mike Odensky and Mike Morrison, both with 3 hits. Morrison, the league's MVP of last year, is recover­ing from a four game slump batting 1 for 15 in those games. Two hits by Jim Cates, Mike Lender, Harry Goldberg and Richard Mendez pro­vided a run-rule against Jim's Gym, 17-1. 3100 FANNIN AT ELGIN HOUSTON, 522-2379 •'' 28 MONTROSE VOICE I JUNE 24, 1983 COVNTT I' AUL AUGUST <tell • 7111. 198:.' - s .... Fwgrounda t'lll,- CASH - PfllZES t15,000 ·auu lt!OI~ 0 8RO"IC RIDING ·cow RICING "CALF ROPING ·a.uu~El RACING "TE.AM ROPING "STEER DECORATING "WILD COW MIUNG CONTEST Le9IMf'l Motks ... Crag' MUQ:t. G..,.... Moiks 'ISARREL RACING 'SARREL RACING 'Cl.ASSJC .. t1-. AU AllOUND COWBOY t1-. AU AllOUND COWGlllL "SCUAlll DMIClllS" A CLOGGIEllS" FESTIVAL CM 6-w-...i1 "COUNTllY PAlll IXHllllTS CM !ntrloe W-1 •AJITS A CllAFT'S "MIDWAY Ul'TEITAINMDIT "WESnllN IAllHCUE "HOllSI SHOW "DANCU, AU l'OUll NIGHTS m.-. A '91.1 m.. ._. C/W - "GAMES - SAi.ES - INFO II MA TION llOOTHS AOVAHCI ftESIEJNED TICXETS 1u.sewm IOX SEA TS FOUllt CAY PACKAGE S35 FOUR ('l.4Y PACll:AGE $"'50 TI-ll'IEEOAYPACKAGE '3J THREEOAY P4CX.AGE S<1C10 Ttin Pw BOll. UNt ot 10 ONLY! 0Mecr Yow Loa/ T,..,.J Ag#ff °'· ~fl MM Olf0flf$. •AnOK.4%. Jlll!KO G.AT B.OZIEO POllt Office Box zrn R-.-89505 llO!llS. vi.vo-Stl l702J&n-07Q M/C·VISAA._..o COWBOYS COME AND GET IT! from $299 Round Trip NATIONAL RENO GAY RODEO & COUNTY FAIR August 4-7, 1983 Contact Eastern Airlines at 738-8615 or your Travel Agent 9 EASTERN America's farorite way to fly .. 2111 Richmond• 523-8348 Open 10-8 MON-SAT Helping you celebrate with your music in mind Come see us­Ram and Ray Gentlemen prefer ••. 1138 W. Gray, 521-9145 * Wide Selection * Reasonable Prices * Customer Service * Major Credit Cards *Delivery Available Old English Eurniture JUNE 24, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 29 Seven Day Calendar Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat JUNE JUNE 24 25 JUNE JUNE JUNE JUNE JUNE 26 27 28 29 30 For 1dd1t1on1l lnlorm1t10n or phone number• !or ...-en!• htt9d billow. look tor the 'POf'llOnng org•n1- Hl1on under ~org1n1u11orw·· 1n the MonlrOH Claatlied Selected Events through 7 Days mFRIDA Y: Latino Day, Gay Hispanic Caucus 5th anniver­sary dance, Noche y Dia Bal­lroom, 2103 N. Main, 8pm-2am •FRIDA Y-SATURDAY: 2nd National Conference on Les­bian and Gay Aging, San Fran­cisco State University • FRIDAY-WEDNESDAY: Isl Latin American & Carib­bean Gay/ Lesbian Conference, Bogota, Columbia II.SATURDAY: Full moon, 3:33am •SATURDAY: Lambda Bicy­cle Club meets, then tours, from llam, unless raining, at 210 Fairview, apt. I llSATURDA Y: Gay Pride Week: Mardis Gras Maddness Inc. afternoon fundraising car­nival for AIDS research llSA TURDA Y: Gay Political Caucu1 reception for out of town visiton1 to Gay Pride Week II.SA TU RDA Y: Gay Pride Week: Montrose Symphonic Band, Montrose Chorale and Kindred Spirits Ensemble in Fred Paez Memorial Concert, "Featival Chorua," Cullen Aud­itorium, Uoffi main campus -SUNDAY: Montrose Tennis Club plays 10:30am-1:30pm, MacGregor Park -SUNDAY: Gay Pride Week: Gay Pride Parade down Wes­theimer, 5:30pm -SUNDAY: Gay Pride Paradee in San Francisco ("Strengthen the Tiea, Break the Chaino'1 and Memphis ("Gay Rights are Civil Rights"); and Gay Pride March in New York City llSUNDA Y: Gay Pride Week: Gay Political Caucus rally at the Summit, 7:30pm, starring Tina Turner mMONDA Y: AIDS victim sup­port group meets 6:30pm, Mont­rose Counseling Center, 900 Lovett Blvd., Suite 203 mMONDA Y: MSA Summer Season ijowling, 9pm at Sta­dium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain •TUESDAY: Anthony Brad­ley, poet, 7pm, Gracielynn Books, 704 Fairview •TUESDAY: Montroae Civic Club (Neartown) meets ?pm, Bering Church, 1440 Harold •TUESDAY: Lutherans Con­cerned meets, Grace Lutheran Church, 2515 Waugh •TUESDAY: Montroae Sym­phonic Band meeta at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30pm •WEDNESDAY: Montrose Chorale rehearsal at Bering Church, 1440 Harold, 7:30-!0pm •THURSDAY: Wilde 'n Stein gay radio show 7:30-9pm on KPFI' Radio, FM-90 •THURSDA~MSAMixoo Bowling League bowls, 9pm at Stadium Bowl, 8200 Braesmain Selected Events in Future Weeks •IN 1 WEEK: Twin Cities Good Time Softball League invitational July 1-4, Minneapo­lis •IN 1 WEEK: Choice's Les­bian Mothers' Group meets July 2, 6:30pm, 210 Fairview, apt. I •IN 1 WEEK: Lesbians & Gay People in Medicine meet 7:30pm July 2 •IN 1 WEEK: Lone Star Gay Softball Classic, Houston , July 2-3 •IN 1 WEEK: Blue Boy Clas­sic Bowling Tournament, July 2-4, Seattle raJN 1 WEEK: "Liberty and the Pursuit Of . .. " theme party, Officer's Club, 2700 Albany, July 3, !Opm, partial benefit for KS/ AIDS Foundation raJN 1 WEEK: Independence Day, July 4 raJN 1 WEEK: Greater Mont­rose Business Guild meets 7:30pm July 5, Liberty Bank community room, 1001 Westhei­mer •IN 1 WEEK: Gay Political Caucus meela July 6, •600 Main #217, 7:30pm ra/N 1 WEEK: IIH Inc. board meeting, 7:30pm, July 7 raJN 2 WEEKS: Metropolitan Community Church general conference, Toronto, opens July 10, lasting to July f? •IN 2 WEEKS: InlA!rnational Gay Assoc. Conference opens July 11, Vienna, Austria, last­ing to July 16 •IN 6 WEEKS: 8th Interna­tional Conference of Gay & Lesbian Jews opens Aug. 4, lasting to Aug. 7, Miami •IN 6 WEEKS: Reno National Gay Rodeo opens Aug. 4, last­ing to Aug. 7 raJN 10 WEEKS: Sixth Bien­nial International Convention of Dignity, Seattle, Sept. 2-5 raJN 10 WEEKS: Gay World Series Softball Tournament, Chicago, Sepl 3-5 raJN 10 WEEKS: Labor Day, Sept. 5 •IN 10 WEEKS: "Come Out and Sing Together,'' lst North American Gay Choral Festival, opens Sept. 8, lasting to Sept. 11, Lincoln Center, New York raJN 18 WEEKS: Autumn beg­in1 at 9:43am Sept. 23 •IN 18 WEEKS: Human Rights Campaign Fund annual dinner, Waldorf Astoria Hotel, New York, Sept. Tl •IN 14 WEEKS: Texas Renaissance Festival opens near Plantersville Oct. I and 2, also running Ocl 8, 9, 15, 16, 22, 23, 29, 30 & Nov. 5 & 6 raJN l/J WEEKS: OcL 8 dead­line to register to vote in November elections raJN 16 WEEKS: Columbus Montrose Classified Day, Oct. IO raJN 18 WEEKS: Halloween, Oct. 31 ra/N 19 WEEKS: Houston city elections, Nov. 8 raJN 21 WEEKS: Thanksgiv­ing, Nov. 24 •IN 22 WEEKS: Gay Aca­demic Union 9th National Con· ference, San Diego, Nov. 25-27 •IN 81 WEEKS: Gay Pre88 Association Southern Regional Convention, Jan. 27-29, Hous­ton • IN 46 WEEKS: New Orleans World's Fair opens May 12, lasting to Nov. 11 •IN 61 WEEKS: 1984 Gay Pride Week begins, 15th anni­versary of Stonewall uprising, June 15-24 • IN 62 WEEKS: Houston hosts 1984 Gay World Series Softball Tournament, Sept. 1-2, 1984 NOTICE BUSINESS OwN"eRS The MonlrOM VOice .... ,,... •act! .... 1n !tie MontfOM CllN•hed bu9t­n... .. t•bhahmenta Mrv1ng u dia1nblJtK>n l)Olnl• tor the Voic1 •nd community org•nlUI· tloN __ •l~tnlltt. t1nt• •MonkoN'lotced ... li­__ , DWELLINGS & ROOMMATES LOVELY COURTYARD APTS. Montrose area. EHlclencies, 1 & 2 bedrooms $260 & up. 522-3338 APARTMENT FOR RENT 3 large rooms, living room, bedroom & bath. Unfurnished (has stove & refrlg), air conditioned, water paid 1/2 block off Richmond (500 block). New paint, quiet and secure amid friendly neighbors. Call 524-9091. No kids please GRAND CENTRAL PIPELINE Your gay roommate service 523- 3223 ROOM FOR RENT Very large, in private home 112 block off Richmond (3 blocks west of Main). Completely furnished, all bills paid. No kitchen but a refrigera­tor is provided. Air conditioned Couple will rent to select singles, couples or roommates No children. Call 524-9092 SUPERB MONTROSE TOWNHOUSE 2 bedroom, 2'Ai baths, superb com­plex with pool, 2-car parking, per­sonal washer-dryer, dishwasher carpeted throughout, exceptional location. $925 monthly include alJ utilities. Security down-payment required_ Call 520-7959. ask for David -- LEASE MY HOME 6614 Longview (Denver Harbor) 6 rooms. 