Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Houston Voice, No. 813, May 24, 1996
File 001
File size: 21.85 MB
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Houston Voice, No. 813, May 24, 1996 - File 001. 1996-05-24. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. February 22, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/17296/show/17263.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1996-05-24). Houston Voice, No. 813, May 24, 1996 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/17296/show/17263

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 813, May 24, 1996 - File 001, 1996-05-24, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed February 22, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/17296/show/17263.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houston Voice, No. 813, May 24, 1996
Publisher Window Media
Date May 24, 1996
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript HOUSTON | 2 May 24,1996 W 1 > I W ISSUE813 A Weekly Community News Publication Finally! A Victory for Equality High Court Declares Anti-Gay Initiative Unconstitutional By CURT MORRISON By a 6-3 margin, the United States Supreme Court upheld a Colorado Supreme Court ruling that stipu­lated the 1992 “Amendment 2” denied Gays and Lesbians equal pro­tection under the U.S. Constitu­tion. Voters in Colorado adopted the amendment by a 53 percent majority in 1992. Had the measure not been blocked by the courts from taking effect, it would have invali­dated laws that barred discrimina­tion based on sexual orientation in jobs and housing that were on the books in Denver, Boulder and Hundreds of people from the Gay and Lesbian community rallied at Tranquility Park to celebrate the Supreme Court's decision to uphold gay rights. (Photo by Frank Parsley) courts to consider if other states attempt to impose laws denying equal rights in the name of sexual orienta­tion. Historically, Supreme Court rulings have been the catalyst for action in civil rights movements. Many analysts believe that this deci­sion will play a pivotal role in the direction the Gay and Lesbian rights movement will take. “This decision will change the course of civil rights for years to come,” enthused Suzanne Goldberg of Lambda Legal Defense and Education Fund. (Continued on page 4) Ryan White funding renewed Asp^n,... - In essence, Monday’s historic rul­ing in Romer vs. Evans provides pow­erful ammunition for the Lesbian and Gay communities and their allies, setting precedence for the Mark Payne Jazz singer Mark Payne By JON ANTHONY For the Houston Voice After a year of touring Australia and most recently Florida, former Hous­tonian and High School for The Per­forming and Visual Arts alumni Mark Payne is returning to Houston for an exclusive engagement at Ovations. In addition, Payne is in the process of completing his upcoming CD, tenta­tively titled Romance, slated to be released on Whole Note Records in July. (Continued on page 9) Funding Increases 16 + Percent President Clinton signed a bill Mon­day renewing the Ryan White Compre­hensive AIDS Resources Emergency (CARE) Act for five more years. The leg­islation authorizes the federal gov­ernment’s leading effort to provide vital medical care to the hundreds of thousands of Americans with HIV and AIDS. “The Ryan White CARE Act has been a big part of America’s progress” on AIDS, said the president. “But even as we celebrate our progress, we shouldn’t forget that the fight is not over. We have to do more to stop the ris­ing tide of infection among women, communities of color and young peo­ple— especially young gay men. Until there is a cure, we can not and must not rest.” “The president yesterday fol­lowed through on his commitment to America’s men, women and children with AIDS,” said Winnie Stachel-berg, HRC’s senior health policy advocate. “This money is desper­ately needed as health-care providers have been struggling to manage ever-increasing caseloads at last year’s funding levels.” “The long-overdue measure pro­vides $738 million in fiscal year 1996 for the care and treatment of people with HIV and AIDS—an increase of more than 16 percent over last year. The bill also provides $52 million specifi­cally designated for new AIDS drugs. The Ryan White CARE Act originally passed in 1990. It expired Sept. 30, 1995. After a House-Senate confer­ence committee hammered out a final version of the renewal bill, it passed the House May 1 by a vote of 402-4. A day later it passed the Senate unanimously. The Human Rights Campaign played a key role in nullifying an amendment to the bill, proposed by anti-gay Sen. Jesse Helms, R-N.C., which would have excluded organizations that serve the gay community from receiving fed­eral funds under the law. “This was a vindictive, discrimi­natory measure, considering that a large number of organizations pro­viding care to people with HIV and Voice Writer to be honored Houston Voice contributing writer Andrew Edmonson will be receiving a 1996 Matrix Award from the Houston Pro­fessional Chapter of Women In Commu­nications Inc. (WICI) for his article “On the Trail of Hate in Texas” which pro­filed Dianne Hardy-Garcia, executive director of the Lesbian and Gay Rights Lobby of Texas. WICI will be recognizing 105 commu­nicators with the Matrix Award while the special Vanguard Award will go to Andrew for submitting “an entry that exemplifies the accomplishments of women and/or highlights issues of spe­cial interest to women.” The award presentation, scheduled for Thursday May 23 at the Junior League of Houston, 1811 Briar Oaks Lane, was to begin with a reception at 6:00 p.m., din­ner at 6:30 and the awards ceremony fol­lowing. The WICI Houston chapter has cele­brated communications excellence since 1949 when the first annual Matrix Awards ceremony took place. Recipi­ents come from the communications fields of journalism, public relations, marketing, technical writing, graphic design and photography. AIDS are based in the gay and lesbian community,” said Stachelberg, who also serves for HRC as co-chair of National Organizations Responding to AIDS. The Helms amendment was replaced by language proposed by Sen. Nancy Kas-sebaum, R-Kan., that prohibits the use of Ryan White money to directly pro­mote intravenous drug use or sexual activity, either hetero—or homosex­ual. “We know that AIDS affects all Ameri­cans,” said the president at Monday’s signing ceremony. “Every person with HIV or AIDS is someone’s son or daughter, brother or sister, parent or grandparent. We cannot allow dis­crimination of any kind to blind us to what we must do.” Last year, as part of the drive to bolster congressional support for AIDS funding, HRC commissioned an unprecedented bipartisan poll dem­onstrating that voters of all politi­cal stripes favor maintaining or increasing federal efforts to care for men, women and children with AIDS. (Continued on page 14) IN THIS WEEK’S ISSUE Family Values Pg. 5 Plain Speaking Pg. 6 Gay Today Pg 7 Outsider Pg. 11 This n' That Pg. 15 2 HOUSTON VOICE / MAY 24, 1996 TEXAS AIR, INC. Air Conditioning & Tejas^ Heating Specialists RRn-462Q UUV “VLJ (Upon Approval) ALL WORK FULLY GUARANTEED A VZ5X WnnnL"r TACL A00610C Proudly Serving OUR Community Over 12 Yearsl HI! We re Ljoup neiglib J Heavenlg Caps at own to Eaptli ppices. Buy * Consign • Sei 1912 S. SkepkerJ corner of Shepherd “ReAtcuviawt 'Zete!! Tke<s\hre pvozAucFiosi c-P TickeB22?-?42l for AV'—'r' <n-x4i«Kces. Cdul-oiMS AViA-'f ta<yiv^je/SEWA:- s>kvxV:<jns. A TOXIC BREATHLE^ cov*\e<Ay ^bouV- <SEXy L<5heViv\ess VUe IMPORTANCE o£ THIN. Alley Tke«hre A^en^ ‘Sf-^e Hzny 17 A nEvj comedy 5y NicVy ^ilvev t>iveci-e<A by 6ve«<xy Boy«A Continental Airlines i ?4s^. SfonserezA by; PanEnergy Vinson&£Ikins If you would like an event listed in this section, Center. 7:00 p.m. Call 529-0037. please feel free to call me at 529-8490 or fax the facts to me at 529-9531. Friday, May 24 * Borders Book Store Gay/Lesbian Book Club meets at the Espresso Bar at 9634 Westheimer. Call 782-6066. * HIV Art classes at the Art League. Call 523- 8817 * HATCH meets. Call 942-7002. * 12 step program at Montrose Counseling Center. 6:00 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Aftercare Group Treatment at Montrose Counseling Center. 6:00 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Houston Tennis Club meets at 7:15 p.m. Call 527-1348. * Q-Patrol meets to walk the streets at 10:30 p.m. Call 528-SAFE. * Free Buffet at the Brazos River Bottom. 4:00 p.m. * The Women’s Group meets at 10:45 a.m. Cali 529-8571. * Using the Resources of Business Incuba­tors to Accelerate Business Growth Lunch­eon at 11:45. Call 932-7495 X 42. * Houston Poet James Ulmer reads at Borders Book Shop. 8:00 p.m. Call 782-6066. * Film at the Museum of Fine Arts: Maya Lin: A Strong Clear Vision at 8:00 p.m. Call 639-7515. Saturday, May 25 * Houston Chain Gang Bicycle Club rides. Call 863-1860. * After Hours on KPFT 12:00 a.m. to 3:00 a.m. 90.1 FM. Call 526-5738. * Gulf Coast Transgender support group meets. Call 780-4282. * Q-Patrol meets to walk the streets at 10:30 p.m. Call 528-SAFE. * Visual Art Alliance meets at 10:00 a.m. Call 583-8408. * Determining Your Entrepreneurial Expo­nents for Starting a Business. 9:00 a.m. Call 932-7495 X 40. * Brothers for Sisters meets at Cafe Artiste. 6:00 p.m. Call 869-9238. * The Articulate Professional! V.J. Singal talks about words at 3:00 p.m. Also The Manus-criptors Guild meets at Borders Book Shop. 7:30 p.m. Call 782-6066. * Film at the Museum of Fine Arts: Maya Lin:A strong Clear Vision at 7:30 p.m. Call 639-7515. * Arts Aficionados-Unite at Leisure Learn­ing Unlimited. Call 877-1981 X 7135. Sunday, May 26 * Houston Chain Gang Bicycle Club meets. Call 863-1860. * Front Runners meet at 9:00 a.m. at the Tennis center in Memorial Park. Call 522-8021. * HATCH meets. Call 942-7002. * Inner Loop Sunday Bowling League. Call 522-9612. * Out in Ft. Bend meets. Call 344-0638. * Brunch at the 611 12:30 p.m. $3 * Steak Night at the Brazos River Bottom. 6:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. * Montrose Ice Picks skate at noon. Call 629- 1432. * Pool Tournament at Chances. 6:00 p.m. * Houston Tennis Club meets at 10:30 a.m. Call 537-1348. * The Ever-lovin Psychic Fair at Borders Book Shop. 1:00 p.m. Call 782-6066. * Film at the Museum of Fine Arts: Maya Lin:A Strong Clear Vision at 7:00 p.m. Call 639-7515. Monday, May 27 * Gay Fathers/Fathers First support group. 8:00 p.m. Call 861-6181. * HeartSong open rehearsal at the First Uni­tarian Church at 7:00 p.m. Call 526-9095. * Calendar/Computer workshop for Pride Week. 7:00 p.m. Call 529-1223. * Positive Living Group at Montrose Coun­seling Center. 2:15 p.m. Call 539-0037. * Outpatient Group Treatment at Montrose Counseling Center. 6:00 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Women and HIV/AIDS Group at Montrose Counseling Center. 6:15 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Men Survivors of Sexual Abuse Group at Montrose Counseling Center. 6:15 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Lesbian Survivors of Cancer and their care givers at Montrose Counseling Center. 6:30 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Men’s HIV Group at Montrose Counseling * Pool Tournament at the Brazos River Bot­tom. 8:00 p.m. Call 528-9192. * Free HIV testing by the Montrose Clinic the Brazos River Bottom. 4:00 p.m. Call 520- 2083. Tuesday, May 28 * Helping Cross Dressers Anonymous meets at 239 Westheimer. 8:00 p.m. Call 495-8009. * Basic Computer Skills Class at the Kolbe Pro­ject. Call 522-8182. * Southern Country gives dance lesson at the Ranch. 9200 Buffalo Speedway. 8:00 p.m. * Gay Men HIV+ Psychotherapy at Mon­trose Counseling Center. 4:30 p.m. Call 529- 0037. * Outpatient Group Treatment at Montrose Counseling Center. 6:00 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Aftercare Group Treatment at Montrose Counseling Center. 6:00 p.m. Call 529-0037. * AIDA Alliance of the Bay Area meets at 7:00 p.m. Call 488-4492. . * Empowerment for Living meets for poi luck. Call 861-9149. * PROTECT support group meets at 7:00 p.m. Call 520-7870. * Free HIV testing by the Montrose Clinic at Club Body Center. 8:00 p.m. Call 520-2083. * Women Survivors of Childhood Abuse at Montrose Counseling Center. 6:30 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Survivors of loss support group meets at 8:30 p.m. Call 778-2677. * Free Dance Lessons and Karaoke at the Bra­zos River Bottom. 9:30 p.m. Call 528-9192. * Live Jazz at Borders Book Shop. Call 782- 6066. * HIV/AIDS Treatment mixer at 2700 Albany. 7:00 p.m. Call 527-8219. * AIDS Equity League meets at noon at Char­lie’s. Call 871-0092. * Love, Sex, and Intimacy-Safe Sex workshop at 7:00 p.m. Call 623-6796. * Trap Door good music at Borders Book Shop at 8:00 p.m. Call 782-6066. Wednesday, May 29 * Houston Tennis Club meets at 10:30 p.m. Call 537-1348. * Shiela Lennon performs at Chances. 9:00 p.m. Call 523-7217. * Houston Pride Band practices at Dignity Houston. Call 524-0218. * GLOBAL meets at 4:00 p.m. Call 743-7539. * Women’s Action Coalition meets at Too-pees. 7:00 p.m. Call 867-9581. * Men’s Network at Montrose Counseling Center. 7:00 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Houston Tennis Club meets at 7:15 p.m. Call 537-1348. * Lambda Rollerskating Club skates at 8:00 P-m. Call 933-5818. * Women’s Network at Montrose Counsel­ing Center. 7:00 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Ongoing Mixed Living in Process Group for men and women. Cail 622-7250 for more info. * Living with Chronic Pain at Montrose Coun­seling Center. 9:30 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Aftercare Group Treatment at Montrose Counseling Center. 6:00 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Women’s Issues Process Group at Montrose Counseling Center. 6:30 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Women’s Action Coalition (WAC) meets at 7:00 p.m. Call 867-9581. * Lesbian/Bisexual Survivors at Montrose Counseling Center. 6:30 p.m. Call 529-0037? * Bi-Net of Houston meets at 7:00 p.m. Call 467-4380. * “The Bible and Homosexuals” series by Ralph Lasher. At MCCR at 7:30 p.m. Call 861 - 9149. * Developing Business Skills workshop. 