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Houston Voice, No. 1135, July 26, 2002
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Houston Voice, No. 1135, July 26, 2002 - File 001. 2002-07-26. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/16888/show/16859.

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(2002-07-26). Houston Voice, No. 1135, July 26, 2002 - File 001. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/16888/show/16859

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1135, July 26, 2002 - File 001, 2002-07-26, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/16888/show/16859.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1135, July 26, 2002
Contributor
  • Weaver, Penny
Publisher Window Media
Date July 26, 2002
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 001
Transcript voice Family Fundamentals Gay filmmaker Arthur Dong's latest work makes its Houston debut. Page 15 ISSUE 1135 ___________ WWW.HOUSTONVOICE.COM All THE NEWS FOR YOUR UFE. AND YOUR STYIE.___________JULY 26, 2002 Dr. Emily J. Erbelding is among health officials monitoring a syphilis outbreak among gay men in Baltimore. Page 5 'Dress Up' by Raymond Terry is one of the productions in Theatre Southwest's new 'Festival of Originals.' Page 19 Evertz out as White House AIDS czar Scott EvertZs replacement as AIDS czar has fueled speculation over AIDS policy clashes within the Bush administration. (File photo by Clint Steib) Speculation rampant on reason for transfer as Bush appoints gay doctor to fill post By LOU CHIBBARO JR. WASHINGTON — Speculation over whether Scott Evertz, the openly gay director of the White House Office of National AIDS Policy, was fired or rewarded with another, equally presti­gious job in the government swirled in Washington this week, with a platoon of unnamed sources giving wildly differing views on Evertz’s fate and the future of a conservative who heads up the presi­dent’s AIDS advisory panel. Two days before the White House’s July 19 announcement that Evertz was being replaced by openly gay physician Joseph O’Neill and transferred to another job at the Department of Health & Human Services, Bush administration sources leaked information claiming the transfer was a disguised firing. Some sources said the action was the result of a “power struggle” between administration factions favoring sexual abstinence until marriage as the prima­ry emphasis for preventing the spread of AIDS and a rival faction favoring con­dom use as the preferred AIDS preven­tion method. Others sources speculated that Evertz lacked the skills needed to address compli­cated medical and scientific issues associ­ated with AIDS. They also said Evertz alienated both conservatives and mainline AIDS groups by telling jokes rather then discussing serious policy issues during his appear­ances before audiences across the country. But Evertz’s supporters in the adminis­tration and among gay Republican groups dismiss claims that Evertz wasn’t quali­fied for the job, saying the president and high level administration officials have praised Evertz’s work. Supporters say the White House trans­ferred Evertz to an equally important post at the Health Department, where he will help to coordinate the government’s inter­national AIDS programs. Please see AIDS CZAR, on Page 7 Police investigate gay club Business owner alleges 'illegal search'; TABC officials allege liquor violations at after-hours Club Nsomnia By PENNY WEAVER Several tickets were issued but no one was arrested in an opera­tion conducted last weekend by Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission agents at Houston’s gay Club Nsomnia. The establishment’s chief exec­utive officer (CEO) said its future is in question after the incident. The after-hours “Bring Your Own Beer” or BYOB club is oper­ated by the AIDS Housing Coalition Houston, a nonprofit AIDS charity organization, according to Matt Locklin, execu­tive director/co-founder of AHCH and CEO of Club Nsomnia. Its clientele includes a number of gay Houstonians. Proceeds from the club benefit AHCH programs, organizers say, including low-income housing for HIV/AIDS patients. In the wake of the Friday night Please see GAY CLUB, on Page 8 Club Nsomnia, which caters to a mostly gay clientele, was the focus of a week­end stop by agents with the Texas Alcoholic Beverage Commission, which alleges the business is selling alcohol without a license to do so. Nsomnia CEO Matt Locklin denies that the club is doing anything illegal. (Photo by Penny Weaver) 33 2 JULY 26,2002______________________ | local news www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE Gay haven Crossroads closes The normally crowded sidewalk in front of Crossroads Market Bookstore & Cafe in Montrose is now virtually empty. The business, which served a largely gay clientele in Houston for a decade, closed its doors permanent­ly this week. (Photo by Penny Weaver) Owner cites declining business, says Dallas store will remain open By PENNY WEAVER A virtual landmark for gay Houstonians closed its doors permanently this week, highlighting what some observers see as an alarming decline in support for gay businesses. Crossroads Market Bookstore & Cafe, a haven for gays that offered everything from books and cards to coffee and snacks, served Houston for 10 years. “Half the task in doing business is knowing when to get out. None of the signs are there that say that gay business is going to be robust,” said Crossroads owner Joe Rumanni. “It’s not just Houston. There’s a gay problem everywhere. Also, the [overall] economy is just sucko.” But Rumanni said his store in Dallas, the original location for Crossroads in operation for more than a dozen years, will not close and, in fact, is profitable. “Dallas is doing great,” he said. Business in Houston was down as much as 30 percent, and Rumanni said the decision was made to close Crossroads before money was lost. “One [reason for the closing] is busi­ness was definitely coming down, as was business everywhere else,” Rumanni said. Another factor was that it was time for Crossroads to sign another three-year lease at its Houston location. Rumanni decided that was too much of a risk. “Our lease was expired. We’re not going to do this for another three years,” he said. “We decided not to incur any losses.” Crossroads originally opened on Alabama Street in Houston, and has oper­ated from its Westheimer Road storefront for the last seven years. The current loca­tion is in the heart of heavily gay Montrose, near other gay businesses such as Mary’s...Naturally and Chances. “It was a great 10 years, but it’s not going to be a great future for gay business, in our opinion,” Rumanni said. “We just looked at everything and said we’ve just got to do it. The time is up. It’s not looking good down there. “We’ve been extremely grateful for the support that customers have shown us over the past 10 years and we’re sorry to go,” he added. “It’s someone else’s turn.” The Montrose area includes most of the city’s gay bars and a variety of busi­nesses that are both gay-owned and cater to gay clientele. Cliff Owen, a co-owner at Mary’s...Naturally, said rumors that Mary’s may close — similar to persistent rumors for months preceding the closing of Crossroads — are premature. “There’s nothing imminent,” Owen said. “We have been approached by a real estate developer who has some other prop­erty in lower Westheimer.” But Owen said the current economy is a tough one. “We’ve noticed a definite drop in busi­ness. Every year, the hot summer months are bad for us. It’s particularly bad this year,” he said. “It’s the worst summer that I can remember.” Longtime Houston gay activist Don ITS WHERE YOU FIND YOUR LOOK LINDBERG* 3966 Westheimer, Highland Village • Houston, TX 77027 • 713-622-4411 its doors Gill, who owns Studio 911 hair salon, attributes the decline in business to an overall economic slump. “My business has dropped too, especial­ly with all the layoffs,” said Gill, noting the widely publicized closing of huge Houston employer Enron. “Business is off in the city of Houston during the summer period. [But] the Houston economy is still strong.” Gill said he, along with other gay busi­ness owners, has experienced a drop in revenue since the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks, and also feels the effects of the stock mar­ket slump. But he does not think the eco­nomic woes are particular to gay business or necessarily tougher on gay business owners than anyone else. Larry Lingle, longtime owner of Lobo, now the only gay bookstore left in Houston, said he, like Rumanni, sees many struggles for gay businesses. “I would have to agree with Joe. Business has been down for us the last two months,” Lingle said. “I think it’s a rough time for gay businesses.” Although Crossroads and Lobo, located on Montrose Boulevard, offered many of the same products and a similar atmo­sphere, Lingle said his business has bene­fited little from Crossroads’ closing. “The only significant difference I’ve seen since Crossroads has closed or is clos­ing is an increase in traffic in our coffee shop,” he said. Lingle also owns the Oscar Wilde Bookshop in New York City. He bought the business, the oldest of its kind in the world, six years ago. That store also is struggling financially. . "It was a great 10 years, but it's not going to be a great future for gay business, in our opinion," Rumanni said. "We just looked at everything and said we've just got to do it. The time is up. It's not looking good down there." “It’s cost me a lot of money,” said Lingle, who noted that Lobo’s profits once had supported the New York shop but can no longer do so. “It’s not just Houston; it’s all over,” he says of economic woes for gay businesses. But Lingle believes some cities—such as Dallas — do have advantages that Hbuston does not have for gay business owners. “My biggest regret is that Houston does not have the kind of gay business district that Dallas has,” Lingle said. “It creates a great atmosphere where anybody, gay and lesbian, can...do whatever they want. We don’t have that in Houston. “It’s a shame we don’t have more of a concentration [of gay businesses] that we can really say is our business area...a friendly atmosphere, a hospitable atmo­sphere,” he said. ■ i : ■ VIRACEPT is indicated in combination with other antiretroviral agents for the treatment of HIV HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com JULY 26, 2002 3 infection. The most common side effect of VIRACEPT is diarrhea, which can usually be controlled with over-the-counter treatments. Some prescription and non-prescription drugs and supplements should not be taken with I VIRACEPT, so talk to your doctor first For I some people, protease inhibitors have been I associated with the onset or worsening I of diabetes mellitus and hyperglycemia, ■ changes in body fat, and increased B bleeding in hemophiliacs. HIV drugs do ■ not cure HIV infection or prevent you ® from spreading the virus. ■ Refer to the important information on M the next page. For more information, ■ call toll free bSSS-VlRACEgT H| or visit www.viracept.com. > Because it's strong and effective. Keep your viral load K down with the *1 prescribed HIV medication of its kind.* ■ VIRACEPT works vyith you to keep your life on track. Because it's easy to live with. VIRACEPT's easy dosing schedule and manageable side effects have been helping all kinds of people continue to lead their lives on their own terms. Because it saves future options. When choosing a treatment plan, it's important to consider what options you will have in the future. Studies show taking VIRACEPT early on leaves you with choices in treatment for later. Ask your doctor about your future with VIRACEPT. VIRZXCERT nelfinavir mesylate tablet* and oral powder Because I promised myself SB when this all started that I'd never .jj^Mln^e sight of the future S i I s 11 Plan Your Future With VIRACEPT®.* ticals.tnc. 4 JULY 26, 2002 www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE a Agouron Phannaceuticais,h& , A Pfizer Company VIRACEPT® (nelfinavir mesylate) Tablets and Oral Powder Information for Patients about VIRACEPT* (Vl-ra-cept) Generic Name: nelfinavir (nel-HN-na-veer) mesylate For the Treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Infection Please read this information carefully before taking VIRACEPT. Also, please read this leaflet each time you renew the prescription, just in case anything has changed. This is a summary and not a replacement for a careful discussion with your doctor. You and your doctor should discuss VIRACEPT when you start taking this medication and at regular checkups. You should remain under a doctor's care when taking VIRACEPT and should not change or stop treatment without first talking with your doctor. Alert Find out about medicines that should NOT be taken with VIRACEPT. Please also read the section “MEDICINES YOU SHOULD NOT TAKE WITH VIRACEPT”. WHAT IS VIRACEPT AND HOW DOES IT WORK? VIRACEPT is used in combination with other antiretroviral drugs in the treatment of people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Infection with HIV leads to the destruction of CD4 T cells, which are important to the immune system. After a large number of CD4 cells have been destroyed, the infected person develops acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). VIRACEPT works by blocking HIV protease (a protein-cutting enzyme), which is required for HIV to multiply. VIRACEPT has been shown to significantly reduce the amount of HIV in the blood. Although VIRACEPT is not a cure for HIV or AIDS, VIRACEPT can help reduce your risk for death and illness associated with HIV. Patients who took VIRACEPT also had significant increases in the number of CD4 cell count. VIRACEPT should be taken together with other antiretroviral drugs such as Retrovir® (zidovudine, AZT), Epivir® (lamivudine, 3TC), or Zerit® (stavudine, d4T). Taking VIRACEPT in combination with other antiretroviral drugs reduces the amount of HIV in the body (viral load) and raises CD4 counts. VIRACEPT may be taken by adults, adolescents, and children 2 years of age or older. Studies in infants younger than 2 years of age are now taking place. DOES VIRACEPT CURE HIV OR AIDS? VIRACEPT is not a cure for HIV infection or AIDS. People taking VIRACEPT may still develop opportunistic infections or other conditions associated with HIV infection. Some of these conditions are pneumonia, herpes virus infections, Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infections, and Kaposi’s sarcoma. There is no proof that VIRACEPT can reduce the risk of transmitting HIV to others through sexual contact or blood contamination. WHO SHOULD OR SHOULD NOT TAKE VIRACEPT? Together with your doctor, you need to decide whether VIRACEPT is appropriate for you. In making your decision, the following should be considered: Allergies: If you have had a serious allergic reaction to VIRACEPT, you must not take VIRACEPT. You should also inform your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist of any known allergies to substances such as other medicines, foods, preservatives, or dyes. If you are pregnant