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Houston Voice, No. 1173, April 18, 2003
File 018
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Houston Voice, No. 1173, April 18, 2003 - File 018. 2003-04-18. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 24, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/16682/show/16670.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2003-04-18). Houston Voice, No. 1173, April 18, 2003 - File 018. Montrose Voice. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/16682/show/16670

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houston Voice, No. 1173, April 18, 2003 - File 018, 2003-04-18, Montrose Voice, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 24, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/montrose/item/16682/show/16670.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houston Voice, No. 1173, April 18, 2003
Contributor
  • Weaver, Penny
Publisher Window Media
Date April 18, 2003
Language English
Subject
  • LGBTQ community
  • LGBTQ people
  • Gay liberation movement
Place
  • Houston, Texas
Genre
  • newspapers
Type
  • Text
Identifier OCLC: 31485329
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries Special Collections
  • LGBT Research Collection
  • Montrose Voice
Rights In Copyright
Note This item was digitized from materials loaned by the Gulf Coast Archive and Museum (GCAM).
Item Description
Title File 018
Transcript f HOUSTON VOICE www.houston voice.com APRIL 18, 2003 17 film MATTHEW FORKE i in n°w °n dvD/ The chi|dren's Hour-' Victim' offer compelling reminders of past cinematic repression. Gay cinema, circa 1961 TASKED WITH PROTECTING THE public morality, the stringent Motion Picture Production Code was an almighty and powerful force in the motion picture industry for many years. Refusal of the Code's seal of approval could doom a film's distribution chances and box-office success. Subversive filmmakers beware. But by the early '60s, successful adult fare such as "Suddenly Last Summer" and "Psycho" stretched the limits of what the Code deemed "appropriate" viewing. Suggestions of sex and violence were fine, to a degree, but open discussion of homosexuality was still a big no-no. Case in point: Basil Dearden's "Victim" and William Wyler's "The Children's Hour," both of which are now available on DVD. "Victim" is a British film starring Dirk Bogarde as Melville Farr, a respected London barrister who's married but hiding a questionable past. A handsome and popular British movie star, it was undeniably brave of Bogarde to play one of the cinema's first openly gay lead characters. In 1961 — or even 1981 — most actors of his stature, if not all, would have treated the part as if it were radioactive. The plot is fairly straightforward. Farr's former lover, "Boy" Barrett (Peter McEnrey) commits suicide after police suspect he's a target of a blackmail ring. At the time, Britain's harsh laws against homosexuality made closeted gays an easy target for blackmail. Farr must decide whether or not to help the police, knowing that exposure may very well cost him his career and marriage. Some may quibble with the ending, but "Victim" is a solid, well-written and acted thriller — and far ahead of its time in its clinical discussion of homosexuality. In fact, the film helped bring attention to the antiquated laws that condemned this "social problem," eventually leading to their abolition. Viewers today can only imagine the ulcers it must have given American censors back in 1961, when "Victim" was denied Code approval and surely suffered at the box office as a result. LESS PROGRESSIVE, AT LEAST BY comparison, is Wyler's "The Children's Hour" adapted by Lillian Hellmann from her play of the same name. Here we see Audrey Hepburn and Shirley MacLaine as schoolteachers accused of having "sinful sexual knowledge" of one another — a lie told by a vindictive student. The film is an affecting drama, skillfully shot and acted. But it's sometimes frustrating to watch, as if the filmmakers go so far out of their way trying to create a Due to now archaic film rules, Audrey Hepburn (left) and Shirley McClain dared not speak the name of their forbidden love in The Children's Hour,' but the DVD is required viewing for its history lesson. "tasteful" story about homosexuality that today it feels cowardly and insincere. And that flaw is a direct result of the Code, which restricted audiences from hearing words like "homosexuality," "lesbian" or "gay." In their place, we get "this thing," "it" or "a great, awful lie." At one point, Audrey Hepburn uses the word "lovers." Hopefully, viewers don't go to the bathroom during that particular scene, or they may find themselves hopelessly lost as to what the film is actually about. And what exactly is "sinful sexual knowledge" of each other? Sharing tips on oral sex? Just say it, for heaven's sake. WHAT SADDENS JVIE THE MOST IS THE tragic decision of one major character near the end of the film. Every time I see it I want to yell at the screen, "It's not that bad! Move to the city! Trust me!" But unfortunately, the Code wins for the last time, and the one "guilty" character is forced to pay dearly for her sin. Both films are presented in their original wide-screen version, and both include their original theatrical trailer. Sound is presented in a satisfactory mono track. A nice bonus, "Victim" includes a vintage 20-minute interview with Bogarde at the time of the film's release, plus a linear essay. As drama or as social history, these films are required viewing. f) MORE INFO ■Victim' Home Vision Entertainment DVD Retail $19.95 The Children's HouK MGM Home Entertainment DVD Retail $19.98 American Federated Mortgage Corp. Over 50 years Experience Apply online at: americanfederatedmortgage.com Denise Wargo Sr. Loan Officer 713.894.6718 cell "We strive to make your mortgage solutions Fast, Fair and Easy." Les Powell Vice President / Sr. Loan Officer 713.894.2418 cell $200 off closing costs by mentioning ad! Corporate Office • 811 Heights Boulevard • Houston, TX 77007 • Purchase or refinance. • Zero down programs as well as jumbo loans over$450K. • Apply online, in person, or by phone. • We offer cash-out refinancing. • Loans available for less-than- perfect credit. • Fast approvals. BERING MEMORIAL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH Iter. Moil} i 3440 Harold Street at Mulberry • Houston, TX 77006 • 713.526.1017 • www.beringum
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