7:15 a.m. Call 932-7495 X 48. * Astrology Science at Borders Book Shop at 8:00 p.m. Call 782-6066. * Landscaping with Texas Native Plants at Leisure Learning Unlimited. Call 877-1981 X 1207. (Continued on page 14) HOUSTON VOICE / MAY 24, 1996 3 Cimmunity Ontanizattom Eidlethi Board Milam House Seeks Help Milam House, a residential center for people living with HIV/AIDS, is in need of sincere individuals to offer friendship and support. In a safe comfortable Montrose neigh­borhood, volunteers and staff strive to address residents’ physical, emo­tional and spiritual needs. As a home for people who are moderately ill and no longer able to provide housing for them­selves, Milam House provides a safety net of assistance when needed. For more information on Milam House or to volunteer, call 520-9248. Miss Camp 1996 Plans are underway for the 28th Annual Miss Camp America Pageant—which will be held at The Music Hall, Saturday Sept. 14, with its ‘96 Olympic inspired theme “The Thrill of Victory and The Agony of D’Feet.” Thursday, June 6 will be the “First Kiss” party, an event for sponsors and invited guests to come and meet Miss Camp Amer­ica Foundation members and 1996 des­ignated charities. If you are interested in sponsorship, or in receiving an invitation, please con­tact Jay Slemmer, Program Chair, at 956- 0465. Mr. Leather Goes Internet The 18th Annual International Mr. Leather contest and show will be simul­cast live on the Internet Sunday, May 26, from its Chicago location between 6 and 11:00 p.m. Coverage will be provided in two formats—the IML home page at http:// www.IMrL.com and via Internet Relay Chat (IRC) in the IML Chat room. The web page will include real-time dig­ital photo updates of the finalists and win­ners as they are announced. The IRC Chat Room will feature an ongoing descrip­tion of the show and contest as well as inter­views. This is the first time a gay event will be cov­ered live on the Internet. Approximately 60 contestants from nearly 10 countries will be participating, with an audience attendance predicted in the area of 3,000. Medical Testing Baylor College of Medicine is seeking volunteers for three studies to begin this year. If you are interested and qualified. telephone the numbers provided for more complete information. High cholesterol for both men and women, 798-4150; Hypertension stud­ies for both men and women, 790-3393; and Exercise Motivation, women between 25 and 60 who haven’t exercised and are overweight, 798-5769. HPMA June Meeting The Houston Professional Men’s Asso­ciation will hold its monthly dinner meeting Friday, June 7 at the Hobbit Hole, 1715 S. Shepherd beginning at 7:00 p.m. The $15 cost includes a Tex-Mex buffet, non-alcohol drinks, tax, tip and some­thing for the HPMA treasury. After dinner a speaker will address the group on an issue of concern to our community. The HPMA is open to all, anyone wishing to attend should RSVP to Steve Allen before Wednesday at 520-9083. Photo Show Photographer John Dugdale is cur­rently featured at the Houston Center for Photography in a show titled “The Poet­ics of Vision” featuring cyanotypes and toned cyahotypes, creating “imagery emerging in a mist of loss and remembrance, melancholy and nostal­gic ennui.” Living with CMV retinitis, HIV-posi­tive Dugdale has been a professional photographer for the past 15 years. Many of the images presented are from the last three years during which time his eye­sight has deteriorated. The Houston Center for Photography is located at 1441 West Alabama and is open Saturday and Sunday noon til 5:00 p.m. and Wednesday to Friday, 11:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. AVES Event Tickets are available for the June 22 “Latino Pride Gala,” an official Pride Week event and semi-formal dance, which will be held at 2151 W. Holcombe from 8:00 p.m. until 2:00 a.m. Admission is a $30 tax-deductible donation ($40 at the door) which includes admission and open bar all night. Latino music (tejano, salsa, cumbia, etc.) as well as country western and other dance music will be provided by a live band and a DJ. Please telephone 626-2837 for more information. Galleria area protest of Newt Gingrich attendance at fund-raiser for Steve Stockman - Houston Area NOW, Queer Nation, Union Members, Students, Enviromentalists and about 100 others gathered in front of the J.W. Marriott on Saturday, May 18 to express feelings that "No Newt is Good Newt" WE ARE MOVING! REAL SOON! To J9J9S Montrose Blvd. BIG MOVING SALE!! AT 1424-C WESTHEWER 7U-S22-S1S6 Don't Get Scared— Get sex Smarts HIV+?i Join us for a Great SEXpectations House Party: "Sex, Toys & Videotape" or "Love, Lust & Intimacy" Call AIDS Foundation Houston (713) 623-6796 4 HOUSTON VOICE/ MAY 24, 1996 A Victory for Equality (Continued from page 1) News of the decision spread quickly via the Internet and public outlets, with many cities holding hurriedly organ­ized rallies to celebrate the victory for equality. It was an emotional day for many—emotions of joy and ebulli­ence. “Our daughter lives in Colorado, so this case was heavy on the heart,” explained Gail Rickey, a co-president of the Houston chapter of Parents and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (P-FLAG). “I was so relieved,” she added. Rickey said that she was “pleased with the margin of victory” and was glad that the ruling did not “squeak” by in a close vote. “The 6-3 vote lent more credence to the victory and clearly showed the court speaking out for this land of equality. It was such a relief,” said Rickey. The celebratory rally in Houston took place at Tranquility Park Monday eve­ning. Hundreds of Gays and Lesbians gathered at the park to share in the excite­ment of the Supreme Court’s landmark decision. Local political and civil rights leaders addressed the crowd to enor­mous applause. The community rallied not only to commend the court decision but to ensure the momentum did not subside. Sea­soned activists warned of a back­lash to the court’s decision by right­wing extremists, in state legisla­tures and courts. “Someone asked me why was I here. Well, I would have to be here because my constituents are here,” intoned District D City Councilperson Jew Don Boney. “I think it’s good that we’re here today celebrating a victory. Victory is for people who are progres­sive... and we ought to pause for a moment and cele­brate. It is always good in this coun­try when the Supreme Court affirms equal pro­tection of the law for all people,” he said. “Gays and Lesbians have been saying for decades, that what we want is equal rights, not special rights. And sometimes it felt like no one was listening. Today the Supreme Court of the United States told us that it was listening and they agreed,” Dale Carpenter, president of Log Cabin Republicans of Texas, told the enthusi­astic crowd. Carpenter received thun­derous applause when he commented on the opening line from the dissenting opinion written by Justice Antonin- Scalia. “The opening line is this: ‘The court has mistaken a Kulturkampf for a fit of spite.’ Well, I don’t know what that means... (laughter). But it is signifi­cant to me that in the opening line of a dis­sent, in which a Justice of the Supreme Court said that people could be singled out based on their status, he couldn’t resist speaking in German,” referring to a German word often associated with the excesses of Nazi Germany.” “The constitutional government lives in the United States,” said Pat Gandy, president of the Houston Gay and Les­bian Political Caucus. “The Supreme Court, by overwhelmingly strong major­ity, decided that we have the right to address our legislators for protection from discrimination. For that we should be thankful. We live in a country where we have the right to fight through the ballot box, through the courts and through ral­lies, and we don’t have to go to the streets with guns and tanks. We have that right in this country, but so many of us take it loosely and do not treat it with the respect it deserves. We are the greatest country in the world in spite of all of our faults... but we all need to commit ourselves to mak­ing sure that rest of the world understands that rights and liberties are precious and can be taken away by those who are organ­ized to fight and oppose them. That’s what the Supreme Court decision means,” said Gandy. “We need to make a commitment that we will work hard together to fight (our opponents) to the bitter end, which we will do, we must do, we have to do, for our very rights and for our very lives,” con­cluded Gandy. It is important to note that the Supreme bians as a separate class, however, it does provide a foundational basis for consideration on future issues that will arise with respect to Gay and Lesbian civil rights. This decision has the potential to have far reaching implications for legal battles going on around the country. However, most pundits are not con­vinced that Monday’s ruling will ensure a win on other issues related to Gays and Les­bians that will undoubtedly reach the high court in the near future. “The Colorado decision does not tell us how the court will decide these issues but it is critical in framing the question,” opines Chaie Feldblum, a law professor at George­town University. “This is a very differ­ent court from 10 years ago. This is a court that was able to look at the law without an overlay of prejudice,” Feldblum told USA Today. In the dissenting opinion, Scalia cited the Supreme Courts 1986 ruling in Bowers vs. Hardwick that refused to strike down Georgia’s anti-sodomy law, which out­lawed sodomy even among consenting adults. “If it is rational to criminalize the conduct, surely it is rational to deny special favor and protection to those with a self-avowed tendency or desire to engage in the conduct,” wrote Scalia. “Amendment 2 is designed to prevent piecemeal deterioration of the sexual morality favored by a majority of Color­adans. Striking it down is an act not of judicial judgment but of political will,” Scalia stated. Justice Anthony Kennedy, who wrote the majority opinion said that the law unfairly singled out people based on a single trait—their sexual orienta­tion—and denies them legal protect­ions across the spectrum. “A state cannot so deem a class of persons a stranger to its laws. ...Homosexuals are forbidden the safe-guards that others enjoy... This Colorado cannot do,” he opined. The mere fact that the majority opinion was written by Justice Kennedy, a con­servative who was appointed by Ronald Reagan gave the decision more weight and significance. Four out of six of the jus­tices who voted in favor of striking down the initiative were appointed by Repub­lican Presidents, as were the three who dissented, Scalia, Chief Justice Wil­liam Rehnquist and Clarence Thomas. In a highly unusual, and indeed rare man­ner Scalia read his dissent out loud. Receiving a cold stare from Kennedy as he read his dis­sent, Scalia asserted that the ruling was not legally sound and solely motivated by politics. The decision handed down by the Supreme Court is historic beyond comprehension. For many Gays and Lesbians it was a decision that was long overdue. The community has persevered and has finally been handed a victory. Moreo­ver, the courts deci­sion demonstrated that there is hope and in spite of adversar­ial opposition, the Gay and Lesbian community can cohesively pre­vail, even against what seems to be insurmountable odds. Those odds have the potential of increasing if the fol­lowing right-wing extremist rhetoric is any indication. “Today is a truly chilling day for people of conscience,” maintained Colorado for Family Values member Will Per­kins. “Those forces bent on forcing a deviant lifestyle down the throats of the American people have moved a long step forward in making government their pet bully,” concluded Perkins. It is undoubtedly because of this kind of rhet­oric that the U.S. Supreme Court over­whelmingly ruled this week that the Colo­rado state constitutional amendment banning gay-rights was unconstitu­tional. Tony Marco, the founder of Colorado for Family Values, has already indicated that he believes the law can be rewritten in a manner that would satisfy the courts objections. Maybe. Maybe not. Whether or not that the court’s decision will act as a talisman remains to be seen. One thing is certain, however, the fight is not over, it has really just begun. Opi,lion Excerp,s Court ruling did not declare Gays and Les­Dissenting Opinion Excerpts By Justice Antonin Scalia In holding that homosexuality cannot be singled out for disfavorable treat­ment, the Court contradicts a decision, unchallenged here, pronounced only 10 years ago (Bowers vs.Hardwick) and places the prestige of this institution behind the proposition that opposi­tion to homosexuality is as reprehen­sible as racial or religious bias... If it is rational to criminalize the conduct, surely it is rational to deny special favor and protection to those with a self­avowed tendency or desire to engage in conduct... Of course it is our moral heri­tage that one should nor hate any human being or class of human beings. But I had thought that one could consider certain conduct reprehensible-murder, for example, or polygamy, or cruelty to animals—and could exhibit even “ani­mus” toward such conduct... I would not myself indulge in such official praise for heterosexual monogamy, because I think it no business of the courts to take sides in this culture war. But the Court today has done so, not only by inventing a novel and extravagant constitutio­nal doctrine to take the victory away from traditional forces, but even by ver­bally disparaging as bigotry adher­ence to traditional attitudes. Majority Opinion j j r Excerpts By Justice Anthony Kennedy Even if, as the State contends, homosex­uals can find protection in laws and pol­icies of general application. Amend­ment 2 goes well beyond merely depriving them of special rights. It imposes a broad disability upon those persons alone, forbidding them, but no others, to seek specific legal protection from injuries caused by discrimination in a wide range of public and private transac­tions. ... This disqualification of a class of persons from the right to obtain specific protection from the law is unprecedented and is itself a denial of equal protection in the most literal sense. ... It is not within our constitu­tional tradition to enact laws of this sort. Central both to the idea of the rule of law and to our own Constitution’s guaran­tee of equal protection is the principle that government and each of its parts remain open on impartial terms to all who seek its assistance. ... We must conclude that Amendment 2 classifies homosex­uals not to further a proper legislative end but to make them unequal to every­one else. This Colorado cannot do. ... We cannot say that Amendment 2 is directed to any identifiable legiti­mate purpose or discreet objective. Another way to reach us! You can now send your letters, news leads, and other correspondence to the HOUSTON VOICE by e-mail. Address to: HouVoice@aol.com. \ HOUSTON / VOICE A Weddy Community News Publicationg ISSUE 813 " May 24, 1996 Published Fridays Established 1974 as the Houston Montrose Star, re-established 1980 as the Houston Montrose Voice, changed name to The New Voice in 1991 incorporating the New Orleans Crescent City Star, re-established December 1,1993 as the Houston Voice 811 Westheimer, Suite 105 Houston, Texas 77006 (713) 529-8490 (800) 729-8490 Fax: (713) 529-9531 Contents copyright 1995 Office Hours: 9am-5:30pm weekdays Crad Duren/pubiisher Jack Leonard/general manager Matthew Pennington/production manager EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT TBA/editor STAFF WRITERS: Jon Harrison, Mark Henry, Carolyn Roberts, Javier Tamez, Glen Webber CONTRIBUTING WRITERS: Jon Anthony, Sam Dawster, Andrew Edmonson, Kerry Kadell, Chris Lambert, Curt Morrison Jazz Paz, John Reed CARTOONISTS David Brady, Scotty, Earl Storm PHOTOGRAPHERS David Goetz, Kim Thompson ADVERTISING SALES DEPARTMENT Lee Davis, Carolyn A. Roberts, CLASSIFIEDS & PERSONALS Maggie Bralick national advertising representative Rivendell Marketing. P.O. Box 518, Westfield. NJ (908) 232-2021 Notice to advertisers: Advertising rate schedule thirteen was effective March 1995 Partial or complete reproduction of any advertisement, news article or feature, copy or photograph from the Houston Voice is specifically prohibited by federal statute —Opinions expressed by columnists or cartoonists are not nec­essarily those of the Houston Voice or its staff and we assume no liability for the content expressed or implied of said articles or likeness of persons living or dead, real or fictional in the cartoons. —Publication of the name or photograph of any person or or­ganization in articles or advertising in the Houston Voice isMfe to be construed as any indication of the sexual orientatio^B said person or organization. —The appearance of advertisements or opinions expressed therein do not constitute an endorsement or guarantee by The Houston Voice or its staff. POSTMASTER: Send address corrections to 811 Westheimer, Suite 105, Houston, TX 77006 ^inPtlOnara,e US (by carrieror US Mail): $1.75 per week ($45.50 per 6 months or $91 00 per year) Oisplay