The effects of VIRACEPT on pregnant women or their unborn babies are not known. If you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant you should tell your doctor before taking VIRACEPT. If you are breast-feeding: You should discuss with your doctor the best way to feed your baby. You should be aware that if your baby does not already have HIV, there is a chance that it can be transmitted through breast-feeding. Women should not breast-feed if they have HIV. Children: VIRACEPT is available for the treatment of children 2 through 13 years of age with HIV. There is a powder form of VIRACEPT that can be mixed with milk, baby formula, or foods like pudding. Instructions on how to take VIRACEPT powder can be found in a later section that discusses how VIRACEPT Oral Powder should be prepared. If you have liver disease: VIRACEPT has not been studied in people with liver disease. If you have liver disease, you should tell your doctor before taking VIRACEPT. Other medical problems: Certain medical problems may affect the use of VIRACEPT. Some people taking protease inhibitors have developed new or more serious diabetes or high blood sugar. Some people with hemophilia have had increased bleeding. It is not known whether the protease inhibitors caused these problems. Be sure to tell your doctor if you have hemophilia types A and B, diabetes mellitus, or an increase in thirst and/or frequent urination. Changes in body fat have been seen in some patients taking protease inhibitors. These changes may include increased amount of fat in the upper back and neck (“buffalo hump"), breast, and around the trunk. Loss of fat from the face, legs and arms may also happen. The cause and long-term health effects of these conditions are not known at this time. CAN VIRACEPT BE TAKEN WITH OTHER MEDICATIONS? VIRACEPT may interact with other drugs, including those you take without a prescription. You must discuss with your doctor any drugs that you are taking or are planning to take before you take VIRACEPT. Medicines you should not take with VIRACEPT: Propulsid® (cisapride, for heartbum) Cordarone® (amiodarone, for irregular heartbeat) Quinidine (for irregular heartbeat), also known as Quinaglute®, Cardioquin®, Quinidex®, and others Ergot derivatives (Cafergot® and others, for migraine headache) Halcion® (triazolam) Versed® (midazolam) Mevacor® (lovastatin, for cholesterol lowering) Zocor® (simvastatin, for cholesterol lowering) Taking the above drugs with VIRACEPT may cause serious and/or life­threatening adverse events. Rifampin® (for tuberculosis), also known as Rimactane®, Rifadin®, Rifater®, or Rifamate® This drug reduces blood levels of VIRACEPT. Dose reduction required if you take VIRACEPT with: Mycobutin® (rifabutin, for MAC); you will need to take a lower dose of Mycobutin. A change of therapy should be considered if you are taking VIRACEPT with: Phenobarbital Phenytoin (Dilantin® and others) Carbamazepine (Tegretol® and others) These agents may reduce the amount of VIRACEPT in your blood and make it less effective. Oral contraceptives (“the pill”) If you are taking the pill to prevent pregnancy, you should use a different type of contraception since VIRACEPT may reduce the effectiveness of oral contraceptives. Special considerations Before you take Viagra® (sildenafil) with VIRACEPT, talk to your doctor about possible drug interactions and side effects. If you take Viagra and VIRACEPT together, you may be at increased risk of side effects of Viagra such as low blood pressure, visual changes, and penile erection lasting more than 4 hours. If an erection lasts longer than 4 hours, you should seek immediate medical assistance to avoid permanent damage to your penis. Your doctor can explain these symptoms to you. It is not recommended to take VIRACEPT with the cholesterol-lowering drugs Mevacor® (lovastatin) or Zocor® (simvastatin) because of possible drug interactions. There is also an increased risk of drug interactions between VIRACEPT and Lipitor® (atorvastatin) and Baycol® (cerivastatin); talk to your doctor before you take either of these cholesterol reducing drugs with VIRACEPT. Taking St. John’s wort (hypericum perforatum), an herbal product sold as a dietary supplement or products containing St. John’s wort with VIRACEPT is not recommended. Talk with your doctor if you are taking or are planning to take St John’s wort. Taking St. John’s wort may decrease VIRACEPT levels and lead to increased viral load and possible resistance to VIRACEPT or cross resistance to other antiretroviral drugs. HOW SHOULD VIRACEPT BE TAKEN WITH OTHER ANTI-HIV DRUGS? Taking VIRACEPT together with other anti-HIV drugs increases their ability to fight the vims. It also reduces the opportunity for resistant viruses to grow. Based on your history of taking other anti-HIV medicine, your doctor will direct you on how to take VIRACEPT and other anti-HIV medicines. These drugs should be taken in a certain order or at specific times. This will depend on how many times a day each medicine should be taken. It will also depend on whether it should be taken with or without food. Nucleoside analogues: No drug interaction problems were seen when VIRACEPT was given with: Retrovir (zidovudine, AZT) Epivir (lamivudine, 3TC) Zerit (stavudine, d4T) Videx® (didanosine, ddl) If you are taking both Videx (ddl) and VIRACEPT: Videx should be taken without food, on an empty stomach. Therefore, you should take VIRACEPT with food one hour after or more than two hours before you take Videx. Nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs): When VIRACEPT is taken together with: Viramune® (nevirapine) The amount of VIRACEPT in your blood is unchanged. A dose adjustment is not needed when VIRACEPT is used with Viramune. Sustiva™ (efavirenz) The amount of VIRACEPT in your blood may be increased. A dose adjustment is not needed when VIRACEPT is used with Sustiva. Other NNRTIs VIRACEPT has not been studied with other NNRTIs. Other protease inhibitors: When VIRACEPT is taken together with: Crixivan® (indinavir) The amount of both drugs in your blood may be increased. Currently, there are no safety and efficacy data available from the use of this combination. Norvir™ (ritonavir) The amount of VIRACEPT in your blood may be increased. Currently, there are no safety and efficacy data available from the use of this combination. Invirase® (saquinavir) The amount of saquinavir in your blood may be increased. Currently, there are no safety and efficacy data available from the use of this combination. WHAT ARE THE SIDE EFFECTS OF VIRACEPT? Like all medicines, VIRACEPT can cause side effects. Most of the side effects experienced with VIRACEPT have been mild to moderate. Diarrhea is the most common side effect in people taking VIRACEPT, and most adult patients had at least mild diarrhea at some point during treatment. In clinical studies, about 15-20% of patients receiving VIRACEPT 750 mg (three tablets) three times daily or 1250 mg (five tablets) two times daily had four or more loose stools a day. In most cases, diarrhea can be controlled using antidiarrheal medicines, such as Imodium® A-D (loperamide) and others, which are available without a prescription. Other side effects that occurred in 2% or more of patients receiving VIRACEPT include nausea, gas and rash. There were other side effects noted in clinical studies that occurred in less than 2% of patients receiving VIRACEPT. However, these side effects may have been due to other drugs that patients were taking or to the illness itself. Except for diarrhea, there were not many differences in side effects in patients who took VIRACEPT along with other drugs compared with those who took only the other drugs. For a complete list of side effects, ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist HOW SHOULD I TAKE VIRACEPT? VIRACEPT is available only with your doctor’s prescription. Your doctor may prescribe the light blue VIRACEPT Tablets either as 1250 mg (five tablets) taken two times a day or as 750 mg (three tablets) taken three times a day. VIRACEPT should always be taken with a meal or a light snack. VIRACEPT tablets are film-coated to help make the tablets easier to swallow. Take VIRACEPT exactly as directed by your doctor. Do not increase or decrease any dose or the number of doses per day. Also, take this medicine for the exact period of time that your doctor has insfructed. Do not stop taking VIRACEPT without first consulting with your doctor, even if you are feeling better. Only take medicine that has been prescribed specifically for you. Do not give VIRACEPT to others or take medicine prescribed for someone else. The dosing of VIRACEPT may be different for you than for other patients. Follow the directions from your doctor, exactly as written on the label. The amount of VIRACEPT in the blood should remain somewhat consistent over time. Missing doses will cause the concentration of VIRACEPT to decrease; therefore, you should not miss any doses. However, if you miss a dose, you should take the dose as soon as possible and then take your next scheduled dose and future doses as originally scheduled. Dosing in adults (including children 14 years of age and older) The recommended adult dose of VIRACEPT is 1250 mg (five tablets) taken two times a day or 750 mg (three tablets) taken three times a day. Each dose should be taken with a meal or light snack. Dosing in children 2 to 13 years of age The VIRACEPT dose in children depends on their weight. The recommended dose is 20 to 30 mg/kg (or 9 to 14 mg/pound) per dose, taken three times daily with a meal or light snack. This can be administered either in tablet form or, in children unable to take tablets, as VIRACEPT Oral Powder. Dose instructions will be provided by the child's doctor. The dose will be given three times daily using the measuring scoop provided, a measuring teaspoon, or one or more tablets depending on the weight and age of the child. The amount of oral powder or tablets to be given to a child is described in the chart below. Pediatric Pose to Be Administered Three Times Daily Body Weight Number of Level Scoops* Number of Level Teaspoons! Number of Kg Lb Tablets 7 to <8.5 15.5 to <18.5 4 1 — 8.5 to <10.5 18.5 to <23 5 1 1/4 — 10.5 to <12 23 to <26.5 6 11/2 — 12to <14 26.5 to <31 7 1 3/4 — 14to <16 31 to <35 8 2 — 16 to <18 35 to <39.5 9 21/4 — 18 to <23 39.5 to <50.5 10 21/2 2 a23 250.5 15 3 3/4 3 In measuring oral powder, the scoop or teaspoon should be level. * 1 level scoop contains 50 mg of VIRACEPT. Use only the scoop provided with your VIRACEPT bottle. 11 level teaspoon contains 200 mg of VIRACEPT. Note: A measuring teaspoon used for dispensing medication should be used for measuring VIRACEPT Oral Powder. Ask your pharmacist to make sure you have a medication dispensing teaspoon. How should VIRACEPT Oral Powder be prepared? The oral powder may be mixed with a small amount of water, milk, formula, soy formula, soy milk, dietary supplements, or dairy foods such as pudding or ice cream. Once mixed, the entire amount must be taken to obtain the full dose. Do not mix the powder with any acidic food or juice, such as orange or grapefruit juice, apple juice, or apple sauce, because this may create a bitter taste. Once the powder is mixed, it may be stored at room temperature or ^ refrigerated for up to 6 hours. Do not heat the mixed dose once it has been prepared. Do not add water to bottles of oral powder. VIRACEPT powder is supplied with a scoop for measuring. For help in determining the exact dose of powder for your child, please ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist. VIRACEPT Oral Powder contains aspartame, a low-calorie sweetener, and therefore should not be taken by children with phenylketonuria (PKU). HOW SHOULD VIRACEPT BE STORED? Keep VIRACEPT and all other medicines out of the reach of children. Keep bottle closed and store at room temperature (between 59°F and 86°F) away from sources of moisture such as a sink or other damp place. Heat and moisture may reduce the effectiveness of VIRACEPT. Do not keep medicine that is out of date or that you no longer need. Be sure that if you throw any medicine away, it is out of the reach of children. Discuss all questions about your health with your doctor. If you have questions about VIRACEPT or any other medication you are taking, ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist. You can also call 1.888.VIRACEPT (1.888.847.2237) toll free. Call 1.888. VIRACEPT VIRACEPT and Agouron are registered trademarks of Agouron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Copyright ©2001, Agouron Pharmaceuticals, Inc. All rights reserved. Agouron Pharmaceuticals, he. A Pfizer Company Agouron Pharmaceuticals Inc. La Jolla, California, 92037, USA 1-V01171-BG L203-0001 PPI Rev. 01/25/01 HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com_____________ Inatioiialiiews JULY 26, 2002 5 Baltimore officials see rise in syphilis cases among gay men Outbreak not considered an epidemic but cause for concern BY RHONDA SMITH BALTIMORE — Public health officials in Baltimore are seeing increasing numbers of syphilis cases among men who have sex with men, though they said the city’s overall syphilis rate continues to decline. This trend among gay men is consistent with those recently identified in other U.S. cities, they said. “This particular population deserves an enhanced focus,” said Dr. Emily J. Erbelding, chief of the STD Clinical Services for the Baltimore City Health Department. Erbelding, who also is an assistant professor of medicine at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, said there were 26 cases of syphilis reported in the first six months of 2002 among men who have sex with men, com­pared with just two cases among this popu­lation during the same period last year. “It’s definitely an important outbreak, but not an epidemic,” she said. Deidre Thompson, a registered nurse and nursing clinical manager for Chase Brexton Health Services Inc., a nonprofit health organization in Baltimore that pri­marily addresses the health needs of gay men and lesbians, echoed Erbelding. “There’s been some clustering of cases identified among men who have sex with men,” she said. “This is consistent with what has been reported in Seattle, Los Angeles County, Chicago, New York City, London, Birmingham, Ala., and Amsterdam.” Syphilis appears first as a sore, usually on the geni­tals, then develops as a rash. It can be cured with peni­cillin, but left untreated it can damage the heart, eyes, brain and other body parts. Public health officials in Baltimore are recommend­ing that men who have sex with men be tested for syphilis every six months. “Anybody who thinks they’ve been exposed to HIV should also ask for a syphilis test,” she said. “And anyone who notices the signs or symptoms of syphilis in themselves or in a sex partner should also be tested for it.” Erbelding said lesbians also could be at risk for syphilis. Dr. Emily J. Erbelding, chief of STD Clinical Services for the Baltimore City Health Department, said there recent­ly has been an increase in the number of syphilis cases reported in Baltimore among men who have sex with men. “It’s extremely