11.i'l baths. 1st & last months rent in advance {713) 86~ 1706. CHARMING HEIGHTS COTTAGE 2/1 with living, dining, TV room, study & modem kitchen. Mid 50s Don Shelton Realty, 528-5924 MONTROSE LOWER DUPLEX Extra large 2 bedroom, completely remodeled, fireplace. $475. Don Shelton Realty, 528-5924 EMPLOYMENT & JOBS WANTED TYPESETTER Montrose Voice Publishing Co. now Interviewing for an experienced "graphics typesetter,·· one extremely familiar with AM equip­ment. Typing speed important but so Is ability to "code" an actvert11• ment fast and accurate Duties will Include typesetting ads for Out m Texas, Montrose Voice and Dallas Gay News and Independent typeset­ting jobs. Person will be required to meet customers, estimate typeset­ting and graphics costs, and follow the job through to completion. Send resume to Montrose Voice. 3317 Montrose #306. Houston, TX 77006 Or call Henry McClurg, (713) 529- 8490. 2-5pm. MONTROSE VOICE CLASSIFIED RATES Advertising rate: o $2 for up to three bold words and o 30¢ for each remain­ing word in regular type. Total minimum charge per ad $3. There are no other rates Advertisers who wish something different should consider running a display advertisement o Deadline tor all advertising 1s 5:30pm Tuesday for newspaper released mid-day Friday. o Blind box numbers can be assigned for $3 each week the ad is run and all responses will be forwarded to you by mail or picked up at our office. o Deduct 15% if you run the same ad4weeks or more end pay for the full run in advance. o Bring or mail your Montrose Voice Classified to 3317 Montrose #204, Houston, TX 77006 Advertising placed under our old rates and format will continue to run until It would normally expire. Use this form or blank sheet of paper Nom• ..... ., ---------- -- Numt:JM ol wMlr• MJ • 10 flXI _ Amount .nck»ed--------- 0 CltKk c MOM.r Otr#r C Ca." (flOt by rnMJ O VISA cN• C M.,'-C•td chMpe Ct«l•tc¥dl --~-- --- ••P"-'- - - - INSIDE SALES PEOPLE Needed immediately. Unlimited earnings. Paid weekly. Unique new recreational concept. Training pro­vided C.11 522-3799 for interview ACTORS/STUDENTS Telephone promotion of '83-'84 Alley Theatre season. A great sense of humor a must. Call James Fowler, 228-9341 , 1-9pm Excellent pay. Now an estimated 24,400 Houston readers each week-the Voice• SEE FOR YOURSELF Local Amway distributors are enjoy­ing extra income We show you how Phone for interview Gene at 859- 0418 anytime. Kent Naasz 520-6541 (M-F 5-7pm). Hank at (W) 529-7525 or (H) 523-6598 Tnsh & Phyllis st 723-8368 WHAT ARE RETREADS? Retreads for folks who (like us) didn't make the above business work initiatfy but want to try again. Call us ADVERTISING SALES The Montrose Voice Publishing Company has an opening each in Austin and San Antonio for an advertising representative Inquire to Lyt Harris. 3317 Montrose #204, Houston. TX 77006 (713) 529-8490 GAY BARS :!::'•-402 LO¥ett-527..- d1rut1g. ti.,. ea.m 710 PKttte 52&-lo427 country eBru.at A•_. Bonom-2400 ar11.os-428- 9112 c:out1lry •Brw P.rch-2214 W Holcombe--MS-9811 e C.tcti-1 O.C0-.965 Mllnin Lllthw 1<1n9- M1-m1 • Ota.en Coop-$35 W..tl'llilmer-529-2240 ·• C-io9e-2631 RIChfnoncl-521-2251· di9CO wottt .