advertising deadline: 12:00 p.m. CT Monday to reserve space, 5 00 p.m. CT Monday to furnish ad copy, for Friday publication iMc^nadVe','Sina dead"ne: n0On CT Monday ,or Friday Responsibility We do not assume financial responsibility for claims by advertisers but readers are asked to advise the news­paper of any suspicion of fraudulent or deceptive advertising and suspicions will be investigated Member: National Gay Newspaper Guild; Gay & Lesbian Press Association; Associate member: Associated PressHOUSTON VOICE / MAY 24, 1996 5 Best Friends are Best Halfway between Mother’s Day and Father’s Day (and amidst Hallmark’s lobbying for National Stepmother’s Day in August to complement Mother-in- Law Day, Family Appreciation Day and Cousin’s Day) it occurs to me that what we really need is a Besf Friend’s Day. You know, a holiday we can actually look forward to, a day to honor your best friend by buying her lunch, or fete her with bal­loons, flowers, confetti—anything but a card! Best friends deserve the recognition. No one knows us better or loves us more than best friends. No one affirms us, delights us and makes us feel as smart as the one person who is a best friend, through thick and thin. Let me introduce Pat. She has been my best friend for 15 years. I met her when I lived in Beaumont. She comforted me through my divorce, was appalled at my nascent lesbianism and when I was abandoned by my first girlfriend she ordered me to “Cheer up! I don’t want to hear any of this stuff about ‘depres­sion’!” She told me to flush the medi­cines my doctors prescribed for the debilitating despair and she observed that my new, cool crew cut was unbecom­ing when I did not ask for her opinion. She altered my new clothes and scolded me about what they cost. She disproved mightily of my politics and predicted that a particularly delicate, long­fingered son of a radical feminist would certainly grow up to be a twitching neurotic. She was bewildered when I changed my name. Pat is illuminatingly beautiful, but she doesn’t like me to say so. Her skin is so shiny and black it would peel like a plum if it were to become snagged. She hated it when I tried to snap pictures of her but she laughed good naturedly at the developed prints. In turn I delivered her baby in her home and forbade entry to her apartment when the cops came investigating the case of a newborn male who was found in a dump­ster. I knew (without knowing how I knew) that she was at acute risk one day and abruptly left my job to seek her out. She was indeed exposed to peril and jeopardy at that instant, but she did not realize it until I came barging in. I gave her a whole truck load of furniture and mementos when I moved back to Houston and we promised we would write and call often, and we have, especially when one of my boys gets a scholarship or hers (the one I was the first ever to touch) has a piano recital or breaks a track record at his school. Even though I have less and less legitimate business there, every time I pass through Beaumont I stop at her house for a brief chat and a hug. Pat has never marched for peace or attended a consciousness-raising ses­sion. If she were pressed to declare an alli­ance with any cause I guess it would be the Right to Life League, but I really can’t see her parading around the Capital with a fetus in a bottle, either. The little we have in common fits neatly into our hearts without much left. I went to visit Pat last week. We were both amazed by how gray the other’s hair had become. We had not seen each other in the daylight in years. We sat on the old porch swing I had given her years ago in my haste to be separated from my ex-husband and every gift he had ever given me. We talked about old times, old loves and old misun­derstandings. The only fight Pat and I ever had was about a man. Hers. I did not want him, I wanted his car. And we didn’t speak for about a year after that. And then we came around. The man comes around occasionally, too. I brought a camera with me when I went ip see her the other day. I intended to capture her unaware. Instead, when she saw it she waved a passerby off of the street. “Can you come here, please? Would you take a picture of me and my friend, here? We’re best friends. We hardly ever get to see each other anymore.” Best friends. We see each other as a bet­ter version than we are, which makes us, momentarily, as good as we wished we were. I love you, Pat. Through thick and thin. Thousands of people participated in the Southwestern Bell's From All Walks of Life 10K Walk this past Sunday, May 19. Nearly $170,000 was raised during the walkathon. The percentage of pledges by walk participants was 40% higher than last year. (Photo by David Goetz) memorial weekend FRIDAY START YOUR WEEKEND WITH FRIENDS AT GENTRY. THE BOY TOYS DANCE FROM 6 PM. ABSOLUT COCKTAILS ARE ONLY $3.50 TONIGHT. SATURDAY CHILL DOWN AT GENTRY THIS AFTERNOON AND ENJOY OUR HOUSE SPECIAL DREAMSICKLE SHOT FOR $2.00 BOY TOY DANCERS GYRATE AT 9 PM. SUNDAY SCOOT ON OVER TO OUR PLACE FOR $2.00 KOOLAIDS. BOY TOYS DANCE AT 5 PM. THEN AT 9 PM SHARP REGINA DANE, HISS GAY HOUSTON US OF A AT LARGE A VARIETY SHOW NO WORK TOMORROW? STAY WITH US FOR SUNDAY FRENZY MALE STRIP CONTEST AT 11 PM MONDAY FREE HOT DOGS WITH ALL THE TRIMMINGS FROM 5 PM UNTIL ? $2.00 DOMESTICS ALL DAY/ALL NIGHT BOY TOY DANCER AT 7 PM WEDNESDAY 11 PM MALE STRIP CONTEST ^ 6 HOUSTON VOICE / MAY 24, 1996 817 FAim X) . > (713) (at Course) 4 52M20(> Su'fwt 'lUee&encL Schedule Friday, May 2^th Miss Zack Victoria Nicole Kara bion Leah Hatston Friday, May 3hh Miss Zack Tony Santana Siyi Ross Special Guest 11 tOO'fML Saturday, May 25th 8 Miss Zack Crystal Rae Lee Lotfe Raye Paitfi Lee Lotfe Saturday, June 1st Miss Zack Tony Santana Brandi Houston Raye Sunday, May 26th Miss Zack Michael Smothers Sidi Ross Erica Lane Sunday, June 2nd Miss Zack Victoria Nicole Kara bion Special Guest (fate me doaue wentp (uedewl cutd oct omttc tUOOl CUtd WutcVl 1 The Gay Men's Chorus of Houston Celebrates Its Fifteenth Anniversary Our debut recording chronicles the history of GMCH in music. Available on compact disc and cassette at the following stores: 713/522-5156 1424-C Westheimer Houston, TX 77006 Books • Periodicals • Cards • Gifts Mil Westheimer (9 Waufh) Houston, TX 77006 (713) 942-0147 Mail Order (800) 445-7186 1846 Richmond Ave. Houston, Teus 77098 <71 J) 521-3369 (800)931-3369 Make plans to celebrate with us at our annual Gay Pride Concert benefiting AFH Stone Soup Pantry, June 15, 1996, 8:00pm in the Cullen Theatre at the Wortham Center. Tickets available beginning May 1st by calling 227-ARTS. PLAIN SPEAKING by Larry Lingle A View on The Supreme Court ruling This week’s Supreme Court decision upholding the unconstitutionality of the Colorado Amendment 2 which would have barred all gay and lesbian civil protections is, after all the ballyhoo and condemnations, a landmark case. This is the first ruling by the nation’s highest court supporting a gay and les­bian issue. It is, also, the first time that a federal court has so forcefully defined “equal” versus “special” rights, and found that gays are entitled to all the basic “equal” rights of all other groups. Of course, what has confounded the anti-gay forces, including the author of the court’s dissenting opinion—Justice Antonin Scalia, is that the decision, by its very nature, recognizes a gay and les­bian constituency. Scalia, arguing the all-too-familiar line of the anti-gay forces, continually referred to gays and lesbians as “those who engage in homosexual conduct,” attempting in the fashion of the radical right to define us by our private actions and implying that such conduct is ours by choice. Thus all heterosexuals should be charac­terized by their rutting behavior rather than their natural humanistic quali­ties. Scalia, who obviously has not acquired any knowledge on the subject in the last half century even resurrected that cher­ished chestnut of misinformation we “have high disposable income” and “possess political power much greater than our numbers.” If either were true, big business would be beating down our doors and politicians would be rally­ing to our cause. If such is the case my door was overlooked and my governor and both senators did not get the message. In a hate-filled dissent, Scalia could not avoid another favorite tool of the radi­cal right—comparing homosexuals to those who commit “murder, polygamy, or cruelty to animals.” Since all these are criminal behavior, and thus offen­sive to all Americans, Scalia must then base his argument on the sad spectacle of the decade-old Bowers vs. Hardwick which, by a one-vote majority, the High Court upheld the right of states to main­tain sodomy laws. This, like all of Scalia’s argument, returns to “conduct” and “choice.” And, while Scalia did stop short of flaunting “lifestyle” in our faces, his supporters of the radical right were quick to dredge up even this ral­lying cry for bigotry. But the most deliberate slap adminis­tered by Scalia was in his opening line of dissent: “This Court has mistaken a Kul-turkampf for a fit of spite.” Choosing a German word most often associated with the excesses of Nazi Germany, Scalia gives legitimacy to Pat Buchanan s “cultural war” as a matter of legiti­matejudicial concern. And he then belit­tles his fellow justices, including four appointed by Republican presidents, by referring to their vision in seeing only “spite” in Colorado. I was particu­larly gratified when, at a rally here in Houston to celebrate this victory, it was Dale Carpenter, president of the state Log Cabin Republicans and an attorney, who noted Scalia’s lapse into Nazi rhetoric. Those who now cry for impeachment of the six affirming justices, certainly buoyed by Scalia’s harsh language, on, the rallying cry of states rights can find abundant support in the past speeches of the nation’s senior senator, Strom Thurmond—particularly from his campaign speeches as the candidate of the Dixiecrat Party in 1948 (and I thought Dole was old). While it is true that this decision cannot equate with the landmark Brown vs. Board of Education in 1954 which struck down segregation, nonetheless the arguments used then to attack the court and its decision are not dissimilar from those pouring out of the conservative think tanks led, as always, by the ilk of Gary Bauer and the henchmen of Pat Robertson. And, as pointed out in an approving edi­torial in The New York Times, “At issue, i the Court made clear, was not whether' homosexuals deserved ‘special rights’ or whether gay people as a group have a protected constitutional sta­tus. The Court simply found that the amendment had condemned gay people to a lesser category of citizenship, and therefore could not survive even a ‘rational basis’ test—the lowest level of constitutional scrutiny.” Kept in perspective this simply means that we should not read too much into this single ruling. While it will dampen some efforts at such state restrictions, it does leave open, in the words of the majority of the Court, legislative action “so long as it bears a rational relation to some legiti­mate end.” And, after all, that’s why we have so many lawyers—to play with words so as to pass all scrutiny. The majority, intentionally, did not. disturb the Bowers vs. Hardwick deci­sion, although its finding that singling out a specific group can be unconstitu­tional seems to leave room for future liti­gation of the sodomy statutes. Just as such anti-sodomy laws, while rarely enforced, often haunt gays and les­bians in our fight for other rights, so, too, shall this decision hover over every future ruling dealing with a gay issue. Obviously, on gays in the military, based on prejudice against a single group would fail this constitutional test, the military cam continue to argue a “rational basis” on good order and dis­cipline. Same-sex marriages, the touchstone of the religious right in this election year, may be equally affected. Such counter laws presently being considered in a number of states would single out and make unequal a single class, i.e. gays and lesbians. Yet the states’will and do argue, as Scalia has in his dissent, a moral bat­tleground on which they perceive rests the survival of a nation. Again, like Scalia, the religious right would, on one hand, have us as a small, insignificant minority, while, on the other, endow us with such disproportionate influ­ence. At a time when the radical right would decry the decline of family, the rise in crime and juvenile misconduct, and government corruption, it somehow finds homosexuals as the root cause of, their misery. Just as homosexuality is! not the cause of the religious wars in the Balkans, in the Middle East, in Northern Ireland, so also it cannot be blamed for the failures of an unjust American soci­ety. WE TAKE TIPS! Your HOUSTON VOICE appreciates your news lead or feature story ideas. Call us (best time: Thursday or Friday) at 529-8490 (Fax: 529-9531). HOUSTON VOICE/ MAY 24, 1996 7 by Glen Webber I finally got to see the clouds to dance among the stars, I finally go to see the sun, Its warmth a friendly touch and as I go I’m glad to know My journey will not be alone. This beautiful poem, titled “One Day” is a poem I wrote long ago-and titled by my Dad, making it more special. The com­mittee for the Continental Airlines Quilt selected it to put on the quilt Conti­nental was making to honor the flight attendants who died of AIDS. I can’t tell you how proud I am for this honor. As a writer, I always hoped that one day I would write something so meaning­ful, so moving, that it would effect peo­ples lives. I always hoped I would be rec­ognized for my writing skills. With the recognition and inclusion on the Con­tinental Quilt, I feel I have achieved my goal. They asked me to sign the poem and then say a few words to the folks gathered for the dedication. Although I had nothing prepared, I am a good speaker and enjoyed sharing my thoughts with the audience. If any of you need an emcee, please let me know. I’m very good on stage. One of the things about the day that made me feel even more proud was that my parents were in the audience, beaming with pride. Ever since I told my parents I had AIDS, they have been so loving and suppor­tive. They have also seen my gay lifestyle, and have met my many friends from Conti­nental, Bering Support Group, and from the Montrose area. They are grateful that I have so many friends who love me and are willing to help me if I need it. I think the cultural shock of it all has been a bit over­whelming. And they have learned what a wonderful caring person I really am, although they knew that anyway. I think I am the luckiest person in the world. Anyway, the ceremony was beauti­ful. Among the audience watching were parents of some of the flight attendants who passed away. They were so grateful that their sons would be remembered in this beautiful way. I am too. I do want to thank Anthony Turney, Executive Director of the National Names Project, Jerry Pennington, and my good friend Barry Liss for making me part of the excit­ing afternoon. And thank you to all you dear readers for letting me share this magical moment with you. I said last week that I don’t want a panel, but I have changed by mind. I would like my parents and sister to help me with mine. I think it would be a very meaningful expe­rience for all of us. And, I would like my sister, who writes the most beautiful poetry I’ve ever read, to write a poem for my panel. The emotional bonding between us would be extremely strong. I think family should be involved in mak­ing the panels if possible. Of course, I hope the need to make one never comes. One of the good things that has come from my being ill is knowing the number of friends