rare for a woman who only has sexual contact with other women to contract syphilis,” she said. “But if they occasionally have sex with their bisexual male friends, then they probably should get tested for syphilis.” In June, public health officials in Alexandria and Arlington, Va., said they were concerned about the increase in the number of gay and bisexual men who have tested pos­itive for syphilis in the past three years. They warned that a spike in sexually transmitted diseases such as syphilis could mean a rise in HIV cases is inevitable because the infections are spread in the same manner. Cesar Pena, an epidemiologist for the STD Division of the Maryland Department of Health & Mental Hygiene, in Baltimore, said the number of syphilis cases statewide is decreasing thanks to initiatives aimed at reducing the rate of infection in Baltimore. He also noted, however, that syphilis cases are increasing in Prince George’s County, Md., a Washington suburb, and in Harford County, near Baltimore. Last November, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control & Prevention reported that while the number of reported syphilis cases in the U.S. hit an all-time low in 2000, outbreaks of the disease have been seen among gay men in a handful of large cities such as Miami, Los Angeles, and Chicago. News reporter Rhonda Smith can be reached at rsmith@washblade.com. O SYPHILIS INFO What is syphilis? Complex STD described as "great imitator" because symptoms are indis­tinguishable from other diseases. How is it spread? Through direct contact with syphilis sore, mainly on external genitals, vagina, anus, or in rectum; also can occur on lips and in mouth. What are the symptoms? Within 10 to 90 days (average is 21), a single sore, or chancre, appears but may be multiple sores. Chancre is usually firm, round, small and painless, lasts three to six weeks and will heal on its own. If left untreated, infection progresses to secondary stage, with rough red or brown rash that usually does not itch on palms or bottom of feet. Even without treatment, rashes clear up on their own. How is syphilis diagnosed? Examination of material from infectious sores, or by blood test. Link with HIV? Syphilis genital sores make it 2-5 times easier to transmit and acquire HIV. Is there a cure for syphilis? Yes, penicillin or antibiotic. Protection against syphilis? Use latex condom before beginning sex and keep it on until the penis is withdrawn. Source: National Center for HIV, STD & TB Prevention Baltimore City Health Department Druid STD Clinic 1515 W. North Ave. Baltimore, MD 21202 410-396-0176 Gay marriage foes press on despite snub in Mass, legislature Blocked vote on constitutional amendment raises conservative ire By SCOn GIORDANO BOSTON — Religious conservatives have vowed to fight with renewed vigor for a con­stitutional amendment in Massachusetts to ban same-sex marriages in that state, and have threatened to begin a “seismic revolu­tion in Massachusetts politics.” The announcement follows a major set­back for conservatives in the Massachusetts state Legislature on July 17, when voting was blocked on a citizen-initiated measure that could have banned same-sex marriages, civil unions and domestic-partner benefits including health insurance, bereavement leave and hospital visitation rights. “The politicians believe they have success-fully ended the debate and the vote about mar­riage —but they are wrong,” reads an open let­ter from Massachusetts Citizens for Marriage, the group behind the right’s effort. “The debate is just starting and the vote is yet to happen. We plan on seeing to that.... This is no longer just a debate about marriage. This is now an uprising against a failed government.” The letter said members of Massachusetts Citizens for Marriage would individually sur­vey “each politician who voted against democ­racy” and give them “a chance to vote again.” “Our legislature broke the law and defeat­ed the measure without allowing a vote on its merits.... If the politicians continue to treat the voters with such contempt as was dis­played last week, it will have profound effects upon our entire political structure. We will help see to that.... The vote that will occur as a result of our survey this week will be well publicized by us across the entire state for a long time to come. No legislator will be able to avoid being recorded on this vote.” Sara Pawlick, president of Massachusetts Citizens for Marriage, referred all related questions back to the statement. The group also was scheduled to hold a July 24 press con­ference to announce its plans in more detail. At issue was a citizen-initiated petition in the Massachusetts state Legislature, labeled the Protection of Marriage Amendment, which would have required 50 votes in a joint House-Senate Constitutional Convention. If the measure had passed, it then would have had to pass one more legislative session by the same margin to be placed on the 2004 election ballot for voter ratification. The proposed amendment’s sweeping lan­guage would have amended the state’s consti­tution to define marriage as “between one man and one woman” and would have pre­vented gay couples from receiving any “ben­efits or incidents exclusive to marriage.” The measure was believed to have enough votes for passage, but it was defeated when Thomas Birmingham, the Democratic state Senate President and a candidate for gover­nor, called for an adjournment vote during a joint House-Senate Constitutional Convention before the amendment could be voted on. The 137-53 adjournment vote effectively killed the measure, despite the support of some 130,000 Massachusetts residents who signed a petition calling for the voter refer­endum. Massachusetts Republican Gov. Jane Swift has publicly opposed the amendment and is unlikely to use her exec­utive powers to reconvene the Legislature around this issue. Calls to Swift’s office were not returned at press time. Gay activists prepare response Arline Isaacson, co-chair of the Massachusetts Gay & Lesbian Political Caucus, was among those who lobbied the Senate president and commended his efforts. “We worked very closely with Birmingham’s office because he strongly opposed the amendment and was prepared to help us find a legitimate way to defeat it, and we presented a number of options to him for ways to do that. He chose one which clearly involved taking a leadership role on his part,” Isaacson said. “He is getting beaten up on this in Massachusetts by the right wing and by con­servatives who are going after him relentless­ly for helping the gay and lesbian community on this critical matter.... So what he did was actually a very gutsy thing to do for the gay and lesbian community He was a quintessen­tial stand-up guy for us on this, and he will pay a price by losing the votes of conservatives.” In an unusual display of solidarity, con­servative gay activists supported the more liberal gay activists and the approach used to defeat the anti-gay measure. “I think that it was not inappropriate in these circumstances for the leadership and Sen. Birmingham to do what he did. It’s interesting what it says about where the gay community is politically these days, when somebody in the middle of a hotly contested gubernatorial election... would take such a step. I think it’s to be applauded,” said Mark Goshko, spokesman for the Log Cabin Republicans of Massachusetts, a gay Republican group. “This is a classic exam­ple of the right’s lack of influence and clout to be so brazenly shut down on this basis, and that sends a very strong message to them that they are running out of options.” Conservatives do, however, have the option of filing a potential lawsuit against the governor, although it is not likely to make any difference. Isaacson believes the nature of the amendment created unusual circumstances. “Civil rights should never be placed on the ballot for a popular vote. This country was founded on the notion that the tyranny of the majority should never be allowed to take away the rights of the minority. Therefore, this ballot question was, in its core, fundamentally un-American,” she said. 6 JULY 26, 2002 ________________________________________________ www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE I around houston I* * * »* * * ^Patrick’s Pottery & Collectibles * McCoy Pottery’. Bronzes! Oak Furniture! Kitch! And lots more! Located inside C & T Antiques • Open Tues - Sun 10-5 625 w. 19th Street • 113-861-ISOO I* ^ * » * ^ * ^ * fr^efc"**** Houston Black Tie Dinner leaders kick off ticket sales for fall event The board of Houston Black Tie Dinner, Inc. has.announced the beneficiaries of the proceeds from this year’s dinner, and a kickoff party for table and ticket sales is today Co-chairs Chree Boydstun and Carlos Reyes Jr. have planned the party, set for 6 to 8 p.m. at the home of Mike Ryan and David Outlaw, 1703 Vermont. The 2002 Houston Black Tie Dinner will be held on Oct. 12 at the Inter-Continental Hotel. Beneficiaries this Houston Area Teen Coalition of Homosexuals (H.A.T.C.H.); Lesbian Health Initiative; Montrose Counseling Center; Montrose Clinic; People With AIDS Coalition, Houston; and Resurrection Metropolitan Community Church. In the last decade, the Houston Black Tie Dinner has raised and distributed more than $1 million to local charity organizations. Calif, judge defends actions in high-profile dog mauling case SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The trial judge in the dog mauling case of Marjorie Knoller in the death of a lesbian neighbor recently defended his decision to toss out a second-degree murder conviction against Knoller. Sharon Smith, whose partner Diane Whipple was mauled to death, was among critics who said that Judge James Warren had “stolen justice” by overturning the jury’s decision. “There was a statement made that this court has destroyed a sense of justice in the city of San Francisco,” Warren said July 15 before sentencing Knoller to four years in prison on the other conviction, involuntary manslaughter. “I certainly hope that is correct. ... A sense of justice is per­sonal. It is infected with bias, prejudice, pub­lic opinion, public feeling, everything that the court should not be involved in.” Knoller and her husband, Robert Noel, were caring for the dogs that killed Whipple outside her apartment in January 2001. They denied responsibility and refused to apologize. Knoller also declined to apologize or offer any verbal statement before her sentencing. Ky. viatical company readies defense in fraud case LEXINGTON, Ky (AP) — A federal grand jury returned a 47-count indictment on July 11 alleging a scheme to fraudulently obtain life insurance policies for people living with HIV/AIDS. Named as defendants in the indictment are officials with Kelco, Inc. and Genesis Viatical. The charges range from mail fraud to money laundering. Kelco’s lawyer, Bob Webb, told WKYT-TV in Lexington that the company is looking for­ward “to vigorously defending these charges and explaining how and why Kelco finds itself in this position.” Viatical companies buy life insurance policies and sell them to investors, who pay the premiums until the insured person dies, then collect death bene­fits. The indictment alleges that between January 1995 and May 2000, the defendants bought and resold falsified policies, in some cases having people who were HIV-positive obtain high face-value policies by substitut­ing their blood with uninfected blood from a healthy person, thereby increasing cash flow and profits. If convicted on all counts, each defendant faces up to 14 years in prison, fines and restitution of $1 million. The companies face fines and restitution of up to $30 million. year are: Bering-Omega Community Services; For info Houston Black Tie Dinner Ticket sales kickoff party • 6-8 p.m. Friday, July 26 Home of Mike Ryan and David Outlaw 1703 Vermont • 713-523-9611 www.houstonblacktiedinner.org Anti-gay gangs linked to six deaths in Australia SYDNEY, Australia — Pofice have linked the murders of six Sydney men to anti-gay gangs that operated 10 years ago, according to the Sydney Daily Telegraph. Officials are expected to subpoena members of three anti-gay gangs to testify in an inquiry into the murders, which include the disappearance of a well-known television anchor. After a two-year investiga­tion, pofice last week presented their findings. Stephen Page, leader of the investigation, told the Daily Telegraph there were “similarities in a spree of murders,” many of which were orig­inally dismissed as suicides and one-time attacks. Police reopened the cases in 2000 after pleas from the families of two of the victims. U.S. sailors face charges after alleged gay bashing in Canada VANCOUVER, British Columbia (AP) — Two US. sailors from a military base in Bremerton, Wash., face charges after an alleged gay bash­ing here, including assault with a weapon, car­rying a concealed weapon and possession of a weapon, Vancouver police Det. Scott Driemel said last week. Ken Drake, 23, and Joe Hummel, 24, are accused of attacking a man after he asked for directions, according to GayWired.com. Before the victim could respond, one of the sailors sprayed him in the face with the pepper spray then kicked him while yelling anti-gay epithets. The two men then ran, and the victim gave chase with help from a passerby “When he was cornered, one of the suspects produced a knife in a some­what threatening gesture,” Driemel said. Police arrived and arrested the two men. They appear in court again on Aug. 27. Indian police arrest two in alleged fake AIDS cure CALCUTTA, India — Indian officials arrest­ed two men in Calcutta accused of selling bot­tles of cow urine mixed with cow dung that they claimed was a cure for AIDS, cancer and tuberculosis, Reuters reported. Sivaji Ghosh, deputy commissioner of Calcutta police, told Reuters that the men were arrested after a complaint to police by drug control officials. Police filed a First Information Report, paving the way for an investigation, after seizing dozens of bottles, which were going for around $12 to $14 each. India’s majority Hindu population regards the cow as sacred. From staff and wire reports HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com_____________ | national news JULY 26, 2002 7 Evertz offered different position in administration AIDS CZAR, continued from Page 1 “Anybody who says Scott Evertz was fired is wrong,” said Kevin Ivers, spokesperson for Log Cabin Republicans, a national gay group. Charles Francis, the gay director of the Republican Unity Coalition, which bills itself as a gay-straight alliance intended to build support within the Republican Party on gay issues, said he had no specific infor­mation about the Evertz job change. Still, he praised Evertz for doing what he called an “excellent job” under unusually difficult circumstances. “He was beat up by the left and attacked by the right,” said Francis, a friend of the president’s from Texas. “He handled it all with dignity and uncomplaining service and loyalty to President Bush.” Gay doc to be new AIDS czar In a statement issued last Friday, July 19, the White House announced that President Bush