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Houston Voice, No. 825, August 16, 1996
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Houston Voice, No. 825, August 16, 1996 - File 007. 1996-08-16. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/17028/show/17001.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1996-08-16). Houston Voice, No. 825, August 16, 1996 - File 007. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/17028/show/17001

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 825, August 16, 1996 - File 007, 1996-08-16, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/17028/show/17001.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 825, August 16, 1996
Contributor
  • Bell, Deborah Moncrief
Publisher Window Media
Date August 16, 1996
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript 6 HOUSTON VOICE/ AUGUST 16, 1996 LIFE-THREATENING ILLNESS, MONEY CAN RESTORE YOUR PEACE OF MIND. Money from a viatical settlement means immediate access to critically needed funds to make choices you might not otherwise have, such as paying for medical treatments or keeping your home. You may even use the funds for day-to-day living expenses. Estate Trust, Inc., is one ofthe oldest and most respected names in the viatical settlement industry. We are also National Managing General Agency of Viaticus, Inc., wholly owned by CNA Financial Corp., parent company of CNA Insurance Companies—one ofthe largest insurance organizations in the country. Together, we bring high ethical standards and superior financial value to the individuals and families who have given us their trust. For more information about this important financial option, call Estate Trust, Inc., at 1-800-456-5100 or E-mail: estatestlfflaol.com Member: Viatical Association of America & National Viatical Association Estate Trust he O VIATICUS PLAIN SPEAKING by Larry Lingle Real Work Is Behind The Scenes National political conventions invariably recall, for me, a nostalgic recall of hot summer days beside a radio blaring the thunderous declamations of political correctness and the far more interesting roll call of states as delegates voted on substantive issues and, finally, on their choice of standard bearer in the coming November crusade for the soul of America. I recall the thundering party-line sermon of Alban V. Barkley in 1948 which single-handedly gained him the vice presidential nod. Now such decisions are singularly decided by an already chosen top of the ticket before the first sitting of delegates. Suspense and drama once highlighted our national political gatherings. In 1924, it took 102 ballots for the Democrats to select their ultimate loser, John W. Davis—he with the support of the Ku KIux Klan. And in 1956, the destined loser—but always a winner in my heart—Adlai E. Stevenson left it to the convention to determine his running mate. The ultimate winner was his chief rival with the unenviable monocle, Estes Kef- auver ( I had to resort to David McCul- lough's "Truman" to revisit the spelling on that one). While in hindsight Franklin D. Roosevelt seemed indestructible, winning four presidential elections from a wheelchair, he only gained that first crucial nod after several ballots when William Randolph Hearst, of newspaper and Marion Davies fame, switched his support. And while Dwight David Eisenhower, having conquered Europe, seemed a likely nominee, it was actually a close call in 1952 over a senior senator, much in the mold of a Bob Dole, Robert A. Taft of Ohio. Taft, like Dole was pursuing his third attempt at the nomination. All that high drama and suspense vanished from our political scene with the advent and popularity of the state primaries. And as states now vie for the earliest slots the decision is settled before many ofthe later primaries. Whereas the motivation for the primaries was a distaste ofthe smoke-filled corridors ofthe conventions where a small number of party leaders made the decisions, now only a few hundred thousand voters preclude any change in the script. Speaking of scripts, not even a Hollywood blockbuster is as well orchestrated as a political convention. While it was a minor scandal when reporters found the Republican script, minute by minute, for their 1972 convention, now it is a given. Even the unruly Democrats have accepted this restraint, a party which Will Rogers endearingly referred to when he remarked "that I don't belong to any organized party, I'm a Democrat." So the story in San Diego this week, as will be the case in Chicago later, is already written. The smoke and mirrors of controversy which was to have been the platform was relegated to obscurity during the first afternoon session on Monday. After all, even Dole had remarked to a San Diego newspaper that he had not read the^ platform. Most political platfor i^B tend to be ignored during the campaign: this is perhaps a first when the "presumptive" nominee turns his back on the supposed party principles before the first gavel has fallen. While it appears everything about the convention is geared for television, nothing could be further from the truth. For behind those well-rehearsed speeches and choreographed demonstrations the real work of the delegates is going on in sundry parties and gatherings, bankrolled like never before by corporations vying for political attention. But wait, we have election reform; corporations cannot donate to politic^^A campaigns. And, besides, there are doi^ lar limits on all contributions. Nye, nye, friends. The scare of Watergate is forgotten—after all, politicians of all people know that voters have short memories—they rely on this. The two words now are "soft money." Friendly regulators and compliant judges have ruled that all limits apply only to politicians themselves. Anyone can give all they want to parties and satellite committees which promote "ideas," not candidates. So, folks, you can promote the Republican Party and the Democratic Party nationally without promoting Dole or Bill Clinton. Yeah, like I can advocate same-sex marriage without backing gay rights. The television network which captured by brief attention Monday night caught a glimpse of some of the high-power parties and corporate jets (Colin Powell arriving on a drug company plane) but .GOP security did its best to block such shots. After this passing shot, even the networks seemed to lose interest in this real story behind the convention. Only the business-minded Wall Street Journal seemed interested in the party thrown by the Securities Industry Association for House Banking Committee Chairperson James Leach of Iowa, or the Union Pacific feast for House Transportation Committee Chairperson Bud Shuster of Pennsylvania. The roll call goes on. For $100,000 you can actually sit down with Dole and Jack Kemp right after their "nominations" on Wednesday. Oh, yeah, you also get a photo op with the happy pair. ^ Ifyou want to attend the gala for the candl^ dates after their acceptance speeches, don't line up at the ticket office, as if there was one, but call the offices of the Association of Wholesale Distributors in Washington. While he is keeping a low profile during this convention, you can have lunch with Speaker ofthe House Newt Gingrich courtesy of General Motors. And, as if anyone is eager to party down with Haley Barbour, the GOP chair, you can attend a "Melee with Haley" through the good graces of Philip Morris, Miller Seagram and Coca-Cola. After ail, it looks as if Haley is fond of all four. I can hardly wait for Chicago where Clinton's New Democrats have learned the financial virtues of corporate sharing. ^* Did you know that Houston Voice classified ads cost less than This Week in Texas, OutSmart or The Houston Press?
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