I have. I never expected to get so much love from so many people. I’m very proud of this, and although I wish I wasn’t sick, I am, and I’m glad so many people care. I wish I could go to Washington to see the quilt. I can’t afford it, but I was thinking, if any of you are driving, perhaps you can handle an extra passenger in your car. If so, call and leave a message and I will call you back. As I do most of my writing at home. I’m not in the office very often. And speaking of ‘at home,’ I sold my house last week. It was only on the market one week—pleasing me with the efforts of Carlos Garcia Realty,, the largest firm in my part of town. For now. I’m planning to get a one bedroom apartment in Mon­trose (with my dog. Miss Lady). I can’t imagine being five minutes from every­thing. As you know, apartment hunting can be very exhausting and if any of you have any suggestions, call me at the Voice offices. I think it will be a very emotional experi­ence to move. After all, I lived in my house for 13 years with Kelse, my lover, and I’ve stayed here three years since his passing. I guess I should have sold it after he died, but I just couldn’t let go. Now I can, but the separation is going to be difficult. I mean I’ve spent my whole adult life here, and would still stay, except I believe it is time to start over and live in the area I spend so much of my time in. Plus I am not getting any better at driving the freeways. Please wish me well in this move. Thank you for your continued support and I promise to never let you down. You my dear readers are my lifeline and I do love you all very much. Glen with his parents, Bob & Carol. Sec an important news story happen? ♦ Call the ▼HOUSTON UOICEV Blues Saturday! Join your friends and enjoy the Blues from 9-12 P.M.! Bacchus II and Marion E. Coleman formerly Kindred Spirits present the newest, hottest musical group in the Bayou City Saturday May 25,1996 Hear Colleen and Sandy WANTED Body Builder or Professional Model Type Handsome, dynamic executive with hilltop estate is looking for someone to share my life. My interests are bodybuilding (the gym), snow, water skiing, bicycling, movies, travel, dining out, spiritual growth and close friends. I am in excellent shape physically, financially, emotionally and spiritually. I am 45, 6ft, 190 lbs., very muscular and very masculine. You are a handsome body-builder or a professional model type, age 28-38, who is career oriented and settled down. You should have job, car and education, and should be committed to honesty, caring, trust, integrity and willing to move to Los Angeles, CA and share a life of happiness. PHOTO A MUST. PLEASE REPLY TO: 8539 Sunset, #4-145, West Hollywood, CA 90069 or call (310) 535-1777 or FAX (310) 652-2483 I if* 805 Pacific • Houston • 529-7488 SUNDAYS ♦ TRASH DISCO ♦ SUNDAYS • TRASH DISCO • SUNDAYS <z> g Q «2 5o5 o s ©-<> b I l° All Well Bloody Marys, Screwdrivers, Cape Cods, L Madras and 1 Hand Shaken Kamikazis \ ONLY $1.75 SUNDAY, MAY 26th Memorial Day Weekend SUNDAYS • TRASH DISCO • SUNDAYS • TRASH DISCO • SUNDAYS Enjoy 2 JBUSTS for A S2.00 (Optional) Buy-In Our Traditional 1 WiERBLST with 25c Refills of Ice Cold Miller Lite Draft or Try Our NEW FROZEN RITA BUST with S1.00 Refills The Patio Opens at 1pm and the Party Continues All Night Long. Montrose Mining Company t&tf fhe Men of The Mine invite you to help them welcome The Summer of ‘96. Enjoy the spectacular view from the patio and inside DJs JOHN SIMS and BRIAN BROUSSARD keep you pumping to the sounds of the 70s & 80s 8 HOUSTON VOICE/ MAY 24, 1996 Gay & Lesbian ‘State of the Movement’—Not Just a State of Mind! The Human Rights Campaign, the largest gay and lesbian organization in the country, was represented by Execu­tive Director, Elizabeth Birch. She focused on how important it is for gays and lesbians to be visible. The HRC is also the tiger running up and down the halls of congress, reminding the law makers of what humanness is. Ms. Birch explained that upon her arrival in Washington, D.C., a little over a year ago, the “storm clouds were gathering” as the Republi­cans were pushing their Contract With America, and the outlook for gays and les­bians was ominous at best. “Most politi­cal pundits predicted that gay and les­bian and bisexual Americans would suf­fer great, great harm at the hands of the 104th Congress.” The essence and “prin­cipal duty” of the Human Rights Cam­paign is to “lead the efforts in congress and to do battle there,” as Ms. Birch put it. The lobbying finesse, strength, and well BY B.R. MCDONALD For the Houston Voice The National Gay and Lesbian Journalist Association held their annual State of the Movement forum, Tuesday, May 7, in Washington, D.C. at the National Press Club and boy did it move! It was an attempt to put their collective fingers on the frag­mented pulse of the Gay and Lesbian Move­ment. This was made clearer as the evening progressed, and every person in the room got a lesson in racism. The panel was a com­pilation of heads of some of the most pow­erful associations that represent our varied gay and lesbian community. The Master of Ceremonies Stuart Perkins, Senior Producer of Black Entertain­ment Television News, did a commend­able job keeping the speeches on time. The eight panelists included; Melinda Paras, Exec. Dir. National Lesbian and Gay Task Force; Cornelius Baker, Act­ing Exec. Dir., National Association of People With Aids; David Clarenbach, Exec. Dir., Gay and Lesbian Victory Fund; Elizabeth Birch, Exec. Dir., Human Rights Campaign; Keith Boykin, Exec. Dir., Black Gay and Lesbian Forum; Jeff Levi, Deputy Director of the White House Office of Aids Policy; Carl Schmhmid, Chapter Pres., Log Cabin Republicans; and Sandra Gillis, Exec. Dir., Parents, Families, and Friends of Lesbians and Gays (PFLAG). Each speaker, representing a particular organization, or association, or forum of the gay and lesbian community, put their contributions to the evenings events in neat, concise, and easily to understand packages. Well constructed speeches defined and declared what each and every group represented, had, is now, and will in the future, try to achieve. How­ever, no one saw the white elephant until it reached the podium. By then, it was too late. the two hour forum. If the purpose of the forum was to check the heart rate of the gay and lesbian commu­nity, the organizers found a racing pulse. With all the different organiza­tions and associations, it’s a minor mir­acle any communications are heard, not to mention heard accurately. In fact, Melinda Paras, Executive Director of the National Lesbian and Gay Task Force summed it up by stating, “What’s criti­cal to the future and strength of this com­munity, is the ability to hear.” She was referring to the attempt to silence Carmen Chavez after she had begun her statement. Ms. Paras also reminded us to listen care­fully, especially to those who are angry and hurt. ‘Coming Out Is As Basic As Rice ’ Racism Among Gays The white elephant in this case is gay racism, made apparent by Carmen Chavez, representing the National Latino/a, a Lesbian and Gay Organiza­tion. She, alone, put into perspective the entire and most obvious “State of the Movement” and that is, the very ugly, ris­ing head of racism among our own commu­nity. The esteemed panel, having each given their speeches and opinions as to just what the state of the movement was, were stunned when Ms. Chavez took to the podium and articulately scolded the panel for having no representation from the Latino/a Gay and Lesbian Organiza­tion. She confronted the lack of interest and “second class” status cast on the latino/a community. “For the third year in a row Latino/a lesbian and gay leaders find themselves blatantly excluded from such significant discussions. We find ourselves fighting racist tactics that keep us from our rightful place at the table.” She explained how she respect­fully tried to gain a voice at this forum, but was not invited to attend. One of the panelists then turned to Steve Cheney, President of the National Les­bian and Gay Journalist Association, and the host of the event and confronted him as to why there was Such an oversight. Head hanging, and not eager to meet the eye of the storm, he responded meekly, “It was a com­mittee decision. We had to cut it down to eight people and those are the ones you see here.” That response was not good enough for panel guest Keith Boykin, Executive Director of the Black Gay and Lesbian Forum. He accurately identified the real white elephant when he stated, “This is the state of the gay and lesbian community right here!” Gay racism was just one of the heavy topics discussed at length'during honed skills have kept many an anti-gay predator from swallowing large por­tions of our hard fought and obvious pro­gressions. The news got even better as results of a Time poll, done three times inside of five years, showed measurably a drop in^k homophobic related hate. Ms. Birch made^ the observation that, “the one measure of hate in this country that has dropped sharply, is homophobia.” And that “coming out is as basic as rice.” In addi­tion she cited statistics that reveal 77% of Americans continue to believe that gays and lesbians should not be discrimi­nated against. Not surprisingly, 84% of African Americans do not think we should be discriminated against. A great statistic from sociological surveys reveal that “80% of people are less likely to be homophobic when they know some­one who is lesbian or gay.” In other words, the more visible we are, the less threat­ening we will be. Despite an admission of disarray inA major areas of communication and rep-* resentation, and despite all the warts our gay and lesbian community may have, we are in the process of changing history. David Clarenbach, Executive Director of the Gay and Lesbian Victory Fund, put it very well, Everytime an elected official comes out, just as everytime a leader in the business community, or a union offi­cial, or yes, a journalist, it destroys the stereotypes upon which homophobia is based.” At least our “State of the Move­ment” is not just a state of mind, but a real­ity. Our reality, one we are in control of. To put it in the proverbial nutshell, we must address our own racist mentality, become far more visible, and compose a “coherent, compelling message:” about just why gay and lesbian rights are so important. ^^^Con^rats qo out from all of usTo^^^ ( Kara Dion, the Neal Miss EJ'sH I Brandon Martin, the Neal Mr. E]'s!l ) Lee LoVe, the Neal Miss Gat/ Pride!^/ -rntt-----------\ C ? J/ Star 5/28. Sft^ Catia Lee LoCe and Special Guests: CfiePette Brooks Special -aL Mystery Guest / & talent a * * niyfit iVinner w Keltv ^en of fke J3orde.r /xJicjKf with AActrilyn "La<2uinta" Alarx Thursday, May 30, 11:00pm ^Robert • Tiffany Roxanne Jamie Lennox VJs' and ALSO Granny's Tacos!!! 2517 Ralph Street at Westheimer C7I3J 527-9071 • Happy Hour 7am-9pm weekdays • $1.50 Well 4-7 Saturday • $1.50 Uodka 7am-6pm • Mue Club 7am-l0pm «$3.75 Pitchers & $1.25 Mugs tin A MALE STRIP CONTEST at 11:00 pm w/ PAIVI T! 2 on 3> ■H on i 3 O z € m o c/oc Amateur/Talent J/W Contest 10:00pm C/OC SI Budweiser & Bud Light 3/ feO All Dav All Night tm MALE STRIP CONTEST J'fcl at 11:00 pm w/PAIUI 5/29 Granny's Burgers!! Coming: June 16 Miss Life Today PageantJazz singer Mark Payne HOUSTON VOICE / MAY 24. 1996 9 (Continued from Page 1) Payne, a megastar in Australia, has had a stellar career working with some of the industry’s biggest names. Hav­ing begun his career as a highly success­ful Liza Minnelli impersonator at La Cage in Las Vegas, along with other high profile venues, Payne parlayed his success into a lucrative and criti­cally praised career as a jazz artist overseas. During a recent interview with the Houston Voice, Payne elabo­rated on his experiences with industry stalwarts and his upcoming projects. Legendary comedian Bob Hope, who he worked with in Palm Springs, is one of his fans. Hope intoned that “Mark Payne will be to cabaret what I am to com­edy.” ‘‘Bob Hope, well, he’s old,” Payne said laughingly when asked about working with Hope,”He was wonderful to work with... it was very easy because there wasn’t a lot of drama going on. He has an incredible ego because he is Bob Hope, I mean, my God! His thing is on the stage... he seems very directed and controlled. He is strictly a professional.” Payne remembered, “His wife, Delores, struck me more than he did. She is incredibly nice and is one of the most amazing people I ever met. She also looked fabulous.” Milton Berle, on the other hand, made an indelible impression. “Milton Berle was a lot more in character as him­self, more like his stage persona off stage. Hope was more laid back and more subdued. It’s strictly more of an act for him. With Milton Berle, his personal­ity carried throughout... he was just on all the time. He was very interesting,” said Payne. “I’ll never forget one time after a show, we were sitting around and he called Dorothy Lamour . ... he would dish all the celebrities and was fun to be around,” shared Payne. Payne has worked with luminaries such as Phyllis Diller, Gloria Est­efan, RuPaul and others. He shared anecdotes from those experiences and seemed to have fond memories of them. “I love Phyllis Diller, I think she’s one of the most wonderful people. I’m just always amazed at her sincerity and her honesty in what she does. She’s very funny,” replied Payne. Gloria Est­efan and her husband Emilio caught Payne’s act in Florida. They went back-stage to meet him. “It was so funny because they came in to see me perform and they brought their cameras and took pictures. They were acting like any other fans, which is the opposite of how it is for her now” intoned Payne. “I didn’t really know who she was because their band, The Miami Sound Machine, were just coming on the scene,’ remarked Payne. Estefan quickly became a fan and the two soon worked together. “She told me about a Pepsi commercial they were filming on South Beach. She asked if I’d help, so I went down there,” he explained. He fondly remembers working with RuPaul at a benefit in Melbourne, Australia. “He was absolutely won­derful. So positive and uplifting,” recalls Payne. “He is extremely pro­fessional and very together, with eve­rything very detailed, it was just amaz­ing. He set a good example for every­one involved, I think he taught people a lot, setting a standard for other art­ists,” complimented Payne. Payne asserts that Sydney, Australia has one of the “world’s most happen­ing” gay communities. He claims that the heterosexual community raves | about the gay night life there. Payne expressed that, “The scene in Sydney is not to be missed.” He recalled his foray into the jazz scene as a happenstance. Having been in Australia to do a “Liza gig,” Payne remembered being “incredibly bored.” As a result, Payne, who always enjoyed singing, went down to sing with a jazz group at a local nightclub. “They really liked me, so I started working with them on a regular basis,” said Payne. “I sort of led a double life, I ran back and forth, I don’t think the musi­cians knew what I was doing,” laughs Payne. The group got asked to do a jazz festival because one of the major American acts backed out at the last minute. “Ironically, since I was American and there, all of a sudden I was like a major American act pushed into the limelight. It just sort of pushed me into the forefront of the Australian music scene overnight. It was really amazing,” chimed Payne. An avowed Liza fan, Payne got to meet his idol, now calling her a friend. “I know her, she’s great. She works with Billy Stritch, formerly of Montgom­ery, Plant & Stritch. They were such an incredible musical influence, indi­vidually as well as