named gay physi­cian Joseph O’Neill, the acting head of the Office of HIV/AIDS Policy at the Department of Health & Human Services, as head of the White House AIDS office. The White House statement made no mention of Evertz or the fact that O’Neill would be replacing Evertz. In a separate statement released that same day, HHS Secretary Tommy Thompson announced that he had named Evertz as his special assistant “to assist in further devel­oping and implementing the depart­ment’s overall strategy to fight HIV/AIDS around the world.” Thompson said Evertz’s duties would include U.S. work on the United Nations Global Fund to Fight HIV, Tuberculosis & Malaria. White House deputy press secre­tary Scott McClellen said in a July 24 interview that Evertz “has done a great job for us” as AIDS office direc­tor and he “will continue to have a very influential role in our effort to combat HIV/AIDS worldwide.” Evertz did not return calls to his office seeking comment on his job change. In the statement released by HHS announcing his appointment as Thompson’s special assistant, Evertz said he was “thrilled to be able to help the administration O FOR INFO Office of National AIDS Policy White House Washington, DC 20502 202-456-7320 www.whitehouse.gov/onap Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS www.pacha.gov address the global pandemic in this new capacity.” McClellen, meanwhile, dismissed reports by unnamed sources in the press who claimed Evertz had been fired. Abstinence debate at issue? McClellen’s comments came one week after sources from the Bush administration and Congress began to leak conflicting stories over the rea­sons behind Evertz’s transfer from the White House to HHS. Some sources, speaking to reporters on condition that they not be identified, claimed Evertz had been fired at the behest of conservative political activists. According to the sources, conser­vative activists, including leaders of anti-gay religious-right groups, per­suaded the White House that Evertz had aligned himself with liberal AIDS groups and emphasized condom use as a key means of preventing the spread of HIV. Some of these same sources said Evertz’s apparent ouster was a victo­ry for Patricia Ware, a conservative activist whom Bush named last year as executive director of the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS. The sources claimed that Evertz and Ware had clashed over the condom-abstinence only policy dis­pute and that Ware reportedly helped orchestrate Evertz’s firing. In a second set of leaks, adminis­tration and Capitol Hill sources report­ed on July 18 — one day before the offi­cial White House announcement about Evertz’s job change — that the White House had decided to fire Ware. Some of the sources said White House political advisers, acknowledg­ing that Evertz and Ware had clashed over policy issues, wanted a clean break from both of them. Other sources said the White House was angry that Ware appeared to have leaked information to the press declaring that Evertz’s ouster from the AIDS office post was a “vic­tory” for her and her conservative allies at the White House. But the unfolding story did not end there. A few days later, some of the same sources said Ware, who told sup­porters she had been fired on July 18, told the same people she was “unfired” one day later, on July 19. According to the sources, the White House caved in from pressure by conservative groups that expressed outrage over Ware’s reported firing. Still other sources supportive of Evertz said Ware was informed she could stay in her job for about a month before being asked to leave. The Human Rights Campaign, the nation’s largest gay political organiza­tion, added its views to the unfolding story by telling the Washington Post and other news outlets last week that it believed Evertz was “ousted” from his White House post. Ivers, the Log Cabin spokesperson, called HRC’s assertion “utter non­sense.” Ivers said reports from unnamed press sources that Evertz had been fired were coming from a small group of uninformed agitators from anti-gay conservative groups and liberal AIDS activists and Democrats whose motive is to stir up criticism against the Bush administration. James Driscoll, a gay Republican activist and a Bush appointee on the Presidential Advisory Council on HIV/AIDS, was the only administra­tion backer to state on the record that he believes Evertz’s departure was a dismissal. “The deciding factor was job per­formance, not ideology, and definitely not the wedge issue of condoms ver­sus abstinence,” Driscoll said in a statement released to Houston Voice. Driscoll called Bush’s decision to appoint Evertz to the AIDS office post “an act of political courage.” He said Bush picked Evertz as a prominent gay Republican, knowing that he lacked experience in Washington and did not have an extensive background in AIDS issues. At the time Bush named Evertz to the White House AIDS office job, Evertz was a fund-raiser for a senior citizens home in Milwaukee. Although he had worked closely with then Gov. Tommy Thompson in the 1990s on gay and AIDS policy issues, Evertz had no technical or medical background on AIDS issues. “Evertz should have compensated for his slim experience with an open door and hard work,” Driscoll said. “Instead, he developed a reputation for not returning anyone’s phone calls, for jokes and flippancy in speeches, and even arrogance. Bush tries to run his administration like a business. Good businesses replace sub-par performers.” Ivers disputed Driscoll’s assessment, saying Driscoll doesn’t have access to informed administration sources. Also disputing Driscoll’s version of what happened to Evertz was Mark Delmonte, director of public affairs for the AIDS Alliance for Children, Youth & Family Delmonte, who said he is in close contact with the nation’s promi­nent AIDS organizations, said Evertz enjoyed widespread support among nearly all AIDS groups, including those aligned with the Democratic Party “He has always been open to us,” Delmonte said. “I’m not aware of any effort by the organized AIDS commu­nity to seek Scott’s ouster. There was a question of whether the administra­tion listened to him,” said Delmonte, “but there was never any feeling that he wasn’t doing a good job.” News reporter Lou Chibbaro Jr. can be reached at lchibbaro@washblade.com. Gay physician becomes new AIDS czar Joseph O’Neill, the newly appointed director of the White House Office of National AIDS Policy enjoys strong eariy bipartisan support in Congress as well as from both conservative and moderate factions within the Bush administration, according to AIDS activists who know him. O’Neill, who is gay, is a physician who worked in the past on the staff of Baltimore’s gay Chase Brexton Clinic, where he treated AIDS patients. He currently serves as acting director of the Office of HIV/AIDS Policy at the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. Prior to his current post, O’Neill worked in other divisions within the sprawling HHS, including a posi­tion administering the department’s Ryan White CARE Act program, which provides millions of dol­lars in grants to states and cities for medical treatment and social services for people with HTV and AIDS. Although O’Neill worked closely with the Clinton administration, AIDS activists who know him said he has gained the trust of high level Bush administra­tion officials who replaced Clinton appointees at HHS. According to information released by the White House, in addition to holding a degree in medicine from the University of California, O’Neill holds degrees in business administration, public health and medical sciences. He has been treating HTV patients since the early 1980s and is “widely recognized for his work in palliative care, community health, and inter­nal medicine,” a White House statement said. LOU CHIBBARO JR. Senate panel boosts Ryan White, CDC The Senate Appropriations Committee on July 18 approved a fiscal year 2003 appropriations bill that calls for increasing the budget for federal AIDS pro­grams under the popular Ryan White CARE Act by $161 million over file current year spending level. The action by the committee, the first in a series of steps Congress must take to approve spending for AIDS treatment and services programs, would bring the total spending for the Ryan White program to slightly more than $2 billion. In the proposed budget President Bush submitted to Congress earlier this year, he called for increasing the Ryan White program by just $175,000. AIDS activists said the president’s proposal would result in a decrease in spending after inflation was taken into account. The committee also approved a $3.7 billion budget for the National Institutes of Health, $25 million more than the figure proposed by the president. In addition, the panel restored $421 million in cuts proposed by Bush for the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention, bringing the CDC budget for fiscal year 2003 to $4,298 billion, according to figures released by the committee. However, as of press time, the committee did not release figures breaking down the NIH and CDC budgets to show how much was ear­marked for AIDS-related programs. The two agencies play a major role in AIDS research and prevention programs. In a related action, the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Foreign Operations on July 18 approved $550 million in spending for global AIDS programs run by the U.S. Agency for International Development. The figure approved is $110 million more than the amount Bush requested in his fiscal 2003 budget. The panel also approved $200 million for a United Nation’s organized Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB & Malaria. The House appropriations committee has yet to begin deliberations on the fiscal year 2003 AIDS programs. LOU CHIBBARO JR.Nsomnia's decline may threaten AIDS patients 8 JULY 26, 2002______________________ www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE | local news GAY CLUB, continued frotn Page 1 incident, TABC agents allege illegal activi­ties at the club, and Nsomnia operators allege “illegal search and seizure” by law enforcement officials. “We had a complaint on this location for selling alcohol without a license or per­mit,” said TABC Lt. Tracy Hudgins. “About two or three weeks ago, we had gone in there [in response to a complaint}.” According to Hudgins, TABC agents first talked to Nsomnia operators about the complaint, and advised them that they can­not sell alcohol without a license to do so. But the TABC alleges that the violations continued, leading to last Friday’s action by agents. “We paid them a follow-up visit. We sent in some undercover officers,” Hudgins said. “It was pretty much a routine thing. We had been in there a few weeks ago and asked them not to do it.” The club had continued its alleged vio­lations, Hudgins said, so up to 10 TABC agents — with backup from Houston Police Department officers as security — entered Nsomnia to issue tickets. “No one was actually arrested and taken to jail that night,” Hudgins said. “They filed When you're ready for greater success with: Relationships 'Love •Happiness -Sex j •InnerPeace 'Career Call for an appointment 713-527-0000 Tony Carroll, lmsw-acp Counseling, Psychotherapy, Workshops for Individuals and Couples houston C Serving Houston's Guy and Lesbian J Community Since 1983 www.HoustonTherapist.com 1006 Missouri St. Houston, TX 77006 WINDOWMEDiA, LLC parent company to: Houston Voice - Texas Southern Voice - Southeast Washington Blade - Washington D.C. New York Blade News - New York Eclipse Magazine - South is seeking dynamic Sales Leaders to join our growing company. If you have a proven track record, and are results driven, we can give you the biggest sales area in the country. We offer competitive salaries as well as benefits. We are an Equal Opportunity Employer. Please send all resumes E-mail: employment@windowmedia.com Fax: 202-478-1663 some charges against some individuals.” He noted there were between 70 and 100 patrons at the club when the agents entered. A number of bottles of liquor were seized, he added. Hudgins said the agency will pursue charges against the club for selling alcohol without a license or permit. Locklin disputes the TABC’s version of events. He said agents did not warn club operators, as Hudgins stated. “That is an untrue statement,” Locklin said. TABC agents did stop by Nsomnia a couple of weeks ago, according to Locklin, but “never said a word to anyone. They never spoke to me. They never spoke to any employee. That certainly would not serve as an official notice. “No one has ever said that what we’re doing here is illegal,” he added. The club’s organizers said that law enforcement officials unfairly targeted Nsomnia. Locklin alleges that peace offi­cers “entered the facility illegally, without warrants, and targeted the gay customers in a mixed club environment,” according to an AHCH press release. “[Officers and agents} began harassing the patrons who looked gay and issuing $25 tickets for drinking in public, inside the building,” according to Locklin. “Straight­looking patrons were allowed to leave with­out being detained.” Locklin said state law allows adults age 21 or over to attend after-hours BYOB clubs. Nsomnia is designed as a fund-rais­er for the AHCH, with a donation taken at the door for the organization. Inside, drink set-ups are offered, but no liquor is sold, according to Locklin. But Hudgins said that is not what inves­tigators found at the club. He also said the at-the-door donation is considered a cover charge, which translates into a cost for any alcohol served within. “You enter and pay a cover charge in order to get in. Then you buy a setup from the server, and then they provided bottles of liquor at another table or bar, and you go over and mix your own drink,” Hudgins said. “A BYOB means you bring your own bottle. Nobody was bringing their own.” He also said the club had a stock of liquor, a charge that Locklin denies. “That’s untrue,” he said. “We have a lot of regular customers. They have liquor lockers that they store their bottles in. At no time did [TABC agents] find any liquor behind the bar. “We weren’t providing the liquor to anyone,” Locklin said. “The liquor was stored in the customers’ cabinets.” Hudgins said that what club operators call a donation at the door is, in effect, a cover charge. TABC agents found that the “donation” was required, he added. “They told [undercover agents] it was going to be an X number of dollars in order to get in. That’s not a donation; that’s a requirement,” Hudgins said. “Even if it is a donation, if they ask you to make a donation in order to receive the alcoholic beverage, there’s still case law that says that is also a sale. Club Nsomnia CEO Matt Locklin said the after-hours establishment's future is in jeopardy after a Friday night 'raid' by law enforcement officials. (Photo by Dalton Dehart) “Any time...if there’s a charge that’s assessed in order for you to get in and be able to get the ‘free’ alcohol, then it’s not free,” Hudgins added, and therefore the club would have to have a license to serve liquor. Locklin said