•..O .ir_ter wit Ol'\Hfl-1732w.thetmer-528-1528 eOirty S.uy·•-220 Avond~7525 e Oovble R Slloon-5731 l<itby 521-1444 e EJJa 1213 ~--527·9071 e &i~1011 s.n~ country e Hote--109 TUWtt-52&-11121 e JR 'a-P1eihc 521·2511 e .k<11 MlnOrl & Lynrfa-117 FaiM9W-5.2t­ll11()". ~1.,, e l<llYbQard-3012 Mtlaf'l\-528-elll e 1<11..0r9d Sprita-5245 8uff1lo ~ MS-117~ptedoo'ntnarlltylel~ • Loi.., Otipot-2327 Gr1nt-528-«M2 e Mafr·•-1022 Wellheitr1er-52S-8151 e M!tmonal Partt Motel Bar-50 W1ugh °'" - 881· 1311 • M•M Ct11rton.a-ll11 W o- -~ oountry ~ e Montroee M•n1ng Co-«15 Pac1fic-521-7418 •Nu'"'*"* 2 300 W1&ll'llotm« 525-6551 '""" e 0tf'IC9r'a Ctub-2700 Albllny-5~ •On• on 0.0.-101& W Gf"ly-52&-8503 e Ttie Outl..-.-14111 Riehmond-~ -e Plnk Elepharil-1211LMllnCl-69-0040 W•th =:ai.-2102 l<M"by-524-1272 d•ning . .... 9 Ripciord-715 ,. .. ,.,, _ 521.2112 e AiN.y e ... ,....,._2100 A11>er1y-s2&-3811 e T .... ~1318W..thelrmer:Cl'*11!"\g • T•IN-635 W1&tt.l'llel" 520-0244 19ab>Mi """' e V-..91Hltftmer-3333W 11~ e V9"tu,....,.-2923 Main-522-0000 e W11d 8th Corra1-J1CUon 91 G...,1- 522- 73•11 ONLY the Voice saturates Montrose each week with over one hundred distribution locations ORGANIZATIONS S£LfCTtD NATIONAL OAGANlZATIONS- 0.., Pr9M "-Oollior-f'Oe 33806. ..... ~. DC~317·2430 G.y AIQl'U N.nor.1Lobby-POS1• ......... """'°". DC 2001H202! 5"41901 .._ AletU c.rnp..WI F~ 1.a. W~ ongtor1. DC 2001>-f2021 ~2025 L#lltldl.Leo-to.i.-.-132w '3rd.NewYortt, NY 100»-{212} ............ W.CS.. fund fcK Hum.,, R'!lhb {Gey "'-• Auoci.i:oOnl-P09 S3«l! WUl'll,,glon. OC ~,-1.2430 30 M ONTROSE VOICE I J UNE 24, 1983 0 Hang him, you idiots! Hang him! ... ' String­him- up' is a figure of speech!" The Far Side by Gary Larson Insect game• ::r will r¥li aci prinlitle ;Y\ clas~­r w;JI no"t oc.'\ fr;,.,,;t;v, \Y\ class. I wd/ not act fl'imih-~ in c\4:55. :r will nol" act " That'• Bernie Harrison from the end of the block. . . Bernie ha1 lost hi1 mind." Natoonel Auoc••ho" 01 au .. -. Counc•b-Bo• 15145. SM! Fr"'ICileo. CA IMl 15-(415) 11$-4363 N•l•Ol'lal ANoc .. toon ol G1y & l-.b11n o.mocra11c =~;::) ;:;~,o:.,. SE, W1thmgton DC NtlllC)nll G1y Atghll "OVOC1tn- -$40 C1ttro-S.n Franc:1teo. CAIM114 -{415)1163-36.24 ,..,toonalGayTuk FOfOe-805thA.Yil .~YOl1<. NY 10011-(212) 741-5800 NQTF"1 Cnl<llme-j900) 221-10U (OUtl•de New YorkSlat1) ~tWm1i-1MOOir01e)ChUrehOi Chr11t-n7-9286 A P•~hi- SiJn-c/O Gr.c;1Yr'ln BoOk1~G'4 F11n11ew-522-7695 1ubgroup ol ttH Inc. con­certs 7pm Tues ACLU-123&W Griy-5~ --­AIDS Hotl1~0Gay Sw1tchbof;rd-.:_5m211 Ar;.T.C1inG1YAthei1Hs1-fi660 --­~ l'MO(loe111 Club)-;.,;;;t.'"';i 01f1 ... nt Orum. 1732 W•lllelmar-528--8S28 dub night Wed =~oi'~T~bow AJ11anc.-520-9'51 (V()t(:e). 520- S.YotJ e·1u: Me MOr1trOHCh'Or-,~--- f:,"ft,~~~~~1ied~~~~;~C,,';'$~~- iiKki. Wtuta-Men roQ91h« (BWM-T)--c/o Gay Sw•tchbomrd. 521--3211 CaiV"i,YP8"1-.Cotia1 CnUrCh-5210-·1:,n;;;;;= 520-$437 S.rvice9 12 :JOpm Sun ;~~~o .X:~.w~~:C::~,f ?:~5i'd Sun . 1i.o ... lMb•an Mother• Cn~urch of tn.-GOOct Sheph.;~07 MonlrOM ..V.Cfl9 1pm Sun, Bible stucty 7 :JOpm Thurs r~~~=-~c:h1~~~~~- ·1700 Mon1r0ae-= C"h7:rchOTChi-.-C •• -n-F11ih=2i7 f11rv1ew.:629- 8005 Ml'Y•Cfl9 10451m Sun & 715pm Wed , 8'ble ltucty 7 15pm Tuee & Sun choir Pl'IC11ce Wed attlf HfVICN C.1~1 ror Human Equ9i1ty (CHE)-Go9 F8nmn #1301-238-8666 board meeting 2nd Tuesdays C011-•5'°1 flOC1af clubl-mM11 "l1 Brazos A1;er Bonom, 2400 Brazoa--528-91'12 Community Go.o;t1 citn1ef-l1-00 MOfltrOie- 523-eous COng "AYu Chay1m-..:__m..11 11 MCCR la1g Dec•tur--552-1340. 688-8997 MMC• I IOCtal lpm 2nd & "h Fnd•Y• COiiroe AfH" lambcli $oc1ety=:iin at 756--03S4 orR•yat 756-4097 CMMHo1Mne:__-~;505" O.a1-a-GaY-Ath.---;! 