together. Billy started working for Liza about a year after leaving the group. He has done amazing things for her musically. I was blown away when I saw her in Miami last February or March, she sounded so incredible. Even the voicing for her standards were changed and she did wonderful new jazz voices that were Billy Stritch influenced. I think he’s been a wonderful influence on her, as he was on me.” Payne credits Stritch as being his personal musical inspira­tion. “You can hear all of his influences in what I do,” explains Payne. Payne has not given up the Liza imper­sonations completely, however, his primary goal is to be a familiar jazz vocalist for American audiences. Judging from an advanced copy of tracks that will be featured on his upcoming album and the talented musi­cians and songwriters who contrib­uted their works for Payne’s interpre­tations, he will not have too much diffi­culty amassing a receptive audience. Payne’s vocals are brilliant, with a voice that mesmerizes with a practi­cally hypnotic quality. He sings with relative ease and congenial style, seeming to emote personal introspec­tion throughout his repertoire. Unique and innovative, Payne dem­onstrates his enviable ability to use his pipes as a musical instrument offering a refreshing twist on covers of jazz standards. It is quite evident that he has honed a distinctive style that is undeniably fresh and inescap­ably infectious. Payne’s new CD has an eclectic array of contributing talent. In addition to vocalists Sharon Montgomery and Donna Corley, are songwriter Ama­nda McBroom (Bette Midler’s The Rose), Michele Brourman, and popu­lar Houston pianist Charlene Wright, all lending their considerable tal­ents. “I have a passion for music. I’m not strictly jazz, my show has a lot of cab­aret as well,” comments Payne. Payne describes his relationship status as “pending,” but adds that his show pro­vides the perfect atmosphere for a wonderful dating opportunity. Payne will be appearing live at Ova­tions, 2536B Times Blvd, on May 30th, which gives you plenty of time to find that perfect date. Tickets for the 8:00 p.m. show are $6.00 at the door. PRIME CHOICE WEEKEND MAY 31ST THRU JUNE 2ND SAT 2STH UNIFORM PARTY (2200 HRS) MON 27TH CRAWFISH ROIL W/$1.S0 KAMIKAZES (ALL DAY ALL NIGHT) (2 PM) BROTHERHOOD of PAIN SLAVE AUCTION JUNEI4TH http://ujujuj.hic.net/ ripcord/journal.htm 10 HOUSTON VOICE/ MAY 24, 1996 A soft answer turns away wrath, but a harsh word stirs up anger. Proverbs 15:1 Bittemesss is like a boomerang, The moment you fling it, It returns. Bering Memorial United Methodist Church nr 1440 Harold St. Houston, Texas 77006 (713)526-1017 Join us for uncommon worship COVENANT An American Baptist Church, founded 1965 We welcome persons of all racial and ethnic heritages, all sexual orientations and all faith perspectives to our Christian community. Covenant meets in the facilities of Bellaire Christian Church, 6610 Alder, 668-8830. Sunday Worship at 1:30pm, education hour at 3:00pm. http://www.neosoft.com/-cov COMMUNITY GOSPEL CHURCH 501 E. 18th at Columbia • Houston, TX Services: * Sun. { MO A.M. PRAISE & WORSHIP Sun. • 7:00 PM EVENINGSERVICE Thurs. » 7:30 P.M. MIDWEEK SERVICE * Sign Language Interpretation for the Hearing Impaired (713) m-^235 (Paid Advertisement) ASK THE PASTOR Q: "I want to be an example to others in my Christian walk. How can I help someone who doesn't want to be helped? What can I do to lead them when they don't appear to be interested?" A: An important part of living the Christian life is setting an example by the way we live our lives every day. Many people don't always fully realize how our countenance, our manners, our interaction with others really makes a difference. If you can walk into the office each day with a smile on your face and greet each person you see with a "Good morning," it will change your attitude and the ones of the people you greet. Peo­ple respond well to kindness. In fact, the Bible tells us that the kindness of God leads people to repentance (Romans 2:4). Be­fore long people will ask why you are so happy everyday. If you are not happy everyday, then 1 would like to make a few suggestions. Living our lives in a constant state of joy takes time and deliberation. If I wake up and my at­titude is not a good one, then I need to spend quiet time alone with God to make some adjustments. It helps for me to "dump" whatever is pulling me down into God's hands. I need to release whatever is burdening me. If 1 take the time to do this, I am generally better off and well able to handle the day. If I skip my time alone with God, I will probably-run into a few snags during the day that may hinder my witness for Christ. Most of the time people will go through five stages before they get to a place where they are walking in a relationship with Christ. As your witness to others, your primary concern for them is to pray for them as well as living out your life before them. Ask God to show you where they are in the five steps. Are they unconcerned about their spiritual life? If they are in this step, then you would pray for God to open their eyes to see the void inside of them that God longs to fill. People try to fill this void with work, recreation, drugs, alcohol, sex, etc. Many times it is during periods of unemployment, relationship crisis, injuries, recovery, and loss that one stops long enough to take census of their life. God does not cause these events, but simply works in the midst of them to lead people to the place of being concerned. It is at this level that you simply need to be a good friend. Offering a listening ear without "preach­ing" to them is the best support. The second stage a person will go through is a place of being concerned. They realize that they have a need to develop and explore their spiritual life. This concern may lead them to read books, attend church or home meetings, and talk to friends about their spiritual journey. This is a great opportunity for your to invite them over for dinner, take them with you to a social event, spend time together with other Christians, enjoy recreational events. A person at this stage is looking for information. They are observing everything around them. They are trying to put the pieces together. It is a very inquisitive stage. Your availability is very im­portant at this time. Stay tuned next week to continue the stages of leading a person to a relationship with Christ and being a good example to them. IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO ASK THE PASTOR A QUESTION, WRITE: REV. JANET PARKER, MARANATHA FELLOWSHIP MCC, P.O. BOX 667032, HOUSTON, TX. 77266-7932 Rev. Janet Parker CHVRCH CALENDAR OF EVENTS FRIDAY - 5/24 * "Your Sacred Self - study group using the best seller by Wayne Dyer. COME learn more about your sacred self, sacred sisters & brothers, & the sacred, loving Creator God who made it so. Kingdom Community Church. 4404 Blossom. Call 862-7533. * Catholic Mass at 10:00 a.m. Kolbe House. 1509 Fairview. Call 522-8182 SATURDAY - 5/25 * Services at 7:30 pm. Dignity Church, 1307 Yale. Call 880-2872 SUNDAY - 5/26 * Grace Lutheran Church . Sunday school for all ages at 9:30 a.m. Worship Service at 10:30am. 2515 Waugh Dr. (@ Missouri) * First Unitarian Universalist Church Sunday Services at 9:30am and 11:30am. 5200 Fannin at Southmore. 526-5200. * Services at 5:30 pm. Dignity Church, 1307 Yale. Call 880-2872 * Maranatha Fellowship Metropolitan Church Services "A Study in the Gospel of Mark" and "The T Factor," (How to be a positive influence on others as a witness for Christ) at 10:00 a.m. Praise and Worship, Ministry of the Word, Drama and Personal Ministry. 11:00 a.m. Maranatha Fellowship, 3400 Montrose, Suite 600, 528-6756. * MCCR worship services with Rev. Jim Burns. 9:00 a.m. & 11:00 a.m. 1919 Decatur. Call 861-9149. * Community Gospel Church' worship service at 11:00 a.m. & 7:00 pm 501 E. 18th. Call 880-9235. * Houston Mission Church worship service at 10:30 a.m. 1505 Nevada. Call 529-8225. * Kingdom Community Church worship service at 11:00 a.m., Sunday School at 10:00 a.m. Call 862-7533. "The Celestine Prophecy, An Experiential Guide" at 10:00 a.m. * Ecumenical Catholic Church Mass at 10:15. 1405 palm. Call 526-8095. * Covenant Baptist Church. Worship service - 1:30 pm and education housr at 3:00pm. 6610 Alder. Call 668-8830. * Bering Memorial United Methodist Church Worship service. 10:50 a.m. Seekers class 9:15 a.m. 1440 Harold. Call 526-1017. MONDAY - 5/27 * Catholic Mass at 7:30 pm Kolbe House, 1509 Fairview. Call 522-8182 * MCCR Handbell Choir Rehersal at 7:00 pm, 1919 Decatur. Call 861-9149. TUESDAY - 5/28 * MCCR: Empowerment for Living support group & pot luck dinner at 6:00 pm. Gloryland Singers at 8:00 pm, The Gospel Ensemble at 6:00 pm Call 861-9149. * PROTECT meets at Bering Church. Call 520-7870. * Small home groups meet to sing, share their faith and pray for one another at 7:30 pm. These groups are open to all people. Call Maranatha Fellowship at 528-6756 for location each week. WEDNESDAY - 5/29 * MCCR: Jubilation Mixed Ensemble meets at 6:30 pm. Midweek uplift service at 7:00 pm, Bible Study, Lecture Series & Choir Rehearsal 7:30 pm 1919 Decatur. 861-9149. * "A Course in Miracles"- Study Group using the book, published by the Foundation for Inner Peace, which is aimed at removing the blocks to our awareness of one's presence. Kingdom Community Church 7:30 pm Call 862-7533. * Ecumenical Catholic Church Mass at 7:00 pm 1405 palm. Call 526-8095. * Small home groups meet to sing, share their faith and pray for one another at 7:30 pm. These groups are open to all people. Call Maranatha Fellowship at 528-6756 for location each week. THURSDAY - 5/30 * Community Gospel Church worship service. 7:30 pm 501 E. 18th. Call 880-9325. * MCCR worship services, 7:00 p.m. 1919 Decatur. Call 861-9149. If you want an event listed in this section, please call (713) 529-8490. ^FELLOWSHIP Metropolitan Community Church PRAISING • TEACHING ENCOURAGING 3400 Montrose, Suite 600 (Handicap accessible) (Montrose at Hawthorne) For info, on weekly home groups, call . 528-6756___ . 'An evangelical ministry' with celebration services of Praise, Prayer and Study of God's word. Bible Class: 10am KINGDOM COMMUNITY CHURCH Catch a glimpse of the Kingdom of God Sunday School - 10 A.M. Sunday Worship Service - 11 A.M. Wednesdays: A Course in Miracles - 7:30 P.M. 4404 Blossom at Snover B 713-862-7533 F GU hm YOU, » Came thare iht LOVING EXPERIENCE. Serving the Gay, lesbian, Bi-sexual Community of Catholies & Friends. Become a part of Dignity U.S.A. SERVICES Saturdays 7:30 pm Traditional Mass Inclusive liturgy celebrated. Call and press 4 for our Social Events & Schedules. Todos bienvenidosl (Full details in VS - *96 Gay and Lesbian Yellow Pages) In the Heights 1307 Yale Stc. H Phone 880-2872 HOUSTON VOICE / MAY 24, 1996 11 Two Points Worth Cele­brating Two events of historic proportions occurred in recent weeks, one local, the other national. The gay and lesbian com­munity of Houston has benefited from both. I am referring to the Senate Dis­trict 13 caucus that took place several weeks ago and Monday’s Supreme Court ruling in favor of protecting gay civil rights. Unfortunately, many people in the community are unaware of the for­mer event which took place in their own city. At the risk of sounding redundant, the events that took place May 6 at the Senate District 13 caucus were historic as it was the first time a Senate district in Texas has been taken back from the relig­ious right. The collaboration between moderate and Log Cabin Republicans resulted in the ouster of religious right leader Al Clements as Senate District Chair of Republican Senatorial Dis­trict 13 and replaced him with a moderate, Lynnda Paukune, who vowed to build a “party of inclusion.” Interestingly, none of the gay news publications reported the event with the exception of the Houston Voice. And I cannot hon­estly say that the Voice would have run the story if their resident conservative, namely myself, had not written the arti­cle for publication. This type of media bias would be typical of the mainstream press, however, when the gay and lesbian press ignores a significant civil rights victory because it was achieved by a minority within the minority, it is a sad commentary on the cohesion of our com­munity. The reasoning and logic for this escapes me. It is entirely disingenuous. One can only conclude that it is prejudicial based on political ideology. Surely, if a liberal faction of the community defeated a religious right incumbent at the polls, the gay media would have made it front page news. Common sense dictates that no group of individuals will all share the same ideology, however, that should not be a deterent to reaching a common goal that all gays and lesbians share regardless of political persuasion: Equal Rights. Even Pat Gandy, President of the Houston Gay and Lesbian Politi­cal Caucus (HGLPC) noted the efforts on behalf of the Log Cabin Republicans and the Precinct Initiative as “great.” It is ludicrous for our community to place our entire existence at the helm of one politi­cal party. This weeks Supreme Court deci­sion is a fitting example of how distorted that logic is. “It is not very popular among gays and lesbians to be a Republican and I under­stand why.” opined Dale Carpenter, president of Log Cabin Republicans of Texas, at the recent rally at Tranquility Park celebrating the Supreme Court decision upholding gay rights. “But I would like to say this, the court that ruled today was a court of nine justices, seven of whom were appointed by Republican presidents. And four of those seven Republican appointees voted for the idea of equality. There is hope in every single party,” rationalized Carpenter. Carpenter’s synopsis is correct. Suffice it to say that more than 50% of the Republican appointed justices were in favor of gay rights. I am not suggesting, nor do I believe that Carpenter is, that there is not an anti-gay contingency in the Republican party. It is there, without a doubt. Who better to sway those individ­uals than fellow Republicans. That is what Log Cabin is attempting to do. Nor am I suggesting that it is wrong to be Demo­crat. It is important for each and every individual to follow their conscience. By the same token, one should not con­demn an individual solely based on party affiliation. Again, the primary goal of our community is obtaining the same equality which is bestowed upon most of this country’s citizenry, is it not? We should be encouraging and supporting one another in our mutual goal of obtain­ing those rights. The Supreme Court decision will reinv­igorate the religious right to work even harder at reversing the tide that this deci­sion has the possibility of creating. As gay Republicans within the party appa­ratus, we can attempt to thwart such action. We may not be entirely success­ful, however, we can cause dissension. We are at a critical juncture in the fight for gay rights and everyone’s partici­pation, Democrat or Republican, is paramount to our success. Lambasting and shunning an “organization that is dedicated to working within the Repub­lican party for the principle of non-dis­crimination on the basis of sexual ori­entation,” is not conducive to achiev­ing civil rights for gays and lesbians. The notion that all Republicans are anti-gay is a ridiculous stereotype. And we as a community should know the ramifi­cations of stereotyping a group of peo­ple. Resorting to such tactics does not increase our credibility. We are not all child molesters and sexual deviants as we have been stereotyped. There are many moderates in the Republican party that are willing to join forces with us to eliminate the injustices that the religious