he does not understand what TABC agents told him is their inter­pretation of the liquor law. According to Locklin, the agents indicated that there is no legal public consumption of alcohol after certain hours. “They said no, nobody can congregate and drink after 2:15 a.m.,” Locklin said. “I don’t know why they’re picking on us. It’s just pure and pure harassment. They’re discriminating against a mostly gay business. “They had no bust, but I can’t do busi­ness if they’re going to keep coming in here and ticketing my customers,” he added. “We don’t have any wiggle room.” Locklin said Nsomnia is still open but without BYOB, and business had dropped dramatically. Hudgins said officials told club operators that they cannot serve alco­hol, but can remain open for now. “We didn’t shut them down. We just told them they can’t do the alcohol thing any­more,” Hudgins said. As long as the club does not serve alco­hol, TABC agents will not return, he added. “If we have information that they’re continuing to do it, we will go back,” Hudgins said. According to Locklin, Club Nsomnia — the major funding source for the AHCH — may be facing bankruptcy in the wake of the TABC action. AHCH, established in 1994, has helped more than 400 residents through the transitional and emergency housing programs it sponsors, he said. “If the fund-raisers bring in no money, we cannot pay to help people off the streets,” Locklin said. HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com________________________________ around the nation JULY 26, 2002 9 Constitution bars anti-gay job bias, Wash, court says SPOKANE, Wash—The U.S. Constitution makes it illegal to fire a public employee based on sexual orientation, a Washington state appeals court ruled July 18, a decision that could have broad legal implications, according to gay civil rights activists. “The decision can be cited in courts outside of Washington to persuade those courts that this is the correct principle of law,” said attorney Ken Choe, who handled the case for the ACLU, according to the San Francisco Chronicle. Mary Jo Davis filed a lawsuit against the public Pullman Memorial Hospital in 1996, claiming she was fired from her radiolo­gy job in 1994 after her supervisor repeatedly called her anti-gay slurs. The three-judge panel of the Division III Court of Appeals in Spokane ruled unanimously that the Constitution’s equal protection clause protects gays. Davis’ case will now go to trial. Hospital attorneys have argued she was fired for being “disruptive” and violating con­fidentiality of patients’ records, not for being gay. Hospital attorney Michael McMahon said Pullman Memorial has long had a policy prohibiting discrimination based on sex­ual orientation. “It’s just a way to bring a social issue into the legal spectrum,” McMahon said, according to the Associated Press. Ky. legislators oppose lesbian health workshop Mass, court rules lesbian mom must pay child support LEXINGTON, Ky. (AP) — A University of Kentucky women’s conference session on lesbian health is drawing complaints from two state senators, but has the support of university President Lee Todd. Sen. Charlie Borders (R-Russell) and Sen. Dick Roeding (R-Lakeside Park) questioned whether the Women’s Health in Kentucky con­ference should hold a 90- minute session on lesbian health issues. Roeding, who is president pro tern of the Senate, wrote to Todd on offi­cial letterhead to complain that the univer­sity would “recognize a lifestyle that the vast majori­ty of women in Kentucky do University of Kentucky President Lee Todd has stood by organizers of an upcoming women's confer­ence that includes a session on lesbian health, despite criticism from some law­makers in the state. (Photo by AP/Ed Reinke) not agree with.” But Todd said the school stands by the lesbian session, part of a Sept. 9-10 conference that also includes sessions on health care issues for black, Hispanic and rural women. “We are an equal oppor­tunity university and pride ourselves on not discriminating against anyone,” he said. Ind. judge fights for visitation ban PLYMOUTH, Ind. (AP) — An Indiana judge is trying to salvage a rule forbidding divorc­ing parents from having sexual partners spend the night after the restriction was struck down by a higher court. The Indiana Court of Appeals overturned the Marshall County Superior Court rule in May after a lesbian mother said it violated her rights. The appeals court said routinely imposing the rule punished parents and their sexual partners without first showing that they were doing any harm to the children. Judge Robert Bowen said he hopes to revise the rule so it will withstand the scrutiny of the appellate court by making sure it is applied case-by-case rather than on a routine basis. BOSTON (AP) — A lesbian must pay child support to her former partner even though she was neither the biological or legally adoptive parent of the child, a Massachusetts judge has ruled. The ruling represents the first time a Massachusetts judge has ordered a same-sex partner to pay child support, according to Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly. Grace A. Connolly and Annette Michell had agreed to a parenting plan for the two children the couple raised together. When the couple split, Connolly said she would pay support for one child, whom she had officially adopted, but said she should not have to pay support for the other child. Middlesex Family Court Judge Spencer M. Kagan ruled that Connolly was a “de facto” par­ent of the five-year-old boy, and if she was to receive visitation rights she must also be responsible for some of the financial burdens of raising the child. Blacks at 'disadvantage' in AIDS fight, report says SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — In areas ranging from AIDS activism to jobs to home owner­ship to politics, blacks continue to make gains, but equality with whites remains a far-off goal, the National Urban League said in its annual report on the state of black America released this week. The report, a collection of eight essays written by experts in fields such as labor, home ownership and civil rights, is intended to capture an annual snapshot of blacks in America. The first one was published in 1976. An essay titled “African Americans Confront a Pandemic,” by Maya Rockeymoore, of the Urban League’s Institute for Opportunity & Equality, noted that blacks represent 38 percent of all AIDS cases reported in the U.S. Gays responded to the early threat of AIDS by using politi­cal muscle to marshal federal, state and local resources, but blacks were slower to organize, Rockeymoore wrote. That lack of a coordinated, early mobilization, com­bined with “poverty, substance abuse prob­lems and exclusion from social insurance programs” has placed black and Hispanic communities “at a distinct disadvantage in their efforts to ward off the spread of AIDS,” according to Rockeymoore. 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Guidelines for freelance contributors are available upon request Issue 1135 HOUSTON VOICE JULY 26,2002 PAGE 10 editorial Reading the tea leaves You need a scorecard to keep up with the shifting lineup of AIDS policymakers at the White House, and Bush must clean up the mess of rumor and speculation. By CHRIS CRAIN HEN PRESIDENT Bush declared the war on terrorism last September, he did so in terms so clear and so stark that he captured the imagination, and support, of millions at home and abroad. He and his advisers under­stood that setting forth the goals of that Herculean effort, as well as the means we would engage to accomplish them, would be key to our success. Months later, even the politically unin­formed remember the “axis of evil” and the line the president drew in the sand for nations that support terrorism: Either you are with the United States, or you are against us. Contrast that clear-cut policy on terror­ism with the sorry mess of rumor and spec­ulation that has clouded our national AIDS policy, especially this past week. Try reading these tea leaves: Out is the president’s first AIDS czar, Scott Evertz, reassigned to a position over­seeing global AIDS policy, about which he has even less experience than the somewhat thin background he brought to the domestic post. According to some sources, Evertz was replaced for publicly supporting HIV pre­vention programs that encourage condom use. Others suggest he was pressured out because he was not up to the job. Rumored to be out but retained at least for now is Patricia Ware, the controversial con­servative who is executive director of the Presidential Advisory Council on HTV & AIDS. She is an outspoken advocate of teach­ing that abstinence until marriage is the most effective means of preventing HTV infection. Newly installed as the AIDS czar, a posi­tion known more formally as director of the White House Office of National AIDS Policy, is Joseph O’Neill, a gay physician from Baltimore with a broad base of experience w in HIV/AIDS treatment and policy. Rumors swirl around his appointment as well, specif­ically about which side of the condoms vs. abstinence debate he will march behind. Conservatives say that Evertz was dumped, Ware was saved, and national AIDS policy is headed in the direction of a Sunday School lesson on the evils of pre­marital sex. Some gay Democrats and AIDS activists are in uncomfortable agreement with those conservatives, and smell a con­spiracy to flush out those unwilling to toe the White House line on abstinence. Gay Republicans spin a whole different pic­ture and say Evertz got a promotion, was replaced by another openly gay appointment, and that Ware’s days are numbered. Log Cabin Republican spokesperson Kevin Ivers went so far as to condemn tide “unholy alliance” of gay liberals and anti-gay conservatives casting the personnel shakeup as a policy battle. But that’s exactly what it looks like, a national AIDS policy in disarray, with far more attention being paid to it by ideologues on the outside than by policymakers on the inside. Meanwhile, the White House focus is elsewhere, on the war against terrorism, the Middle East, and growing concerns about Wall Street and the economy. DURING THE DARKEST DAYS OF THE AIDS epidemic, the. activists at ACT UP suc­ceeded at delivering a crystal clear message about HIV policy “Silence = Death,” they chanted. Today, unlike then, the White House isn’t home to a president who refused to say the word “AIDS,” so that particular slogan doesn’t work. But the longer George W Bush allows his administration’s AIDS policy to be defined by outsiders, rumors and speculation, the more his record will become aligned with those policy leaders who floundered in the face of a disease that has already killed so many more than it should have. The White House needs to answer its critics, from both sides, about where exactly the administration stands on the extent to which “abstinence until marriage” is the primary, or sole, means of teaching HIV pre­vention. Prevention funding aimed at the single largest risk group, gay men, needs to be increased, not kept flat. In the face of statistics that continue to show slightly less than half of new HIV infections in this country are transmitted sexually between men, it is the height of irresponsibility and incompetence to sug­gest that “abstinence until marriage” has any relevance at all. Gay men can’t get mar­ried, and the president supports our exclu­sion from that institution. If the underlying message is that men who have sex with men should abstain from gay sex and settle down with a woman, that too-subtle policy is even more destructive, especially among African Americans and Latinos. Epidemiologists from the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention — and slowly but surely black and Latino activists — have come to understand that closeted gay men who have sex with women (in or out of mar­riage) are the primary reason that rates of HTV infection are so much higher among black and Latino women than they are among women in the general population. NOW MORE THAN EVER, IT IS IMPORTANT that we speak loudly and clearly about AIDS policy. Mixed signals from the White House and spin control from ideological interests are only part of the problem. Missing in action are the AIDS activists from across the country who used to be so influential in the direction HIV policy took in this country. Instead, the leadership (if you can call it that) at most AIDS service organizations has been gagged by government purse strings, afraid or unwilling to criticize publicly, lest they offend those who determine a significant chunk of their budgets (a growing percentage in the face of declining private contributions), And in most places, the street activists are gone, burned out, or have lost all credi­bility due to their far-fetched claims or mean-spirited personalities. This is the sorry state of national AIDS policy, and it’s scary to think that our coun­try is looked upon to help lead the world’s fight against the disease. Presumably other countries and international organizations will employ the same nose-holding as do AIDS groups domestically, and take our fed­eral government money, with whatever trendy strings the lurching Bush adminis­tration policy ties to it this week. HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com JULY 26, 2002 11 CHARLOTTE CROSON When the Ohio Supreme Court struck down a gay solicitation law, the activists -cheered. But male supremacy was the real winner. Gay rights defeat disguised as a win IN MAY OF THIS YEAR, THE OHIO Supreme Court struck down Ohio’s “impor­tuning” statute, which made it a crime to sexually solicit a person of the same sex when the offender knows the solicitation is offensive. The decision in the case of Ohio v. Thompson has been widely hailed by gay activists as a victory, another step in the long road to equality for gays and lesbians. But the decision wasn’t about, and doesn’t provide, real equality. The court neither notices nor protects gay people as gay people, nor does it protect gay sex. What the court protects is heterosexual male sexual access, using the sexualized inequalities of homophobia and sexism. The court struck down the statute as a violation of free speech rights, taking pains to note that anybody could be con­victed under the statute because anybody could solicit another person of the same sex for sex. By keeping the focus on speech, the court guaranteed anybody’s right to engage in that speech. That “anybody” is not likely to solicit someone of the same gender for sex, the court did not consider. This myopia allowed the judges to find that the statute did not violate equal protection guaran­tees, despite its explicit targeting of gay men and lesbians. Instead, the court refused to recognize the statute as a violation of equal rights for gays because same-sex solicitation can and does result in violence against gays. So in a perverse way, gay bashing, rather than being a risk and result of our inequality, became an accepted reason for discrimina­tion — and even criminalization of gays. Gay bashing provided a valid justifica­tion for the court exactly because it pro­tects existing norms of sexual