457-66e0 Ameucan -G1y Atheists o.Wfoundahon--27oci M..00--52•~67i1- 0ignl1y-=m.ei1•1 C.1hOl.C"SiUd«.1Center.170i Boiso..er-520-9289. 528-76" mee11ngs 7pm S.turdays faml••es & frienc11 oi0ays--4&4-eel3 meets 2pm 3rd Sundays at Prffbytensn Center. 41 Oakdale. behind First Pr•byterian Church. 5300 M11n lslun•la,,anChurcit 5210Fann•n· 5°26-1571 MrVICe111hm!kln Frontninnw.-~9:251 G1y & AhveStianng fxper1enee tGA5E)··52S:: 1311. 528--0891 Gay & L..:b.an Archives ol-TexH 1H1hateof llH Inc Gay A11an Ci"ub-2i"i5W~gh 1124 77008 a.y Hispa7.(: C1ua.1 2122 New~" ;·,2..:.s21 :3,:e ~u'::2i'~~~~dtr.'ei1~':o!::i~~C:::l M1tn Gay ltahanGrO\JP-S•~ 0.Y-NutMI Athal'lce-=Mo-"9.ee ?:1ee~~~\~~c.=,! J&,~~;,~~71~ :!~.!1-~:!:~~,::ero·-o~~;~~ ~:.2~~ Rally 1n the Summitt. 1 :JOpm. June 2fl. 1t1mng Tina Turner Gay Pr.-deWeek c~o M&non Co1e- 1N1n. House ol ColeMan. ll01 W Alabam•-523- 2521 rnMI• ... nous Sundays. 2 JOpm. Kindred Sp1nt1, 5245 Butt•lo Speedway_ Gsy Pnct. Week June 1&-28 (m•ior rem•ln1ng eYenll hsted 1n 7· Oaycal9nd1rJ G1Ysw-;t"Chb0ard--P<5a i124-5n--3211 inlcif. mation. counse11ng. referrals. TTY. AIDSHolllne G~Nter-MOMioee Bu .. M.1-Guikl--::COOtici ~~ahys~c~,!,'!~n1~~·:m~~=-·1dr:~ W•tM•met Gr;.Mpo1nVF-M 1960-A--;;_·-f1r-Away F~19ndl- 82HIM1 ,H,o,m_o9_ti1 le lnterl••lh ;i,,;::729 ManOr­Hou110ri Ar.; Gay & L..o-:ln Enli•l"IMfll a Sc•enh•l•--52&-731& meets 7prn 4th Wedn•· days HOU1ton commul'llly Clown1-862-i31·-­Hii. 11on - 0•11 -·Ftfof ... ;ona~me.11 tn Eait Room. Hohday Inn Central. 4&40 S Ma•n-523- 9922 mH11ng 7 30pm 2nd Tues<11ys HOtJ"'iiOO M010feyii4. -CiiJb(.OC1alciubJ-c10 M1ry·1. 1022 Wfffheimer-528-8851 HoustOn N0rth Pr018hjon"a11_:PQ9 3840. Hum ble 77338-811111 821·712e I/Hine :.p0&-1'°41. T7222--8"-1132~529- 1ou att1l••ted grouos 1re 1n11rac1 Grai::,.1ynn G••letY·• A Place "' lt'8 Sun. Montrote Art All•ance. Gay I l•b•al'I Arct11vff of Texas. G•y S•ttchboard. Mont rote Symphonic Bind. Mont roH Cloggers. board m"ting 1 30pm 111 Thura­~ VI fvened loethons). educahonal lowm 7 JOpm 3rd Thufldaya V;1:15~::~ ~~hlt'1)2;:o::,i at Autry HO\JM. e2e5 Malt'l~lh TUt11<11y1 •I -wa-n-ed-lo-c·at-1o·m· - lnt1ract. educauon.1 subgroup ol 1/H Inc =;;oe 18041. 77222-529 7014. 94-1732 i<PFT-Red107M-~lili>v9tt 81;(i":'5~ ~9-=·nste"1"gayradioahowThura<Uya Ks/AIDS FouOdat1Dn-100IW9i1~ 524-AIDS "1.lbet1y and 11'18 Pursuit 01 • 1ne,,... party at Offocer's Club. 2700 Albany. July 3 10pm. Plr11al benefit c.mbci• ~M;::~4'~ 52tt-4975 meets. tours 111m Saturday._ un'-t rawng •1210 F••rvtew. ap1_1 __ _ ~~~t;!~.~t~fe~i~ A1ooh011c1 & Alanon- 121• B1u-Robel1 30-10pmWlld ln conc.n with KindredSpu1ta r.clPMZMem­onal Conc9rt. June 2S It CuUM Auclilonum. UOrHmlJnca~ Montrose Civic Club '"NNrtown A.llocaltion e MontrOM Chnic-104 W•theitMr 52&-5531 099n ...,...kdly1 1Cllm-5pm (•11cept Wed.) and w"kd•y ._ e 30-930pm, '#01nerl"1 empt\hl1 program 1-5pm Sun Mcin1~.--c0Un ..~ ~t •203-529-0037 AIDS Y!Clim 1upPOf1 group rneeta 8 30pm Mond1._,,yo'------- =lr~~-S~.r-e:;eJo~~~~:-~=~~1~: ~lnQI. a.ring Church. 1440 H•rold M001fOl.SPo11i·Aai(;C;",i;°n~-3304 MOMrOiiT.nnl1 Club-Jim 81 527-9178. pl1y1 Sundl}'I. t0·30lm·L30pm, M•cGreQOr Park =~~;f~;!::!~~k":.."?;~: :i:=m ~~~s~i~~~1=:?n8:~ti1- "" MSAIWC>ml'n'a SoftHll Leagu.-728-9371 MSA/Vollaytlall 810-2130 g1rnH 7 30pm TUlll _ Or990ry-L1ncoln IChocH. 1101 Tart ~~!i'h~ ~1:QP"w.~~~'t21~; .. :i:: ~•= ~":11 t,,.:;:'!n '!!~:..~~ Fred Paez M9m0t•al c:onc.r1. Jun41 25. Cullen Audlt0t1um. UOfH me1n c•mpo1. 1f1'111t• llH Inc ~- Wilch~bg~"NMrt"ownANOC­Mu1tang: 1 (10C<e1 ciub):='"'"tt 11 1ne earn. 710 Pac1hc-52&-IM27 club nig"h"-1 T-"h~"""---- =~o~~ -:~a'C°'1~on~r: ~z;g~~:~; ~:F~ ~:.~~ ~=--.c:,"-'~'-.