right has tried to impose upon us and other individuals who do not con­form to their beliefs. If we are truly a community who wants to obtain equal rights, we as a community should have praised the moderate forces who joined us in defeating a religious right chair of a senate district and pro­vided them with the recognition they deserved. There are many heterosex­ual individuals in our society who will champion the cause of equality along side of us, however, we must welcome their participation and encourage their support and not require that they endure a litmus test concerning their political affiliation. We as a community should not shun those individuals, Republi­can or Democrat, who are willing to help us achieve that equality. To do so would be counterproductive. We as a community have much to cele­brate this month. For the first time, the Supreme Court has ruled favorably on an issue concerning gay rights. A decid­edly conservative court at that. And they did so by a margin of 6-3. That in itself, is worth championing. So, unless you are a member of AA, break out the champagne and revel in our first major constitu­tional victory. TELL US HOW WE’RE DOING! The HOUSTON VOICE is your Voice in Houston, and we value your input and suggestions. Write us at 811 Westheimer, Suite 105, Houston TX 77006 (Fax: 529-9531) to tell us what you like and don't like or to share your own creative ideas. (Please indicate if your letter is for input only, as we also receive numerous letters for publication). Tpy our new DARTBOARD! FpidAy, May 24 at 9:00pivi The Royal Court presents AnotIier Zany Show at CIiances Hosts: Emperor Jim Holbert & Empress Ruby Stone Fundraiser for Coronation XIII • Final Benefactor Colt 45's SATURdAy, May 25 at 9:00pivi LfiDY Vff & BIG ROBERT SMITH with the future Stars Band SuudAy, May 26 at 4:00pivi GISTAND & CHANEY Rhythm & Bluet/Mofown Sound Come dance the afternoon away with people who know how to party. DONT FORGET - JUNE 1st, 9:00pM Mr. Chances Contest Ask any bartender how to register! Hosted by RSICSS Emperor & Empress. Step forward if you feel "BUTCH"! EVERY WEDNESDAY, 9:00pM StilELA LENNON SINOS and shares the stase for EALAOEE! FkidAy, June 7 at 9:00pM Black Leather Emperor Jim Halbert and Guardian Angel Empress Ruby Stone Leather 'n Lace A MiNd-BENdiNq Draq Show (or aII tastes. BENEfiTINq ThE MEMORY of "CaI Moran, Ths Man Part II" • 1100 WESTHEIMER • 523-7217 • Neuf Vilts | U/e Never Close "5^^ No Dealers Please As Many As You Can Carry k 62 Channel Video Arcade w/quad k Squeaky Clean Booth & Friendly Clerks ► Video Sales & Rentals * Largest Selection of Swinger Mags ► Books & Novelties k Gay, Lesbian, TV's, Bondage, Foreign, Kink, New Releases IS MBH® 2039 Mangum (713) 957-4152 Expires Tune U 19% Houium Voice Bring in Coupon for 4D OPENING SPECIAL 12 HOUSTON VOICE / MAY 24, 1996 Riding high on The Food Chain Interview With Play­wright Nicky Silver By JAVIER TAMEZ Houston Voice/Houston What does sex have to do with a ris-ing American playwright? Well, nothing really. Except that for critics, such as myself, who insist on instilling theater pieces with the subtext that we, in our analytical wisdom, are certain the playwright intended in the first place, a situation such as Nicky Silver’s is ripe for speculation. Silver is the playwright of The Food Chain, which is this sea­son’s closing production on the Alley Theatre’s Neuhaus Arena Stage, and he said in a recent interview that he had not had sex since he was 21 or 22. This is a man who lost his virginity “on a sofa in Studio 54,”.so he’s clearly not shy about sex. And who is now 35! Over a decade without sex!! (Hell, I once went three months without any and I hired an “escort” to relieve my dry spell.) With a fornicating track record that would make a Shaker proud, the inspiration for Sil­ver’s creative juices immedi­ately becomes interesting in a mischievous sort of way. Why, the name of his latest work alone is enough to raise eyebrows given his sexual abstinence. Mostly though, this revela­tion is surprising, because Nicky Silver, if first impres­sions are any indication, is one great guy. Dressed in a slightly oversized vested suit, Silver looked half dapper, half nerdy as he slouched himself into a com­fortable position on an uncom­fortable looking chair in Greg­ory Boyd’s sanctum sanctorum at the Alley. He took time before returning to New York to speak to the local gay media, and he did so with an easy-going self-assur­ance befitting his frumpy friendly appearance, made all the more so when, halfway through the interview, he gave up on the uncomfortable chair and sat cross-legged on the floor. Better still, his personality jumps all over a room, for Silver is affable, charming, self-dep­recating and has an artist’s off-center attractiveness. And he’s funny. Very funny. So is The Food Chain if the New York critics are to be believed. Labeled by the Times as “poison-ously funny” and by the Post as “one of the funniest shows in years,” this comedy, as described in the press release, is a “wildly fractured farce about sex, loneliness, and the impor­tance of being thin,” that “fol­lows a young wife at wit’s end as she confesses to a suicide hot­line operator that her husband for three weeks has been missing for two,” which leads to “a fren­zied series of revelations and coincidences that ultimately unites the five hopelessly mis­guided characters in a raucous rondo of narrative surprises and wacky confrontations.” Sex, loneliness, suicide, missing husband, hopelessly misguided. Sure sounds like it was written by someone who hasn’t had sex since before the Olympics were in Los Angeles. (Am I obsessing here?) Still, Sil­ver minimizes the impact his solo sex life might have on his work. “Psychologically, all the characters in “The Food Chain” are rooted in my own per­versions, but I am neither an anorexic poet nor a 400-lb over­eater. I am taking one of my traits and letting it run amok.” Interestingly enough, Silver admits that he “writes to figure things out,” which he contrasts with Lillian Hellman (and why not put yourself in the best com­pany) who “wrote about issues. Her genre is that of storyteller. And I mention her because she’s dead.” Whether or not he figures any­thing out through his writing. Silver gives no credit to critics analyzing his work. “There are only a couple of critics who know what I mean.” This disdain for criticism verges on out­right animosity, as he sug­gests, somewhat justifiably, that criticisms are 10% bene­ficial to the playwright and “90% aggrandizement of the critic.” (Perhaps it’s because only 10% of what we see is any good.) But he does read reviews. “I would be disingenuous if I claimed that I didn’t care what critics said or never read reviews.” He happily adds that he has “no problem believing the good ones and dismiss­ing the bad ones.” Silver almost regretfully bemoans hav­ing to interact with members of the fourth estate at all. “A playwright is a commodity, second only to the play itself. Image has become an inte­gral part of earning a liv­ing.” So he sits through inter­views and pro­motes his work. And his work, or at least “The Playwright Nicky Silver Food Chain,” is about “sex, ostensibly. And the power of beauty in culture and food as a substitute.” Food as a substitute for sex? Hardly an original notion (though the reverse would seem a better route). But that does offer insight into the man’s motivation. “I think thin people are hoard­ing happiness.” A peculiar comment from someone who doesn’t appear too overweight—just a little chubby. But there’s probably something in his history that developed into this presuma­bly tongue-in-cheek theory. (There goes that damn critic ana­lyzing again.) However the connection is specifically drawn, Silver had something which weighed on his mind when “The Food Chain” first took root. It started from one scene (still in the play) in which a “fat man descends on a shallow model and delivers a 20-minute harangue.” Is this going to be a prelude to eating or screwing? Or perhaps this is an area where he uses one as a metaphor for the other. One thing is certain. If “The Food Chain” approaches in ear­nest charm what the playwright radiates in conversation, then this is going to be a wacky, funny play. Sunday June 2nd Xavier Luna Candidate for Mr. TGRfl ’96 Show at 8:OOpm BRB’s Denim Party is July 28th not June 28th COMMERCIAL MEMBER Colts & LVL’s fvery Monday 4-8pm fRff ti.I.V. Testing & Counseling Benefiting 45's Stone Soup PWfl Holiday fund Special Drink Prices fvery Monday All Day - All Hight DON'T fORGET Kountry Karaoke Every Tuesday at 8pm followed by Dance Lessons at 9:30pm PLUS $1.00 Domestic Beer 4)11 Day - All Night Sunday May 26th, 7:3Opm Robert tiarwood Candidate for Mr. Prime Choice '96 o° Oome Join us Monday. May 27th, 3—6 pm for our Memorial Day Buffet HOUSTON VOICE / MAY 24, 1996 13 Alley’s Heiress worth seeing Theater Review telling again and YOUR OUT & PROUD CLOTHING STORE Sloper (Shelley a pathetically shy 1232 WESTHEIMER • 522-1626 OPEN MON.-SAT. 10 - 9 • SUN. 12 The Houston Voice welcomes well-written, insightful and to-the-point commentaries for our opinion/editorial pages. We also welcome "counterpoint" articles that represent a different view on the issues approached in articles we have already run. We reserve the right to edit for length, format and clarity. The views expressed in guest commentaries and letters to the editor published in the Houston Voice are those of the writers. We seek to provide a broad-based forum which reflects the varying points of view of our rich and diverse community. Selection for publication is at our discretion. Send articles to: The Houston Voice, Attn.: Editor, 811 Westheimer, Houston, TX 77006, or fax to 713-529-9531. BASIC PERFECTION Williams in ‘The Heiress' John Feltch gives another fine perform­ance as Morris, evincing in his charac­terization emotional consistence in the pursuit of Catherine. Annalee Jef­feries was exceptional as the sage Mrs. Almond, patiently and lovingly disa­greeing. with Dr. Sloper and his assess­ment of Catherine and would-be hus­band. Christianne Mays was also worth noting. As Mrs. Montgomery, Morris’ sister, she presents well a sibling loy­alty that cannot be breached despite the doctor’s best efforts. Director Michael Wilson has again suc­ceeded remarkably well with his cast, as their are solid performances across the board. He has also, mercifully enough, avoided his usual efforts at redefining the plays he directs. “The Heiress” was left to stand on its own merit without flashy additives and it worked just fine. Wilson though could not altogether abandon his propensity for special effects. In one scene, as Catherine ascends the stairs, a flash of lightning rips through the sky, eerily illuminating Catherine and the Sloper parlor. It’s an unnecessary (and silly) bit. Of greater concern are the number of backs the audience gets to see. This is not a large cast, and there’s plenty of room up on that stage (they don’t call it the Large Stage without good reason). There is no excuse for a character to be speaking with his back to the audience. At one point this happens while there are only two people on the stage! The reasoning behind this completely eludes me, but I don’t for one second suppose that the rationale is well-founded. The scenic design by Tony Straiges is nothing short of gorgeous. The set was so beautiful I wanted to live there. Susan Tsu’s costume design is lush and sumptu­ous. The Heiress is a timeless, brilliant piece of theater with psychological underpinnings and savagely genteel relationships. I quote Vincent Canby in The New York Times: “You won’t want to miss it.” By JAVIER TAMEZ Houston Voice/Houston Some things just get better with age. One such example is The Heiress, by Ruth and Augustus Goetz, adapted from the novel Washington Square by Henry James. This work is the season­closing production on the Alley Theatre’s Large Stage, and it is a classic American story of a father and daughter, of love and its absence, of opportunities lost and dismissed. And it is a story worth again. Catherine Williams) is and socially awkward young woman; she is plain, graceless and inelegant. And she is responsible for her mother’s i death years earlier in child­birth. At least that’s what Dr. John Feltch and Shelley Sloper (Tom Lacy), Catherine’s father believes. He is continually cast­ing Catherine in an unfavorable light compared to her mother, yet speaks in frustrated fashion about his daughter’s lack of even the tiniest shred of her mother’s graces. And Katherine knows how her father feels. Dr. Sloper’s sisters, Lavinia (Bettye Fitzpatrick) and Mrs. Almond (Anna­lee Jefferies), recognize that their brother is too harsh on Catherine, and that he searches for too much of his wife in his daughter. The unintentionally cruel doctor finds himself so incapable of loving I Catherine, that he can’t imagine that anyone else could have genuine feel­ings for her. Thus, when Morris Town­send (John Feltch), professes his love for Catherine, Dr. Sloper is certain that the young man without a position or pros­pects is merely interested in his daugh­ter’s wealth. Though Catherine is torn that her father does not approve, she nonetheless makes clear her intention to marry Morris, despite Dr. Sloper’s threat of disinher­itance. Lacking the wherewithal to be “clever,” Catherine informs Morris of her father’s admonition, as the two make plans to elope. Catherine’s vigil on the night of her planned elopement and her subsequent transformation into a woman of strength and dignity are profoundly moving, and reflect well the overall power of this play. Shelley Williams in the title role is ter­rific. She exudes a painful honesty as the withdrawn, uncertain woman who is uncomfortable in any crowd, and she seamlessly transforms into an incred­ulous maid, giddy with her own good for­tune and into a recalcitrant daughter, finding the fortitude for the first time to stand firm against her father. Williams captures both heartbreak and hard­heartedness in a performance as fine as any she’s delivered. Tom Lacy does well as the emotionally misguided Dr. Sloper, presenting him­self with appropriately superior airs. | 14 HOUSTON VOICE / MAY 24, 1996 Pride Week-All Class! By B.R. MCDONALD For the Houston Voice The Houston Lesbian and Gay Pride Week Committee met Tuesday evening to begin piecing together the enormous puzzle that is Houston’s Pride Week, and all the events leading up to it. Hold on to the bar, ladies and gentlemen, because 1996 Pride Week looks to be our classiest and sassiest yet! With the community still riding high after the Supreme Court decision overturning Amendment 2 in Colorado, and the presence of none other than Candace Gingrich as Honorary National Grand Marshal, the electricity in Houston for the week of June 14th through June 23 should cause sparks hot enough to be seen from space! The energy it takes to orchestrate an event in such a diverse city as Houston comes from a core group of concerned and hardworking community volunteers in whose capable hands the final arrange­ments lay. Present at the meeting were Julie Siska, Exec.Dir.