access. It is utterly reasonable to the legislature and the court that straight men would protect their own sexual inviolability as men by reacting violently to gay sexual overtures. This is what the Thompson case really means for gay men: You can talk about sex with a stranger, but the reasonable price of doing so may be your life. In other words, gay men can ask but they better be careful whom they ask. HETEROSEXUAL SEXUAL VIOLENCE IS also minimized by the court so that equal protection for gays can be avoided in the decision. The court found the statute was justified because it is reasonable to believe that gay solicitation is “more likely to induce violence” than heterosexual solicitation. But we know that heterosexual solici­tation often incites violence and abuse from men when their solicitations are rejected by women. Lesbians are even more precisely targeted because, merely by being lesbian, they defy norms of male 'ExmiON'' » NoWTHAT YoU Ve GIVEN MEW, YOU GET To KEEP W' >.HN+ sexual accessibility. The court also ignores the epidemic violence, including rape, battering, and incest, which follows successful heterosex­ual solicitation. Counting all this up, it’s safe to say that gay solicitation may result in less violence than heterosexual solicita­tion, not more. To reach the opposite conclusion, how­ever, the court makes this gendered vio­lence against women and lesbians invisi­ble. Because the court’s view that male violence actually justifies a law that dis­criminates against gays, it becomes plausi­ble to restrict a woman’s ability to say no to heterosexual sexual advances — since that’s what precipitates male violence. This view of sexuality is actually a form of male supremacy. The court pro­tects sexual violence predicated upon who has sexual access to whom. Gay solicitation can be prohibited because heterosexuals (straight men) may react violently do it, and because that form of violence is more important and worthy of judicial recognition than the violence that results from rebuffed heterosexual solicitation by straight men of women. By endorsing homophobic violence and ignoring gendered violence, Thompson reflects and reinforces gender and sexual inequality. THE THOMPSON DECISION DOES accomplish something that gay rights liti­gation has focused on for years. It protects gay men from prosecution for their solici­tations for sexual activity in public places. That is a victory of sorts. A victory of what type is another question. Put this against what the court could have done, should have done: said simply and clearly that equal protection means that homophobia is not a rational basis for passing a law, any law, but most especially a law that targets gay men and lesbians. This the court explicitly refused to do. I Charlotte Croson is an attorney practic- I W0ing *aw in Detroit' Mich., and can be I reached through this publication. WHA.TS GINGER'S COMPLFTER SITVAHON? DID STUART GET THAT STATION WAGON? | IAaTBE YOU SHOUI.DNT BE DOING -KOFT-v7VW. DYKESTOWATCHOUTrOR.COM I rw GENDERQUEER role model i have very CATHOUC TASTES. jasmine and jonas are IERE. D^ou W> TO THE LAKE THIS, SPARROW. THESE FUMES CANT BE GOOD FOR THE BABY. OR ME, EITHER. I'M STARTING TO feel a STRANGE CONVICTION ARE YOU FINDINGTHE action-packed SUSPENSEOF THIS COMIC stwp simply unbearable? LOIS, LOOK? MOM LET ME WEAR THE TUBE TOP YOU GOT ME? ARE YOU PURSUING JASMINE JUSTTO TORTURE Me? ______ __ LAST I HEARD, YOU WERE AND BESIDES, INTO BUTCH DADDIES and JONAS NEEDS A HAS SYDNEY HEARD FROM THE PROVOST? WOOHOO? TENURE, BABY? I'M HERE TO STAY? STOP GLOW WMI TODAY WE'LL UP-rH£A< /‘S RESOLVE A FEW SUBPLOTS THAT HAVE NO DOUBT KEPTYOU ON TExrrERHOOKS FOR WEEKS. NEXT TIME you BUY A USED CAR, DO ITFROM A L Left wing wacko. PykeS ToWaYch. 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Loop South, Ste. 185 Bellaire, TX 77401 untnv.SchmerlerAgency.com I on the record MARTINA NAVRATILOVA: But what I would have to go through with this kid to protect him or her from the media scrutiny as Rosie O’Donnell has to do, Jodie Foster, I mean, these women, you know, have to go to the earth’s lengths to protect these kids from that kind of scrutiny So, I don’t really know CONNIE CHUNG: Forgive me. You mentioned Jodie Foster, but forgive me, I’m not aware that she has... NAVRATILOVA: Well, single mothers. I’m talking about single mothers. I’m not talking about just lesbians. An exchange between lesbian tennis legend Martina Navratilova and CNN host Connie Chung about the challenge of celebrity lesbians raising children (CNN, July 17) “I wouldn’t want them to be gay Because of the fight I’ve had to go through since I was a child. I wouldn’t want them to go through the same thing.” Thomas Dysarz, who along with his partner Michael Meehan, is expecting quadruplets from a surrogate mother; the two men have been together for four years and each owns hair salons in Lexington, Ky. (CNN, July 12) “He wears a bathrobe all the time ... the fact that he even has a bathrobe.” One of the contestants on the CBS reality televi­sion program “Big Brother 3, ” explaining why she thinks another participant — Marcellas, 34, a fash­ion stylist — might be gay; he eventually came out “Homosexual militants need to realize that attacks on people as being ‘homophobic’ for questioning homosexual claims and demands is getting tiresome.” An editorial defending Nancy Ahern, who lost her job as an aide to Conn. Gov. John Rowland after AIDS activists complained that she blamed spread of the disease on “predatory males in the minority commu­nities and by those gays deliberately infecting others” (Waterbury Republican-American, Waterbury, Conn., July 12) “Everyone who believes in human rights and human life and human dignity owes a great debt to Pope John Paul II.” President Bush, praising the human rights record of the Roman Catholic pontiff, who has vigorously opposed gay rights measures, especially marriage, and whose spokesperson blamed the ongoing church sex abuse scandal on gay priests (Washington Post, July 19) “I’m way too underground for people to give a shit, I guess, although the whole time I’ve been performing I’ve been purposefully excluded from the main shows — like Dave Letterman, the night before I was supposed to go on his show, someone called and said I would freak him out.” Lesbian comedian Reno, talking about her latest one-woman show, which criticizes the government’s reaction to Sept. 11 (Salon.com, July 18) HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com JULY 26, 2002 13 Please see adjacent page for Patient Information. ©2002 Abbott Laboratories 02D-036-3555-1 May 2002 Printed in USA WHAT KALETRA HAS TO OFFER ‘-A MAY SURPRISE YOU reported in patients receiving KALETRA. Tell your doctor if you have or have had liver disease such as hepatitis. Your doctor may want to monitor your liver function. In patients taking protease inhibitors, increased bleeding (in patients with hemophilia) and diabetes/high blood sugar have occurred. Changes in body fat have been seen in some patients receiving antiretroviral therapy. Some patients receiving KALETRA have had large increases in triglycerides and cholesterol. The most commonly reported side effects of moderate or severe intensity are: abnormal bowel movements, diarrhea, feeling weak or tired, headache, and nausea. Children most often reported diarrhea, rash, taste aversion, and vomiting. KALETRA oral solution contains alcohol. KALETRA is indicated for the treatment of HIV infection in combination with other antiretroviral agents in patients 6 months of age or older. KALETRA does not cure HIV infection or AIDS and does not reduce the risk of passing of HIV to others. Safety Information KALETRA should not be taken if you have had an allergic reaction to KALETRA or any of its ingredients. KALETRA must not be taken with certain drugs due to the potential for serious and/or life-threatening side effects. Discuss all medicines, including those without a prescription and herbal preparations, you are taking or plan to take with your doctor or pharmacist. Pancreatitis and liver problems, which may cause death, have been www.kaletra.com Abbott Laboratories Abbott Park, IL 60064 ST 14 JULY 26, 2002 www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE KALETRA™ (lopinavir/ritonavir) capsules (lopinavir/ritonavir) oral solution ALERT: Find out about medicines that should NOT be taken with KALETRA. Please also read the section “MEDICINES YOU SHOULD NOT TAKE WITH KALETRA.” Patient Information KALETRA™ (kuh-LEE-tra) Generic Name: lopinavir/ritonavir (lop-IN-uh-veer/rit-ON-uh-veer) Read this leaflet carefully before you start taking KALETRA. Also, read it each time you get your KALETRA prescription refilled, in case something has changed. This information does not take the place of talking with your doctor when you start this medicine and at check ups. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about KALETRA. What is KALETRA and how does it work? KALETRA is a combination of two medicines. They are lopinavir and ritonavir. KALETRA is a type of medicine called an HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) protease (PRO-tee-ase) inhibitor. KALETRA is always used in combination with other anti-HIV medicines to treat people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. KALETRA is for adults and for children age 6 months and older. HIV infection destroys CD4 (T) cells, which are important to the immune system. After a large number of T cells are destroyed, acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) develops. KALETRA blocks HIV protease, a chemical which is needed for HIV to multiply. KALETRA reduces the amount of HIV in your blood and increases the number of T cells. Reducing the amount of HIV in the blood reduces the chance of death or infections that happen when your immune system is weak (opportunistic infections). Does KALETRA cure HIV or AIDS? KALETRA does not cure HIV infection or AIDS. The long-term effects of KALETRA are not known at this time. People taking KALETRA may still get opportunistic infections or other conditions that happen with HIV infection. Some of these conditions are pneumonia, herpes virus infections, and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infections. Does KALETRA reduce the risk of passing HIV to others? KALETRA does not reduce the risk of passing HIV to others through sexual contact or blood contamination. Continue to practice safe sex and do not use or share dirty needles. How should I take KALETRA? • You should stay under a doctor’s care when taking KALETRA. Do not change your treatment or stop treatment without first talking with your doctor. • You must take KALETRA every day exactly as your doctor pre­scribed it. The dose of KALETRA may be different for you than for other patients. Follow the directions from your doctor, exactly as written on the label. • Dosing in adults (including children 12 years of age and older): The usual dose for adults is 3 capsules (400/100 mg) or 5.0 mL of the oral solution twice a day (morning and night), in combination with other anti-HIV medicines. • Dosing in children from 6 months to 12 years of age: Children from 6 months to 12 years of age can also take KALETRA. The child’s doctor will decide the right dose based on the child’s weight. • Take KALETRA with food to help it work better. • Do not change your dose or stop taking KALETRA without first talk­ing with your doctor. • When your KALETRA supply starts to run low, get more from your doctor or pharmacy. This is very important because the amount of virus in your blood may increase if the medicine is stopped for even a short time. The virus may develop resistance to KALETRA and become harder to treat. • Be sure to set up a schedule and follow it carefully. • Only take medicine that has been prescribed specifically for you. Do not give KALETRA to others or take medicine prescribed for someone else. What should I do if I miss a dose of KALETRA? It is important that you do not miss any doses. If you miss a dose of KALETRA, take it as soon as possible and then take your next scheduled dose at its regular time. If it is almost time for your next dose, do not take the missed dose. Wait and take the next dose at the regular time. Do not double the next dose. What happens if I take too much KALETRA? If you suspect that you took more than the prescribed dose of this medicine, contact your local poison control center or emergency room immediately. As with all prescription medicines, KALETRA should be kept out of the reach of young children. KALETRA liquid contains a large amount of alcohol. If a toddler or young child accidentally drinks more than the recommended dose of KALETRA, it could make him/her sick from too much alcohol. Contact your local poison control center or emergency room immediately if this happens. Who should not take KALETRA? Together with your doctor, you need to decide whether KALETRA is right for you. • Do not take KALETRA if you are taking certain medicines. These could cause serious side effects that could cause death. Before you take KALETRA, you must tell your doctor about all the medicines you are taking or are planning to take. These include other prescription and non-prescription medicines and herbal supplements. For more information about medicines you should not take with KALETRA, please read the section titled “MEDICINES YOU SHOULD NOT TAKE WITH KALETRA.” • Do not take KALETRA if you have an allergy to KALETRA or any of its ingredients, including ritonavir or lopinavir. Can I take KALETRA with other medications?