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Houston Voice, No. 825, August 16, 1996
File 012
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Houston Voice, No. 825, August 16, 1996 - File 012. 1996-08-16. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 5, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/17028/show/17006.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1996-08-16). Houston Voice, No. 825, August 16, 1996 - File 012. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/17028/show/17006

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 825, August 16, 1996 - File 012, 1996-08-16, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 5, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/17028/show/17006.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 825, August 16, 1996
Contributor
  • Bell, Deborah Moncrief
Publisher Window Media
Date August 16, 1996
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 012
Transcript HOUSTON VOICE/ AUGUST 16, 1996 11 Comics continued. (Continuedfrom page I) crowd of friends that he was a "faggot", a label they sometimes threw at others. When playing in areas where he grew up, Kennedy says some of the people who knew him in school may be in for a surprise when they come to their show. "P.S., in case I forgot to tell you in junior high, I'm gay." He says he has done independent performances nol titled "Gay Comedy" and when he comes out to the audience, they don't believe him. He says. "They'll come up after the show and tell me how funny they thought my gay character is." He tells them "Funnier than you know." Several things strike you about Kevin. Although he has been described as the "Felix" of their odd-couple relationship and the quieter one of the two, he was very open and outgoing in our conversation. His blond, mid-western good looks and delightful, smile warm you to him instantly. Although he is much thinner now than he appears many of the publicity photos, he feels good and is optimistic about the future because ofthe new therapies. He actually thinks coming oui has helped his health. His HIV posilive status has been incorporated in his act which he says was one of the scariest things he has ever done and he really struggled within himself before deciding to do so. He thinks it has been one ofthe best things he has ever done as it has been very liberating. He makes an analogy to the statement thai "the truth will set you free". He adds he has received so much support from audiences, straight and gay, who either let him know they appreciate candidncss or share their own HIV status with him and thank him for giving them courage to come out or to make the decision to get tested. He knows that he is providing education as well as humor. He now can even make cracks aboul his health, such as the fact that he has only two T-cells. "I named, Thelma and Louise." he quips. He also shared lhat when he was a kid he and his sisters who make fun of their grandmother. "She carried around like a whole suitcase full of pills, which was funny to us Ihen. Now I can relate to what it was like for her. I take aboul 18 pills and have to do daily IVs. The thing about Grandma doesn't seem so funny now." He jokes that. "Of course. I now have less room in my luggage for my make-up." He says his illness has nol been much of a problem even with their hectic schedule on the road. "Just when I first got sick, we were in Washington and I was in the hospital for ten days. That's when I found out that I was HIV positive." Opening for the pair for both performances is Frank Lockwood. Lockwood had been in the audience one night and after the show asked Kennedy for advice about becoming a comic. Kennedy told him that the only way to do it was to "Just do it!" Ne took the advice and later showed up in a Houston's Funniest Person Contest at the Laff Stop where Kennedy was one of Ihe judges although he didn't remember their prior meeting. Lockwood ran over his time so was disqualified from winning, but was so good that Kennedy asked him to open the Houston Show. Lockwood is a medical doctor and also openly gay. Scott and Kevin joked about being so successful that they now had their own doctor with them. They don't exclude straight audiences or hetero- bash billing themselves as being "Hetero- friendly". Kennedy quips that "Some of our best friends are straight. We know they were born that way and that's OK with us. We just don't know if we want them teaching our kids..." Kennedy and Maye are among the pioneers of openly gay male performers, being among a handful that they know of. Maye states, "1 like to think we're doing something that is on the cutting edge of a new era." They have often opened for Bob Smith, who they admire. Smith has appeared on the Tonight Show with Jay Leno as out performer. There are many more out lesbian performers, such as Kate Clinton. Lea DeLaria, Suzanne Westenhoffer and Georgia Ragsdale. and locally Vicky Shaw and Nancy Ford. The guys agree that the women have had more venues in which to perform, but things have changed so rapidly in the last few years. The thought of during the kind of show they do now five years ago would have been impossible. Gay visibility and acceptance has radically changed things. Kennedy has been in discussions with television producers regarding programming with gay characters, which maybe at least 3 years away. But who knows, that could change with the right script and he will be ready when the time comes. The guys let me know that attendees to their shows will have the first chance to buy tickets for an upcoming Suzanne Westenhoffer show scheduled for October. So come on to the Laff Stop and be ready to hold your sides, because you arc bound to be sore from laughing. 1641 Westheimer • 523-6925 N£U" PRfMlfR A Debut Showc of Hew Artist August 24-September 21 ABTISTS" RECf PTIOM Saturday, August 24 6pm-Bpm until they get to know you, it's whafs on the surface that counts. With that, do you want your image quickly splashed on paper? Or do you want House ot" Coleman to ink a tetter job? THE jMAGE INKER 55. ,rP- LL~~ House of Coleman Fine Printing & Graphics WEST ALABAMA ■ HOUSTON, TX 77006-41 713.523.2521 • FAX 713.524.2643 Cheap and Easy Sundays ,0 ^eart The drinks are cheap and the bartenders are easy. . -#» a C.P.R. 2 Year Certification Contact Q-Patrol (713) 528-SAFE $1.50 Well Drinks and Beer All Day All Night
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