—PCOH; Darren Armstrong, Treasurer; Howard Mc­Hale, Co-Chair; Teri Vega, Co-Chair; Robin Duncan, Parade Co-Chair; Scott Lewis in charge of the Pride Guide and var­ious other events; Rick Hunt, (aka Rai-nbo de Klown) Fund raising Chair; and C. Patrick Mcllvain, Volunteer Chair. In observance of the meeting were Vale­ntin de la Rosa, representing Aves, Inc., and Ruby Stone, Empress XII of RSICSS. The meeting began with the basics, money and fundraising. In addition to the political celebri­ties themselves will be personal items from film and television celebrities. One of the fund-raising events. Pumped Up On Art, is an auction that promises to have celebrity footwear from the likes of RuPaul, Martha Stewart, Gloria Este­fan and Carl Lewis. There will also be autographed pictures of Kathy Bates and Loni Anderson and the list goes on and on. That event will be held June 21. As the invitation says, “Featuring the Absolutely Fabulous Footwear of the Famous.” Local favorite, Jan Glenn, previously of KTRK’s Good Morning Houston, will be the emcee for the fund-raiser/ auction. Moving on to new business was the dis­cussion surrounding Candace Gin­grich, not the least of which was the cor­rect spelling of her name! Particularly exciting are the plans for a Mix 96.5 radio interview with Candace Gingrich, scheduled sometime for the week prior to June 14th, and her presence in our parade June 23, 1996. Ms. Gingrich was propelled into the national limelight by virtue of being an out Lesbian and half sister of one of the most powerful mem­bers of the United States Congress. The arch-conservative, anti-Gay and Les­bian Rights, dare we say, homophobic United States Representative from Georgia and Speaker of the House, Newt Gingrich. She has become an active lob­byist and spokesperson for the Les­bian and Gay civil rights movement since joining the Human Rights Campaign in 1995 and will be attending the Houston event via the HRC. Her participation in Houston’s Pride celebration brings unsurpassed national attention to our unique and powerful Gay and Lesbian community. Fundraisers are just one of the many pieces of the Pride Week puzzle. The logistics of a project such as Pride Week, and all it entails, are mind boggling. The Houston Lesbian and Gay Pride Com­mittee, in preparing for the parade alone, deals with everything from col­lecting entry fees to providing water stations, from soliciting space to pro­viding ambulances, from providing sound stages and port-o-potties to golf carts, and in deciding which order the floats and delegations should be in the parade, to what kind of rooms to have for the entertainers and special guests. The participation of neighborhood merchants is vital, and Hollywood Video is one of the numerous merchants working with the Pride Committee. As confirmed by Teri Vega, Hollywood Video will allow film to be shot from their roof. That film, combined with the audio coverage of the parade by Mix 96.5, will be edited into a complete video. A brief preview of the Pride Guide revealed what is scheduled for the Hous­ton community. A wide variety of events will begin the week of June 7th including, just a to name a few; The Actors Workshop, The Dogs of Foo, by Scott Ross; Pumped Up On Art Fund-raiser; Make A Joyful Noise VI, Latino Pride Gala, the Pride Parade (June 23) Pride Fest 96, and the Juneteenth Pride Cele­bration. The Houston Pride Commit­tee’s work is, without question, cut out for them. Volunteers are always needed. Any interested party can contact Pat­rick Mcllvain, at the Houston Lesbian and Gay Political Caucus at 2700 Albany. The Pride Committee and its volunteers will offer Houston an opportunity to wear our pride with a lot of class. Remember, the world will be watching! ANNIVERSAR Y PAR TY YOU MONDAY MAY27 DRINK SPECIALS ALL DA Y HOTDOGS WITHALL THE FIXINS Ryan White ... (Continued from page 1) “HRC vigorously opposed a provision of the bill that directs states to institute mandatory HIV testing of newborns if states cannot demonstrate by the year 2000 that they have significantly reduced mother-to-child HIV transmission. How-^. ever, that provision is mitigated some-™ what by a provision of the bill promoting voluntary HIV counseling and testing for pregnant women as part of their prena­tal care. “Mandatory testing is the wrong response to the problem, and we will con­tinue to fight against it,” Stachelberg said. “Instead of attracting women and children to seek health care, mandatory testing drives women and children away.” The Human Rights Campaign is the largest national lesbian and gay political organi­zation, with members throughout the country. It effectively lobbies Con­gress, provides campaign support and educates the public to ensure that lesbian and gay Americans can be open, honest and safe at home, at work and in the community.^ Community Calendar (Continued from page 2) Thursday, May 30 * Montrose Ice Picks skate at the Galleria. 8:00 p.m. Call 629-1432. * Broadway Showtunes at J.R’s. 9:00 p.m. Call 521-2519. * Art Classes at The Art League. 1:00 p.m. Call 523-8817 * Front Runners meet at Memorial Park. 6:30 p.m. Call 522-8021. * Gay Men’s Chorus of Houston open rehearsal at 7:00 p.m. Call 521-7464. * Twentysomething meets at 7:30 p.m. Call 531-9396. * KPFT Lesbian and Gay Voices airs at 8:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. Call 866-6505. * Burger and Chili night at the Brazos River Bottom. 6:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. * Steak Night at the 611 Pub. 6:30 p.m. * Dance lessons at the Brazos River Bot­tom. 9:30 p.m. Free. Call 880-0670. * Ongoing gay men’s Living in Process Group. Call 622-7250. * Open Mike Night at Cafe Artiste. 1601 W. Main. 8:00 p.m. Call 528-3704. | * HIV+ Men Psychotherapy at Montrose Counseling Center. 1:15 p.m. Call 529- 0037. * Relapse Prevention at Montrose Coun­seling Center. 2:00 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Outpatient Group Treatment at Mon­trose Counseling Center. 6:00 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Aftercare Group Treatment at Mon­trose Counseling Center. 6:00 p.m. Call 529-0037. * Meditation and Chanting Group meets at 7:00 p.m. Call 942-0923. * HIV Affected at CASA. 7:00 p.m. Call 796- 2272. * Men’s Therapy Group at Montrose Counseling Center. 7:00 p.m. Call 529- ft 0037. V * HIV survivor Support Group meets at 2929 Unity Drive. 7:00 p.m. Call 782-4050 * Center for the Healing of Racism. 7:30 p.m. Call 738-RACE. * That Dam Debate: Safer Sex for Lesbians by Nancy Ford at Ms. B’s. 9:30 p.m. Call 666- 3464. * Brooke Dailing teaches dowsing and more. At Borders Book Shop. 8:00 p.m. Call 782-6066. HOUSTON VOICE/ MAY 24, 1996 15 This &■ Th^xt! by Jon Anthony ABC and CBS, both desperate for new hits, unveiled their fall schedule's for next season this week. As expected, ABC added the new Michael J. Fox sitcom Spin City to its slate as well as seven other new series. Spin, produced by Gary David Goldberg who created Fox's long-running hit Family Ties, star's Fox as a deputy mayor. Other comedies include: Townies, starring Molly Ringwald in an ensemble show about a group of friends in New England; Life's Work, starring stand-up comic Lisa Ann Walter as a state's attorney; Sabrina, the Teenage Witch, based on the heroine from the Archie comic series starring Melissa Joan Hart (Clarissa Explains it All); and Clueless, an adaptation of the hit movie starring Rachel Blanchard. Dramas on ABC include: Dangerous Minds, an Annie Potts vehicle based on the hit movie starring Michelle Pfeiffer; Common Law, about a young man fresh out of law school; and Relativity, a coming of age drama about a couple's life story that spans decades from the producers of Thirtysomething. The big news at ABC is that it has renewed Murder One, the critically praised but low rated drama from famed producer Steven Bochco. ABC is wooing Alan Alda to take over the lead next season. Alda would replace Daniel Benzali who will not return to One. Over at CBS, Bill Cosby, Ted Danson, Scott Bakula and Gerald McRaney return to the series grind. CBS also picked up NBC's JAG as a midseason replacement. CBS has added 10 shows to its lineup. Comedies: Cosby (tentative title), reunites Cosby with Phylicia Rashad in a sitcom about a retired curmudgeon; Ink, a sitcom that uses a New York newspaper as the backdrop for the comic foil surrounding a divorced couple who must work together. Ted Danson and Mary Steenburgen (real life husband and wife) co-star; Everybody Loves Raymond, a sitcom produced by David Letterman; Public Morals, a Steven Bochco produced sitcom that is described as a comedic version of his hit drama NYPD Blue. Dramas on CBS include: Early Edition, about a man who receives his newspaper a day early and tries to change events that will occur tomorrow; EZ Streets, a cop show starring Ken Olin; Moloney, champions the return of Peter Strauss to the small screen after a lengthy hiatus. Strauss stars as a police psychologist; Mr. and Mrs. Smith, about a husband and wife who globe-trot as detectives. Scott Bakula and Maria Bello star; Touched By An Angel Spinoff (no title yet), stars Gerald McRaney. The premise: McRaney and his family will do good deeds for those less fortunate as they roam the country; and Pearl, about a widow who returns to college starring Rea Perlman. .. Vanessa Redgrave delivers a deliciously compelling cameo in Mission: Impossible as a villain.... Due to the success of the Jacqueline Onassis auction, rumor has it that a similar auction could take place in honor of Princess Grace of Monaco, formerly known as Grace Kelly. The auction would benefit the Princess Grace Foundation, which aids aspiring artists.... ABC has signed two high profile individuals to add luster to their network next season: Academy Award Winning actress Meryl Streep will star in a made-for-TV movie next season and Tom Clancy will produce a miniseries and one-hour drama series for the network.... All This Useless Beauty is the title of the new Elvis Costello album which was released this week to critical praise.... Rita Moreno lambasted Julie Andrews this week in New York for the premier of the newly restored film version of The King and 1. Moreno contends that Andrew's decision was "not so terrific" and that she views the decision as a personal affront. "Its like telling me how I should vote - and I don't think people should do that," said Moreno according to USA Today. Moreno is the only entertainer who has won an Oscar, Tony, Emmy and Grammy award ... Chastity Bono is upset with her father Rep. Sonny Bono (R-CA). Bono said her father told her he would support same-sex unions and then co-sponsored current legislation that would define marriage as an act between a man and a woman. "Its just very disappointing to me that my father would put aside personal convictions for a political party," said Chastity.... In case you've missed the hype, John Grisham's latest novel. The Runaway Jury, has been released and available at Crossroads and other bookstores.... By the way, if you haven't been to Crossroads yet, check it out, its absolutely divine. Great job guys.... John Tesh will not return to Entertainment Tonight next season as a co­host. Tesh will focus his energies on his rising status as a musician. Tesh will embark on a four month tour beginning this June.... Sherman Hemsley returns to television this fall in a new sitcom on the UPN network entitled Goode Behavior.... NBC has signed Armand Assante to star in the miniseries adaptation of Homer's The Odyssey, for next seasons sweep period.... USA announced that they will enter their first foray into the miniseries competition with an adaptation of Herman Melville's Moby Dick. No word on casting yet.... Billy Idol was honored in Manhattan last week for his outstanding efforts on behalf of the Muscular Dystrophy Association.... U2 is currently in the studio working on their highly anticipated new album and plans are underway for the band to hit the concert circuit when the album is released.... Director P.J. Hogan (Muriel's Wedding) is being considered to direct the film version of Angels in America, the Pulitzer Prize winning Tony Kushner play. A deal is expected to be announced within the next week or so. Al Pacino, Tim Robbins and Robert Downey, Jr. are being touted as possible stars.... Jim Carrey's stint as guest host on NBC's newly energized Saturday Night Live's season finale garnered the show its highest ratings of the season.... PBS proffers a retrospective on the life of Georgia O'Keeffe replete with archival photographs. O'Keeffe airs Monday, May 27 at 8 p.m.... George Burns is profiled on A&E's Biography series Monday May 27 and Carol Burnette is the subject on Tuesday May 28. Biography airs daily at 7 and 11 p.m.... Whoopi Goldberg talks with Good Morning America on Wednesday May 29 and Diana Ross appears for an interview on Thursday May 30.... Lauren Bacall visits with Tom Snyder on the set of his Late Late Show May 27.... Clint Eastwood receives an AFI Salute at 9 p.m. on ABC May 27. Jim Carrey co-hosts the event with Renee Russo. .. Goldie Hawn chats with Larry King May 29 at 8 p.m. on CNN ... AMC offers a compelling profile on Marlon Brando Tuesday May 27 at 7 p.m ... Top of the Charts: The Crossroads by Bone Thugs- N-Harmony is the top single and 77ie Score by the Fugees tops the album charts according to Billboard. How Stella Got Her Groove is the best selling fiction title and Dennis Rodman's tome Bad As I Wanna Be tops the non-fiction charts according to The New York Times bestseller list. E.R. dominated the weekly Nielsens and Twister spun at the top of the box-office last week for the second week in a row raking in $38 million. Flipper swam his way to a distant second place with $4.2 million in receipts. Quote of the Week: "I signed on for one more year and that's it. And I think everybody's contract is up. It will be very expensive to bring us all back. Very expensive!" - Heather Locklear in a TV Guide interview promoting her upcoming NBC teleflic Shattered Minds (Monday 8 p.m.), referring to her desire to play the vixen Amanda on Fox's Melrose Place. A QUALITY OF LIFE ALTERNATIVE WHEN SELLING YOUR LIFE INSURANCE POLICY MONEY TO EXTEND LIFE. MONEY TO ENJOY LIFE. As the largest and oldest Gay Owned and Operated Viatical Company in Houston, we simply provide the best service and get the most money for your LIFE INSURANCE POLICY. Linked Benefits OF HOUSTON A Viatical Service Company 811 Westiieimer V Suite 208 Houston, Texas 77006 (800) 275-3090 V (713) 528-6777 16 HOUSTON VOICE / MAY 24, 1996 B. Alan Bourgeois Resigns The Board of Directors of Town Meeting Inc., has accepted the resignation of B. Alan Bourgeois as President of the organization, to, in Alan’s words “help save Town Meeting, Inc. from any fur­ther negative press that may cause the event known as Spectrum ‘96 to be can­celed or damaged financially due to my association.” Town Meeting Inc., producers of the Spectrum ‘95 event and the recent “Con­cert of the Stars” featuring RuPaul, has asked Bourgeois to remain through the end of June to staff the TMI office and han­dle day-to-day operations, and to facil­itate the transition to new manage­ment. In this interim position, he will have no authority to make policy or to commit the corporation. In an unrelated move Vice President Clay Howell has also resigned effective June 1 citing his need to devote more time to other activities. Speaking for the Board of directors, Secretary Dee McKeller said. Clearly, this is a critical moment for Town Meeting. We intend to honor our commitments to those who have paid for booth space for Spectrum ‘96, the two day business exposition scheduled for October. Eventually, we hope to repay the debt incurred last year. Half of those debts are to individuals and compa­nies within the LeTsBiGay commu­nity; the ‘shrewd’ move of simply aban­doning them through bankruptcy has never been an option we would willingly choose.” “In order to accomplish these goals, we need the support of the commu­nity,” McKellar continued. “In the past, many capable and energetic peo­ple have declined to get involved because of previous associations with Alan Bourgeois. If they will now join with us, hand in hand we can build an organiza­tion the entire community can take pride