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Houston Voice, No. 825, August 16, 1996
File 014
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Houston Voice, No. 825, August 16, 1996 - File 014. 1996-08-16. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/17028/show/17008.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1996-08-16). Houston Voice, No. 825, August 16, 1996 - File 014. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/17028/show/17008

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 825, August 16, 1996 - File 014, 1996-08-16, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/17028/show/17008.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 825, August 16, 1996
Contributor
  • Bell, Deborah Moncrief
Publisher Window Media
Date August 16, 1996
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 014
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE / AUGUST 16, 1996 13 Insurance company didn't tell man about positive test By ALAN SAYRE medical test used solely to deter- gress to force disclosure of med- pital. In his ruling, Wingate said it for thf Houston voiof mine insurance eligibility. ical records to a policyholder Deramus had been asked whether would have made no difference By ALAN SAYRE FOR THE HOUSTON VOICE NEW ORLEANS, Saturday, Aug. 3 (AP)—For Jody Deramus, the shock was finding out that her husband had AIDS. Her anger came from learning his life insurance company had known he was infected— and steadfastly refused to tell him. For 18 crucial months before an independent diagnosis revealed why he was getting sick so often, the couple tried unsuccessfully to conceive a child, exposing Mrs. Deramus to repeated unprotected sex. Her husband died in 1991. So far, she says, she has tested negative for the virus—-"a miracle," as she puts it. On Monday, the 5th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals will consider whether Jackson National Life Insurance Co. had the responsibility to tell Frank Deramus he had tested positive for the AIDS virus. Mrs. Deramus, 53, who seeks unspecified damages, already has lost before a Mississippi federal judge, who ruled the company had no duty to disclose results of a medical test used solely to.determine insurance eligibility. In court papers, Jackson National has not said why it withheld the results—only that it was within its rights to do so under Mississippi law. U.S. District Judge Henry T Wingate of Jackson, Miss., agreed last September and dismissed the lawsuit without a trial. One possible reason for Jackson National's decision—that it hoped Deramus would let his policy lapse and the company could then deny reinstatement—is suggested by Mrs. Deramus' appeal, which says a company memo instructed Jackson National employees to do just that. "According to the judge, insurance companies can do this to anyone they want to, any time they want to. There's nothing we can do about it and there's something wrong with that," Mrs. Deramus said from Vienna, Va., where she now lives. D. Collier Graham Jr., an attor- ney representing Jackson National, refused to discuss the case. Mrs. Deramus has started a foundation aimed at lobbying Con gress to force disclosure of medical records to a policyholdei or a person denied coverage. Currently, 29 states have disclosure laws. Mississippi does not. In 1988, Deramus, a Jackson attorney, took a blood test as part of a routine examination required before Jackson National would consider increasing his coverage from $500,000 to $800,000. The results showed he had been exposed to the virus that causes AIDS. Although he was denied additional coverage, in April 1988, for an unspecified medical reason, the company spurned numerous requests from him and his doctor for the test results, Mrs. Deramus alleges. Shortly after learning the extra coverage had been denied, Deramus came down with a series of mal- adies—flu he could not shake, fatigue, headaches, loss of memory. With a family history of cancer, the couple sought medical help, an 18-month hunt that eventually involved 26 doctors and, finally, a move to Virginia to be closer to Johns Hopkins University Hos pital. Deramus had been asked whether he had engaged in AIDS-risky behavior, and always answered in the negative, but doctors at Johns Hopkins added a new question: Had Deramus been to Africa or been exposed to anyone from Africa? A horrible bell tolled: In the mid- 1980s, Deramus had been soaked in blood while helping an accident victim who had worked for about five years in Africa. Deramus' resulting AIDS tesl, in Oct. 1989, was positive. "We would see stories about AIDS in the newspapers and pass them by," Mrs. Deramus said. "They didn't affect us. We didn't engage in homosexual behavior, extramarital sex or use drugs. AIDS didn't affect us. How wrong we were." When the other doctors found out about the diagnosis, their response was universal: "We didn't fit the profile," Mrs. Deramus said. Deramus died in June 1991 at age 51, nine days after Jackson National finally released its test results to his doctor. In his ruling, Wingate said it would have made no difference even if Jackson Life had informed Deramus of his condition, since AIDS remains incurably fatal. But the appeal contends Deramus might have gotten life-extending treatment had he known ofthe test results. In addition, finding out that her husband had the AIDS virus while they were engaging in unprotected sex created stress-related problems for Mrs. Deramus that required psychiatric treatment, the appeal said. While rejecting Deramus, Mrs. Deramus was granted life insurance coverage by Jackson National in a simultaneous application, even though the company was aware of her husband's condition, her appeal said. "What's galling to me is that I can't change insurance companies now. If I applied with another company I'd have to tell them that I'd been exposed to someone with AIDS or they could accuse me of fraud," Mrs. Deramus said. Rumor: Kemp is Gay Articles in both the San francisco Independent and LGNY (Lesbian and Gay New York) reported this week that Jack Kemp is rumored to be gay. The rumor originally stemmed from a 1967 New York Time article exposing a "homosexual ring" in then California Governor Ronald Reagan's administration. It resurfaced during a 1986 NBC "Today Show" interview in which he was asked if he had ever had a homosexual experience. LGNY reporter Andy Humm explained that '"when someone being hailed as supposedly tolerant and committed to civil rights is in reality someone who shuts the door in the faces of gay people on every single issue, it becomes relevant if he is homosexual. It's something he is going to have to address." Kemp was quoted in the New York Times on August 11 as saying, "I believe in civil liberties for homosexuals. I guess I'd draw the line at letting them teach in the schools." They'll help you with your overdue returns, explain your payment options, and help get your refund if you're due money back. But don't wait... the IRS is looking hard at people who aren'i filing their taxes or answering IRS ^£k*v notices. <^^ ^g^" Do it now...call ^ 1-800-829-1040. w it's in your interest. m Internal Revenue Service HAPPY HOUR 4 PM • 8 PM WELL DRINKS DOMESTIC BEER DOWNSTAIRS, ?hpw *»*tioi 1318 HOUSTON• WEDNESDAY «>.i DOMESTIC LONGNECKS REWIND THURSDAY *1.50 SCREW DRIVERS FRIDAY *x.oo SCHNAPPS SUNDAY OPEN 2 PM *2.00 MIMOSAS ALL DAY E!!?S5 COFFEE 42-CLUB BAR
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