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Houston Voice, No. 825, August 16, 1996
File 026
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Houston Voice, No. 825, August 16, 1996 - File 026. 1996-08-16. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/17028/show/17020.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1996-08-16). Houston Voice, No. 825, August 16, 1996 - File 026. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/17028/show/17020

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 825, August 16, 1996 - File 026, 1996-08-16, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/17028/show/17020.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 825, August 16, 1996
Contributor
  • Bell, Deborah Moncrief
Publisher Window Media
Date August 16, 1996
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 026
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE/AUGUST 16, 1996 25 A Statement from the Lesbian Avengers The following was presented for publication in the Houston Voice. It concerns the firing of Pearland High School Softball coach Holly Nuber after the state championship win of the Lady Oilers. Nuber maintains that one reason for her firing was her "alleged" sexual orientation. The Lesbian Avengers responded by writing with weedkiller in the grass the words "Hate Kills" outside the Administration Building and "Homophobia High" next to the school building. Nuber runs a lawnmowing/ landscaping business in the Summer and had been thought to be responsible for the Avengers' action. STATEMENT by THE LESBIAN AVENGERS : It has been brought to our attention that many consider our choice of tactics (regarding the Pearland ISD action in particular) to be (at least) questionable: and to some, counterproductive or just plain wrong. In light of these questions, we would like lo clarify the position that we are taking on this action, to wit: that the struggle against homophobia has yielded many small 'victories' in the form of some small concessions by the dominant culture, but—none which—even begin to provide the protection and security which are supposed to be guaranteed by our Constitution. We are not protected from hate crimes; we can still lose our jobs, our homes, or our children and have no legal recourse; we may not marry or adopt; and, in many states, the physical expression of same-gender sexual love is punishable by law. In light of these facts, the 'victories' obtained through four and more decades of homosexual organization seem like nothing so much as crumbs from the table of heterosexual privilege, and the user- friendly techniques of our predecessors in this movement appear as a noble attempt to do things the "right" way, an attempt which operated on an assumption of mutual respect for basic humanity on both sides. It is with regret that we conclude that to continue to extend this respect to our oppressor is impractical in the face of said oppressors continued failure to surrender his position of institutionalized supremacy. The Lesbian Avengers recognize that our options within the system are being exhausted at an alarming rate; and that the highest achievement of this approach, Bill Clinton's claim of support, was eventually revealed to be no more than a political expedient to be immediately forgotten upon inauguration. It has become obvious to us that new tactics are necessary, and that these might not be comfortable, legal, safe, or polite. This is not a struggle; it has to be a war; and as our armies are outnumbered ten to one it would be ingenuous to attempt this battle on open ground. Guerrilla tactics are not adopted just for the hell of it, or out of any particular affection for mischief, vandalism, or sneakiness in general. As concerns the Pearland action—if our oppressor has so little respect for us as to (allegedly) deny one of our (alleged) own her means to life and livelihood, why should we respect the integrity of their lawns (purchased with the tax dollars which are the asking price of our government for our citizenship, which continues to be withheld by said government)'? We killed their grass. Some say we should have tried ... What? a picket? A petition? A boycott? No. The Lesbian Avengers are saying: "Enough! Enough of this respectful requesting of our oppressors: Please be nicer to us! Please let us be people, too. Enough!" We killed their grass. The Lesbian Avengers saw an injustice occurring and moved to confront it as we thought appropriate. If our actions are seen as damaging to the public image of our community, all I can say is that there was plenty of room out there in Pearland for anyone else who cared to act in any other way which might be considered more palatable. If any think that there was a better way to represent the