in.” VOLUNTEERS ARE NEEDED! Omega House, an eight bed residential hospice for individuals in the terminal stages of AIDS. Volunteers are currently needed on weekdays to help with supportive functions such as cooking, housekeeping and administrative assistance. If you are interested, please call Claudia Commo at 523 1146. C.P.R. 2 Year Certification Contact Q-Patrol (715) 528-5AFE n stone soup Wish list Beef Stew Bread Breakfast Cereal Canned Fruit Canned Meat Canned Vegetables Cleaning Supplies Coffee - 1 lb. cans Cooking Oil Deodorant Dry Beans Ensure Pro Drink First Aid Items Fruit Juices' Gravies and Sauces Hamburger & Tuna Helper Jello/Pudding Jelly - 14oz. Mayonnaise - 16 oz. Mustard - 8 oz. Paper Towels Pasta (dry) Peanut Butter - 16 oz. Razors Rice Saltine Crackers Shampoo Shaving Cream Side Dishes (rice & noodles) Soup (canned or dry) Soap (dish, hand, laundry) Sugar - 21b. bag Tea Bags Toilet Paper Tomato Paste Tomato Sauce Tuna Paper Grocery Bags * NO GREEN BEANS OR CORN PLEASE!! The coach of Past Time Packers explains the finer points of softball. MSL Notes In the Recreation Division of the Mon­trose Softball League action Sunday (19th) Rich’s Prime continued their reign as the only undefeated team in the league by overpowering Positively Venture-N 16-1. The win gives Rich’s Prime a perfect 7-0 record. With the loss Positively Venture-N drops to 1-5. Hot on Rich’s heels is J.R.’s (6-1) who defeated Gentry 15-3. Gentry drops to .500 with a 3-3 record. J.R.’s plays Rich’s Prime on Sunday, June 2 (the next sched­uled games) in a battle for first place. As well as both teams are playing it should be a very hard fought game. In other games Sunday the Past Time Packers (5-2) raced by Pacific Street 15-6 to take over sole possession of third place. It was the Packers second con­secutive victory. The loss by Pacific Street drops them into a tie for fourth place with a 4-3 record. Tied for fourth is Chances (4-3) who gained a 7-0 forfeit win on Rich’s Boys Club (1-6). In the days final game Club Inergy turned the seasons’ first triple play in a losing cause to the Nowlin Mortgage Loan Rangers. In a close and exciting game the Loan Rang­ers pulled out a 5-3 victory. It was the Rangers second win of the season against five losses. The loss by Club Inergy drops their record to 1-6. Congratula­tions on the triple play Inergy!!! The Competitive Division enjoyed a weekend off and did not play. No games are scheduled for Memorial holiday weekend. Softball action will resume Sunday, June 2 with games being played at Memorial Park Fields #4 and #5. Good wishes to the Briar Patch softball team who will be traveling to Atlanta over Memorial weekend to participate in the Armory Sports Classic. And to Posi­tively Venture-N who travel to San Fran­cisco for their tournament. Go get’em guys! Lambda Rollers Lambda Rollerskating Club will hold its next Skate Night Wednesday, May 29 from 8 until 10:00 p.m. at the Starlight Roller Rink, 8075 Cook Road. Admission is $5 plus $1 skate rental (only $5 if you bring your own skates). Every­one is welcome to skate, and a variety of events will be scheduled along with docrr prizes. The organization benefiting for skating this night is the Gay-Lesbian Switchboard of Houston. If your organization would like to hold a skate event, please contact us at gay-skatel@ aol.com or telephone 933-5818 or at the new WEB page site which is http:// members.aol .com/gay skate 1 / lambda.htm. Bowling Notes The Montrose Monday Night Men’s League reports Division A standings in First, Second and Third are Eight Balls, A Frickin Fairy Tail and 1 Watches 4 Play. Division B is headed by Ms. Dee Dee & Da Dahs, followed by The Meat to Beat and Four Mix Pieces. High scratch game of 278 and series of 694 was bowled by Kenny Harmon. For more information call Gardy at 641-5424. The Inner Loop Alternative Sunday Evening League reports Could, Should, Would and Did in first place. Tough & Tight in second and Faster Pussycats in third. For the men, Chis Bennett bowled high scratch game of 245 and series of 671. For the women, Terry Shannon bowled high scratch game of 214 and series of 589. For more information call Tom at 522-9612. The Wednesday Night Mixers reports 1st place is taken by Charlie’s Tunas, 2nd by What’s In A Name, and 3rd by 1 Gal & 3 Guys. Richard Dauchy bowled high scratch game of 214 and series of 578 for the men. For the women, Pat DeCarlo bowled high scratch game of 175 and series of 481. For more info call Tom at 522-9612. Bowl­ing is at AMF Southway at 6:30 p.m. Wed­nesday. The Monday Night Women’s League reports first place -team is Walking Wounded, second place is Half & Half, third place Festive Foursome and fourth is Don’t Go There. For more info about the league call Pat at 437-6218. HMBL Pocket News The Houston Metropolitan Billiards League reports that after 17 weeks of play the team Coalition is leading the league with a won match average of .938, fol­lowed by J.R.’s Cue Crew at .813 and Jack-son 5 and Briar Patch tied at .688. I Coalition also leads the list of games won with an average of .675 with J.R.’s Cue Crew not far behind at .621. Individually, Billy Lea leads the league with a won game average of .813 followed by Keith Fuseli at .750 and Jerry Smith at .689 and Carlos Romero at .688. The thought of the week is “Nomina­tions for all elected officers shall be made by any member in good standing.” HOUSTON VOICE/ MAY 24, 1996 17 Chastity Bono says dad broke commitment to allow same-sex marriages By MICHELLE LOCKE FOR THE HOUSTON VOICE BERKELEY, Calif., Friday, May 17 (AP)— U.S. Rep. Sonny Bono was accused of break­ing his word on Friday by one of his closest supporters—his own daughter. “I feel really ... disappointed and angry,” Chastity Bono, who is a lesbian, said Friday in a telephone interview from San Francisco. “... It obviously shows that he is not all that supportive of me or of our issues.” Bono, R-Calif., half of the 1960s TV duo Sonny and Cher, signed on as one of several cosponsors on Friday of a bill that would define marriage under federal law as a legal union between one man and one woman. The bill, sponsored by Rep. Bob Barr, R-Ga., would allow states to reject the legality of same-sex marriages performed in any other state. It was introduced in response to a gay rights case that could make Hawaii the first state to recognize same-sex mar­riages. Chastity Bono, 27, said her father had agreed to support same-sex marriages in an interview with her that was published in The Advocate, a national gay and lesbian mag­azine. Bono’s answer, as printed in the Jan. 23, 1996, article: “That seems fine if that’s what they want to do. Yeah, I’ll support that, unless there are any costs involved, but there don’t appear to be any.” Bono’s complaint comes three days after Candace Gingrich appealed to her brother to stop “an unprecedented political assault on the lives of lesbian and gay Amer­icans.” The lesbian half-sister of House Speaker Newt Gingrich also accused Republican leaders of “a wave of political gay bash­ing” in their budget. Ms. Bono said she had not talked to her father since he became a cosponsor of the bill, and didn’t expect to. “It’s just very disappointing to me that my father would put aside personal convic­tions for a political party,” she said. Neither Bono or his press secretary, Frank Cullen, were in their Washington offices Friday afternoon for comment. Church celebrates ruling on homosexual ordinations By DAVID WILKISON FOR THE HOUSTON VOICE MAPLEWOOD, N.J., Sunday, May 19 (AP)—The Rev. Barry Stopfel stood out­side his small church in sweltering heat and received one congratulatory hug after another as he wiped away what may have been sweat but in all likelihood were simple tears of joy. “It feels like all of the struggle is vindi­cated,” Stopfel said before being inter­rupted for another hug in the unseasona­ble May heat. “It feels like a good ending to the years of struggle and trying to be a good and open priest in this church. It deep­ens my faith.” His St. George’s Episcopal Church wel­comed four new members Sunday, but it was a decision by a panel of bishops Wed­nesday not to try the man who put him on the road to priesthood for heresy that made the service a celebration. That panel of eight Episcopal bishops in Wilmington, Del., chose not to pursue a trial for Bishop Walter Righter, 72, for ordaining Stopfel, a non-celibate gay man who lives with his partner of 10 years in the rectory, as a deacon in 1990. The panel found Episcopal doctrine does not spe­cifically ban the ordination of non-cel-ibate gay men. “It’s really strengthened them,” Sto­pfel, 48, said of his 300-member congre­gation. “They’re more alive. They’re more committed than ever to be a church that’s open to everyone.” Throughout parts of Sunday’s two-hour service, members of the church and the Episcopal Diocese of Newark, gave standing ovations to Righter and Sto­pfel, who at one point hugged partner Will Leckie in front of the sanctuary. “The whole congregation, everyone was on Barry’s side,” said 13-year-old Lauren Peach, who has attended the church all her life and became a member Sunday. “I’m proud because we all pulled together as a congregation. I’m happy I was able to be a part of this.” Righter knew Stopfel was involved in a long-term gay relationship when he ordained him a deacon despite a 1979 res­olution saying it was inappropriate for bishops to ordain non-celibate gays. Stopfel was later ordained a priest by the Rt. Rev. John S. Spong, bishop of the 40,000-member Newark diocese. “You dared to act upon your principles when you issued a call to the Rev. Barry Sto­pfel to be your rector,” Spong told the congregation. “You chose him because of who he is. You did not choose him in spite of who he is. “You have defined yourselves anew as a Christian community, a community that dares to practice what the church has always preached: that there are no bound­aries on the love of God,” Spong said. Righter, who presided over commun­ion at the service, said afterward he was impressed by what he saw. “The church is alive,” he said. “As Bishop Spong said, we’re going to resur­rect the Episcopal Church. This is a way of claiming not so much victory, but claim­ing the whole of the church. You can’t let 10 nuts take over the institution the way they tried to do it.” Roland Spiotta, a member of the congre­gation who sat on Stopfel’s search com­mittee, said it was never about doing what was politically correct. “Barry was picked because we per­ceived, with God’s help, that the holy spirit wanted him here,” Spiotta said after offering his own congratulations to Stopfel. Church member Dennis Parker, 43, of Leonia said Stopfel’s sexuality was never an issue for the congregation. “He’s our spiritual leader and our friend and he means a great deal to many of us, both as a priest and friend,” Parker said. “It’s been kind of disruptive to have all of the attention while still trying to stay the family community that we are,” Parker said. “It’s been a challenge, but I think we rose to it.” During his sermon, Spong noted some recent articles written by conserva­tive religious publications question­ing the significance of the Maplewood church and the diocese. “People love to take shots at the Diocese of Newark,” he said. “Today, this insig­nificant fly speck has become God’s agent in doing nothing less than defining the very nature of the church.” 811 O^ice Space "W M ~T ^AvailabLe in /Kontzose Westheimer P)C)b Leasing and Management RYAN 713/523-1600 Photo by Robert Miller Longer Power Hour-Lower Prices OPEN to CLOSE: SUN-MON-TQES-WED-THURS NOON to 7:00pm: FBI 8 SAT ALL WELL/BEER/WINE $1.75 NEVER A COVER CHARGE Cuervo Shots $2.50 • All the Time FRIDAY, MAY 24, 9:00pm till ?? Guest Bartenders on the "TOP" W NLA:H w SUN., MAY 26 6 MON., MAY 27 HAPPY MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND All Well/Beer/Wine $1.75 OPEN to CLOSE 18 HOUSTON VOICE / MAY 24, 1996 Motors Used Cars, Too! LAND-^ -ROVER . 7025 Old Katy Road Houston, Texas 77024 Main # (713) 869-4855 Fax # (713) 869-5272 Kothy Scott Sola* Repwentativ* or Judi Osborn You Get A Of^llNsidE ThE LOOP GUYS and GIRLS ARE YOU ALONE? Need Someone To Talk To Need Adventure Need a Friend Need a Mate Need Fun Meet People In Your Areal! That Special Someone ia A Phone Call Away!! Call 1-900-988-6003 ext. 8097 SZN p«r ninuU - nual ba 18yr». Sarv U W1») >45-8434 •a 1307 FAIRVIEW A ™ (3 blocks West of Montrose) (713) 529-1414 YfHIIRf • Alignment • Brakes Look for Houston Voice Personals in every issue SINCE 1921 m JAC|< ROACH.FOBD 2727 SOUTHWEST FREEWAY HOUSTON. TEXAS 77098 Phone: 713-525-7400 Fax: 713-525-7491 SKIP WILLETT New & Used Car Sales F ’I WHAT’S ON YOUR HORIZON?? For all the answers talk live to one of our METAPHYSICAL ADVISORS!!!! CALL 1-900-255-0500 Ext 8545 $3.99 per min. Must be 18 yrs. Serv-U (619) 645-8434 COP A VER BEAR Mike Copenhaver Realtor 2214 Singleton Houston, Texas 77008-4457 Bus: (713) 880-1866 Fax: (713) 880-5662 Pager: (713) 318-8675 1411 Taft Houston, Texas 77019 Electrical Repair Complete Brakes j---j Tune-Up Major or Minor Repair Carburetor and Fuel Injection Taft Street Auto Repair & Service 526- 3723 . CLflYTOn f. SfITIIfP owntp -- J: 5551 n™ 4***’ ” sunt 1711 V UOIBIOH. THUS 77056 POt: 715^71-1619 flU: 715-871-1619<-0 Wednesday & Thursday Bucket Nite $9.00 Wednesday - Sunday 5pm - 2am Fri. & Sat. - DJ 1016 W. 19th • Houston, TX 77009 • 880-1770 BEAUTIFUL GIRLS!!! Exciting!!! Passionate!!! Talk to ‘em LIVE!!! Call 1-900-446-1414 Ext 5937 $3.99 per min. Must be 18 yrs. Serv-U (619) 645-8434 k_____________________________________________ J Fresh Cut Flowers Terra Cotta Pottery Bedding Plants Topiary Animals Tropical Plants Hanging Baskets Vases, Cards, Gift Ideas & more 8im«r (n«ar MontrojQ Boakvurd) Sate 2 Dz. Long Stem Roses $19.99 fill Green Plants 6 Clay Pots 20% OU Floral orrongoments for all occasions FTD World Wido Sorvica and local delivery - - HOUSTON VOICE / MAY 24, 1996 19 Homosexuals seek divorce-like relief from courts By JEFF DONN FOR THE HOUSTON VOICE NORTHAMPTON, Mass., Sunday, May 19 (AP)—For nearly 18 years, the couple lived, loved, invested and made their life together. But when love withered, Adria Golannsued for what she views as her fair share. It would be a common, even trite tale, if her companion were not another woman. “I really hope that the courts can see this the same as any legally married couple,” Golannsays. While the nation engages in a protracted, polarized debate over legalizing gay and lesbian marriage, Golann’s lawsuit and others like it are challenging the legal system. Should courts honor spoken vows or writ­ten contracts of everlasting support by such couples? Should courts order the equivalent of alimony? Should they grant child visitation rights? With many judges uneasy about gay unions in the first place, homosexuals gener­ally face difficult odds in such lawsuits', according to some lawyers who repre­sent such clients. But, with the increase in openly gay unions and a growing willing­ness to go public in lawsuits, a small num­ber of judges are finding ways to grant at least some divorce-like relief in such cases. “It’s hard to argue that divorce laws apply when there’s no marriage, so that leaves you having to come up with some pretty fancy footwork,” said Mary Bonauto, a Boston lawyer with gay clients. Some gay-rights advocates say the best tool to resolve these disputes would be legal same-sex marriage, which would presumably carry with it legal same-sex divorce. Hawaii’s Supreme Court has ruled favorably on same-sex marriage, but that state’s lawmakers and lower courts are still hashing it out. It also has entered pres­idential politic
File Name pdf_uhlib_31485329_n813_ac.pdf