-,,-W-11-lh-- 591-1342. HrYiC• 10.m Sun. 7 30pm Wed ~ P-aOPli.:cJO NiaftOWn -co;;;mu-ri1ly Flr.nouae·~741·2524 .p.;.z.·y -utJ«•c.On:....POe 800083. nz&>:-52J: AKre.i.Onal Lind.· FUnd Comm•tlM- -Mustang Clubpro1ec1 Rice Un!YGayiLM~an Support GrOup- -524 0724 f.xa1 8-•y Ar .. -G•is- -332=373f ITIMl•ng Thurt evening T.;;. e.Y Ar11 Gay Youth- -332-3737-mMt1ng1 bt-...-1y T.u1 G1y1L•t111A iiik FOf'ee-=e..."'1231. 868- 0001 T1u1 HUman Jf,ght-. -lOUndil~ CommonWffllh- -522-2824 T1ulR1d9'1-e10 -Mary~. 1022 WMlhe!met"· 528-8851 iJit;ti.n1n1Un7~9f'Nll.ii -Giy C.ucU1---<Jo 111 Un1t1n1n Church. 5210 hnoon-5~9787. 528- 5842 rMetuig 3rd Sun 1tternoon1 W9tl1fl,,;- F911ow.tup-164-M91 ~=:~:i~r'_f2~~i~ Arts A11oci1hon-90a Women·iLo"'bbYAJli1nce.::..::fCti1~ Your dependable, unbiased source of community news in Montrose-the Voice PERSONALS & ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR WOMEN ONLY A discrete dating service coordi­nated by counselors. Date-a-Mate, 521-2299 ~BDOWN, YOUR PLACE No sex. 493-4850. BODY MASSAGE In or out, Bruce, 521·2009 TENSION EASING MASSAGE Licensed, certified, in or out. Phone for appointment. Chase, 527-0876 Want to talk? Call the Gay Switchboard, 52S-3211 'Montrose Live' each week in the Voice Is your guide to Montrose entertainment The Vo-ice has more news, more Houston readers, more Houston advertising Gary Larson's Cartoons­Exclusive in Houston in the Voice Randy Alfred's 'Dateline S.F.,' twice a month only in the Voice PRIVATE GAY CLUBS i Clu-bHOul10n~Bathl· ~206 f1nnin~i9iii i Ffe,:;-ch ~Q-uo111111i fhMlet· -3201 LO\l!t;'ini= 527--07!2 e Mrdtowne-SPa -3100 Fann1n-52i-2379 e 230SC1~b-2n-a.,,.....--s2e::e2Js- MONTROSE VOICE CLASSIFIED RATES Advertising rate: o $2 for up to three bold words and c 30¢ for each remaining word m regular type. Total minimum charge per ad $3. There are no other rates Advertisers who wish something different should consider running a display advertisement. o Deadline for all advertising Is 5:30pm Tuesday for newspaper released mid-day Friday. c Blind box numbers can be assigned for $3 each week the ad Is run and all responses will be forwarded to you by mail or picked up at our office. o Deduct 15~ if you run the same ad 4 weeks or_ more and pay for the full run in advance. a Bring or mall your Montrose Vorce Classified to 3317 Montrose #204, Houston, TX 77006 Advertising placed u.nder our old rates and format wlll continue to run until i would normally expire Use this form or blank sheet of paper ---~'------- --------- - ------------- ------ ----- - ----- - .Addt•U NllftlbM ol w"•"' «111 to '"" .AMOUnt 811(;/o.94 c CtiK• c Alofl9)' OrdfH r Ciuh (not by m8'1} c VIS.A Clterge M.atftrCard chwge t:red<l&•rd• ••i> O••• RESTAURANTS 9e.Ji,';. :'°2Lov9t1-:.s21-986e i'Br8$ ..9"TW0:::-1-322-Wnttltutnef-~~ • eti.PUl11j;C~13 R-.Cn~-522-23&5- iO Amor9·1-219 W•Ole.mer-~liii"" ,~. -..: ;=MontroM 1i Wei-th.1me~ ~-30'2Tu'•m_:5i2·7040 _ _ •Gyro Gyro1 S1ndwich Sh0i>=1S38 We1the<mer-528-<4855 e HouMol Pte9-3112 Kirby-521-3818 .e.H..o uM ol Shiah Kibob-2042 M1rat111~1. e J1de DrlQOn-224 WMthelrnet-526-2683 e w .. -1303 W•thelmer-.sz&.ea23 -­• Old Houston Oiner-91' w AllbllT'!l-524- 2318 e P9rky·a-Ridunond •1 K•rby-524-0075 e Ruc.tt 2702 Kirby-524-t272 • &ilon Et VCH.9 Wine & coff" Mr 133& WM11*mlr-522-3418 e Spud-U-llke-418 W•11'1e<mer 520-0554 •St• Pizza 2111 Not1olk 523--0IOO • St.U ·n· Eg9-4231 MontrOM-5zt=il35 - eTlm'1 Cott" Shop-1!125 W11the1mer--529- 22811 Want to talk? Call the Gay Switchboard, 529-3211 SERVICES, ETC. BODY MASSAGE Alcohol rubs. Coconut butter mas­sages. In or out. Call John Owens a her 1 pm, 63CH>809 DISCOUNT MAIL SERVICES Includes mail pick up, mall forward­ing, notary services, typing Grand Central Pipeline, 523-3223 HYPNOTISM-THERAPY-COUNSELING Weight, smoking. body building, stess, depression, past lives! Per­sonal & professions/. Jay Carby, Ph D., Associates. (713) 440-4867 HOUSECLEAING, HOUSESITTING Bonded. Aef.,.enen fuml9hed. Coll 529-0878. Edword Bonging. PATRICIA ANNE O'KANE Attorney at law. 526-7911 ASTROLOGICAL CHART INTERPRETATION Professionally prepared. over 8 page printout Send $10 & birth info to Astro Forcast. 