* KALETRA may interact with other medicines, including those you take without a prescription. You must tell your doctor about all the medi­cines you are taking or planning to take before you take KALETRA. MEDICINES YOU SHOULD NOT TAKE WITH KALETRA: • Do not take the following medicines with KALETRA because they can cause serious problems or death if taken with KALETRA. -Dihydroergotamine, ergonovine, ergotamine and methyler­gonovine such as Cafergot®, Migranal®, D.H.E. 45®, Ergotrate Maleate, Methergine, and others - Halcion® (triazolam) - Hismanal® (astemizole) - Orap® (pimozide) - Propulsid® (cisapride) - Rythmol® (propafenone) - Seldane® (tlrfenadine) - Tambocor™ (flecainide) - Versed® (midazolam) • Do not take KALETRA with rifampin, also known as Rimactane®, Rifadin®, Rifater®, or Rifamate®. Rifampin may lower the amount of KALETRA in your blood and make it less effective. • Do not take KALETRA with St. John’s wort (hypericum perforatum), an herbal product sold as a dietary supplement, or products containing St. John’s wort. Talk with your doctor if you are taking or planning to take St. John’s wort. Taking St. John's wort may decrease KALETRA levels and lead to increased viral load and possible resistance to KALETRA or cross-resistance to other anti-HIV medicines. •Do not take KALETRA with the cholesterol-lowering medicines Mevacor® (lovastatin) or Zocor® (simvastatin) because of possible serious reactions. There is also an increased risk of drug interactions between KALETRA and Lipitor® (atorvastatin); talk to your doctor before you take any of these cholesterol-reducing medicines with KALETRA. Medicines that require dosage adjustments: It is possible that your doctor may need to increase or decrease the dose of other medicines when you are also taking KALETRA. Remem­ber to tell your doctor all medicines you are taking or plan to take. Before you take Viagra® (sildenafil) with KALETRA, talk to your doctor about problems these two medicines can cause when taken together. You may get increased side effects of VIAGRA, such as low blood pressure, vision changes, and penis erection lasting more than 4 hours. If an erection lasts longer than 4 hours, get medical help right away to avoid permanent damage to your penis. Your doctor can explain these symptoms to you. • If you are taking oral contraceptives (the pill') to prevent pregnancy, you should use an additional or different type of contraception since KALETRA may reduce the effectiveness of oral contraceptives. • Efavirenz (Sustiva™) or nevirapine (Viramune®) may lower the amount of KALETRA in your blood. Your doctor may increase your dose of KALETRA if you are also taking efavirenz or nevirapine. • If you are taking Mycobutin® (rifabutin), your doctor will lower the dose of Mycobutin. •A change in therapy should be considered if you are taking • KALETRA with: Phenobarbital Phenytoin (Dilantin® and others) Carbamazepine (Tegretol® and others) These medicines may lower the amount of KALETRA in your blood and make it less effective. • Other Special Considerations: KALETRA oral solution contains alcohol. Talk with your doctor if you are taking or planning to take metronidazole or disulfiram. Severe nausea and vomiting can occur. • If you are taking both didanosine (Videx®) and KALETRA: Didanosine (Videx®) should be taken one hour before or two hours after KALETRA. What are the possible side effects of KALETRA? • This list of side effects is not complete. If you have questions about side effects, ask your doctor, nurse, or pharmacist. You should report any new or continuing symptoms to your doctor right away. Your doctor may be able to help you manage these side effects. • The most commonly reported side effects of moderate severity that are thought to be drug related are: abnormal stools (bowel move­ments), diarrhea, feeling weak/tired, headache, and nausea. Children taking KALETRA may sometimes get a skin rash. • Blood tests in patients taking KALETRA may show possible liver prob­lems. People with liver disease such as Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C who take KALETRA may have worsening liver disease. Liver problems including death have occurred in patients taking KALETRA. In studies, it is unclear if KALETRA caused these liver problems because some patients had other illnesses or were taking other medicines. • Some patients taking KALETRA can develop serious problems with their pancreas (pancreatitis), which may cause death. You have a higher chance of having pancreatitis if you have had it before. Tell your doctor if you have nausea, vomiting, or abdominal pain. These may be signs of pancreatitis. • Some patients have large increases in triglycerides and cholesterol. The long-term chance of getting complications such as heart attacks or stroke due to increases in triglycerides and cholesterol caused by protease inhibitors is not known at this time. • Diabetes and high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) occur in patients taking protease inhibitors such as KALETRA. Some patients had diabetes before starting protease inhibitors, others did not. Some patients need changes in their diabetes medicine. Others needed new diabetes medicine. • Changes in body fat have been seen in some patients taking anti­retroviral therapy. These changes may include increased amount of fat in the upper back and neck ("buffalo hump"), breast, and around the trunk. Loss of fat from the legs, arms and face may also hap­pen. The cause and long term health effects of these conditions are not known at this time. • Some patients with hemophilia have increased bleeding with pro­tease inhibitors. • There have been other side effects in patients taking KALETRA. However, these side effects may have been due to other medicines that patients were taking or to the illness itself. Some of these side effects can be serious. What should I tell my doctor before taking KALETRA? • If you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant: The effects of KALETRA on pregnant women or their unborn babies are not known. • If you are breast-feeding: Do not breast-feed if you are taking KALETRA. You should not breast-feed if you have HIV. If you are a woman who has or will have a baby, talk with your doctor about the best way to feed your baby. You should be aware that if your baby does not already have HIV, there is a chance that HIV can be trans­mitted through breast-feeding. • If you have liver problems: If you have liver problems or are infected with Hepatitis B or Hepatitis C, you should tell your doctor before taking KALETRA. • If you have diabetes: Some people taking protease inhibitors develop new or more serious diabetes or high blood sugar. Tell your doctor if you have diabetes or an increase in thirst or frequent urination. • If you have hemophilia: Patients taking KALETRA may have increased bleeding. How do I store KALETRA? • Keep KALETRA and all other medicines out of the reach of children. • Refrigerated KALETRA capsules and oral solution remain stable until the expiration date printed on the label. If stored at room tem­perature up to 77°F (25°C), KALETRA capsules and oral solution should be used within 2 months. • Avoid exposure to excessive heat. Do not keep medicine that is out of date or that you no longer need. Be sure that if you throw any medicine away, it is out of the reach of children. General advice about prescription medicines: Talk to your doctor or other health care provider if you have any questions about this medicine or your condition. Medicines are sometimes prescribed for purposes other than those listed in a Patient Information Leaflet. If you have any concerns about this medicine, ask your doctor. Your doctor or pharmacist can give you information about this medicine that was written for health care pro­fessionals. Do not use this medicine for a condition for which it was not prescribed. Do not share this medicine with other people. • The brands listed are trademarks of their respective owners and are not trademarks of Abbott Laboratories. The makers of these brands are not affiliated with and do not endorse Abbott Laboratories or its products. Ref.: 03-5177-R6 Revised: January, 2002 02B-036-2825-1 MASTER 3 ABBOTT LABORATORIES NORTH CHICAGO. L 60064. USA. 02D-036-3555-1 PRINTED IN U.S.A.HOMEFRONT: Hosting the right plants in the yard can help bring butterflies near. Page 20 THEATER: "Dress Up" has a gay-themed twist that theater­goers won't want to miss on stage this month. Page 19 HOUSTON VOICE JULY 26, 2002 PAGE 15 Film fundamentals Clockwise from bottom: Gay filmmaker Arthur Dong's latest work, 'Family Fundamentals,' is now playing in Houston. The son of a Mormon bishop, Brett Mathews (also above) was ousted from the military because he was gay. Also featured in Dong's film, Brian Bennett is a former aide to Congressman Bob Dornan (R-Califomia), one of the country's most strident gay rights opponents, and later served on the 2001 Bush-Cheney Transition Team. Lesbian Susan Jester and her mother, Kathleen Bremner, are among the subjects in Dong's new film. Susan's gay son, David Jester, also is featured in the movie. Gay director's latest work explores fundamental Christian attitudes toward gays, even when they are close family members By ERIC ERVIN A DOCUMENTARY FILM*EXPLORING how self­proclaimed Christian fundamentalists deal with the news of having gay sons or lesbian daughters makes its premier in Houston today. “Family Fundamentals,” the newest release by three-time Sundance Film Festival award-win­ning director Arthur Dong, will run through Aug. 1 in the Bayou City. The showing is part of a three-city debut in Texas, which includes screen­ings in Dallas through next week and a finished run in Austin this month. Dong reveals that he conceived the film while working on his 1997 documentary, “Licensed to Kill,” in which he conducted prison interviews with nine convicted killers of gay men. He says he noticed that a great deal of the killers where raised in conservative Christian homes and had strong religious beliefs. According to Dong, all of the killers spoke freely about how their attitudes regarding gays were shaped by both their church leaders and parents. “I though it must be interesting how these families deal with the news of having a gay or lesbian child,” Dong says. THE 75-MINUTE DOCUMENTARY — FILMED with a digital camera and with Dong solely con­ducting the interviews — is about three families, headed by conservative religious parents, and their gay children. In all of the families’ relationships between parent and child, the one constant was pain, Dong relates. “None of them have good relation­ships,” he says. “I wanted to make a film where both [par­ents and children] can sit down and resolve a conflict,” he adds. The subjects of the film include Kathleen Bremner, a Pentecostal church leader who conducts monthly support group meetings for parents whose children have “become homosexual.” In the documentary, Bremner tells the group that gays recruit their members and that, once indoctrinated, it is hard for them to break away. Susan Jester, Bremner’s estranged lesbian daugh­ter, provides the opposing view, along with her grown son, David, who also is gay. Please see FILM, on Page 17 JULY 26,2002__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE S3 ^WEIGHTS • DRY SAUNA • STEAM SAUNA • JACUZZI • FREE PARKING ■ ROWING MACHINES • NORDIC TRACK UJ co • PRECOR • UFE FITNESS ■ CYBEX • NAUTILUS • HAMMERSTRENGTH • EXTENSIVE FREE ’MOVHl OIGHON ■ S3NIH0VIAI 9NIM08 ■ ONIMHVd 3383 • IZZDOVf • VNflVS WV31S • VNDVS AUG ■ S1H0I3M HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com______________________ I out on the bayou JULY 26, 2002 17 Director Arthur Dong wants film to start dialogue FILM, continued from Page 15 Dong’s goal was to create a film that isn’t one-sided and gives equal time to both the parents and their children. “I wanted to make a film they could watch,” Dong says. “These are not bad people. I don’t want to judge them — they do enough judging.” Also in the film, Brett Mathews, a member of the U.S. Air Force who was ousted for being gay, tries to persuade his Mormon family to talk about his homosexuality, only to be rejected. Originally, the Mathews family had planned to participate in the film, but dropped out, to their son’s dismay, according to Dong. The family didn’t believe that the film would be objective, he explains. Mathews’ parents have told Dong they would participate in the film only if their son went through a gay de­programming course at the church and start living a straight life, the director says. THE THIRD SUBJECT IN THE FILM is probably the most intriguing, Dong asserts. Brian Bennett, former chief of staff and legislative aide to former U.S. Rep. Robert Dornan, a conservative Republican, talks about the father-and- Family Fundamentals' is the newest film for Dong, whose ’Coming Out Under Fire,' a historical account of gays and lesbians in the mili­tary, won the 1994 Special Jury Award at the Sundance Film Festival. son relationship he had with Dornan. Bennett hid his homosexuality during the 12 years he helped Dornan form anti-gay policies that eventually played a role in his 1997 defeat. That same year, Bennett finally told Dornan he was gay. Dornan refused to be interviewed by Dong for the documentary, but the direc­tor includes an excerpt from a radio interview between Dornan and Bennett, who are no longer associates. Dong says he knows his latest film won’t end the conflict between gays and those who promote conser­vative Christian fundamen­tals, but he hopes it will open up more civilized discussions. “I don’t think any one thing can change the world, but if the film can pave the way to talks in a civilized manner, then that’s what I want to do,” he says. Dong — who produces his work via his own Deep Focus Productions, based in Los Angeles — considers himself both a storyteller and social advocate, and he uses his films to accom­plish those tasks. Other films under Dong’s belt include “Coming Out Under Fire,” a historical account of gays and lesbians in the mili­tary that won the 1994 Special Jury Award at Sundance. He is also the director behind the crit­ically acclaimed film “Sewing Machine,” a documentary about his mother’s immi­gration from China to the United States; “Forbidden City, USA,” a musical tribute to the plight of Asian-American night­club performers in the 1940s; and “Lotus,” a drama depicting the foot­binding of Chinese women. He also has produced 12 documentaries for the series “Life & Times,” at the Los Angeles PBS station, KCET-TV For info "Family Fundamentals" Houston - July 26-Aug. 1 The Angelika Bayou Place 510 Texas Ave. 713-225-5232, Dallas - July 26-August 1 The Angelika Mockingbird Station 5321 East Mockingbird Lane 214-841-4700 www.angelikafilmcenter.com www.deepfocusproductions.com The Ryan White Planning Council invites you to attend the following presentation of the Advances in Medical Treatment & Medications Committee: HIV Medications and Substance Abuse AugustS • 1:15pm Speakers: Michael Migura, LCDC Montrose Counseling Center Calista Nnabuife Pharmacy Manager, Thomas Street Clinic Ryan White Planning Council Office of Support 2223 West Loop South, Suite 101 Houston, TX 77027 Phone: 713-572-3724 Fax: 713-572-3740 TTY: 713-572-2813 Web: www.rwpc.org Please call for more info THE LOVETT INN Distinctive Lodging and Catering Accommodations Call us for your next out-of-town guest! Historic Accommodations • Corporate Meeting Rooms Banquet Facilities • Jacuzzi Suites • Pool/Hot Tub Near Downtown, Museums and Medical Center We do catered events for up to 200 people! 501 Lovett Blvd. Houston, TX 77006 (713) 522-5224 • (800) 779-5224 Fax (713) 528-6708 • lovettinn.com YOU'LL LOVE IT! 18 JULY 26, 2002 www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE Sundays at 9am & 11 am Wednesdays at 7pm Noche Espiritual (Spanish service) Saturdays at Gpm 2025 W. 11th St. @ T.C.Jester • 713-861-9149 • www.resurrectionmcc.org July 28 • “How to be a Manager for God” Rev. Janet Parker Maranatha Fellowship Metropolitan Community Church "Building Community Through Compassion Church Service begins at 10am and nursery is available for small children. Mid-week “Home Group’’ services on Tuesdays and Wednesdays. Please Join Us For Praise and Worship at our Sunday Morning Service And Experience The Love That Maranatha Fellowship MCC Has To Offer! 