concerns of our community, all I can say is that they should have been there. To Holly—one of our foremost concerns in formulating this action was that it not reflect badly upon you or your case. We regret that we did not know about your summer business. We tried to make it very clear through the flyers posted at the weedkill sites that we were reacting to homophobia in general and independently of any connection to you or your appeal except as it served to reveal the prejudice of Pearland ISD. It could have been anything that set us off, from textbook censorship to student hazing and so on. We are very sorry for any inconvenience which we may have caused to you. The September SPIN This month in SPIN Magazine •AIDS: WORDS FROM THE FRONT- HOME ALONE" —Anyone who walks inlo a drugstore will soon be able lo lesl themselves for HIV with a personal kit anil an 800 number—privately and anonymously. Staff writer Celia Farber examines the process by which Ihe kit was approved and some potentially serious problems with the concept. The kit, sold under the brand name Confide by lohnson & Johnson, was approved by the FDA in May 1996 and wdl soon be on shelves. The obvious benefit is that buying a kit is much less int.midat- ing than a visit to the clinic. But the absence of direct counseling for those who test positive could prove to be questionable health care. "By far the gravest concern, however, is the isolation factor," says Farber "What if people simply hang up and commit suicide? A home test for pregnancy is one thing, but a home test for a vrrus believed by most Americans to be the equivalent of a death sentence?" "REBEL GIRL" —It took her critically acclaimed portrayal of would-be assassin Valerie Solanis in this year's / Shot Andy Warhol for actress Lili Taylor to be fully recognized for her stable of weird, ugly and homicidal characters. Taylor has played Ihe obsessed ex-lover in Say Anything . River Phoenix's entry into an "ugly date" contest in Dogfight . and the Queens B-girl mom in Girlstown . which comes out in August. After years of forsaking the Hollywood routine for more challenging and complicated roles, Taylor's career is finally on the rise. "So many female roles in commercial movies are just devices, not a lot of energy, not a lot of fun," says Taylor. "I always wanted to be the detective or the pirate, not just the girl by his side." focus group - WAnteb participants to critique and give direction to The Houston Voice. For details call 529-8490. Leave name and phone number. V^ I ^jfetojjessionaL Office Space yAvAltrxbte In /Konttose We estheimer Bob RYAN Leasing and Management 713/523-1600 CRAD DUREN, ID, 1213 Hermann Dr., Suite 430 (713) 52CM3653 Internal medical practice offering discreet confidential care to the community, including HIV/AIDS diagnostics & theraputics HEALTHCARE FROM THE HEART Anonymous Testing & C Majj-r Credit & Personal Checks Accepted Insurance with Qualification Medicare On YourNextVisittoHouston... What you get at the motel on the highway & what you get at the Montrose Inn Motel: Heterosexuals with kids fighting next door. Montrose Inn: Gay men next door. Only gay men. Nothing but gay men. Motel: Several miles to the gay bars. Montrose Inn: 5 tiny blocks to the gay bars. Motel: Drive to the gay bars &pay $5 to park, ifyou can find parking. Or take a $15 cab. Montrose Inn: Walk to the gay bars. Or take a $3 cab. Motel: Drive back from the gay bars and risk the cops making you walk the straight line. Or take a $15 cab. Montrose Inn: Walk back from the gay bars. Or take a $3 cab. Motel: Pay $35 to $95 a night for a room. Montrose Inn: Pay $41 to $79 a night for a room. Motel: Eat in their restaurant. Food for the masses. Pay plenty. $1 soft drink machine. Montrose Inn: Complimentary late night sandwiches & full breakfast the next day. Free soft drinks, juices, coffee 24 hours. Motel: Cruise the parking lot and get threatened. Montrose Inn: Cruise the hallways. Please! Motel: The receptionist sneers at you. Montrose Inn: The receptionist winks at you. Motel: Washing machine? Ironing board? Hair dryer? Refrigerator? Stove? Microwave? VCR & gay movies? Are you kidding? Montrose Inn: All of the above. Free to use. Motel: Full size bed, everything else is plastic. Montrose Inn: Queen size bed, hardwood floors, hardly any plastic. Motel: Maid knocking 8 a.m., you moan but she's coming in anyway. Checkout 11 a.m. Montrose Inn: Handsome man next door knocking 11 a.m. to join him for breakfast. Checkout 1 p.m. Reservations requested. 1-800-357-1228. The house at 408 Avondale. The Montrose Inn is NOT a motel. We're NOT a hotel. We're a Bed & Breakfast. (And we're Basic & Butch. We're the B&B that's B&B.) We're completely different!
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