9593 S Main #159. Houston 77025 LOOKING ... for an honest auto repair shop? We have just opened & our six women mechanics are ready to serve you. Our specialties are tune-ups, brakes & air-conditioning. Moving Right Along Garage. Open Saturdays, 663-7329. ---;;iiwAY PRODUCTS MEAN quality-& personal service. Try us & see. Phone Kent Naasz 520-6541 (M-F 5-7pm). Gene at 85~0418 any­time. Hank at (W) 52~7525 or (H) 523-6598 Trish & Phyllis at 723- 8368 FOR GUARANTEED PRODUCTS & dependable service. call you local Amway distributors at above numbers GAY TRAVELERS WANTED Grand Central Pipefine ls expanding rts operations to include complete travel agency services. ··High on ser· vice & low down fares." 523-3223 ROBAIRES HOME SERVICE Apa~ment, house cleaning Experts at mildew We try harder Your apart­ment flt for a queen. Call Bob at 52().. 5777 while we work. JUNE 24, 1983 I MONTROSE VOICE 31 An estimated 24.400 HOUSTON readers each week-the Voice! DRAINS STOPPED UP Doctor Rooter Sewer and Drainage Co. 24-hour service. No overtime charge tor Sundays, holidays. Call 473-6449 e Fitn ... Excti.nge 3307 Richmond 524· 9932 :~e'n"' 8-lty School 327 W•thelmer .e.L.e.g enctl Hair DMign-908 W•bllMI' 527· e uone1 Hair O..~ YOUunt-521-4414 -• Mon1TOM Half 0..ign--1004 Caklonua-522· e Montrou V0tee riewspaper-3317 "*ontroee •30&-529-3490 e Nnrtown Gat'9Q1-1I01 Tart-523-279' e OUt in Tu• IT\llQ&l.lne---3317 MortttOM 1308-529-3490 ::~=~~~~ mail box• 1713 • Tommy's Barber Shop-2154 Portarnouth 52&-3218 e TrlY91 1nno ... ation1 1508 W Alab.lm1~ Montf'OH Tia* Club 523-3051, commerc•ar accounts~ SHOPS & STORES e All-Star Adutt N_.._1407 Aichmo~21- M05 ByTycho eAI That Gl•H~ Montroee--522-M715 eAay1~iTtAdu11 BookJtOf*--1201 Roe""'°'1d ee.o P1r11 Ach.111 Bookator.--1830 w Alabl;;; ~-ctoth•ng 1220Weslhe!rnef­S22- 1&28 •BM~ol~ ·~~ lrtt-38115 ~~7 ,•.C..o bWllO Liquors-2036 Westh11rner-526- ,•.D..in er"• Adun ~240 Westne!lMf-52&­. e.D..o 'Mlbut Record&-2117 Richmond-523- e Oratnltik• girt.-3224 Yoakum-521-5457 e FIOIW giltl-1412 w.tn.imet 523-1412 e Fridl)""I Flonaa-1331 WMthetmw 524-8511 • GrKW)'M Boob 704 Flin- 522-7185 • Greet1ng1 P\J9-1411 W•tt1<11rner~1aa a Kirby Newstlnd--3115 Kirby 520-0241 e Qtl Boy L•thw Goodt--112 W•lhelmer- 52•71:51 e P11n1~12Waatn.imet-52't-eo50 e o-1 LM~-"°8 W•thetmar-527--904-4 -• Record Rid! lftl.lllC-3109 s ~ 524- -e sr;;;;-W-nou..-2024 W•lhl•mer 524- • Stl.ldz Adult News-1132 w Alab9ml e UnionJackdothing-1212Westt'lliimer-521- MOO e Up On• Well•rnlluth•r-eRB. 2400 Br1Z01-52•S7._::37:.._. ___ _ • W•'*1ner FIM Martiet-1733 WM11'1e•,..,.r • WHll'le•rner tnt•r1ot1-1727 Wesllta•m•- 520-1357 Fortunes fOf Frtd•Y ..,.mng. Jun• 24. 1"63, through FotJ1y ...,.nmg. July 1. 1"'83 ARIES-Gay Pride is bustin' out all over. and Aries 1s right at the head of all the action. The leader takes his proper place and revels in the rightness of his position. This is no act. This is you as you want to be, where you function best TAURUS-No big deal. Just time for some time out. A little recreation and reflection go a long way to get you back Into good shape. A keen eye, a soft touch, a good memory then give you the right ingredients for something a little more special. GEMINI-In your sign this Wflflk .