3333 Fannin, Suite 106, at 10AM Church office 713-528-6756 • E-mail maranatha@evl.net www. maranathamcc. com The Reform Church of GolveAtou, lexoA IVe would like to extend an invitation for all to come worship with us at 11am Sunday. Father Tom Martin, pastor 3712 Broadway Galveston, TexaA 77550 409.765.8500 The KOLBE Project Offering Peace & Reconciliation to the Alienated 1030 Heights Blvd. Houston, TX 77008 ph. 713.861.1800 tuiav.kolbelymject.coi'n CALENDAR Friday • July 26 Morning Prayer 10am Movie Night 7pm "Tortilla Soup" Monday • July 29 Eucharist 7:30pm Thursday • August 1 Potluck 7pm Gulf Coast Community Services, guest Friday • August 2 Morning Prayer 10am Monday • August 5 Eucharist 7:30pm Friday • August 9 Morning Prayer 10am Movie Night 7pm "A Beautiful Mind" Saturday • August 10 Breakfast 9:30am got Jesus? , find Him at Community Gospel Church 713-880-9235 HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com JULY 26, 2002 19 on the aisle penny weaver New plays in production include five one-act pieces at Theatre Southwest Originals take the stage ‘Festival of Originals’ Produced by Mimi Holloway, Theatre Southwest’s “Festival of Originals” includes five original one-act plays never before produced. Each has a different direc­tor and different cast. The plays are: “The Wisdoms of Pearl” by Michael Moore, “The Last 20 Minutes” by Ed Vela, “The Ghost in High Heels” by Carl L. Williams, “The First Shift” by Jesse Bainbridge and “Dress Up” by Raymond Terry on stage 'Festival of Originals' 8 p.m. Fridays & Saturdays through Aug. 10 3 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 4 • Tickets: $12 Theatre Southwest 8944-A Clarkcrest • 713-661-9505 ‘Tamalalia 7: The Love Show’ A one-woman show, with a cast of 30, “Tamalalia” is an original musical extrav­aganza. This installment is all about love and features Tamarie Cooper in her very own Harlequin romance — with a twist. 'Tamalalia 7: The Love Show' 8 p.m. July 26,27 and Aug. 1-3,8-10,15-17 Tickets: $10-15 The Axiom • 2524 McKinney Infernal Bridegroom Productions 713-522-8443 • www.infernalbridegroom.com ‘Romeo & Juliet: Sex & Love at Holy Cross High’ Theatre New West opens “Romeo & Juliet: Sex & Love at Holy Cross High” next week, starring Rob Nash, a former Houstonian now living in New York. Johnny and Maria have broken up (again) and must portray two star-crossed lovers onstage while making each other jealous backstage. 'Romeo & Juliet: Sex & Love at Holy Cross High' 8 p.m. Through Aug. 17, Thurs., Fri. & Saturday Tickets: $18-20 • Theatre New West 1415 California St. • 713-394-0464 ‘West Side Story’ Co-produced by Theatre Under The Stars, a 15-week tour of “West Side Story” plays in Houston at the Miller Outdoor Theatre. The musical is a modern telling of Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet, where the young lovers are lower West Side dwellers with their families in racial conflict. Theatre Under The Stars is part­nering with Houston’s Recycled Baseball Items Foundation and, during the run of “West Side Story,” will collect used and new baseball/softball equipment for the RBI Foundation to distribute to inner-city youth teams. Taavi Mark performs in 'Dress Up' by Raymond Terry, one of the productions in Theatre Southwest's 'Festival of Originals.' ’West Side Story' 8:15 p.m. • Ends July 27 Miller Outdoor Theatre • 100 Concert Drive 713-558-2600 • www.tuts.com ‘Cabaret’ Christopher Ayres is director/choreog-rapher and Claudia Dyle is musical direc­tor for “Cabaret,” now playing at Country Playhouse in Houston. This is the first local theater to perform the musical while it is still on the Broadway stage. ■bn stage ’Cabaret' 8 p.m. weekends • Through Aug. 10 2 p.m. Sunday matinees, July 28 and Aug. 4 Tickets: $19 • Country Playhouse 12802 Queensbury • 713-467-4497 www.countryplayhouse.org. ‘Largo Desolato’ Dos chicas theater commune presents “Largo Desolato” by Vaclav Havel, the English version by Tom Stoppard. Shortly after publishing a paper the government deems “intellectual hooliganism,” philoso­phy professor Leopold Nettles simultane­ously becomes an enemy of the state and a pop culture icon. Struggling between self­identity and the expectations of others, he must decide what price he’s willing to pay for his intellectual freedom. The produc­tion includes nudity and adult situations. on stage 'Largo Desolato' 8 p.m. July 26,27 Tickets: $10 or $6 for senior citizens & students The Helios • 411 Westheimer • 713-201-0193 R O B N A S H SEX £ LOVE AT HOLY CROSS HIGH a BRiLLIAnt tuacicomEDY by a HYStEFQC AL solo ARjist July 18-August 17. 2002 Thursday, Friday Saturday 8 p.m. Tickets: $18-20 Reservations 713.394.0464 1415 California 9t. TWEATBE NEVE WEVT (Located on the ground floor of the Sonoma Restaurant Building) designed by Phillinda Roy (phiilinda@>ev1 .net) Sage Associates, Inc. Phone: 713 861 6667 Fax: 713 861 0009 www.sageways.com Contact: Julie Williams, with any questions. Monday—Friday 10:00 a.m. 12 noon. Centers for Disease Control Cooperative Agreement #R18/CCR620928-0l-0l Are you American Indian or of Native American Descent? You may be eligible to participate in a study of risk-taking and health behaviors. If you are over 18 years, have lived in Texas for 6 months or more, and self-identify as Native American please give us a call. If you qualify and complete the survey, you will receive a gift certificate. To schedule an appointment please call: 713 861 6667 20 JULY 26, 2002 www.houstonvoice.com HOUSTON VOICE GUCCI jewelry I UUmork/ Fine Fashion Jewelry, Diamonds, Bridal Jewelry and Better Swiss Watches NOW OPEN SAM 1501 DURHAM • MON-FRI 5-10 • SAT-SUN 8-6 3841 Bellaire Blvd. • Houston, Texas 77025 • 713-668-5000 homefront ella tyler The right plants in the garden can entice sweet-craving creatures to flutter by Invite the butterfly in WHEN MY 5-YEAR-OLD NEPHEW LEFT after several weeks of visiting, he left half a box of Trix cereal. I scattered the cereal across the patio for the birds. They’ll eat rock-hard bread and dried out rice, so I was certain they would “take on” over the bright colors and high inten­sity sugar. It would be an exciting change from their custom seed mix. Three days later, the pink, green, blue and yellow cereal was still there, undimin­ished in quantity, though sort of shriveled up. The birds, the squirrels, the possum that sometimes comes to visit, even the rats — presuming we have them — had all completely ignored it. I guess there are no rabbits in the neighborhood. The sugar addicts in the garden are the butterflies and migrating hummingbirds, both nectar drinkers. Butterflies are a wonderful attraction in a summer garden. Since their body temperature needs to be above 85 degrees for them to fly, they are most active now. They don’t just sit in the sun, waiting to warm up. Butterfly favorites include black-eyed Susan, butter­fly weed and bush, gay feather, coreopsis, lantana, coneflower and pentas. Some also like rotting fruit, dung and nearly dry mud puddles, but those things are not nearly as nice to host in the garden. FAVORITE LARVAL HOST FOODS FOR some local species include plants from the mustard and carrot family, citrus, passion vine, butterfly weed and hackberry trees. However, be warned that larval host feed is what garden writers call the plants that will be breakfast, lunch and dinner for caterpil­lars. Also, some caterpillars eat only one kind of plant, so if you want to be a good butterfly parent, you may find yourself on a hunt for more citrus leaves or native passion vine. My attitude is that if you don’t want caterpillars to chew up your butterfly weed, you shouldn’t plant it, but it is a native that adds height and color to the garden, so I understand its appeal. Many people plant it for its beauty, then are horrified when it is chewed up. It will come back. Caterpillars don’t want to kill your plant; they just want food for the next generation. Butterfly weed and some other kinds of milkweed are host plants for monarch butterflies. These are migrating butter­flies, and early spring is the time the pop­ulation here is the largest. If you want to attract and feed them, plant your butterfly weed now. It is very difficult to acquire butterfly weed in the spring. Demand is high and production has just begun. The chrysalis is a beautiful pale jade color, with three gold dots. I would have sold Manhattan Island for $24 worth of really good beads, so I love these. Warm weather is sure to bring out butterflies of all kind, searching for nectar to drink. HUMMINGBIRDS ALSO ARE MIGRANTS, and should begin coming through Houston in mid-August. They are most attracted to tubular shaped flowers that are orange, red or hot pink, such as hamelia, which is also called hummingbird bush and firecracker bush, but I have seen them exploring my plumbago, which is blue. They like many of the same plants the butterflies like. If you put your humming­bird feeders up soon, you will attract the early ones, and then the rest. I use a mix of one part sugar to four parts of water (1/4 cup of sugar to 1 cup of water), but a l-to-6 ratio also works. Don’t, however, in an attempt to be more natural, use honey. It incubates a fungus that is dangerous to humming­birds, but they will still consume it. For the most part, though, wild ani­mals, birds and insects have some sense about what they eat. They will consume things that they normally eat that have been poisoned with insecticide or other toxic chemical, but don’t eat plants that are naturally poisonous to them. This is not always the case with cats and dogs. Particularly if you have a kitten or puppy, be aware of what you have growing in your house and yard that could be toxic. Lilies, for example, are very toxic to cats, though not to dogs. Poinsettias are very dan­gerous. Oleander is very toxic, but it is so bit­ter that it is rarely a danger. However, a chewing puppy could ingest enough to kill it. The SPCA’s Web site has a long list of toxic plants. Check it out if your pet is a chewer. There are other garden dangers for pets. One popular snail bait is little brown pellets that look a lot like some dried cat food. It is very dangerous. Since there are other effec­tive snail baits, don’t use it if you have a cat. For your pet’s heath, always read your labels and use the least toxic remedy that you can for whatever problem you try to address. And use care when storing any kind of chemicals. HOUSTON VOICE www.houstonvoice.com JULY 26, 2002 21 dining kathreenlee Ocean-derived cuisine at Canton Seafood a delight with flavors, variety of choices Value abounds inside THE CANTON OR GUANGDONG Province in southern China has few fertile and arable land for crops and grazing animals, and therefore turned to its most abundant natural resource — the ocean — for sustenance. Bordering the South China Sea, Canton developed its characteristic cuisine based on the crabs, oysters, shrimp, fish and the other abundant marine life available. Canton Seafood, located on the corner of Kirby and Richmond Avenue, brings Canton’s regional specialty to Houston and treats diners to an array of seafood prepared in the unique culinary style and sauces of the province. Upon entering the restaurant, you are greeted with numerous salt-water fish tanks housing a variety of colorful and tropical fish native to the coasts of Canton. Further inside the restaurant, fresh lobsters, King Crabs, and shellfish swim idly in large tanks and unwittingly await their fate to be handpicked for immediate preparation. A similar smooth and silky ginger-based sauce was used in the preparation of the Sauteed Prawn and Scallop with Asparagus. THE SPECIAL ONE EVENING WAS lobster steamed and prepared in the diner’s choice of ginger and green onion, spicy salt, or black pepper and beer sauces. The creamy ginger and green onion sauce was incredibly rich and smooth, and would have been the perfect medium for many meat dishes. However, when one splurges to eat lobster, the natural flavors of the fresh lobster should define the essence of the dish. Unfortunately, the velvety sauce, while delicious, overwhelmed the subtle natural flavors of the lobster and made the extra expenditure virtually unneces­sary. Interestingly, the “special price” for the lobsters was $15.95 per pound. However, if you paid in cash, the lobsters were $18.95 for two pounds! I am not quite sure the reason for the incredible price break and thought it unwise to ask about the specifics. A similar smooth and silky ginger based sauce was used in the prepara­tion of the Sauteed Prawn and Scallop with Asparagus ($11.25). Unlike the lob­ster special, the rich sauce enhanced the naturally strong flavors of the shrimp and gave emphasis to the tex­tured but typically mild scallops. The green asparagus were incredibly Canton Seaiood Restaurant crunchy with freshness, and I would have been satisfied with merely a dish of the asparagus coated with the savory sauce. Which is just as well, since the dish offered rather scanty prawn portions. ONE GREAT VALUE ITEM, ESPECIALLY if you’re in the mood for soup, is the Crab Meat with Asparagus Soup ($7.25). Served in a bowl the size of half a watermelon, bits of real crab meat (not the fake variety), slices of white aspara­gus, and boiled eggs infuse a slightly salty and creamy medium. The soup is similar to the common egg drop soup; however, it is enhanced multifold by the abundant asparagus and shreds of crab. While some of their other dishes might be a bit pricey, one bowl could easily feed four or five and is a must-get for soup lovers. If you come in a large group, Canton Seafood can easily cater to your party size. Actually, the layout of the restau­rant includes only a handful of four-tops, and most of the tables are six- or eight­seat round tables with a lazy-Susan for sharing. I would recommend going to Canton in large parties just so that you can try as many of the 100 seafood entree selections as possible. Don’t be thrown off by the location and exterior surroundings of Canton Seafood. The strip mall seems rather seedy and uninhabited, but like many great restaurants, it’s not until you get inside that you witness its true value. Canton Seafood 2649 Richmond Ave 713-526-1688 Food: wmww Service: W !•! W W Value: Scene: mil r = Stay home and eat cereal !•! !•! = Well, if you really must !•! »l »l = Fine for all but the finnicky !•! !•( !•) !•! =Worth more than a 20-minute drive !•! »i »i »i !®i =As good as you'll find in this city » g C°CiNq MgXicqNq OPENING SPECIAL! MRRQARIFR^ $3.95 4:30PM -7:30PM • 7 DAYS A WEEK 713-53-2815 I 2815 ^ouTrf ©HeFfteRP (off Westheimer) STEAKS CHOPS CHICKEN FISH SHRIMP PASTA SALAD TIhe CldERRykuRST CriLL presents HAPPY HOUR Every Wednesday from 4-12 Every other night from 10-12 Tlw only late night Happy How in Montrose, Industry Night every Sunday Closed Mondays 2100 Waugh Drive Houston, TX 77006 713.942.2100 22 JULY 26,2002_____________________ | appts a weekly guide to arts & entertainment activities for gay Houstonians SPECIAL SUNDAY, JULY 28 "Extra Mile Awards Brunch’ will be hosted this week­end by Uncommon Legacy of Houston, a nonprofit foun­dation dedicated to enhancing the vitality of the lesbian community. Guest speaker for the event is Kate Kendall, executive director for the National Center for Lesbian Rights. Entertainers will include Houston native Vickie Shaw. 1130 am. Sunday, July 28. Cost $60. Warwick Hotel. 713-774-1744. www.uncommonlegacyhouston.org "LIVE 2002,’the yearly fund­raiser hosted by Don Gill Productions, this summer will b
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