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Houston Voice, No. 1171, April 4, 2003
File 019
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Houston Voice, No. 1171, April 4, 2003 - File 019. 2003-04-04. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/17058/show/17047.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2003-04-04). Houston Voice, No. 1171, April 4, 2003 - File 019. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/17058/show/17047

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1171, April 4, 2003 - File 019, 2003-04-04, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/17058/show/17047.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1171, April 4, 2003
Contributor
  • Weaver, Penny
Publisher Window Media
Date April 4, 2003
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 019
Transcript 18 APRIL 4,2003 www.houston voice.com HOUSTON VOICE ON YOUR NEXT VISIT TO HOUSTON Stay with us! Montrose Inn A 7-ROOM ALL-GAY B&B We're right /TVthe neighborhood. And priced right! Queen bed, cable TV, phone. Walk to 15 gay bars. 408 AVONDALE 800-357-1228 713-520-0206 montroseinn.com Want to write? (and get paid for it?!) Houston Voice seeks to add to its pool of freelance writers, particularly those interested in covering news such as politics, police reports, court issues and in-depth investigative pieces. Ideal candidates will have polished writing skills, an eye for accuracy and detail, and the ability to adhere strictly to weekly deadlines. Contact Penny Weaver e-mail: editor@houstonvoice.com television brianmoylan HBO brings back 'Def Poetry Jam,' focusing on the works of spoken word artists with many different voices. Full body slam IN A WORLD WHERE REALITY TELE- vision sitcoms like "Everybody Loves Raymond" and war-related news dominate the airwaves, HBO's "Def Poetry Jam," which returns for its third season Friday, April 4, takes viewers in a different direction. Already spawning a popular Broadway version and a touring company of the concept, "Jam" brings the voices of underground poetry slam masters to a mainstream audience. The power is not always in the words carefully wrought and delivered to the expectant audience, but in who utters them. Many of the artists on the show are people of color, and several in the upcoming season, such as Alix Olsen, Nikki Giovanni, and Staceyann Chin, are lesbians. Chin, who took time out from appearing in the cast of the Broadway version of the show and from filming several segments for television, told Houston Voice this week that a diversity of voices was the goal of "Def Poetry Jam" producers when deciding on the lineup. "They were looking for people who were out there making a lot of waves with their work," she says. "I think they were looking for particular faces so that the group they put forward is as inclusive as possible. "I cover so many of the bases, I'm half Chinese, half black, from Jamaica, and I'm queer," she notes. "If you want diversity, stick me in the foreground." The show features poets and celebrities — such as Caroline Kennedy, Jewel, Amiri Baraka, Benjamin Bratt, muMs (who played Poet on gay favorite "Oz"), andnoted spoken word performer Maggie Estep — Chin still worries about tokenism. "I think that everybody who is involved in anything where they're trying to be diverse, especially in the climate of a very straight, white world, we all feel like the token," she says. "I try to remind myself though that, even if I am a token, it's an opportunity to add some color and some diversity and sexuality to a picture that has been not that for so many years." THE CELEBRITY SIDE OF BEING ON television is not always easy for Chin, who moved to New York City because she says it's illegal to be gay in Jamaica. She came to the city to find anonymity and to be out and proud. Issues she faced after arriving here pushed her to use poetry to express herself. Award-winning slam poet Staceyann Chin always receives attention, but her identity as a queer of color on 'Def Poetry Jam' sometimes takes the spotlight — sometimes to her chagrin. (Photo by Will Hart/HBO) "I was dealing with being a new immigrant, and I moved here to be an out queer person of color," Chin says. "Then I realized being a black woman is as much a 'handicap' in America as being a lesbian in Jamaica. "I had a lot of shit to say, basically," she says. "So much of how I exist has to do with language." It's that language and getting her message to the public that drives Chin to do what she does on stage and television. "What's great about being on TV is that it helped my career," she says. "But I don't want it to be about me. I want it to be about the ideas." And if you like her ideas, please let her know — in the proper way. "I'm moved when people tell me my work moved them. But I don't like when people say, 'Oh, you're Staceyann Chin and you're the best poet,'" she says. "The people who understand my work are the least inclined to yell my name in the street. They understand that it's not about my autograph, it's about making those feelings your own and sharing them with others." © MORE 'Def Poeby Slam' Fridays at 12:30 a.m. HBO INFO
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