· Mercury and M•rs (only through Wednesday morning). You're willing and determined. You know that it's a time to do more than your share. to mend bridges and heal wounds That's especially true with family members or someone you once were very close to. Going back can often be moving forward CANCER-In your sign this week: Mercury and Mars (entering Wed­nesday mornmg) and the Sun (all week). Anticipation can certainly lead to frustration unless you understand the value of waiting. Take this time to be good to yourself, to be with yourself. Being your own best fnend is a cliche. but it works nght now-at least until you best friend comes back LEO-Venus continues in your sign. Enough of that fantastic fantasy life. You've satisfied someone else's fancy, but now it's your turn for some good reality on you own. Something senous this way comes. and you're seriously interested in its coming. You should be. VIRGO-Dy-no-mite! Things are happening, and admit it. you love itl A less adventurous soul would run away from all th ts action, but you love being right in the thick of things Your very Vanous friends and lovers love your being there, too ! LIBRA-In your sign this week: Pluto and Saturn. Boy, are they going to love you at work this week! That lighter side of yourself that you've been exploring has relieved the pressures you were exerting on your co-workers. Your renewed sense of direction is a beacon to the confused. SCORPIO-The power of love that struck you last week has a healing effect and enables you to move ahead in other areas of your life. With you nighttimes shining, your day-to-day responsibilities take on a bet­ter, brighter ltght. SAGITI"ARIUS-ln your sign this week: Jupiter. Uranus and Neptune. Now comes the turning point. Balanced between yesterday's require­ments and tomorrow·s hopes 1s the part of your life that involves deci­sion and committment. You'd love to get lost in dreams. but reality beckons. Remember, dr~am, but consider. CAPRICORN-In your Stgn this week: The Moon, from Fnday evening to Monday morning. You and a lover can't seem to reach an a_greement. It might be time to take a vacation from one another. Keeping up the same battle can be tiresome. Separate space for a short time can do wonders. Get away and get rested AQUARIUS-In your Sign this wHk: The Moon. from Monday morn­ing to Wednesday evening. All that detective work you've done h_as paid RELAX I: ENJOY off. You've learned a lot about what you wanted, and now it's giving you the Bodyworks massge. Evenings some pleasure. New friends and new ideas should make this summer ~~~ :~~~~~~ ~v~illaB~:~. 526-2470 one of more than simple content PISCES-The Moon enters Pisces next Wednesday evenmg. June 29 LIFE RELATIONSHIP I: Have you learned to go with the flow yet? If so, you're swimming in some LONELINESS PROBLEMS fine waters this week. If not, you may be in over your head •·Go with the can be alleviated through psycho4 flow·· doesn·t mean the same thing as getting earned away The surface therapy. Sliding fee scale for cou- may be calm, but there are np-tides and crosscurrents. pies. and 1ndfv1duals. Some ·- ,.... 9e0v5e1n ings. Tony Carroll.MSW 527- ••• ••·· =l•fli'l"'•}!•llili:•<,/\ll•'fll 'IJl!'•!'ffIi'·•~ •••••••••••• 32 MONrnOSE VOICE I JUNE 24, 1983 Tuesday Movie. June 28: "Comedy of Terrors" with Vioncent Price. Joe E. BroW1"\. Boris Karloff and Bas1I Rathbone AAk!N<.. 5 ('IT SP'lll-llAM Wf.C\OAY All DAY Wf. Kl: S TON /WVAV lOM 0 f< ~ME ... ) 'Ill/ OF 1-14 Olli l\/10TORCYO l: vllF & TEXAS w U RS Af _R-H< Y 1022 VvfSIHEIMER 'i28-885• MUSIC BY ARRY FO l(.M Lorry Fought-DJ Every Weekend
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